Items Tagged ‘concussion’

August 28th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Star Tribune
Mayo offers at-home colon cancer test; stool sample goes in the mail
by Paul Walsh and Jeremy Olson

Patients often plead they’ll do anything to avoid a colonoscopy for cancer screening. Now doctors at the Mayo Clinic have an alternative that will put that sentiment to the test. Mayo officials announcedStar Tribune newspaper logo Monday they will be the first in the United States to offer patients the Cologuard test, by which patients collect their stool samples and mail them in sealed containers for DNA analysis of their colon cancer risks.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

 

KSTP
Mayo Offers At-Home Colonoscopy Alternative

It's the test no one wants but everyone needs, at least until now. Doctors at the Mayo Clinic will be the first to offer the Cologuard test, which they say is a new alternative to getting a colonoscopy. Basically, KSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logpatients taking the Cologuard test would collect their own stool samples and mail them in for analysis. "Patients can do this test in the comfort and convenience of their own home, and only those patients who have positive tests would be asked to undergo a follow-up diagnostic colonoscopy," said Dr. John Kisiel, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

 

WCCO
Mayo Clinic To Offer At-Home Test For Colon Cancer

It’s called Cologuard and in the privacy of your bathroom at home, you can use it to collect a stool sample and mail it in for analysis. “The most important advance and why this test is really revolutionaryCBS Minnesota is that this will allow a larger percentage of the population that needs screening to undergo screening,” said Dr. Vijay Shah, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional Coverage:

Star Tribune, Steve Sack editorial cartoon: Mayo Clinic Home Colon Cancer Test

Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic to discuss new screening test, Mayo Clinic and Exact Sciences Corp. have scheduled a Monday audio conference with journalists to discuss a product called Cologuard "a stool DNA test for colorectal cancer screening."…Mayo gives no specifics about its Monday news conference. But it has previously noted online that an "ideal screening test would be noninvasive and affordable; require no bowel prep, medication restriction or diet change; and would detect neoplasms on both sides of the colorectum with high accuracy."

Post BulletinMayo Clinic first to offer screening for colorectal cancer, By Jeff Hansel, Mayo Clinic announced today that it will become the first health-care organization to offer newly FDA-approved screening tests for colorectal cancer, the second-leading cancer killer in the U.S.

BringMeTheNews, Quick Bite: 3 stories to read over lunch, The Mayo Clinic will be the first health center in the nation to offer patients a mail-in stool sample test that is an alternative to a colonoscopy. The new procedure, called the Cologuard test, got FDA approval earlier this month. It was co-invented by a Mayo gastroenterologist. The test will be available by prescription. 

Star Tribune, Readers Write: Mayo’s policy sensitive to conflicts of interest, In response to the Aug. 27 letter “Cologuard test isn’t just a Mayo product”: The Mayo Clinic receives no royalties when a Mayo patient is prescribed the Cologuard test. Mayo will receive royalties when other providers prescribe the test outside of the Mayo Clinic. This arrangement is consistent with our robust policies governing conflict of interest at Mayo.

Star Tribune, Reader’s Write: Cologuard test isn’t just a Mayo product,…The story also reported that a Mayo doctor is co-inventor of Cologuard. But it didn’t report that under a license agreement with Exact Sciences in Madison, Wis., the doctor and Mayo “share in equity and royalties” for the test kit. Mayo is a fine and respected clinic, but there are many quality primary-care doctors and centers far closer to interested patients that, unlike Mayo, don’t have a direct revenue motive for prescribing Cologuard.

Kansas City Star (AP), Mayo Clinic to offer at-home colon cancer test, Doctors at the Mayo Clinic are offering a new way for patients to be tested for colon cancer. The Star Tribune (http://strib.mn/1tPcCY3 ) reports officials announced Monday the Rochester clinic will be the nation's first to provide patients with a new at-home colon cancer test. The Cologuard test recently won government approval as the first such test that uses patients' DNA to detect warning signs in stool samples.

