Items Tagged ‘Cardiovascular Business’

March 17th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic researchers pinpoint experimental drug that may shrink tumors in multiple myeloma patients
by Jason Pope

The Mayo Clinic says this experimental drug is leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is a cancer that affects the blood cells that fight infection. Rather than fighting infection, the cancer causes kidney problems and infections. AccordingKTTC TV logo to Dr. Marta Chesi, the drug was developed to support tumor death but instead of killing the tumor cells, it made them more visible. This visibility helps the immune system spot the tumor cells and eliminate them.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Life Science Daily

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers have found that an experimental drug, LCL161, stimulates the immune system, leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. The findings are published in Nature Medicine. Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that affects plasma cells – white blood cells that normally produce antibodies to fight infection. Rather than produce helpful antibodies, the cancer cells, as they grow, secrete large amounts of a single antibody that accumulate in the body, causing kidney problems and infections. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Huffington Post
Finding treatments to fight fibroids

Fibroid embolization and focused ultrasound are minimally invasive options that reproductive endocrinologist Dr. Ebbie Stewart says warrant Huffington Post Logomore research to help guide women and health care providers on a treatment plan. She co-authored a recent study that looked at the two treatments, compared recovery time, and noted adverse events in the first six weeks after treatment, Dr. Stewart says.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context:  Elizabeth "Ebbie Stewart, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. Dr. Stewart studies uterine fibroids, also called uterine leiomyomas or myomas. Fibroids are noncancerous tumors of the uterus that commonly cause heavy menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain and pressure, bowel and bladder problems, and sometimes infertility and miscarriage. Fibroids are also the leading cause of hysterectomy.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Men’s Health
This Exact Workout Routine May Actually Reverse Aging
by Elizabeth Millard

Research has shown physical activity can reduce inflammation in your body and improve heart health—both important for staying young beyond your years. But not all exercise is the same in keeping age-related decline at bay, researchers from the Mayo Clinic say…“Decline is mitochondria isMens Health Logo the key factor responsible for age-related physical declines,” says the study’s senior author, Sreekumaran Nair, M.D., Ph.D. That includes osteoporosis, arthritis, gastrointestinal issues, decreased flexibility, hypertension, and cardiovascular issues. “Higher intensity of exercise seems to elicit a rejuvenation of mitochondrial [processes] in everybody, including older people.”

Reach: Men's Health has an audience of more than 13.5 million readers.

Additional coverage: Healthline, The Hans India, Canindia.com, AARP

Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell MetabolismMayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
It’s not just being stuck inside; cold weather sets us up for getting sick
by Emily Sohn

It's not clear why winter brings so many health woes, says Pritish Tosh, an infectious-disease physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Washington Post newspaper logoRochester, Minnesota. "The reason one virus is a wintertime virus may not be the same reason another virus is a wintertime virus," Tosh says. "We're finding more and more that it's not one size fits all."

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
Chicago TribuneWhy do we get sick in winter?
Health, How to Get Rid of the Flu Faster

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness. Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting.

Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: AARP, ABC News, Analitica, Anesthesiology News, Associated Press, Becker’s Hospital Review, bone health, Brandix, bullying, BuzzFeed, Canindia.com, Cardiovascular Business


December 9th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Los Angeles Times
A senior-friendly workout to improve movement and prevent injury

Jogging outdoors, running on a treadmill or lifting weights at the gym aren’t always practical — or enjoyable — activities for everyone. However, one type of exercise works for everyone, no matter your age or ability, because it relies on improving practical movements often involved inLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper everyday activities. “Natural movement is universal, and it’s about bringing movement back to the basics,” says Bradly Prigge, wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program. “It’s not about following the latest fitness craze or learning the newest secret to weight loss. Natural movement is about connecting with your body and cultivating an awareness of your full abilities.”

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Additional coverage: Mountain Grove News-Journal

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor

 

Prevention
4 Easy Moves To Ease Your IBS Symptoms

When you're dealing with the abdominal pain, bloating, cramping, constipation, or diarrhea that comes along with irritable bowel syndrome Prevention logo(IBS), the last thing you probably want to do is exercise. Yet according to research, moving your body can decrease the pain associated with this condition that affects an estimated one in six Americans. Brent A. Bauer, MD, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, says many movement practices, such as yoga and tai chi, as well as meditation and guided imagery, benefit those suffering from IBS thanks to the fact that they induce the relaxation response. "This in turn balances the autonomic nervous system," says Bauer, which influences the function of many internal organs, including the digestive system.

Reach:  Prevention magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 1.5 million readers and covers practical health information and ideas on healthy living. Its website has nearly 1.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Brent Bauer, M,D., is director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. As director of the program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests. Since its founding in 2001, the program has promoted a collaborative spirit that enables researchers from both within and outside Mayo Clinic to share resources, ideas and expertise regarding research in this exciting realm.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic co-sponsoring World Stem Cell Summit
by Brett Boese

The Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine is co-sponsoring next week's World Stem Cell Summit in FloLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaperrida. More than 1,200 people are expected to attend the 12th annual event. Mayo will have a delegation of administrators, researchers and clinical experts participating in presentations and panel discussions involving stem cell discoveries, promising clinical trials and therapy options currently available.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine is a co-sponsor of the 2016 World Stem Cell Summit. More than 1,200 attendees are expected at the 12th annual event in West Palm Beach, Florida. A delegation of administrators, researchers and clinical  experts from Mayo Clinic will participate in featured presentations and panel discussions highlighting advances in discovery science, promising clinical trials and available therapies. Diverse topics to be covered include cardiovascular regeneration, restoring eyesight, and growing stem cells in a microgravity environment in space. Mayo Clinic experts also will be involved in panel discussions regarding education, consumer information and stem cell clinics. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Angela Bingham

 

KIMT
Study: Changes in how someone walks could predict decline in memory and thinking
by DeeDee Stiepan

