Items Tagged ‘C. Difficile’

March 31st, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

NY Times
How to Follow the News in a Political Age of Anxiety
by Lesley Alderman

Another day and, for many, another worrisome news alert out of Washington — or two, or three. Travel bans. Policy reversals. Wire taps. In October, during the buildup to Election Day, we heard from therapists about how their patients were feeling fearful, angry and distrustful in reaction to the contentious presidential race. Now, these same therapists report that many of their patients are even more upset as they struggleThe New York Times newspaper logo to make sense of the direction in which the country is heading. And many can’t tear themselves away from the news. … “Many of my patients are frightened and on edge. They wonder, Could the next news alert report that missiles are flying through the air?” said Dr. Robert Bright, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. “Almost all my patients report having insomnia.” He tells clients who are feeling overwhelmed to turn off news alerts on their phones and instead tune into the news just once a day. If social media feels as if it’s making your blood pressure rise, limit the number of times per week you log on.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Robert Bright, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist.

Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Traci Klein

 

Today.com
'Black Insomnia' may be the strongest coffee in the world
by Emi Boscamp

A couple years ago, scientists unveiled the world's blackest black, called Vantablack, which absorbs 99.965% of visible light. Well, now there may be a coffee equivalent to Vantablack, called Black Insomnia. It debuted in South Africa last year and just arrived in the United States. No word yet on how much light it absorbs. … But what would happen if you drank more than that? We're jittery just thinking about it. "It depends how sensitive you are to caffeine, Dr. Sharonne N. Hayes, M.D., cardiologist at Mayo Clinic and professor of cardiovascular diseases, explained to TODAY Food over the phone. "It may not cause a serious medical issue, but it may be uncomfortable. For example, people with arrhythmias are triggered by caffeine and may experience palpitations."

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
With almost $300 million in private funds, Mayo's Rochester project set to get $585M in public money
by Matt McKinney

Millions of dollars in state aid for expansion of the Mayo Clinic should start to arrive in Rochester this fall, it was announced Thursday. The public dollars were pledged for the Destination Medical Center (DMC) project in 2013, but the Legislature said they wouldn’t come until the Star Tribune newspaper logoclinic and private investors first put up their own money. Now that has happened, with almost $300 million in private investment. The figures released Thursday by the DMC board put private investment totals so far at $297.7 million, a figure that covers everything from a new sign at a private business to a $68 million Mayo project at its Saint Marys Campus.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTCBecker’s Hospital Review, U.S. News & World Report, KDLT News, Kansas City Star, Post-Bulletin, Santa Cruz Sentinel, LMT Online, Post-Bulletin, ABC News, Wichita Eagle, Las Vegas Sun

Related coverage:

Star Tribune, Destination Medical Center by Lisa Clarke

Post-Bulletin (special report table of contents)

Post-Bulletin, Special Report- DMC: Transforming Rochester

Post-Bulletin, The hustle is over; the show’s about to begin

Post-Bulletin, Where in Discovery Square will Mortenson build first? 

Post-Bulletin, Saint Marys area prepares for dramatic change

Post-Bulletin, Developers discover Discovery Square 

Post-Bulletin, Hammes doubles down on Rochester investment

Post-Bulletin, Where health care meets hospitality 

Post-Bulletin, Staver: As DMC unfolds, we must protect city’s values

Post-Bulletin, DMC will be a draw for millennials 

Post-Bulletin, Powers: History should repeat itself, with DMC

Post-Bulletin, Will DMC create 'Silicon Valley of Medicine'? 

Context: The Destination Medical Center Corporation (DMCC) Executive Committee announced today that the DMC economic development initiative exceeded the $200 million private development investment threshold –needed to trigger the release of state DMC dollars to be used for public infrastructure improvements – by $97.7 million, totaling $297.7 million in private investment. “Reaching this important milestone reaffirms that we are on the right track, and Rochester is already experiencing growth and new opportunities,” said Lt. Gov. Tina Smith, DMCC Board Chair. “With the $200 million threshold met, I look forward to working with the State of Minnesota, Rochester community and Mayo Clinic to invest in transportation, world-class amenities, and other public infrastructure that supports opportunity for everyone.” More information can be found on the Destination Medical Center website.

Contacts:  Kelley Luckstein, Bob Nellis

 

ActionNewsJax
Mayo Clinic study: High-intensity interval training can reverse aging process
by Danielle Avitable

A new study by the Mayo Clinic found that certain workouts can reverse the aging process. The study found that a high-intensity interval training workout, combined with resistance training, can turn back time. "You're essentially slowing down that aging process, what I think is amazing, because we didn't have those things before," Dr. Vandana Bhide, of the Mayo Clinic, said.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Additional coverage: Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Previous coverage in March 24, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in March 17, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in March 1o, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell MetabolismMayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kevin Punsky, Bob Nellis

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Tags: ABC News, ABC2 Baltimore, AccuWeather, ActionNewsJax, aging, Aiden Remme, Albert Lea Tribune, allergies, alzheimer's disease, anger rooms, anxiety, apps


January 20th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highhlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

CNBC
Important not to lose ground on ACA

Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president & CEO, and Bernard Tyson, Kaiser Permanente CEO, talks about implementing reforms in the health care system.

Reach: CNBC is a 24-hour cable television station offers business news and financial information. The channel provides real-time financialCNBC logo market coverage to an estimated 175 million homes worldwide. CNBC online receives more than 26 million unique visitors each month.

Additional CNBC coverage:
CNBC, Drug pricing and regulations: Mayo Clinic CEO — Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president & CEO, and Bernard Tyson, Kaiser Permanente CEO, talk about the rising cost of drugs.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

New York Times
Getting Older, Sleeping Less
by Jane E. Brody

Nonmedical causes of insomnia are often successfully treated by practicing “good sleep hygiene,” a concept developed by the late Peter J. Hauri, a sleep specialist at the Mayo Clinic. That means limiting naps to less than 30 minutes a day, preferably early in the afternoon; avoiding stimulants and sedatives; avoiding heavy meals and minimizing liquids within two to three hours of bedtime; getting moderate exercise daily, The New York Times newspaper logopreferably in the morning or early afternoon; maximizing exposure to bright light during the day and minimizing it at night; creating comfortable sleep conditions; and going to bed only when you feel sleepy.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: The Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine (CSM) is a multidisciplinary enterprise comprised of pulmonologists, neurologists, psychiatrists and pediatricians who — with the support of a physician assistant, nurses and polysomnographic technologists — are engaged in a vibrant array of clinical, educational and research activities. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Washington Post
Why the ‘gluten-free movement’ is less of a fad than we thought
by Caitlin Dewey