CBS DC, CBS Baltimore, Medical Product Outsourcing,KAAL, Twin Cities Business, AP, La Crosse Tribune, Wichita Eagle, MinnPost, Yahoo! NewsYahoo! Finance, Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal, MarketWatch, StreetInsider, Wisconsin State JournalArizona Republic, Sacramento Bee, EndoNurse, Wisconsin Radio Network

Context: Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) today announced that Mayo Clinic will be the first health system to offer Cologuard®, the first and only Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved, noninvasive stool DNA screening test for colorectal cancer. Cologuard will be available to patients through their primary care physicians at Mayo Clinic.

cologuardAvailable by prescription only, Cologuard offers people 50 years and older who are at average risk for colorectal cancer an easy to use screening test which they can do in the privacy of their own home. It is the first noninvasive screening test for colorectal cancer that analyzes both stool-based DNA and blood biomarkers to detect cancer and precancer. The Cologuard technology platform was co-developed by Exact Sciences Corp. and Mayo Clinic as part of a broad, exclusive collaboration. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic president and CEO accepts Ice Bucket Challenge

Mayo Clinic president and CEO, Dr. John Noseworthy, took part in the Ice Bucket Challenge this week after being nominated by KTTC reporter, Mike Sullivan. Video of Dr. Noseworthy accepting theKTTC TV logo challenge appeared on YouTube (http://youtu.be/OMq_Yrn2YYk). The Ice Bucket Challenge helps raise awareness and support for ALS research.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Related Coverage:

KAAL, Amid Ice Bucket Challenges is the Real Challenge for Families Battling ALS by Jenna Lohse, Dumping cold water over your head to raise millions of dollars for ALS research seems to be all the rage in recent weeks, but sometimes we forget why we're doing things. What is ALS and how does it feel to live through it every day? Ernie Faulkner never would have dreamed to be taking care of his bed-ridden wife at just 63 years old…His wife Linda was diagnosed with ALS in 2011. They traveled from South Carolina to Mayo Clinic, but Linda is now in hospice care, with little time left. "It can't be long I don't see, unless there's a miracle of biblical proportions,” said Faulkner…"This disease is devastating, for individuals many of the people who it's affected are in the prime of their lives,” said Dr. Eric Sorensen, Medical Director of Mayo's ALS Center.

Context: To help raise awareness and support for ALS research, John Noseworthy, M.D.Mayo Clinic president and CEO, braved the shower of icy water and took part in the Ice Bucket Challenge this week. Dr. Noseworthy was nominated by reporter, Mike Sullivan, at KTTC News, the local NBC News affiliate in Rochester, Minn., to take part in the challenge. Though he was miles away in Canada on vacation, Dr. Noseworthy didn’t hesitate to pledge his support to ALS research and take the challenge. Learn more about ALS research at Mayo Clinic.

Other Dr. Noseworthy-Related Media Coverage:

Twin Cities Business, Three MN Leaders Among ‘Most Influential People In Health Care’ by Stephen Montemayor, Three Minnesotans this week made a publication’s annual “100 Most Influential People in Health Care” list, led by UnitedHealth Group CEO Stephen Hemsley ranking in the top five…The health care publication also ranked Mayo Clinic President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy 16th while Rulon Stacey, president and CEO of Minneapolis-based Fairview Health Services, came in at 87th.

Post Bulletin, Magazine: Noseworthy 16th most influential in healthcare, Modern Healthcare magazine lists Dr. John Noseworthy, president and chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic, as one of the 100 most influential people in healthcare. It is the 13th annual publication of the list, which Modern Healthcare put together after receiving more than 15,000 nomination submissions this year. A story announcing the ranking was posted on the magazine's website Saturday.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley LucksteinDuska Anastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

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Tags: A.L.S., ACA, ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, AP, Arizona Republic, bladder cancer, BringMeTheNews, Business Insider, Cardio3, CBS Baltimore, CBS DC, CBS News


May 15th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


NY Times
AGING AMERICA: Exercise as the Fountain of Youth

…Exercise may be the closest thing we have to a fountain of youth, one of the best ways to age happy and well. "The mantra now is, exercise is a drug" — able, like some medications

The New York Times newspaper logo are, to prevent and treat a host of age-related ailments, said Dr. Andrea Cheville, a Mayo Clinic expert on exercise in the elderly.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Star Tribune (AP), KAAL, ABC News, Huffington Post Canada, Monterey Herald, Ottawa Citizen