Researchers at Mayo Clinic believe that changes in how someone walks over time could help predict if they will develop memory loss. The study KIMT LOGOanalyzed gait, which is the manner in which someone walks that includes everything from stride length to speed, even arm swing. They found that changes in those parameters were associated with decline in memory, thinking and language skills. “The goal will be to identify these individuals that develop these changes through time and potentially do something to prevent the decline if possible,” explains Rodolfo Savica, M.D. a Mayo Clinic Neurologist and lead author of the study.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Context: Walking is a milestone in development for toddlers, but it’s actually only one part of the complex cognitive task known as gait that includes everything from a person’s stride length to the accompanying swing of each arm. A Mayo Clinic study recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease found that problems associated with gait can predict a significant decline in memory and thinking. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

KAAL
3D Printing Improving Surgery Outcomes at Mayo Clinic

For nearly ten years, Rochester’s Mayo Clinic has been creating life-like models of people’s organs, vascular systems, and bones to help with surgery. This is all done using a three dimensional printer, which Mayo Clinic says says the demand for is only growing. The very first modelKAAL 6 News Rochester Logo surgeons created was a liver, and neuroradiologist Dr. Jonathon Morris says the rest was history. "So then we went into spine models, complex congenital scoliosis cases, from there we went into tumor, and then after we went into tumors we went into cancer, and then there was no turning back," Dr. Morris said.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context:  Mayo Clinic’s 3-D anatomic modeling program started with a realization that surgeons needed a new way to look at human anatomy that went beyond two-dimensional images. Surgeons who were planning the separation of conjoined twins in 2008 approached the Department of Radiology about producing a 3-D model of the babies’ shared liver. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Ethan Grove

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Tags: "work-fit" stations, 21st Century Cures Act, 3D printing, alzheimers, Ambert Kohnhorst, Ashville Citizen-Times, Associations Now, AZFamily, Boston Globe, Bradly Prigge, brain games, Cancer


November 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

STAT
Mayo leaders: A nine-fold path to preventing burnout

We’ve talked about burnout before, and it seems like lots of hospitals have ideas to combat it. Well, Mayo Clinic has some more ideas – nine of them, to be precise. In the issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings released today, Dr. Tait Shanafelt, director of Mayo’s Program on Physician Well-STAT Logo of Boston Globebeing, and Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo’s CEO, say administrators can’t force doctors to fight this battle on their own. “Burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations,” Shanafelt writes.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: News-Medical.net, Cardiovascular Business, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, FierceHealthcare

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have been documenting the rise and costs of physician burnout for more than a decade. Now, they are proposing nine strategies that health care organizations can use to reverse the trend and limit the risk to patients and their medical staff. Tait Shanafelt, M.D., director of Mayo Clinic’s Program on Physician Well-being, and John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic, offer the nine-point plan in the current issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Research has shown that more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing symptoms of burnout, and the rate is increasing,” says Dr. Shanafelt, first author of the article. “Unfortunately, many organizations see burnout as a personal problem to be addressed by the individual physician. It is clear, however, that burnout is a system issue, and addressing it is the shared responsibility of both the individuals and health care organizations.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
A non-pill treatment for many chronic illnesses: Exercise

Exercise isn’t good only for building muscle and losing weight. “If a pill could give you all benefits of exercise, it would be the best pill around,” Washington Post newspaper logosays Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine and a specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Yet doctors underprescribe exercise, even though research shows that it can deliver comparable benefits to drugs and surgery with fewer side effects, according to a recent review in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Here’s how to safely get the disease-fighting benefits of exercise…

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post
Why You Might Be Losing Your Sense of Taste As You Age
by Bill Ward

Our mouths perceive just five elements — sweet, sour, bitter, salt and umami (glutamate). They also can tell if there’s fat in food, said Dr. Erin O’Brien, a rhinologist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Rochester, Minn. “As you chew food, the flavor is released andHuffington Post Logo you smell it through the back of the nose,” O’Brien said. “If you’re eating strawberry ice cream, your tongue will tell you it’s sweet, but it won’t know the flavor. The nose tells you it’s strawberry. That’s the difference between taste and flavor.”

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Erin O'Brien, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic otorhinolaryngology (ENT). The Department of Otorhinolaryngology (ear, nose and throat or ENT) at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota provides a full range of medical and surgical services for pediatric and adult patients with head and neck disorders and diseases.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

FirstCoastNews
A day in the life of a cancer survivor; Judi Zitiello
by Keitha Nelson-Williams

Eighty-five percent of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer will die with-in six months. Judi Zitiello was diagnosed in 2014, and she's still First Coast News Logoliving to this day. But every three months, as she goes to the Mayo Clinic for a CT scan, life stands still for the mother of four and grandmother of seven with one on the way…FCN sat down with Dr. Pashtoon Kasi, M.D. Assistant Professor, GI Oncology at the Mayo Clinic to discuss the lethal cancer and why there are so few survivors. "The tumor itself it's a pretty unforgiving disease," said Kasi. "Unlike some of the other tumors this causes a lot of dense fibrous tissue around it. So a lot of the drugs are not able to get to it."

Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate.

Context: Pashtoon Kasi, M.B.B.S. is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and hematologist. An avid runner, Judi Zitiello, 66, was forced into a six-week hiatus when she developed a meniscus tear in early 2014. The retired financial executive was always active – exercising, hosting dinner parties, and volunteering to run the JT Townsend Foundation, a Jacksonville, Florida, philanthropic organization. Judi wasn’t too concerned about the downtime at first. She knew her body would take time to heal. But the pain lingered. Then Judi began losing weight and her energy waned. "I didn't have the energy to get off the couch. I didn’t feel well. I was just not myself," Judi recalls. Still, she thought it must be related to her knee injury. But when she began experiencing severe itching on her arms and torso, and her stool turned a clay color, Judi knew it was time to see someone other than the physical therapist. Little did she realize she would be starting a fight against pancreatic cancer. You can read more about Judi's story on Sharing Mayo Clinic and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Arizona Republic
Ask a Doc: Making surgery safer for high-risk bleeders

Question: What research is underway to help those at high risk for bleeding during medical procedures? Answer: As Arizona Republic newspaper logoa vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic, I treat patients with a wide range of vascular diseases and disorders. When I’m not performing procedures, I’m in the lab researching ways to improve current therapies, making the experience even safer and more effective for our patients, especially those who are at high risk for bleeding… — Dr. Rahmi Oklu