There’s growing evidence that severe gluten sensitivities exist outside the realm of celiac disease. And researchers simply don’t know how many of the people following a gluten-free diet may actually have a legitimate health complaint — as opposed to a baseless fear of all things gluten, or a misplaced desire to lose weight. “We have no real inkling from our results,” said Joseph Murray, a celiac researcher at the MayoWashington Post newspaper logo Clinic and one of the authors of the new research. “We didn’t think to ask why people avoid gluten. When we designed this study 10 years ago, no one avoided gluten without a celiac diagnosis.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, News Herald

Other recent coverage regarding celiac disease and Dr. Joseph Murray:
January 6, 2017 edition of Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights
November 4, 2016 edition of Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Bloomberg
The Two-Day, $5,000 C-Suite Physical
by Sam Grobart

I am in good health. I am out of shape. These two facts—one I hoped to be true, and one I absolutely knew to be true—were delivered to me at the end of a thorough two-day medical exam in early November at the Bloomberg Business LogoMayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. I underwent this battery of tests not because I was at risk for any major illness, nor because I’m a hypochondriac (I mean, no more of one than any unfit 42-year-old man has a right to be), but because the renowned medical center offers something called the Executive Health Program, which sounded exceedingly fancy.

Reach: Bloomberg BusinessWeek has a weekly circulation of more than 990,000 and has more than six million unique visitors to its online site each month.

Context: For more than 40 years, the Mayo Clinic Executive Health Program has been leveraging our nationally recognized expertise to help executives, business owners and entrepreneurs maintain good health.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

 

KJZZ
Summit Features Experts Making Sense Of Health-Care Payments
by Steve Goldstein

Paying for health care is complicated and confusing. Does a provider accept your health plan? How many bills can you expect to receive after the fact? What about catastrophic care? Mayo Clinic and ASU’s School for the Science of Health Care Delivery have teamed up to host a Payment Reform Summit featuring a number of experts trying to figure out what makes sense in the realm of health-care payments. We talked aboutKJZZ NPR -AZ Logo some possible reforms with Dr. Lois Krahn of the Mayo Clinic and Dr. Victor Trastek, director of ASU’s School of Science and Health Care Delivery.

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Additional coverage: Fierce Healthcare

Context: The Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care Payment Reform Summit convened subject matter experts from around the country, including the voice of patients, to inform the development of alternative payment models. With a focus on the needs of patients, the expert participants examined data drawn from a variety of sources to assess the impact of various payment models on patient access and patterns of health care use. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

 

WOKV Jacksonville
Mayo Clinic receives $1.6 million to fund Alzheimer’s research in Jacksonville
by John Engel

Eight programs at Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus are receiving a total of $1.6 million in grants to fund Alzheimer’s research in Jacksonville. Kevin Bieniek, a post-doctoral research fellow at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, will benefit from this most recent round of grant funding from the state. His study examines the relationship between brain trauma and Alzheimer’s disease. “There are so many people that get Alzheimer’s disease that have no family history of this disorder,” Bieniek told WOKV. “It’s really a complex interaction of your genetics; the environment; your lifestyle; there are so many factors that come into play.”

Reach: WOKV-FM is Jacksonville's 24 hour news station.

Additional coverage: Healthcare Business News

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida were awarded eight grants from the Florida Department of Health to investigate the prevention or cure of Alzheimer’s disease. These awards followed a peer-reviewed and competitive grant application process, where the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Grant Advisory Board reviewed applications and selected 27 studies statewide. “Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus is home to international leaders in neuroscience research who are focused on addressing the unmet needs of patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., vice president, Mayo Clinic, and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida. “We integrate basic and clinical research and immediately translate our findings into better patient care. We very much appreciate the state’s investment in finding solutions for Alzheimer’s disease.” More information about the grants can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kevin Punsky

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Tags: "liquid biopsies", ACA, acupuncture, aging, alzheimers, Arizona Republic, baby powder, blood donation, Bloomberg, Bradly Prigge, breastfeeding, C. Difficile


August 12th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Buzzfeed
What You Should Know About Zika If You’re Going To The Olympics
by Anthony Rivas

So much so that athletes from around the world — mostly golfers, but also basketball players and cyclists — have given up their chance at winning gold over concerns that they might get infected. Meanwhile, lots of other spectators getting ready to fly down are probably wondering,BuzzFeed Logo “Is it really worth the risk?” …For men and women who don’t plan on having kids anytime soon, “the impact of the Zika virus on you is probably going to be very minimal,” Tosh said. In fact, about 80% of people who become infected “have absolutely no symptoms whatsoever.”

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Zika Won't Pose Risks at the Olympics: Health Experts
Hospitals & Health Networks, Clinical Vaccine Trials Underway; Rio Olympics See Few Mosquitoes by Matt O’Connor

Context: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an emergency travel advisory after health officials in Florida identified local transmission of Zika virus in a Miami neighborhood. The CDC advisory recommends pregnant women and their partners avoid nonessential travel to Lynwood, a neighborhood in Miami, Florida where the Zika virus is active. Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh says, "It is somewhat unprecedented for a travel advisory to be issued to a very specific neighborhood. That's a testament to the strength of the epidemiology that has been going on, and how well the CDC and other health authorities have been working at this." More information, including a video interview with Dr. Tosh, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Deb Balzer

 

Chicago Tribune
Dirty baby: Just how clean does your child need to be?
by Bill Daley

Cleanliness may be next to godliness, or so the old rhyme scolded us, but is it healthiest — particularly for babies and children? "People are very Chicago Tribune Logoconcerned, almost preoccupied, with their child touching a surface that is not clean," said Dr. Angela C. Mattke, a pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn. "Early exposure to their environment full of germs, bacteria and viruses is not a bad thing." "Not everything a child touches should be sterilized," she added. "You don't have to wash their hands every time."