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is an expert on exercise in the elderly.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KSTP
On the Road with Jason Davis: Mayo Clinic Celebrates 150 Years

KSTP's Jason Davis goes on the road to Arizona, Florida and Minnesota fKSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logor his feature on Mayo Clinic. This was Davis's last report for his On the Road series before retiring at the end of May 2014 after nearly four decades with KSTP.  This year, one of Minnesota's best known institutions celebrates its 150th anniversary. It was in 1864 that Dr. William Worral Mayo started his small clinic in Rochester, and just how that small practice grew into a world-renowned facility is a fascinating story. Jason Davis went on the road to learn about the past, present and future of Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Additional Mayo Clinic 150th Anniversary and history of Mayo coverage:

KTTC, Mayo Clinic celebrates 150 years by Courtney Sturgeon

KARE11, Recovering Brokaw hosts Mayo's 150th anniversary 

KTTC, The early beginnings of the Mayo Clinic Mid-century advancements, Recent history

KTTC, Dr. John Noseworthy reflects on 150 years of Mayo Clinic success 

MPR, Mayo's mark: 5 innovations that changed health care 

Post-Bulletin, Jordanian king touched many in Rochester 

Post-Bulletin, Descendants of Dr. W.W. Mayo visit family home 

Post-Bulletin, Massive medical team focused 'millimeter by millimeter' to separate twins 

Post-Bulletin, 150th anniversary: Mayo Clinic helped U.S., allies win World War II 

Post-BulletinOddchester: 150 years in less than three hours

Greenhouse Grower, Mayo Clinic Will Promote Coreopsis ‘Electric Avenue’ As Its Flower Of Hope

Perishable NewsMayo Clinic Chooses Yellow Coreopsis As Its 'Flower Of Hope'

WCCO, Star Tribune, Big News Network, WCCO AM, Coon Rapids Herald, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin

Context: On July 1, 1907, Dr. Henry Plummer and Mabel Root, Dr. Plummer's assistant, inaugurated Mayo's system of patient registration and medical record keeping. The single-unit record was central to the new system. It brought together all of a patient's records -- clinical visits, hospital stays, laboratory tests and notes -- in a single file that traveled with the patient and was stored in a central repository. This simple system quickly became the standard for medical record keeping around the world. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Rebecca Eisenman, Kelley Luckstein

 

FOX47
Mayo Clinic announces campaign to raise $3 billion
by Mary McGuire

Mayo Clinic is looking to the future in a big way as it launches a camFox 47 TV station logopaign to raise $3 billion. It's all part of the "You are ... the campaign for Mayo Clinic" being announced Thursday. The goal of the campaign is to raise $3 billion by the end of 2017 to strengthen patient care, research and education at Mayo.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Becker’s Hospital Review, KROC-AM

Previous coverage

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care, Mayo Clinic today announced a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on the Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic trial: Massive blast of measles vaccine wipes out cancer
by Dan Browning

Stacy Erholtz was out of conventional treatment options for blood cancer last June when she underwent an exStar Tribune Health newspaper logoperimental trial at the Mayo Clinic that injected her with enough measles vaccine to inoculate 10 million people. The 50-year-old Pequot Lakes mother is now part of medical history…But the experiment provides the “proof of concept” that a single, massive dose of intravenous viral therapy can kill cancer by overwhelming its natural defenses, according to Dr. Stephen Russell, a professor of molecular medicine who spearheaded the research at Mayo.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
KARE11Minn. woman's cancer in remission thanks to measles 

Washington Post, Woman’s cancer killed by measles virus in unprecedented trial

MPR, How the Mayo Clinic handles potential patients in clinical trials

USA TODAY, Massive dose of measles vaccine clears woman's cancer

WGN-TV, Mayo Clinic: Woman’s cancer cured with huge dose of measles vaccine

International Business Times UK, Mayo Clinic Landmark Trial: Measles Vaccine Wipes out Cancer in Patient