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic, Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing a biomaterial that has potential to protect patients at high risk for bleeding in surgery. The Nov. 16 cover article, “An Injectable Shear-Thinning Biomaterial for Endovascular Embolization,” in the journal Science Translational Medicine reports on a universal shear-thinning biomaterial that may provide an alternative for treating vascular bleeding. The study’s lead co-author Rahmi Oklu, M.D., Ph.D., a vascular interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic’s Arizona campus, explains shear-thinning biomaterial offers many advantages over metallic coils, the current gold standard. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, acupuncture, Affordable care act, aging, alcohol, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Aneurysm, Arizona Republic, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine


November 4th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Advisory Board
Mayo Clinic got 'five stars'—but its CEO still doesn't like how CMS rates hospitals

CMS' five-star rating system for overall hospital quality—and similar systems that purport to measure health care quality—are too reductionist and need to be changed, Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy argues in a Modern Healthcare op-ed. You might think, given that CMS awardedAdvisory Board Mayo Clinic five stars, that Noseworthy would praise the ratings system. But Noseworthy argues that "many measurement programs currently in use ... do not differentiate complexity of patient conditions nor account for their settings of care, which results in inaccurate reports on value."

Reach: The Advisory Board Company is a global research, technology, and consulting firm partnering with more than 165,000 leaders in more than 4,100 organizations across health care and higher education.

Previous coverage in October 28, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Hospitals & Health Networks
Experts Take on the Big Picture of Value-Based Payment
by Brian Frankie

Value-based payment is coming to health care. And its complications are something we have to understand. That was the message of panelists Hospitals and Health NetworksWednesday during a session at the H&HN Executive Forum in Chicago on value-based payment and purchasing and what can make it successful…Much of the discussion, led by moderator Robert Nesse, M.D., senior medical adviser for payment reform to the Mayo Clinic Board of Governors and former Mayo Clinic Health System CEO, focused on leveraging data to track value.

Reach: Hospitals & Health Networks is a monthly magazine with a circulation of more than 77,000 that reports on and analyzes the social, political and economic forces that shape healthcare delivery. Its website has more than 21, 000 unique visitors each month. The publication targets health care executives and clinical leaders in hospitals and health systems.

Context: Robert Nesse, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Health System family medicine physician in Lake City, Minn. and he also serves as senior medical director, Payment Reform at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Nesse is also former CEO of Mayo Clinic Health System, a network of clinics and hospitals serving more than 70 communities in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

TIME
You Asked: Should I Go Gluten Free?
by Markham Heid

Gluten is a type of elastic grain protein that helps wheat, rye and barley hold their shape. Because of its glue-like properties, gluten is often added to other food products—pasta, sauces, crackers, baked goods—to thicken or bind those products together. “These kinds of junk foods and refinedTime magazine logo carbohydrates promote weight gain and diabetes and disease,” says Dr. Joseph Murray, a professor of medicine and a gluten researcher at Mayo Clinic. So if you’re eating a lot of cookies, crackers and other grain-based snack foods, any diet that limits your intakes of them is bound to do your health some good. “But for those who don’t suffer from celiac disease, gluten isn’t inherently bad, and gluten-free foods aren’t inherently healthy,” he says.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and hepatologist with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and enteropathy; and esophageal disorders, particularly esophageal functional disorders, particularly reflux, and the detection of atypical reflux.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
Health Notes: Mayo Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s now open
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s has opened. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare Florida Times-Union newspaper logobrings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the St. Vincent’s Medical Center Riverside campus. Mayo Clinic is staffing the facility with physicians from its Department of Hematology/Oncology. St. Vincent’s is assuming the remaining clinical and administrative responsibilities. The cancer services include medical oncology, an infusion center for chemotherapy, and multidisciplinary disease specialized care for various types of cancer. An official blessing and dedication ceremony will be held Monday.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Previous coverage in October 21, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To deliver Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked comprehensive cancer care to more people in Northeast Florida, the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center located at St. Vincent’s Riverside will open to patients on Oct. 17. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a part ofAscension, the nation’s largest Catholic and non-profit health system, brings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. “We are excited to launch this community collaboration and we look forward to further meeting the needs of cancer patients, right here in their own community,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida.  “This community collaboration will enable patients to receive cancer care at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s and come to Mayo’s San Pablo Road campus when they need highly complex care, such as bone marrow transplants.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Wall Street Journal
Boy’s Cardiac Death Led to Misuse of Genetic Test, Study Says
by Ron Winslow

A 13-year-old boy’s sudden cardiac death led doctors to wrongly diagnose more than 20 of his relatives with a potentially lethal heart disorder in a case that illustrates the potential for genetic testing to go wrong… The search for a genetic cause of the teenager’s death was done with “goodWSJ Banner intentions,” said Michael Ackerman, a cardiologist and director of the Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But “the entire clinical evaluation was a train wreck, where wrong conclusions led to wrong turns and resulted in wrong therapies.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: The sudden death of a 13-year-old boy resulted in more than 20 relatives to be incorrectly diagnosed as having a potentially lethal heart rhythm condition. This erroneous diagnosis occurred as a result of inappropriate use of genetic testing and incorrect interpretation of genetic test results, according to Mayo Clinic research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. This case highlights the potential danger of genetic testing when it is used incorrectly and the great need to not only use this powerful tool carefully and wisely but to scrutinize the results with great caution, says senior author Michael J. Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D., genetic cardiologist and director of Mayo Clinic’s Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory. “While the technological advances in genetic sequencing have been exponential, our ability to interpret the results has not kept pace,” he says. More information cane be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Additional coverage: STAT, CNN, Immortal NewsKIMT, Raw Story, Science Daily, Cardiovascular Business, Healthcare Business News, GenomeWeb, FOX News, Motherboard, News4JaxBecker’s Health IT & CIO Review, The Scientist

Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: ActionNewsJax, advisory board, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, ASU, bad breath, Becker's ASC Review, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, caffeine, Cannon Falls Beacon, Cardiovascular Business