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: Angela Mattke, M.D. is a pediatrician with Mayo Children's Center which is rated in all US News & World Report pediatric specialty categories and is the only children’s hospital in the five-state region to rank in all 10 specialties.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Chicago Tribune
Crawling: The next best core workout?
by Alison Bowen

Your next best exercise doesn't involve equipment, running, jumping or even standing. "Make the floor your friend," says Danielle Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn. As a working mom, Johnson is always looking for ways toChicago Tribune Logo challenge exercise norms. "We're looking for things that are a little outside of the box sometimes," she said. Crawling is one of those things. She said it's an "amazing core exercise" that also benefits the legs, shoulders, arms and chest.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. The program is research-driven around diet, exercise and resiliency, and, when all of these are connected, they encompass the power needed to make sustainable changes. For more information, visit https://healthyliving.mayoclinic.org/.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wall Street Journal
At the Rio Olympics, Women Athletes Bump Against a Gold Ceiling
by Kevin Helliker and Matthew Futterman

Sports scientists say there is no physiological reason for shortening courses for female athletes or, for that matter, games such as tennis, where women play the best out of three sets versus best of five for men. In WSJ Bannerfact, some research suggests women are built to go farther than men, if at a slower pace. While that remains unproven, the notion that women have inferior endurance capacities has been debunked. “That’s totally anachronistic,” says Michael Joyner, a former competitive marathoner who studies sports science at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Related coverage:
ABC News, Olympic Swimmer Katie Ledecky Blows Competition Out of the Water
Business Insider, Why Katie Ledecky's Olympic world record Sunday night is even more amazing than you think
Business Insider, Here's an exact breakdown of why 6'4" Michael Phelps has the perfect body for swimming
Business Insider, The internet is driving athletes to do crazy things no one knew were possible
Tech Insider, People are stronger and faster than ever before, but the reason why isn’t what you think

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

TIME
What Is Cupping? Here’s What You Need to Know
by Alexandra Sifferlin

…There is a difference between how cupping is practiced in traditional Chinese medicine and how it is used in Western medicine, says Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. Bauer says a traditional Chinese medicine practitioner would likely offer cupping as part of a larger integrative health check, which might include recommendations around nutrition and otherTime magazine logo health things, and not just as a one-off therapy. “It’s kind of an American phenomena, I think, to consider cupping by itself,” he says.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
HealthDayDoes 'Cupping' = Success for Olympic Athletes?
Live ScienceMichael Phelps' Weird Bruises: Does Cupping Therapy Really Work?
Jakarta Post, Phelps puts spotlight on cupping
CCTV-AmericaIt works for Michael Phelps, so we tried “cupping” for the first time

Context:  Brent Bauer, M,D., is director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. As director of the program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests. Since its founding in 2001, the program has promoted a collaborative spirit that enables researchers from both within and outside Mayo Clinic to share resources, ideas and expertise regarding research in this exciting realm.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO-Radio
Mayo Clinic ranks #1 in latest US News and World Report Rankings

Interview with Dr. John Noseworthy and Dave Lee.

WCCO-AM Dave LeeReach: WCCO radio, a CBS owned and operated affiliate in Minneapolis, boasts one of the largest coverage areas in the country as it reaches into portions of North and South Dakota during the day. At night, the station’s signal typically reaches across many U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

Additional coverage:
KTAR-TV, US News & World Report grades Phoenix’s Mayo Clinic top hospital in Arizona
Arizona Daily Star, U.S. News & World Report ranks Tucson hospital third in state
Healio, Mayo Clinic ranked as top hospital for neurology and neurosurgery
WIBW-TV, New ranking proves patients are in good hands at Stormont Vail Health 

Previous coverage in August 5, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic was named the best hospital in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published online today. In addition, Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in more specialties than any other hospital in the country. Mayo Clinic took the No. 1 spot in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. It also ranked No. 1 in the Phoenix metro area and in the Jacksonville metro area. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo’s New Blood Test Could Predict Chances Of Experiencing A Heart Attack
by Sam Schaust

Mayo Clinic launched a new type of blood test on Wednesday that is the first-of-its-kind in the U.S. With the new test, measurements are taken from blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids highly linked to cardiovascular disease events, such as a heart attack. It’s believed the test could even predict the chance of a cardiovascular event as much as a year before it occurs. “Through our strongTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo collaboration with Zora Biosciences, we hope our new test will improve the evaluation of individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease,” said Jeff Meeusen, co-director of Mayo’s Cardiovascular Laboratory Medicine Group.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional coverage:
Clinical Lab Products, Mayo Clinic Launches Blood Test to Assess Heart Attack Risk

Context: Mayo Clinic has launched a new type of blood test that will be used to predict adverse cardiovascular events in patients with progressing coronary artery disease (CAD). The test measures blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids that are highly linked to cardiovascular disease processes. Researchers say this test is especially useful for patients with CAD when it does not improve with treatment or for young patients with premature CAD. The new test will help clinicians identify at-risk individuals and is available to Mayo Clinic patients and health care providers worldwide through Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML). MML is the reference laboratory of Mayo Clinic, offering advanced laboratory testing and pathology services to more than 5,000 health care organizations in more than 60 countries. MML collaborated on the test with Zora Biosciences Oy, a diagnostics discovery company based in Finland that specializes in cardiovascular disease. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

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Tags: ABC News, accupuncture, Addyson Cordes, AOL News, arthritis, Astrobiology, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, Best Hospitals, blood test, brain tumor, Breast Cancer, breast microbiome


October 29th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Scientists Probe Indoor Work Spaces for Clues to Better Health
by Sumathi Reddy

… Clinical trials are due to get underway early next year at the Well Living Lab, a new, 7,500-square-foot research facility adjacent to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., designed to study indoor environments with the aim of creating healthier spaces.WSJ Banner Sensors throughout the building monitor factors ranging from noise levels to air quality and temperature; other sensors in furniture will tell how long people stay seated and their posture. “The ultimate goal is to improve health,” said Brent Bauer, medical director of the Well Living Lab and professor of medicine for the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. “If we spend 90% of our time in an indoor environment there are almost endless opportunities to find better ways to do what we’re doing inside the building,” he said.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has anaverage circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Exposure to indoor environments is at an all-time high. In fact, Americans spend more than 90 percent of their time indoors, whether at home, work, school, retail stores, fitness centers, health care facilities and more. But what many people don’t realize is that buildings, and everything in them, can affect human health and well-being. Today marked the opening of the Well Living Lab, a new research facility dedicated to studying these environments and creating healthier indoor spaces in which to live, work and play. “There is a growing awareness and body of scientific evidence that indoor, built environments can affect human health and well-being, with the perception often being that indoor environments have a negative impact on health,” said Brent Bauer. M.D., medical director of the Well Living Lab and professor of medicine for Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. “But new knowledge shows that by building healthier indoor environments, we can actually preserve and enhance human health and quality of life.” More information about the Well Living Lab can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

MPR
What is the best research on breast cancer screenings?