Daily BeastMeasles Vaccine Killed Patient's Cancer

MashableMeasles Vaccine Wipes Out Cancer in Groundbreaking Test

UPI.com, Massive dose of measles vaccine knocks out woman's cancer

azcentral.comMeasles vaccine cures woman's cancer in study

Reuters, CNN, International Business Times, La Parisienne (France), Le Monde (France), Telegraph (UK), Globe and Mail, Fox 19 (OH), Examiner, Detroit Free Press, Green Bay Press Gazette, ABC 15 Arizona, Fox News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, News 4 Jax, L’Economiste, 11 Alive Atlanta, Le Figaro (France), Yahoo! France, Le Huffington Post, ABC.es (Spain), Access Atlanta, Honolulu Star-Advertiser, Yahoo! Health, Business Standard India, France 24, Yahoo! News UK & Ireland (AFP), Yahoo! MexicoKTTCNational PostDaily MailThe BlazeThe Daily BeastRefinery 29

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: 11 Alive Atlanta, 3-D printing, 3D printers, Abbigail Carlsen, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC.es (Spain), ABC15, Access Atlanta, Advanced Primary Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic in Florida, aerobic activity, aging, American Academy of Neurology


January 17th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

January 17, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

NY Times
Ask Well: Is there any scientific study to substantiate the claim that older people (over 45) should limit high-impact exercises like jogging, sprinting, etc…?

...Running and similar high-impact activities likewise have a salutary effect on bone density, said Dr. Michael Joyner, an exercise physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and an expert on aging athletes, of whom he is one. Over all, he continued, he is “skeptical” of the ideaNYT that older people should avoid high-impact activities. “A lot of concerns about age-appropriate exercise modalities have turned out to be more speculative than real over the years,” he said, adding that during his research and personal workouts, he’s seen many seasoned adults pounding the pavement without ill effects.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Bryan Anderson

WCVB Boston
Shoulder replacement can ease pain, improve motion in RA patients

… Despite surgical challenges with some rheumatoid arthritis patients, the procedure improves WCVB-Bostonrange of motion and reduces pain in nearly all cases, especially for those with intact rotator cuffs, a Mayo Clinic study shows. The findings are published in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. “I think it’s quite encouraging,” says senior author John Sperling, M.D., an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Additional coverage: WTAE PittsburghOrthopedics Today, Jersey Tribune, Medical XpressScience DailyOncology Nurse Advisory 

Reach: WCVB-TV is an ABC affiliate that broadcasts to Needham, Mass., and the surrounding area.

Context:  John Sperling, M.D., is an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Shoulder arthritis is a common problem for rheumatoid arthritis patients: the pain and difficulty moving their arms can grow so severe that daily tasks and sleep become difficult.  If medication and physical therapy aren’t enough, shoulder replacement surgery is a common next step. Despite surgical challenges with some rheumatoid arthritis patients, the procedure improves range of motion and reduces pain in nearly all cases, especially for those with intact rotator cuffs, a Mayo Clinic study shows. The findings are published in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery.

News Release: Mayo Study Finds Shoulder Replacement Eases Pain, Improves Motion in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Star Tribune
Stress can be as contagious as germs
by Jeff Strickler

…Secondhand stress — tension that we pick up from the people and activities around us — is a natural defense mechanism that helped keep our ancestors alive, said Dr. Amit Sood, an expertStar-Tribune-Logo-300x45 on stress at the Mayo Clinic. But as soon as we pick up that tension, we risk becoming carriers, passing it on to any friends, family members or co-workers — and, yes, even strangers — who we encounter.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician and stress management expert. Dr. Sood is the author of The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Becoming Overwhelmed

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

MPR
The challenge of living well with ALS, but also accepting the inevitable
by Cathy Wurzer

This is part of our continuing series of stories about Bruce Kramer, the former dean of the College of Education, Leadership and Counseling at the University of St. Thomas, as he copes MPR-News-300x45with life after being diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. Bruce Kramer was diagnosed with the incurable disease ALS in 2010. Since then, he's been involved in a couple of drug trials. And about two months ago, Mayo Clinic doctors implanted a device in his diaphragm that has improved his breathing.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Previous Coverage in Mayo Clinic in the News

Context: Bruce Kramer of Minneapolis received a medical diagnosis that changed his life in an instant. Kramer, who was 54 at the time, had noticed his left foot feeling heavy and a little floppy. His ordinarily muscular thighs would tremble noticeably, and he had taken a couple of falls and found it tough to get back up…Jeffrey Strommen, M.D., the Mayo Clinic physician overseeing Kramer's use of the DPS, says, "he's more energetic. He feels stronger and we do have some evidence, albeit, limited that this may actually prolong survival." Dr. Strommen is a Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation specialist.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram
Companies are offering lower-calorie products to help combat the country’s obesity epidemic. But is it enough to win the battle?