October 7th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

New York Times
Men Get Osteoporosis, Too
by Jane E. Brody

Men remain inadequately tested and treated after low-trauma fractures “even though their risk of a subsequent fracture is markedly increased,” said Dr. Sundeep Khosla, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, echoing Dr. Adler’s concerns. In fact, Dr. Khosla said, thereThe New York Times newspaper logo is now evidence that even following a “high-trauma fracture,” as might happen in a car accident, they should have the strength of their bones checked. “Just because men escape the sudden bone loss women experience at menopause, that doesn’t mean men don’t lose bone as they get older,” he said.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Sundeep Khosla, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Khosla's research focuses on the mechanisms of age-related bone loss, sex steroid regulation of bone metabolism and the detrimental effects of diabetes mellitus on bone. Dr. Khosla's research group in his Osteoporosis and Bone Biology Laboratory is examining how fundamental aging mechanisms in bone lead to increased skeletal fragility.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

KIMT
Public granted rare access to the Historic Plummer Building
by DeeDee Stiepan

This weekend, the public will be granted access to areas of Mayo Clinic that few people have seen. On Saturday, an open house at the Historic Plummer Building will bKIMT LOGOe held from 10:00am-2:00pm.“We have an amazing library, we have the room named in honor of Dr. Plummer filled with beautiful paneling, plastered ceilings, oil paintings of the founders,” explains Matthew Dacy, the Director of Heritage Hall the Museum at Mayo Clinic. “These are things never before open to the public and so we want everyone to come in and enjoy the beauty and significance of this wonderful building.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage:
KIMTPlummer’s political past

Context: Mayo Clinic’s annual Heritage Days took place Oct. 1-7. The festivities were held across all Mayo Clinic locations. This year’s theme, “Defining Innovation,” places special emphasis on the career and life of Henry Plummer, M.D. Heritage Days’ mission is to thank all members of the Mayo Clinic community for their tireless efforts in offering the best care and service to patients. The week is also a time to reflect on Mayo’s history and values. More information about Heritage Days can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

HealthDay
Certain Parents More Likely to Skip Kids' Flu Shot
by Amy Norton

Researchers found that of nearly 9,000 U.S. kids, those who'd received certain alternative therapies were one-quarter to 39 percent less likely to have gotten a flu shot in the past year. The findings do not prove a cause-and-effect connection, however. No one knows whether any alternativeHealth Day Logo medicine providers advised parents against having their kids vaccinated, said Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious disease expert who was not involved in the study. But, he added, some alternative-therapy practitioners do tend to "reject certain aspects of evidence-based medicine." So it's possible they sometimes influence parents' decisions on flu vaccination, said Poland, a spokesperson for the Infectious Diseases Society of America and a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn.

Additional coverage: CBS News, KTTC

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Reader’s Digest
7 Silent Signs You Could Have Endometriosis
by Colette House

During retrograde menstruation, endometrial cells get out of the uterus through the fallopian tubes and implant on tissues inside the abdomen, says Gretchen Glaser, MD, a physician in gynecologic surgery at Reader's Digest LogoMayo Clinic in Minnesota. Pay attention to these endometriosis symptoms and talk to your doctor if you’re concerned. “When women find that they have to stay home from school or they have to stay home from work, they’re vomiting, or that they can’t function essentially during their period, that’s a good time to get checked out,” says Glaser. These are other unusual menstrual cycle symptoms to watch for.

Reach Reader's Digest has more than three million readers each month and its website has more than 2.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Gretchen Glaser, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic gynecologic surgeon.

Contact: Kelly Reller

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Tags: Allyn Kakuk, Alzforum, antidepressants, AOL, arrhythmia, Barron News-Shield, Becker’s Hospital Review, biorepository, bipolar biobank, body fat, Botox, brain cancer


September 2nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

WESA Pittsburgh
St. Clair Hospital Brings A Virtual Mayo Clinic To Its Patients
by Mark Nootbaar

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. is known for employing doctors with highly refined subspecialties, and now St. Clair Hospital doctors can tap into that expertise. An agreement between the two hospitals, finalized this week, will allow St. Clair doctors to access eTumor Boards – a virtual version of tumor board reviews, in which multiple doctors brainstorm ways to treat an individual patient.  “There are certainlyPittsburgh NPR station cancers that affect millions of people in the United States but there are also cancers like sarcoma, which might be more on the order of a couple thousand a year,” said Mayo Clinic Medical Director of Provider Relations Ryan Uitti.

Reach:  WESA is a southwestern Pennsylvania’s only independent public radio news and information station. The station targets listeners, ages 18 to 64 and its website receives more than 171,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Post BulletinKROC AMMSN, Pittsburgh Business Times, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Tribune-Review, Observer-Reporter, seattlepi.com, KDKA Pittsburgh, Washington Times

Context:  St. Clair Hospital is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a growing national network of independent health care providers committed to serving patients and their families through clinical collaboration. St. Clair Hospital remains independent and locally governed. Under this formal agreement, St. Clair Hospital has access to the latest Mayo Clinic knowledge and promotes clinical collaboration between physicians to benefit patients. The goal of St. Clair Hospital and Mayo Clinic is to help patients get answers to complex medical questions while staying close to home. “St. Clair is proud to be selected as the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network,” says James M. Collins, president and CEO of St. Clair Hospital. “This clinical collaboration with Mayo – unique in western Pennsylvania – is rooted in our common philosophy. It will provide our physicians the expertise of Mayo Clinic to assist them as they treat challenging medical cases – at no additional cost to patients and insurers.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post

Why Aren’t More Parents Vaccinating Their Kids Against Cancer?
by Erin Schumaker

The HPV vaccine got off to a rough start. For starters, the vaccine was originally only tested on and approved for girls and women. The vaccine wasn’t approved for boys until 2009, three years after it was Huffington Post Logointroduced, and wasn’t recommended for boys until 2011, according to NPR. “That was a terrible mistake,” Dr. Gregory Poland, who heads up Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group and serves as editor-in-chief of the journal Vaccine, told The Huffington Post. “It pretends that only women get or acquire the disease and that simply isn’t true.”