On Monday morning, Kerri Miller and her guests try to bring clarity these new MPR News logoevidence-driven guidelines. Dr. Nancy Keating is a primary care physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and Dr. Sandhya Pruthi, who specializes in breast cancer research at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, join Miller to sort through the latest research on breast cancer screenings.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: The American Cancer Society (ACS) has updated its recommendations for breast cancer screening for women at average risk of the disease. The recommendations strongly support the value of mammograms and provide some further direction for women at both ends of the age spectrum. Sandhya Pruthi, M.D., a Breast Clinic physician and Mayo Clinic Cancer Center researcher says,"This is an important paper and we are pleased that ACS has paid attention to and respected patient preferences and values in its recommendation. While the ACS now recommends annual screening mammograms for women who have no risk factors at age 45, it did recommend that women age 40 and up still receive an annual screening mammograms if they choose to seek screening. This shared-decision making approach between a patient and her provider is something we support at Mayo Clinic. Overall, the new ACS recommendations reaffirm that screening mammography for women in their 40s is associated with a decrease in breast cancer deaths." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

KIMT 
Special day for special kid

A Minnesota toddler who has battled brain cancer for more than half his life had a very special day on Monday in Rochester. Vito from Waconia rang a bell at MayoKIMT Clinic to signify the end of his proton beam therapy in Rochester. The now two-year-old was first diagnosed with Medullblastoma at 11 months old and we are told that type of cancer is usually treated with giving radiation to the brain. However, that can be difficult for someone with a developing brain, like Vito. That’s why the family decided to come to Mayo so doctors could focus their treatment, with the proton beam, on specific areas of the brain.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage:

KTTC — 2-year-old boy celebrates completion of proton beam therapy; KWWL Iowa, KOMU Mo., KJRH Okla.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota this past June and in Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Billboard magazine
Meet Music's Top Throat Doctors Who've Saved the Voices of Adele, Sam Smith and More
by Carolina Buia

DAVID LOTT, Phoenix  Specializing in regenerative ­medicine, Lott, the Mayo Clinic’s ­director of its head and neck ­regeneration program, has developed a process to re-create parts of the voice box and vocal folds using stem cells and 3D printing. Although the technology is still in the investigation stage, he plans to offer Billboard magazine logothe treatment to patients (which includes opera and Broadway stars) in 2016…“By addressing the physical and mental aspects of the pain in addition to retraining her vocal system, she could speak with confidence,” he says.

Reach: Billboard has served the entertainment business since 1894. Beginning as a weekly for the bill posting and advertising business, Billboard and its popular music charts have evolved into the primary source of information on trends and innovation in music, serving music fans, artists, top executives, tour promoters, publishers, radio programmers, lawyers, retailers, digital entrepreneurs and many others. Written for music industry professionals and fans. Functions as the trade journal for the music and entertainment industries. Contents provide news, reviews and statistics for all genres of music, including music videos, related internet activity and retail updates. The weekly publication has an audience of 18,000 and its website receives more than 24.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Davi Lott, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic ENT who is dedicated to investigating disorders of the larynx (voice box) and airway. This includes bioengineering of laryngeal and tracheal tissues, laryngeal transplantation techniques and immunotherapy, laryngeal cancer, and functional outcomes of various laryngeal surgical procedures. Read more about Dr. Lott's research here.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Florida Times-Union
Lead Letter: Mayo Clinic is a leader in telemedicine
by Sarvam P. TerKonda, medical director, Connected Care, Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus

The Federal Communications Commission and Mayo Clinic recently sponsored a forum for Florida policy makers on the future of telemedicine — delivery of patientFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo care through a secure video or computer link… Studies have shown that for management of chronic conditions that become more prevalent with age, such as congestive heart failure, diabetes and stroke, outcomes are improved when patients and their local caregivers can be connected remotely to specialty care.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Sarvam TerKonda, M.D., is Mayo Clinic's medical director for Connected Care at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Connected Care integrates new care and service delivery models into traditional outpatient and inpatient care.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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March 5th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

 

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Health magazine
Watch a Blind Grandfather ‘See’ His Wife and Family Again Thanks to a Bionic Eye
by Rachel Swalin

After losing his vision to a degenerative eye disease, a 68-year-old Minnesota grandfather of 10 can now make out the forms of his wife and family for the first time Healthin a decade, NBC News reported. And it’s all thanks to one fascinating piece of technology…Raymond Iezzi Jr., MD, a Mayo Clinic researcher and ophthalmologist, had been treating Zderad’s grandson, who’s in the early stages of the disease, which is caused by genetic defects and is often passed on through families. Knowing Zderad’s eyesight had been lost to the disease, Dr. Iezzi suggested that the grandfather take part in a clinical trial for a device called the Second Sight Argus II, better known as a bionic eye. “Tell your grandfather I’d like to see him,” Dr. Iezzi told the boy, according to a Mayo Clinic release.

Reach: Health magazine has a monthly circulation of 1.3 million and Health.com delivers information that puts health into context in peoples' lives.

Additional coverage: Huffington Post, Tienes Que Verlo. La Tercera Tendencias

Previous Coverage in February 26, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: It’s a medical story, a science and technology advancement and a romance wrapped into one moment: when a man who is blind sees his wife again for the first time in a decade. Allen Zderad began to have serious vision problems about 20 years ago due to retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease affecting the retina. There is no effective treatment or cure. It ended his professional career and after a decade he was effectively blind, unable to see anything other than very bright light. He adjusted, even continuing woodworking by developing his sense of touch and spatial relationships. But he was unable to see his family, including ten grandchildren or his wife, Carmen. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nelllis

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
A vision for improving quality, driving down costs: Meet the new leader of Mayo Clinic Jacksonville
by Colleen Michele Jones

It's easy to see why Dr. Gianrico Farrugia was chosen to lead Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoJacksonville, replacing Dr. Bill Rupp who retired last December. By turns warm and personable, intense and passionate, Farrugia practically lights up when talking about the future of the renowned institution, particularly here in Northeast Florida.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. was named Mayo Clinic vice president and chief executive officer (CEO) ofMayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida, in August 2014.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

WBUR Here & Now
View From The Top: CEO Of The Mayo Clinic

U.S. News & World Report recently named the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, the number one hospital in the country this year, a first for the hospital. The Mayo WBURClinic is world famous for a model that pays doctors salaries instead of fees, to head off the possibility of physicians ordering unnecessary tests to pad their incomes. Physicians also work on teams for better communication, and to keep costs down. The Mayo Clinic has been center stage in the debate over the Affordable Care Act and “bending the curve” on the high cost of healthcare in the U.S. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Dr. John Noseworthy, president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, who says “it’s that team-based, patient-centeredness that drives us forward.”