... Those companies had pledged in 2010 to cut 1 trillion calories by 2012 and 1.5 trillion by 2015…That’s good news, said Diane Dressel, a dietitian at Mayo Clinic Health System inLeader Telegram EauClaire, where she also is coordinator for the hospital’s weight management services.

Circulation: The Leader-Telegram is the largest daily newspaper in west-central Wisconsin. It covers 12 counties with circulations of 23,500 weekdays and 29,800 Sundays.

Context:  Diane Dressel is a dietitian at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, where she also is coordinator for the hospital’s weight management services.

Public Affairs Contact:  Paul Meznarich 

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:

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Tags: 100 Best Companies to Work For, ABC News, ABC15, ADHD, Agencia Digital de Noticias Sureste, Air Force Master Sgt. Lori Jung, alzheimer's disease, American Stroke Association, AP, Artículo 7, ASCO Post, Associated Press


March 29th, 2013

Using Your Head: Mayo Clinic finding a way to diagnose concussions with more certainty

By loganlafferty

At the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, neurologists are discovering new ways to diagnose concussions. Research shows that autonomic reflex testing, which measures involuntary changes in heart rate and blood pressure, consistently shows significant changes in those with concussions. The findings were presented at the American Academy of Neurology annual meeting held in San Diego last week.

 

Chicago Health by Riley Anderson

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Tags: American Academy of Neurology, autonomic reflex testing, blood pressure, Chicago Health, concussion, diagnosis, heart rate


March 26th, 2013

Concussion center to fill need in the Valley

By loganlafferty

The Banner Concussion Center at Good Samaritan Hospital hopes to reduce the wait for specialists by offering physicians, neuropsychologists, vestibular therapists, athletic trainers, audiologists and vision therapists under one roof…More than 3,000 people visit Good Smaritan’s emergency room annually with head trauma, he said. That’s just a fraction of the number of injured people in the Valley, said Dr. Bert Vargas, a specialist at the Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Concussion Program in Phoenix.

 

Arizona Republic by Eugene Scott

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Tags: Arizona Republic, Banner Concussion Center, concussion, Dr. Bert Vargas, Good Samaritan Hospital, head trauma, Mayo Clinic in Arizona’s Comprehensive Concussion Program


March 21st, 2013

Concussion Testing Method Diagnoses Traumatic Brain Injury with Heart Rate, Blood Pressure

By loganlafferty

Now, neurologists at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona have taken a major step toward an accurate biological marker for concussion testing. Their research shows that autonomic reflex testing, which measures automatic changes in heart rate and blood pressure, consistently shows changes in people who suffer concussions.

 

Medical Daily by Ashik Siddique

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Tags: autonomic reflex testing, biological marker, blood pressure, concussion, concussion testing, heart rate, Medical Daily, traumatic brain injury


March 21st, 2013

Blunt Force Drama

By loganlafferty

Unfortunately, existing concussion statistics – how many athletes sustain them, how many suffer multiple concussions – are worryingly incomplete. Neurologist Dr. Davis Dodick, a concussion specialist at Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, speculates that adding asymptomatic “silent concussions” and unreported concussions would balloon current estimates to alarming figures.

 

Phoenix Magazine by Wynter Holden

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Tags: concussion, Dr. David Dodick, multiple concussions, Phoenix Magazine, silent concussions, statistics, unreported concussion


March 21st, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

March 21, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Bloomberg
Cervical Cancer Vaccines Spurned by 44% of U.S. Parents
by Michelle Fay Cortez

Researchers analyzed data from a national survey from 2008 to 2010 on immunizations for teenagers…“That’s the opposite direction that rate should be going,” Robert Jacobson, a pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota, and a senior researcher of the paper, said in a statement. “HPV causes essentially 100 percent of cervical cancer and 50 percent of all Americans get infected at least once.”