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo’s Kogod Center On Aging Spawning Spinoffs, Breakthrough Research
by Don Jacobson

The same Mayo Clinic lab that earlier this year spawned a buzzworthy anti-aging startup firm has recorded another research breakthrough connecting “senescent” human cells to age-related maladies—in this case, osteoarthritis. The Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging at Mayo Clinic is the home of researchers Jan van Deursen and Dr. James Kirkland (its director). They and colleagues have been investigating the roleTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo played in the aging process by senescent cells—living cells that have stopped reproducing due to age or damage.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context:  Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells – cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age – negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects. “Cellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‘emergency brake’ used by damaged cells to stop dividing,” says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. “While halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‘emergency brake’ has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.” More information on Mayo Clinic's aging research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Megan Forliti

 

News4Jax
Father with ALS hopes 'Ice Bucket Challenge' continues
by Joy Purdy

The millions of people who helped participate in the 2014 "Ice Bucket Challenge" helped raise more than a $100 million to fund ALS research. Since that summer of 2014, two major discoveries have brought News Jax 4 Logoresearchers like Mayo Clinic's local Neurogeneticist Dr. Rosa Rademakers closer to understanding how the disease attacks the body. The more dollars donated will allow for more extensive the research, like ways to predict the disease before it strikes. "Identify individuals who are at risk of developing the disease, even before they have any symptoms," explained Rademakers. "Or, it will allow us to be able to say who will have a fast disease progression or slow disease progression. These are very important things that we're still working on."

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. This Week in Jacksonville is a weekly public affairs program on WJXT.

Context: Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D., a neurogeneticist on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus,  receiveed one of the highest honors in neuroscience: the 2016 Potamkin Prize for Research in Pick’s, Alzheimer’s and Related Diseases. The $100,000 prize is an internationally recognized tribute for advancing dementia research. It recognizes major contributions to the understanding of the causes, prevention, treatment and cure for Pick's, Alzheimer's and related diseases. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Wall Street Journal
Don’t Wait Until You’re Older to Fight Getting Old
by Sumathi Reddy

One of the hallmarks of aging is sarcopenia, which is the progressive loss of skeletal muscle that starts in the 30s, says Nathan LeBrasseur, associate professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.  It becomes noticeable in the late 30s and early 40s, when losing weight often becomes more difficult, he says. The loss of muscle mass happens at a rate of about 10% per decade, he says, whileWSJ Banner muscle strength and power—the ability to generate force over time—declines even more dramatically. Dr. LeBrasseur says this may go beyond muscle loss, and be related to impaired brain signals and changes to the circulatory system.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Nathan LeBrasseur, Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic researcher and is affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. More information about his work can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO CBS
Good Question: Why Are Knee Injuries So Common?
By Heather Brown

The Minnesota Vikings announced Tuesday that starting quarterback Teddy Bridgewater has a complete tear in his ACL— the anterior cruciate ligament. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says it is WCCO logothe most common kind of knee injury, with more than 200,000 of them reported every year. “The knee is particularly vulnerable because it transmits all of the forces from the ground up to the body,” said Dr. Nancy Cummings, an orthopedic surgeon at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional Coverage:

KARE11, What is the anterior cruciate ligament, ACL? by Adrienne Broaddus — Dr. Nancy Cummings,  Mayo Clinic's Orthopedic surgeon and head physician for the Minnesota Lynx says the , restrains the knee from going into an abnormal position where other structures can get injured in the knee. "The ACL's purpose is to prevent your lower leg from moving forward on your upper leg when you do motion with your knee," she said. "A tear to your ACL is pretty serious. What it does is it puts other structures in knee at risk. It increases your risk of arthritis down the line."

Context: Nancy Cummings, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine physician.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

MPR
Mayo Clinic surgeon: Vikings' Bridgewater faces long recovery from knee injury

The Minnesota Vikings play the Los Angeles Rams Thursday night in a preseason game. It will be the team's first game since starting quarterback Teddy Bridgewater was injured during practice this week. Bridgewater dislocated his left knee and tore his ACL during non-contact drills on Tuesday. He'll have surgery soon and is expected to miss the remainder of the season. To find out more about the injury andMPR News logo how an athlete recovers from it, MPR's Cathy Wurzer spoke with Dr. Michael Stuart. He's an orthopedic surgeon specializing in knee injuries at the Mayo Clinic and the co-director of their sports medicine.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Star Tribune
NFL players with ACL injuries face uncertain recovery, shortened careers
by Jeremy Olson

Medical advances have made it possible for injured athletes such as Vikings quarterback Teddy Bridgewater to return from dislocated knees and ligament tears, according to physicians interviewed Wednesday, but Star Tribune Logothey nonetheless face long and uncertain roads to recovery… Improvements in surgical techniques and post-surgery rehab have turned a surefire career-ending injury into something that athletes such as Bridgewater can overcome, said Timothy Hewett, who directs the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Research Center. “Twenty-five years ago, they would have cast him and he would have come back with a bunch of scarring, and it would have taken months to decrease the stiffness in the joint. We know now that you immediately move it.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Tim Hewett, Ph.D. is Mayo Clinic sports medicine director of research, biomechanics. Dr. Hewett's research optimizes sports performance through a three-prong model he has developed. He expects to refine it at Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center so that it can be applied across the life span, from grade-school children to pro athletes to senior citizens.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

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Tags: Ability Learning Center, ACL, actigraphy, aging, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, American Journal of Managed Care, AZ Big Media, back to school, Becker’s Hospital Review, body donation


August 26th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 


AP
Pros to Joes: Elite Athlete Training for the Corporate World
 by Dave Campbell

Kyle Rudolph's two most productive seasons for the Minnesota Vikings were also those in which he played every game, not coincidentally. After all the surgeries, crutches and rehab, Rudolph has found a training program to supplement team-supervised workouts that has contributed to theAssociated Press Wire Service Logo durability he's long sought to establish. The sturdiness of his body at age 26 has become equally important as the agility and strength needed to thrive as an NFL tight end in the prime of his career. "It's all about playing 16 games," said Rudolph, who found his happy place in downtown Minneapolis at the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center through a joint venture with the specialized performance training firm EXOS … "The elite athlete is the beacon that gets all the attention, but those same principles trickle down to how we treat every athlete," said Dr. Ed Laskowski, the co-director of Mayo's sports medicine operation.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional coverage: FOX Sports, ABC News, USA Today, NY Times, Star Tribune, Washington Post, Salon, Centre Daily Times, Kansas City Star, Charlotte Observer, The Daily Progress

Context: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries. Edward Laskowski, M.D. is co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Buzzfeed
How Katie Ledecky Stacks Up Against Male Swimmers
by Peter Aldhous

Katie Ledecky blew away the competition in Rio de Janeiro, and was the standout racer of the 2016 Olympics. She won three individual golds, BuzzFeed Logoplus another gold and a silver in the relays. But it was her world records, and the margins of her victories, that really got people talking. Ledecky set world-best times in the 400- and 800-meter freestyle finals — winning that second race by more than 11 seconds. As she cuts through the water, Ledecky’s form is close to perfection. “I think her stroke is just really, really good,” Michael Joyner, an exercise physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, told BuzzFeed News. “Watch her hands: There are very few bubbles.”