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Reach: A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Wall Street Journal
A Fast Track to Treatment for Stroke Patients
by Laura Landro

…Bart Demaerschalk, a neurologist and medical director of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Connected Care in Phoenix, says remote consultations are “the next best thing toWall Street Journal Life and Culture logo having a live stroke team, and in terms of time we are just as fast.” The Mayo Clinic Telestroke Network has three hubs in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota which serve 38 “spoke” hospitals in nine states.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Bart Demaerschalk, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. In stroke telemedicine, also called telestroke, doctors who have advanced training in the nervous system (neurologists) remotely evaluate people who've had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations to emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Doctors communicate using digital video cameras, Internet telecommunications, robotic telepresence, smartphones and other technology.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic reports 36 percent rise in operating income for 2014
by Christopher Snowbeck

Operating income jumped by more than one-third last year at Mayo Clinic, as the Star Tribune Business section logoRochester-based hospital and clinic system posted its strongest performance in more than 25 years. The volume of patients seeking care from Mayo Clinic was strong, including sicker patients who stayed longer than anticipated, said Chief Financial Officer Kedrick Adkins Jr. At the same time, tight control on expenses meant that Mayo Clinic provided the care without a significant increase in labor costs, Adkins said.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Modern Healthcare, HealthLeaders Media, Post-Bulletin, BringMeTheNews, La Crosse Tribune Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

Context: Mayo Clinic reports a strong 2014 performance, including providing direct care for more than 1.3 million people, contributions of $410 million to its pension plan as a commitment to employees, and plans for a $1.5 billion investment to fund information technology infrastructure. “Whether viewed through the lens of quality, patient outcomes, research advances, operational performance or sharing our knowledge with the world — by all measures, we had an extraordinary year,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “That success allowed us to reinvest in our people, our infrastructure and our mission so we can better serve our patients.” More information about Mayo's 2014 performance can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

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January 22nd, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Star Tribune
Mayo fights stricter oversight of lab tests
by Jim Spencer

Proposed federal rules to require new government approval of certain tests developed in medical schools and private business laboratories have drawn cries of protest from the Mayo Clinic… Mayo says it already goes through a certification process with otherStar Tribune Business section logo federal agencies and monitors its so-called adverse events. The clinic recently sent the chairman of its laboratory medicine and pathology department to Washington to testify against the rules as the government considers tweaking them. “These rules have the potential to get in the way of effective patient care and really disrupt the whole patient-physician-laboratory relationship,” Dr. Curtis Hanson told the Star Tribune after his testimony to the FDA.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Proposed lab regulation worries Mayo Clinic officials

Context: Curtis Hanson, M.D. is chair of Mayo Clinic laboratory medicine and pathology, one of the largest clinical laboratories in the world. It is composed of more than 3,200 people working in numerous specialty laboratories performing more than 20 million tests a year.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Huffington Post
How To Train Your Brain For Happiness
by Sarah Klein

Broody, a very unhappy brain, is plagued by fear and self-doubt. "Seeing otHuffington Post Healthy Living Logohers in pain, physical or emotional, fires his own pain network," says Amit Sood, M.D., professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic and chair of the Mayo Mind Body Initiative, in a new video "starring" Broody. "His imaginary fears cause him real damage."

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free LivingMayo Clinic stress management and resiliency expert Amit Sood, M.D., draws on decades of groundbreaking research to offer readers a scientifically proven, structured and practical approach to reducing stress. He explains the brain’s two modes — focused mode and default mode — and how an imbalance between the two produces unwanted stress, and he shares new insights about how the mind works, including its natural tendency to wander. In this easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Sood provides actionable steps to cultivate emotional and mental strength, find greater fulfillment and nurture a kind disposition. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Sood, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

NBC Nightly News
New Study Finds Lack of Exercise Is Deadlier Than Obesity

Walking for 20 minutes every day can reduce a person's risk of death by up to 30 percent, according to a new University of Cambridge study. Dr. Edward Laskowski, NBC Nightly News LogoMayo Clinic, is interviewed by Dr. Nancy Snyderman, NBC Medical Correspondent.

Reach: NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams continues to be the top rated evening newscast with more than 7.9 million viewers each night.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Traci Klein

 

Washington Post
What is President Obama’s ‘precision medicine’ plan, and how might it help you?
by Lenny Bernstein

In his hour-long State of the Union address Tuesday night, President Obama spent a Washington Post newspaper logofew seconds announcing a "Precision Medicine Initiative," but did little to explain what he has in mind…What is precision medicine? Clinically, experts don't even agree on a single term for it. But "individualized," "personalized," and "precision," medicine are all used to convey the same idea, according to Gianrico Farrugia, former director of the Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine: "rather than treating a person as [part of] a group, treat the person as an individual, based on [his or her] own genetic material, to enable us to provide individualized, personalized and precise care."

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Additional coverage:
FOX 9 Twin Cities
Minnesota shout out minutes into State of the Union Address…. Federal funding for individualized medicine
Health IT Outcomes, Austin Daily Herald, MedCity News, Pharma Times

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for 150 years at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. More information about the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Mayo Clinic's response to President Obama's precision medicine initiative can be found here.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Bob Nellis, Sam Smith

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June 12th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Apple’s New Health Focus Comes at Propitious Time
by Clint Boulton

…Apple and the Mayo Clinic are collaborating on one such integration in which HealthKit, capturing data from a blood pressure app, will notify the hospital in the event a patient’s blood pressure falls outside normal range. Mayo Clinic physicians will provide the patient recommendationThe Wall Street Journal newspaper logos — take medication or come in immediately — in the context of the app, said John Wald, Mayo Clinic’s medical director for marketing and public affairs.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:
Forbes, In Healthcare, Apple Will Struggle To Match Huge Samsung Ambitions

Product Reviews, mHealthNews, Pauls Valley Daily Democrat, Fast Company

Previous Coverage in June 5 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: During last week's  keynote address at the Worldwide Developers Conference 2014Apple, Inc., unveiled HealthKit, a digital repository for various types of health-fitness related data. Apple highlighted HealthKit through a new Mayo Clinic app under development that would offer users a more personalized experience and make their health data more actionable in supporting healthier lifestyles. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Minneapolis/ St. Paul Business Journal
Made at Mayo: Cultural shift lets Mayo Clinic researchers helm their own startups
By Katharine Grayson

For most of its history, Mayo Clinic has lauded innovative medical research, but made entrepreneurship against the rules. The health care giant barred its Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal newspaper logodoctors from owning medical companies or serving as C-level executives. That meant researchers had to bid farewell to their inventions, as Mayo licensed their medical therapies to new firms they couldn’t lead or to larger companies.