Circulation: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional Coverage:
MPR, Mayo: Not enough girls getting HPV vaccine

Star Tribune, News 4 Jax, KMSP, KTTC, My Fox Phoenix, MinnPost, KARE 11, KMSP, KTTC, KTVK Good Morning Arizona, WCCO, WEAU,

Context: A rising percentage of parents say they won't have their teen daughters vaccinated to protect against the human papilloma virus, even though physicians are increasingly recommending adolescent vaccinations, a study by Mayo Clinic and others shows. More than 2 in 5 parents surveyed believe the HPV vaccine is unnecessary, and a growing number worry about potential side effects, researchers found. The findings are published in the new issue of the journal Pediatrics.

News Release: More Parents Say They Won't Vaccinate Daughters Against HPV, Researchers Find

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Bloomberg Businessweek
Mayo Prostate Cancer Test Gives Hope When Tumors Return
by Michelle Fay Cortez

Mayo’s medical center in Rochester, Minnesota, is the only facility in the Western Hemisphere to offer the 20-minute scan, enhanced by an injected radioactive drug that lets doctors see rapidly dividing cancer cells. Demand is surging, though scans are limited to eight patients a day, three days a week.

Circulation: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio. BusinessWeek has a weekly circulation of more than 993,000.

Previous Coverage From March 15 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from Dec. 7, 2012 Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval last fall to produce and administer Choline C 11 Injection, an imaging agent used during a positron emission tomography (PET) scan to help detect sites of recurrent prostate cancer. Mayo Clinic is the first, and currently only, institution in North America approved to produce this imaging agent. “This technology is a game changer,” says Eugene Kwon, M.D., a urologist at Mayo Clinic. “In stark contrast to conventional imaging, PET imaging with Choline C 11 Injection can help identify sites of recurrence for tissue sampling and examination when a patient’s PSA level reaches 2 ng/mL — months or even years earlier than before. This technology also allows us to pinpoint the locations of recurrent cancer more accurately and permits us to develop more effective treatment strategies.”

News Release: Mayo Clinic Gets FDA Approval for New Imaging Agent for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

Public Affairs Contacts: Joe Dangor, Sharon Thiemer

NBC Sports (AP)
Docs Say Keep Trained Eye on Possible Concussions
by Malcolm Ritter

Dr. David Dodick, a concussion expert at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix who was familiar with highlights of the new document, said they contain "no great revelations" beyond what experts know already. He noted that the guidelines state that the first 10 days after a concussion are the period of highest risk for being diagnosed with a second concussion, and that younger athletes take longer to recover from the injury.

Reach: NBC Sports is the sports division of the NBC television network.

Additional Coverage:
ABC News, Experts: New Sports Concussion Rules a Game Changer

Huffington Post, ABC News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, USA Today, Yahoo! News UK & Ireland (AFP), Huffington Post Canada, Star Tribune, ABC News

Context: Neurologists at Mayo Clinic in Arizona have taken a promising step toward identifying a test that helps support the diagnosis of concussion. Their research has shown that autonomic reflex testing, which measures involuntary changes in heart rate and blood pressure, consistently appear to demonstrate significant changes in those with concussion. They presented the findings at the American Academy of Neurology annual meeting in San Diego this week. "This has the potential to change the way we approach concussion patients," says David Dodick, M.D., a neurologist and director of the Mayo Clinic Concussion Program. "One of the challenges of treating someone with a concussion is to reliably make a diagnosis: to know when the brain is injured and to know when the brain is actually recovered."

News Release: Mayo Clinic Researchers Develop Test to Gauge Severity of Concussions

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Jim McVeigh

NBC
Rock Center with Brian Williams
 (Video)

For those with panic attacks, there are proven remedies. At the Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Dr. Cynthia Stonnington, chair of psychiatry and psychology, says the first step is acknowledging the condition. So, if your response is this is awful, I have to hide it, people are going to think I'm crazy, that's going to interfere with your recovery.” It’s also essential to understand that no one can be sure when a panic attack will occur, nor can they simply “will it” away.