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Additional coverage:

Business Insider, 8 of the most impressive Olympic feats of all time

Previous coverage in August 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in August 12, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

 

12News Arizona
US swimmer ignites interest in unusual chest condition
by Pete Scholz

It was June 2016, right after Cody Miller, 24, qualified for the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. It was then he shared with the world what he had been dealing with for the past 10 years or so.   The pictures he posted showed his noticeably sunken sternum -- the telltale symptom of a!2 News Arizona Logo condition known as pectus excavatum --"pectus" for short. From an operating theater at Mayo Clinic in north Phoenix, Dr. Dawn Jaroszewski pointed to a screen with two CT scans. "If you look at the normal chest, you have this rounded curvature," she indicated, "and on the pectus patient, you can see how the front of the chest collapses down," she added.

Reach: 12 News is KPNX, Phoenix, an NBC affiliate in the 12th-largest market in the country. The newscasts reach about 2 million viewers each day.

Context: Dawn Jaroszewski, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiac surgeon. Pectus excavatum is a condition in which a person's breastbone is sunken into his or her chest. In severe cases, pectus excavatum can look as if the center of the chest has been scooped out, leaving a deep dent. Pectus excavatum can be surgically repaired, but surgery is usually reserved for people who have moderate to severe signs and symptoms. People who have mild signs and symptoms may be helped by physical therapy. Certain exercises can improve posture and increase the degree to which the chest can expand.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Tags: 12News Arizona, ABC News, antibiotic resistance, AP, Assurex Health, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, back to school, blood sugar, Bradenton Herald, Business Insider, BuzzFeed, Cancer


August 12th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Buzzfeed
What You Should Know About Zika If You’re Going To The Olympics
by Anthony Rivas

So much so that athletes from around the world — mostly golfers, but also basketball players and cyclists — have given up their chance at winning gold over concerns that they might get infected. Meanwhile, lots of other spectators getting ready to fly down are probably wondering,BuzzFeed Logo “Is it really worth the risk?” …For men and women who don’t plan on having kids anytime soon, “the impact of the Zika virus on you is probably going to be very minimal,” Tosh said. In fact, about 80% of people who become infected “have absolutely no symptoms whatsoever.”

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Additional coverage:
HealthDay, Zika Won't Pose Risks at the Olympics: Health Experts
Hospitals & Health Networks, Clinical Vaccine Trials Underway; Rio Olympics See Few Mosquitoes by Matt O’Connor

Context: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an emergency travel advisory after health officials in Florida identified local transmission of Zika virus in a Miami neighborhood. The CDC advisory recommends pregnant women and their partners avoid nonessential travel to Lynwood, a neighborhood in Miami, Florida where the Zika virus is active. Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh says, "It is somewhat unprecedented for a travel advisory to be issued to a very specific neighborhood. That's a testament to the strength of the epidemiology that has been going on, and how well the CDC and other health authorities have been working at this." More information, including a video interview with Dr. Tosh, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Deb Balzer

 

Chicago Tribune
Dirty baby: Just how clean does your child need to be?
by Bill Daley

Cleanliness may be next to godliness, or so the old rhyme scolded us, but is it healthiest — particularly for babies and children? "People are very Chicago Tribune Logoconcerned, almost preoccupied, with their child touching a surface that is not clean," said Dr. Angela C. Mattke, a pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn. "Early exposure to their environment full of germs, bacteria and viruses is not a bad thing." "Not everything a child touches should be sterilized," she added. "You don't have to wash their hands every time."

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: Angela Mattke, M.D. is a pediatrician with Mayo Children's Center which is rated in all US News & World Report pediatric specialty categories and is the only children’s hospital in the five-state region to rank in all 10 specialties.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Chicago Tribune
Crawling: The next best core workout?
by Alison Bowen

Your next best exercise doesn't involve equipment, running, jumping or even standing. "Make the floor your friend," says Danielle Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn. As a working mom, Johnson is always looking for ways toChicago Tribune Logo challenge exercise norms. "We're looking for things that are a little outside of the box sometimes," she said. Crawling is one of those things. She said it's an "amazing core exercise" that also benefits the legs, shoulders, arms and chest.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. The program is research-driven around diet, exercise and resiliency, and, when all of these are connected, they encompass the power needed to make sustainable changes. For more information, visit https://healthyliving.mayoclinic.org/.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wall Street Journal
At the Rio Olympics, Women Athletes Bump Against a Gold Ceiling
by Kevin Helliker and Matthew Futterman

Sports scientists say there is no physiological reason for shortening courses for female athletes or, for that matter, games such as tennis, where women play the best out of three sets versus best of five for men. In WSJ Bannerfact, some research suggests women are built to go farther than men, if at a slower pace. While that remains unproven, the notion that women have inferior endurance capacities has been debunked. “That’s totally anachronistic,” says Michael Joyner, a former competitive marathoner who studies sports science at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Related coverage:
ABC News, Olympic Swimmer Katie Ledecky Blows Competition Out of the Water
Business Insider, Why Katie Ledecky's Olympic world record Sunday night is even more amazing than you think
Business Insider, Here's an exact breakdown of why 6'4" Michael Phelps has the perfect body for swimming
Business Insider, The internet is driving athletes to do crazy things no one knew were possible
Tech Insider, People are stronger and faster than ever before, but the reason why isn’t what you think