Reach: The Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Related Coverage in Minneapolis/ St. Paul Business Journal:
Made at Mayo: Mayo professor doubles as founder of text tech company
Made at Mayo: Oncology professor launches startup to track cells and viruses
Made at Mayo:
Zumbro uses custom peptides to battle hypertension

Context: The Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides infrastructure that enables entrepreneurism for the Rochester community. Founded by the Rochester Area Economic Development, Inc. (RAEDI), City of Rochester, Mayo Clinic Treasury Services and Mayo Clinic Ventures, the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides collaborative space for new companies, venture capital firms and entrepreneurs. It also works with existing companies and service providers to support entrepreneurial ventures. It encompasses over 2,000 square feet within the skyway level of the Minnesota BioBusiness Center. The Accelerator promotes local and regional economic development through new company creation and expansion. "Our goal with the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator is to bring together like-minded entrepreneurs, investors and advisers to share ideas, resources and expertise, and by doing so we hope to build a unique ecosystem and support the spirit of entrepreneurism in Rochester," says Jim Rogers, chair, Mayo Clinic Ventures. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Post-Bulletin
Hockey: Stuart ready to get Jets back to postseason

Mark Stuart is settled and content in Winnipeg. The Rochester native is an assistant captain of an NHL team, he likes the city and the hockey-mad fans who call it home. "It's always nice to have that stability and in a place I enjoy," said Stuart, who was at the new Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center on Wednesday to Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperwork out and talk to Rochester youth hockey players and their parents about the Center's hockey training program. "Winnipeg is where I wanted to be. I'm excited to be there."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

WCCO
Study: Sharing A Bed With Your Pet Can Disturb Your Sleep

This is an obvious statement — pet owners love their furry family members. There’s always debate though, on where you let them sit or sleep. A new study from WCCO logothe Mayo Clinic says while cozying up with your dog or cat may sound nice, pets actually disturb your sleep.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional coverage:
Daily Mail UK, Sidebar: Pet Owners Are Increasingly Being Kept Awake By Their Animals
Prevention magazine, The Cutest Reason You Can’t Sleep
Health24, BringMeTheNews, WBZ-CBS Boston, WDAF Kansas City, WFLD-FOX  Chicago, WOIO-CBS Cleveland, KTLA Los Angeles

Context: While countless pet owners peacefully sleep with a warm pet nearby, a new Mayo Clinic study, presented this week at the 29th Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, finds an increase in the number of people experiencing sleep disturbances because of their pets. A previous Mayo Clinic study published in 2002 reported that of patients who visited the clinic’s sleep center and owned pets, only one percent reported any inconvenience from their pets at night. The new study shows a larger number of patients — 10 percent in 2013 — reported annoyance that their pets sometimes disturbed their sleep. “The study determined that while the majority of patients did not view their pets intolerably disturbing their sleep, a higher percentage of patients experienced irritation — this may be related to the larger number of households with multiple pets,” says Lois Krahn, M.D., Mayo Clinic psychiatrist and author of the study. “When people have these kinds of sleep problems, sleep specialists should ask about companion animals and help patients think about ways to optimize their sleep.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

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May 29th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


NY Times
Ask Well: For Fitness, 2,000 Calories a Week?
By Gretchen Reynolds

I have read and heard that a person should aim to expend 2,000 calories weekly in exercise for optimum health. Is there any basis at all for this notion?...Adhering to these guidelines means that most of us would burn about 1,000 calories per week in planned The New York Times newspaper logoexercise, said Michael J. Joyner, an exercise researcher at the Mayo Clinic. And with the stairs we climb and chores we do, we come closer to that 2,000 calorie a week number, he said.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci KleinBryan Anderson

 

ABC News
Wrong Women Getting Double Mastectomies, Study Finds
By Suneeta Ganji, MD

…A growing number of women with cancer in one breast are choosing to have both breasts removed. But new research suggests that the women who should be doing this aren’t – ABC News logoand, ironically, those who don’t need to take this approach are opting for it.The study, published Wednesday in JAMA Surgery, reveals what some doctors are pointing to as a problematic trend – as well as possible evidence of a breakdown in communication between women anxious about a breast cancer diagnosis and their doctors...Dr. Judy Boughey, a breast surgeon at Mayo Clinic who was not involved in the study, said breast cancer patients often have various reasons for either opting for or avoiding surgery to remove a healthy breast.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Previous Coverage

Context: Unique laboratory testing during breast cancer lumpectomies to make sure surgeons remove all cancerous tissue spares patients the need for a repeat lumpectomy in roughly 96 percent of cases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, a success rate much higher than the rate nationally, a Mayo study shows. During the years reviewed, 13.2 percent of breast cancer lumpectomy patients nationally had to return to the operating room within a month of their initial surgery, compared to 3.6 percent at Mayo in Rochester, which uses a technique called frozen section analysis to test excised tissue for cancer while patients are still on the operating table. The findings are published in the journal Surgery. More information on this study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

US News & World Report
Air Travel Safe After Chest Surgery, Surgeon Says

If you're returning home after having chest surgery at an out-of-town hospital, flying is as safe as driving, an expert says. It's widely believed that ground travel is safer than air US News & World Report Logotravel after chest surgery, but a study by Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon Dr. Stephen Cassivi found that isn't true. He also concluded there is no reason to wait for weeks after chest surgery to fly home.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage:
HealthDay, Air Travel Safe After Chest Surgery, Surgeon Says
Health.com, MSN Healthy Living, Philadelphia Inquirer, HHS Healthfinder.gov, Newsday, Yahoo! Health, Winnipeg Free Press Ciencias Medicas News

Context: Summer travel isn’t for vacation alone. For some people, it may include a trip to an out-of-town hospital for surgery. If you are traveling for chest surgery, you may wonder whether it is safer to return home by car or plane. A new Mayo Clinic study found that, contrary to conventional wisdom, air travel is just as safe as ground travel after chest surgery, and there is often no reason to wait for weeks after an operation to fly home. Lead study author Stephen Cassivi, M.D., a Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon, offers these five tips for safer, more comfortable travel home after surgery on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Star Tribune
Miracle fruit: Is the coconut all it's cracked up to be?
By Allie Shah

…“I always say: If all else fails, try coconut,” said Oprish, who recently wrote about the wonders of coconut for the Twin Cities Moms blog. The 33-year-old is part of a consumer movement that is transforming a tropical fruit once maligned for its high fat content into aStar Tribune Health newspaper logo super food embraced by people who swear by its therapeutic powers. The coconut’s healing abilities are said to be vast — from bad-breath-erasing mouthwash to Alzheimer’s treatment. As with other so-called miracle foods, “things start snowballing, and that’s what happened with coconut,” said Dr. Donald Hensrud of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a preventive medicine expert at Mayo Clinic and medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet; David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist and Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. helps people sort through the facts and figures from the fads and the hype to learn more about nutrition and diet.