Reach: Rock Center with Brian Williams is a weekly television newsmagazine broadcast by NBC and hosted by NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams. It airs Friday at 10 pm Eastern Time.

Context: Cynthia Stonnington, M.D. is Chair, Psychiatry and Psychology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: Lynn Closway

Star Tribune
Editorial: Mayo Clinic's expansion warrants state help

It’s not hard to convince Minnesotans that the Mayo Clinic is an exceptional asset. Mayo is where a father’s heart was repaired, a sister’s cancer successfully treated, a neighbor’s liver replaced. For more than 100 years, Minnesotans have held that if a cure is possible anywhere, it’s at “the Mayo” in Rochester…What Mayo seeks from Minnesota is exceptional — but so is Mayo. As legislators and the Dayton administration fashion one of this year’s most important bills, that status should guide their decisions.

Other Prominent Coverage:
Star Tribune
Mayo proposal is sound, but industry is a problem

Star Tribune
Mayo subsidy request facing a tough sell at Minnesota Legislature

MPR
Seeking help with future growth, Rochester already feels strain of expansion

Pioneer Press
Letters:
How can anyone argue?

How can anyone argue against bonding for infrastructure improvements to support billions in private investment by the Mayo Clinic when the state so generously provides funds for professional sports stadiums? – Ellen T. Brown, St. Paul.

Pioneer Press
Opinion:
Applying Different Perspectives

Additional Coverage: NBC News (AP), KARE 11, Post Bulletin, Bemidji Pioneer, MPR

Context: On Jan. 30, Mayo Clinic announced Destination Medical Center (DMC), a $5 billion economic development initiative to secure Minnesota’s status as a global medical destination center now and in the future. The goal of DMC is to ensure that Minnesota and Mayo Clinic are destinations for medical care in the coming decades. This initiative is the culmination of a three-year study by Mayo Clinic to chart its future business strategy in an increasingly complex, competitive and global business environment.

Previous Coverage from March 15 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from March 8 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from March 1 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from Feb. 22 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from Feb. 15 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from Feb. 8 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from Feb. 1 Weekly Highlights

Video: DMC By the Numbers

Briefing for Editors and Reporters: Destination Medical Center

News Release: Destination Medical Center Bill Introduced in Minnesota House, Senate

News Release: Mayo Clinic to Invest More than $3 Billion to Position Minn. as World Destination for Health Care

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Karl Oestreich, Bryan Anderson

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Tags: ABC News, AP, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Businessweek, BusinessWeek, Cancer, cervical cancer, Choline, Choline C 11, concussion


March 19th, 2013

Docs Say Keep Trained Eye on Possible Concussions

By loganlafferty

Dr. David Dodick, a concussion expert at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix who was familiar with highlights of the new document, said they contain "no great revelations" beyond what experts know already. He noted that the guidelines state that the first 10 days after a concussion are the period of highest risk for being diagnosed with a second concussion, and that younger athletes take longer to recover from the injury.

Additional Coverage: Huffington Post, ABC News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution,  USA Today, Yahoo! News UK & Ireland (AFP), Huffington Post Canada

 

NBC Sports (AP) by Malcolm Ritter

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Tags: athletes, concussion, concussion risk, Dr. David Dodick, NBC Sports, recovery


February 7th, 2013

How Mayo is Making Sports Safer

By loganlafferty

We’re sitting in her small-utilitarian office tucked into Mayo’s Sports Med Center – a working office, an office with sports studies stacked on the floor and sports books lining the shelved – and Aynsley Smith, if history is any indication, is talking about the kinds of ideas and issue that are a few years away from people even realizing they’re important ideas and issues…In 2010, she was part of a team that hosted “Ice Hockey Summit: Action on Concussion,” the first-ever hockey concussion summit to collaborate with top scientists, trainers, coaches, officials, and equipment manufacturers.

 

Rochester Magazine by Steve Lange

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Tags: concussion, Dr. Aynsley Smith, Ice Hockey Summit II: Action on Concussion, Rochester magazine, Sports Med Center