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

TIME
What Is Cupping? Here’s What You Need to Know
by Alexandra Sifferlin

…There is a difference between how cupping is practiced in traditional Chinese medicine and how it is used in Western medicine, says Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. Bauer says a traditional Chinese medicine practitioner would likely offer cupping as part of a larger integrative health check, which might include recommendations around nutrition and otherTime magazine logo health things, and not just as a one-off therapy. “It’s kind of an American phenomena, I think, to consider cupping by itself,” he says.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
HealthDayDoes 'Cupping' = Success for Olympic Athletes?
Live ScienceMichael Phelps' Weird Bruises: Does Cupping Therapy Really Work?
Jakarta Post, Phelps puts spotlight on cupping
CCTV-AmericaIt works for Michael Phelps, so we tried “cupping” for the first time

Context:  Brent Bauer, M,D., is director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. As director of the program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests. Since its founding in 2001, the program has promoted a collaborative spirit that enables researchers from both within and outside Mayo Clinic to share resources, ideas and expertise regarding research in this exciting realm.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO-Radio
Mayo Clinic ranks #1 in latest US News and World Report Rankings

Interview with Dr. John Noseworthy and Dave Lee.

WCCO-AM Dave LeeReach: WCCO radio, a CBS owned and operated affiliate in Minneapolis, boasts one of the largest coverage areas in the country as it reaches into portions of North and South Dakota during the day. At night, the station’s signal typically reaches across many U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

Additional coverage:
KTAR-TV, US News & World Report grades Phoenix’s Mayo Clinic top hospital in Arizona
Arizona Daily Star, U.S. News & World Report ranks Tucson hospital third in state
Healio, Mayo Clinic ranked as top hospital for neurology and neurosurgery
WIBW-TV, New ranking proves patients are in good hands at Stormont Vail Health 

Previous coverage in August 5, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic was named the best hospital in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published online today. In addition, Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in more specialties than any other hospital in the country. Mayo Clinic took the No. 1 spot in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. It also ranked No. 1 in the Phoenix metro area and in the Jacksonville metro area. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo’s New Blood Test Could Predict Chances Of Experiencing A Heart Attack
by Sam Schaust

Mayo Clinic launched a new type of blood test on Wednesday that is the first-of-its-kind in the U.S. With the new test, measurements are taken from blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids highly linked to cardiovascular disease events, such as a heart attack. It’s believed the test could even predict the chance of a cardiovascular event as much as a year before it occurs. “Through our strongTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo collaboration with Zora Biosciences, we hope our new test will improve the evaluation of individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease,” said Jeff Meeusen, co-director of Mayo’s Cardiovascular Laboratory Medicine Group.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional coverage:
Clinical Lab Products, Mayo Clinic Launches Blood Test to Assess Heart Attack Risk

Context: Mayo Clinic has launched a new type of blood test that will be used to predict adverse cardiovascular events in patients with progressing coronary artery disease (CAD). The test measures blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids that are highly linked to cardiovascular disease processes. Researchers say this test is especially useful for patients with CAD when it does not improve with treatment or for young patients with premature CAD. The new test will help clinicians identify at-risk individuals and is available to Mayo Clinic patients and health care providers worldwide through Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML). MML is the reference laboratory of Mayo Clinic, offering advanced laboratory testing and pathology services to more than 5,000 health care organizations in more than 60 countries. MML collaborated on the test with Zora Biosciences Oy, a diagnostics discovery company based in Finland that specializes in cardiovascular disease. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

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Tags: ABC News, accupuncture, Addyson Cordes, AOL News, arthritis, Astrobiology, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, Best Hospitals, blood test, brain tumor, Breast Cancer, breast microbiome


April 22nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Florida Times-Union
Renowned neurosurgeon recruited by Mayo Clinic
by Charlie Patton

Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, a brilliant neurosurgeon with a fascinating personal story, has been hired as the William J. and Charles H. Mayo Professor and chair of Neurologic Surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. “I think by any measure this is aFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo remarkably accomplished surgeon,” said Gianrico Farrugia, CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. “Any place in the world would be pleased to have him coming ... It’s a real coup to have him coming to Florida. I think he will have a remarkable impact on Jacksonville”. His recruitment is part of a strategy that Mayo in Jacksonville has been pursing for the last 15 months of increasing its status as a destination medical center for the Southeast United States and Latin America, Farrugia said.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, will join Mayo Clinic as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus in September, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Florida Times Union
Mayo Clinic researcher honored with prestigious award
by Charlie Patton

In 2011, Rademakers’ lab identified a mutation of the C9orf72 gene, which turned out to be the most common cause of both Florida Times-Union newspaper logofrontotemporal dementia and of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often called Lou Gehrig’s disease. Her lab has since discovered several genetic factors that help explain why some people with the mutation develop ALS while others develop frontotemporal dementia and still others develop both.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! News — Two Researchers to Receive $100,000 Potamkin Prize for Dementia Research

Context: Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D., a neurogeneticist on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive one of the highest honors in neuroscience: the 2016 Potamkin Prize for Research in Pick’s, Alzheimer’s and Related Diseases. The $100,000 prize is an internationally recognized tribute for advancing dementia research. It recognizes major contributions to the understanding of the causes, prevention, treatment and cure for Pick's, Alzheimer's and related diseases. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic parasite researcher is ticked off by her work
by Allie Shah

A giant plush-toy tick hovers over Dr. Bobbi Pritt from atop the high-powered microscope at her Mayo Clinic office. She pays it no mind as she examines slides of various parasites, describing each creature in a merry tone of voice. “This one is the head ofStar Tribune Variety Logo
a tapeworm that lives inside your gut,” she chirped. “It basically just gets longer and longer and it kind of just absorbs the food that you’re eating. So you’re eating for two.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Bobbi Pritt, M.D., Mayo Clinic Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, research focus is in clinical parasitology, vector-borne diseases, trainee education and appropriate test utilization. As director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory in Mayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Dr. Pritt has coordinated the development of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for multiple tick and mosquito-borne pathogens such as Plasmodium knowlesi, Borrelia mayonii, Borrelia miyamotoi, Powassan virus and chikungunya virus. She is author of the Parasite Wonders blog where she posts a weekly parasite case.  You can also learn about the ABCs of ticks on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

 

Twin Cities Business
Q&A: How Mayo Is Integrating 3D Printing Into The Operating Room
by Sam Schaust

The emerging technology is revolutionizing the way surgeons tackle complicated operations, and the practice of simulating Twin Cities Business Magazine Logosurgeries with anatomically correct, patient-specific models is becoming a tactic widely adopted by medical professionals at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. Dr. Jonathan “Jay” Morris, a diagnostic and interventional neuroradiologist, and Dr. Jane Matsumoto, a pediatric radiologist, head the organization’s burgeoning 3D printing lab. (They instead call it “the anatomical modeling lab.”)