Public Affairs Contacts: Joe Dangor, Duska Anastasijevic, Ginger Plumbo

 

KARE11
Mayo Clinic says sideline test detects youth concussions
by Renee Tessman

On the sidelines of youth sports, a new Mayo Clinic study shows a simple test, known as KARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paulthe King-Devick,can detect concussions. Dr. Amaal Starling of the Mayo Clinic is co-author of the study. She said for youth athletes, "This is really the first accurate, rapid, cost effective, removal-from-play tool that is available for concussion screen."

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional Coverage:
KSTP, Forum at Edina High School Addresses Concussions in Sports
Healio Optometry News, King-Devick test effective in detecting concussions for adolescents, study finds

Context:  A rapid, easy-to-administer eye movement test is showing great promise as a sideline concussion test for youth sports, a Mayo Clinic study finds. In the study, Mayo Clinic researchers assessed high school hockey players using the King-Devick test. The test requires an athlete to read single-digit numbers displayed on cards. After suspected head trauma, the athlete is given the test, which takes about two minutes, and the results are compared to a baseline test administered previously. If the time needed to complete the test takes longer than the baseline test time, the athlete should be removed from play until evaluated by a medical professional. Amaal Starling, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist and a co-author of the study. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Post-Bulletin
Back and Forth: Mayo’s 150 Years Included Dr. Donald Balfour
by Harley Flathers

One of the many people we might describe as a "Rock" at Mayo Clinic shortly after entering the 20th century was Dr. Donald C. Balfour, an early associate with Drs. Will andLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Charlie Mayo...Balfour took a liking to Dr. Will and Hattie Mayo's daughter Carrie…One of the Balfour daughters, Mary, married the late Henry Frederic Helmholz Jr., who died Jan. 6, 2012, at age 100. Their daughter, Martha Mayo Helmholz-Anderson, told me Balfour was a loving grandfather.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

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March 14th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

 

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Twin Cities Business
Mayo's Operating Profits Climb 55%; CEO Talks Strategy
By Jake Anderson and Dale Kurschner

Mayo Clinic said it beat expectations in 2013, and CEO John Noseworthy, who recently spoke to Twin Cities Business about the future of health care, highlighted ongoing initiatives. “The strong commitment of our entire organization has allowed us to respond successfully to unprecedented Twin Cities Businesschange in health care,” Dr. Noseworthy said. “We have changed the very definition of Mayo Clinic and stayed true to our core mission and values.”

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: As Mayo Clinic recognizes its Sesquicentennial year, the not-for-profit organization reached a record 63 million people in 2013. The strong performance was bolstered by successful implementation of new care delivery models — such as the Mayo Clinic Care Network — that provide knowledge to patients, physicians and consumers in traditional and new ways. “Expanding our reach is not a new goal for us,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “In fact, as we consider our history, growth has been a constant for 150 years.”

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Reports Strong Performance in 2013, Reaching More Than 63 Million People

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

Star Tribune
Stand up for yourself and your health
by Allie Shah

As a health reporter, I’ve read the research, from the National Institutes of Health to the Mayo Clinic to the American Cancer Society, all of which Star Tribune Logowarns that prolonged sitting leads to increased risks of heart disease, cancer and diabetes… So I set out to stand as much as I could for two straight days. No sitting at my desk. No sitting during meetings or meals or TV time. To help prepare for my 48-hour standoff, I consulted with a pioneer — the man who jump-started the anti-sitting movement: Dr. James Levine of the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University, a world-renowned obesity expert and among the first to use a treadmill desk.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

MinnPost
Mayo takes a big step in growing sports-medicine field with pro teams, Block E clinic
by Pat Borzi

The last thing the Mayo Clinic needs is a higher profile. Who around the world hasn’t heard of Mayo? For more than a century, Mayo’s innovative care and research brought heads of state, the rich and famous, and foreign royalty to its Rochester, Minn., campus for checkups and treatment… MinnPost“It’s a comprehensive service, one-stop shopping where you can get all your fitness-related needs met, from diagnosis of an injury to treatment of an injury to recommendations regarding injury prevention,” said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo’s Sports Medicine Center.

Reach:  MinnPost is a nonprofit, nonpartisan enterprise which provides news and analysis based on reporting by professional journalists, most of whom have decades of experience in the Twin Cities media. MinnPost averages more than 78,000 unique visitors to its site each month.. In Dec. 2013, MinnPost also had 27,300 followers on Twitter and its main Facebook page was liked by 9,500-plus readers.

Context: Mayo Clinic and the Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx announced in early February a partnership which extends the Mayo Model of Care for patients in sports medicine to the Twin Cities. The collaboration includes: 1) the opening of a Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at 600 Hennepin, 2) designating Mayo as the preferred medical provider for the teams, and 3) utilizing the teams’ international reach to educate the public about numerous health and wellness topics.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic, Minnesota Timberwolves & Lynx Announce Collaboration

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Steam Boat Today
Our View: Mayo network enhances patient care

The recently announced partnership between Yampa Valley Medical Center and the Mayo Clinic is good news, further solidifying the local Steamboat Today newspaper logohospital’s reputation for excellence and enhancing patient access to high-quality health care. As the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, YVMC is one of 26 medical centers nationwide and only the second hospital in Colorado to achieve this distinction.

Reach: Steamboat Today is a daily newspaper serving Steamboat Springs and the surrounding areas in Routt County, Colo. with a circulation of 7,000. Its website receives more than 30,500 unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic and Yampa Valley Medical Center officials announced this week that the Steamboat Springs hospital is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The network connects Mayo Clinic and health care providers who are interested in working together to enhance the delivery of locally provided high quality health care. Yampa Valley Medical Center is the second hospital in Colorado to be invited to join the network. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Arizona Central Sports
Concussion in sports documentary receives premiere at Valley’s Mayo Clinic
by Paola Boivin

My Sunday best …A powerful documentary by an Academy Award nominee made its U.S. premiere Saturday night at an unlikely place: the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix. “Head Games: The Global Concussion Crisis” delivers an unfiltered lookedArizona Republic at one of the more-troubling story lines in today’s sports world…Following the documentary was a panel I was lucky enough to moderate and included Nowinski; former ASU and NFL standout Mike Haynes; neurologist David Dodick, director of the Concussion and Headache Program at the Mayo Clinic; and director Steve James, who also directed the Academy Award nominated “Hoop Dreams.” Additional coverage: Sports Business Daily

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona will hosted a special sneak preview of the highly anticipated documentary, Head Games: The Global Concussion Crisis. 

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Tags: 000 steps, 10, 2013 Mayo Clinic Performance Report, ABC News, Abilene, Adirondack Enterprise NY, Advertiser-Tribune, airborne fungus, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, antibacterial soap, antibiotics and weight gain


March 7th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Steamboat Today
Yampa Valley Medical Center announces new partnership with the Mayo Clinic

...Yampa Valley Medical Center has announced a new partnership with the Mayo Clinic that will give physicians here the ability to consult with thousands of the clinic's specialists across the country. "We couldn't be more proud to have this relationship with this organization," hospital CEOSteamboat Today newspaper logo Frank May said Wednesday morning in a packed conference room as he was flanked by the Mayo Clinic's vice president and medical director. "This elevates our game."

Reach: Steamboat Today is a daily newspaper serving Steamboat Springs and the surrounding areas in Routt County, Colo. with a circulation of 7,000. Its website receive more than 30,500 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Post BulletinHeard on the Street: Mayo Clinic adds Colorado health-care provider as new member

Context: Mayo Clinic and Yampa Valley Medical Center officials announced this week that the Steamboat Springs hospital is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The network connects Mayo Clinic and health care providers who are interested in working together to enhance the delivery of locally provided high quality health care. Yampa Valley Medical Center is the second hospital in Colorado to be invited to join the network. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Wall Street Journal
The Debate Over Juice Cleanses and Toxin Removal
by Melinda Beck

…Consuming more vegetables is great, mainstream doctors and nutritionists agree. But they dismiss the detox claims as a confusing jumble of The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoscience, pseudoscience and hype. They argue that humans already have a highly efficient system for filtering out most harmful substances—the liver, kidneys and colon..."Nobody has ever been able to tell me what these toxins are," says Donald Hensrud, an internist and nutrition specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D., is Chair, Mayo Clinic Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine in Minnesota. Dr. Hensrud's research focuses on obesity, nutrition and disease prevention, physical activity and health promotion, and clinical preventive medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Traci Klein

 

Philadelphia Inquirer
Getting Teeth Pulled Before Heart Surgery May Pose Serious Risks

If you're a heart patient, you might be wise to wait to have any infected teeth pulled if you're about to have cardiac surgery, a new study suggests. Philadelphia InquirerIn a small, retrospective study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that 8 percent of heart patients who did not wait to have teeth pulled suffered major adverse health outcomes, such as a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or death.

Circulation: The Philadelphia Inquirer has a daily circulation of more than 350,000 readers. Philadelphia Inquirer - Online has more than 1.7 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Winnipeg Free PressNewsMedical.NetNew Jersey HeraldMyFoxTampaBayHealthYahoo!.netUPI.comKEYC (Mankato)Tech Times, State ColumnMedical ResearchYahoo! Health, NIH Medline Plus, MSN.com, ScienceDaily, CBSAtlanta.com, WDAM.com (Mississippi), KNOE.com (Louisiana), MyFoxDFW (Dallas based in Las Vegas), MyFoxNewYork, HawaiiNewsNow 

Previous Coverage in Feb. 28, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To pull or not to pull? That is a common question when patients have the potentially dangerous combination of abscessed or infected teeth and the need for heart surgery.  In such cases, problem teeth often are removed before surgery, to reduce the risk of infections including endocarditis, an infection of the inner lining of the heart that can prove deadly.  But Mayo Clinic research suggests it may not be as simple as pulling teeth: The study found that roughly 1 in 10 heart surgery patients who had troublesome teeth extracted before surgery died or had adverse outcomes such as a stroke or kidney failure. The findings are published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Pulling Problem Teeth Before Heart Surgery to Prevent Infection May Be Catch-22

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

FOX9
INVESTIGATORS: Radiation and records

…Former Airman Nathan Edward Morris must run a medical drill once every four months. Blood is drawn, an MRI is taken and the oncologist My Fox KMSP TCwill read the results Morris believes can be linked back to what might be called friendly fire from 11 years ago…Morris's tumor is so invasive that only a surgeon at the Mayo Clinic was willing to operate on it last July…Doctors believe they were able to cut most of the cancer out…Morris finds himself back at Mayo Clinic so often. The system of sashaying patients from appointment to appointment is incredibly slick and is specifically designed so the sick don't have to wait for days to get results -- but every minute spent waiting is one that makes Morris "nervous."

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes. FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m.

Follow-up story: FOX9, Airman gets brain tumor resolution

Context: Nathan Morris is a patient of Mayo Clinic oncologist and neurologist Derek Johnson, M.D.  Dr. Johnson's research is part of Mayo's Neuro-Oncology Program. The goal of the Neuro-Oncology Program of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is to identify prevention and treatment strategies that improve the survival and quality of life for patients with primary brain tumors.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

 

KTTC
Small business start-ups finding success in Rochester
by Devin Bartolotta

The Rochester Area Economic Development, Inc. (RAEDI) held its annual meeting Thursday. It was all about the future of Rochester. "Growing the companies that are from here and want to stay here, you have the opportunity to create a new legacy," said Peter Barth, keynote speaker atKTTC today's meeting…"I think it's going to be a really positive change. Rochester, until now, has been dominated by a single industry or maybe two. And I think having these small satellite industries build up around Mayo Clinic will be really healthy," said Dr. Russell.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: RAEDI's primary goal is to attract, retain and assist the growth/expansion of base business within the Rochester Area. Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides infrastructure that enables entrepreneurism for the Rochester community.   Founded by RAEDI, City of Rochester, Mayo Clinic Treasury Services and Mayo Clinic Ventures, the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides collaborative space for new companies, venture capital firms and entrepreneurs.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

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