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: Not all great advances in surgery happen in the operating room. Some are coming off the printer – a 3D printer. At Mayo Clinic, radiologists and surgeons are teaming up to discover every possible detail about complex cases before the operation. In some situations, it means patients experience less pain, shorter hospital stays and quicker recoveries. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Ethan Grove, Dennis Douda

 

Post Bulletin
Mayo Clinic doctor wins award for MS research
by Brett Boese

A Mayo Clinic doctor will be honored this week in Canada for her groundbreaking research on multiple sclerosis. Dr. Claudia Lucchinetti will be given the 2016 John Dystel Prize for MS Research Tuesday at the American Academy of Neurology annualLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper meeting in Vancouver. She'll be given $15,000 for the award, the second time a Mayo doctor has been honored by the group since its inception in 1995.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: Claudia Lucchinetti, M.D., will be awarded the 2016 John Dystel Prize for Multiple Sclerosis Research for her outstanding contributions to understanding and treating multiple sclerosis. Dr. Lucchinetti is one of only a few neurologists in the world with expertise in neuroinflammation, and her research has led to paradigm shifts in our understanding of central nervous system demyelinating diseases over the past two decades. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: 3D printing lab, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC15's Rally for Red, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's Prevention Registry, amyloid beta production, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), anatomical modeling lab, AOL News, Aol.On


April 1st, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Cancer Treatment’s New Direction
by Ron Winslow

Evan Johnson had battled a cold for weeks, endured occasional nosebleeds and felt so fatigued he struggled to finish his workouts at the gym. But it was the unexplained bruises and chest pain that ultimately sent the then 23-year-old senior at theWSJ Banner University of North Dakota to the Mayo Clinic. There a genetic test revealed a particularly aggressive form of acute myeloid leukemia..…Dr. Kasi and his Mayo colleagues—Naseema Gangat, a hematologist, and Shahrukh Hashmi, a transplant specialist—are among the authors of an account of Mr. Johnson’s case published in January in the journal Leukemia Research Reports.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Naseema Gangat, M.B.B.S., is a Mayo Clinic hematologist, Shahrukh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic hematologist and transplant specialist and Pashtoon Kasi is a Mayo oncology fellow. Evan Johnson’s case was published in the the journal Leukemia Research Reports and is an example of Mayo Clinic’s multidisciplinary-team based care approach. 

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

New York Times
On C.T.E. and Athletes, Science Remains in Its Infancy
by Benedict Carey

In the best study to determine risk so far, published in December, a research team at a Mayo Clinic bank in Jacksonville found The New York Times newspaper logoC.T.E. in 21 of 66 brains of people who had played contact sports. It found no evidence of the disorder in 198 people with no record of playing such sports. But the authors said they had no way to know whether those 21 former athletes had symptoms linked to C.T.E.; some had other neurological disorders as well when they died. “These are very early days, and we badly need larger studies, that include both athletes and nonathletes,” said Dr. Dennis Dickson, the study’s senior author.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Related coverage:

Washington Post — Dale Earnhardt Jr. plans to donate his brain for concussion research

Previous coverage in March 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth. About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic will begin construction on two new buildings, costing $100 million, this year
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville announced Tuesday that it will begin $100 million in major construction projects this year. It will begin construction this summer on what Mayo officials are calling “a destination medical building” that will provideFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo integrated services for complex cancers, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. The 150,000-square-foot building will have four stories with the potential to add 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit in the first year after the building opens.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

WJXT-TV Jacksonville — Mayo Clinic announces $100M expansion;  WOKV-RadioJacksonville Daily Record, Jacksonville Business Journal, First Coast News, Twin Cities Business, WOKV-TV Florida

Context: Advancing its position as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience. This summer, Mayo Clinic will begin constructing an innovative destination medical building that will provide integrated services needed for complex cancer, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. Initially rising four stories, the 150,000-square-foot building has the potential for 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit the first year the building opens. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Fast Company
Mayo Clinic Technology Said To Alleviate Nausea From VR
by Dahniel Terdiman

VR sickness could soon be a thing of the past, thanks to new technology developed at the famed Mayo Clinic. Today, the clinic Fast Companyannounced that it has licensed its patented galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) technology to the Los Angeles-based entertainment company vMocion. GVS is aimed at helping to alleviate the nausea problem many people have when using virtual reality systems. The idea is to incorporate GVS into a platform, known as 3v—which stands for virtual, vestibular, and visual—into VR and augmented reality systems, giving users what they call a three-dimensional movement experience.

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Additional coverage: Forbes, Electronic Specifier, Engadget, (e) Science News, Digital Journal, Tech Crunch

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Mocion, LLC, an entertainment technology company, today announced it is making available Mayo Clinic’s patented Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation (GVS) technology specifically for use in virtual reality and augmented reality. vMocion’s 3v™ Platform (which stands for virtual, vestibular and visual) incorporates this patented GVS technology, which adds a complete sense of three-dimensional movement for the first time into a virtual reality or augmented reality environment. vMocion has been granted the exclusive, global, perpetual license for Mayo Clinic’s GVS patents and algorithms within all media and entertainment categories and will offer the 3v Platform to other media and entertainment companies through a licensing agreement. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: "MoodCheck", acute myeloid leukemia, AdWeek, Albuquerque Journal, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Anesthesiology News, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, benchmarks of good health, bioengineer replacement tissue, bladder cancer, BLR.com


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