Items Tagged ‘Dr. James Levine’

June 19th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Effort Seeks to Reduce Ear-Tube Surgeries for Small Children
By Sumathi Reddy

Parents of young, otherwise healthy children fear them like the plague: ear infections…Contributing to a desire by doctors and parents to avoid surgery are concerns about the use of general anesthesia in young children. Researchers and doctors are exploring devices that would enable ear-tube procedures to be The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoperformed using alternatives. Preceptis Medical, a Plymouth, Minn., company, is testing a device, the Hummingbird, that uses nitrous oxide instead of general anesthesia in clinical trials at four sites, including the Mayo Clinic…Randall Flick, director of the Mayo Clinic Children's Center, said his and other studies show the risk seems to occur after multiple exposures.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Randall Flick, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic Children's Center. For 150 years, Mayo Clinic has provided trusted answers for children and their parents. Mayo Clinic Children's Center includes providers from over 40 medical and surgical specialties, all focused on children's health care needs.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Traci Klein

 

Science Friday
Pre-Surgery Routine Needs an Update

Says Doc, For years, patients preparing for colon surgery have been told to stick to a liquid diet and do a colon cleanse. The only problem? There's not much science to back up those suggestions, says Robert Science FridayCima of the Mayo Clinic. He and his Mayo colleagues subscribe instead to the “enhanced recovery” approach, which spares patients the fasting and heavy narcotics in favor of regular meals and over-the-counter painkillers. Surgery is like running a marathon, he says, and the body needs to be in a normal state to brace for the big event.

Reach: Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4pm Eastern time as part of NPR's 'Talk of the Nation' programming. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand.

Context: Robert Cima, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic surgeon and chair of Mayo’s surgical quality subcommittee.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KSTP
Burnsville Father and Son Hope for Gift of Life
by Naomi Pescovitz

As Minnesota families celebrate dads this Father's Day, a Burnsville family is especially grateful for another year together. Last winter, David Costello's double organ transplant saved his life. This year, theKSTP-TV Eyewitness News Log Costellos are hoping for the gift of life once again. David Costello waited four and a half years to finally get the call. "My phone lit up, the ID said Mayo Clinic," Costello said.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: Mayo Clinic Transplant Center, with transplant services in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, performs more transplants than any other medical center in the world.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Orlando Business Journal
Brevard County hospital first in C. Fla. to join Mayo Clinic network
by Matthew Richardson

Parrish Medical Center in Brevard County has formed a partnership with Mayo Clinic— the first hospital in the Central Florida area to do sOrlando Business Journal newspaper logoo, reports News 13. Parrish is now the 29th member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, under the umbrella of the original Mayo Clinic. The century-old, renowned nonprofit is focused on medical care and research, helping millions every year.

Additional coverage:

Florida Today, Parrish to benefit from Mayo's expertise

Bay News 9Parrish Medical Center joins Mayo Clinic network

Post-Bulletin, KROC AM, Becker’s Hospital ReviewStamford Advocate, Cincinnati Finance, EMoney Daily,Virtual-Strategy magazine, Townhall Finance, Review Seeker, News13 Fla., MoneyShow.com, Minyanville, KVVU Las Vegas, Financial Content, KAIT 8 Ark., Florida Today

Context: Mayo Clinic and Parrish Medical Center officials have announced Parrish Medical Center (PMC) as the 29th member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. PMC is the first Central Florida member of the network and the third in Florida. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

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Tags: 2014 Practice Greenhealth Emerald Award., : ABC News Radio, A TransAtlantic Cardiovascular risk Calculator for Rheumatoid Arthritis, ABC, ABC News, ABC15 in Arizona, Adam Scott, addictions, aging, Albert Lea Tribune, Apple, Arizona Republic


May 29th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


NY Times
Ask Well: For Fitness, 2,000 Calories a Week?
By Gretchen Reynolds

I have read and heard that a person should aim to expend 2,000 calories weekly in exercise for optimum health. Is there any basis at all for this notion?...Adhering to these guidelines means that most of us would burn about 1,000 calories per week in planned The New York Times newspaper logoexercise, said Michael J. Joyner, an exercise researcher at the Mayo Clinic. And with the stairs we climb and chores we do, we come closer to that 2,000 calorie a week number, he said.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci KleinBryan Anderson

 

ABC News
Wrong Women Getting Double Mastectomies, Study Finds
By Suneeta Ganji, MD

…A growing number of women with cancer in one breast are choosing to have both breasts removed. But new research suggests that the women who should be doing this aren’t – ABC News logoand, ironically, those who don’t need to take this approach are opting for it.The study, published Wednesday in JAMA Surgery, reveals what some doctors are pointing to as a problematic trend – as well as possible evidence of a breakdown in communication between women anxious about a breast cancer diagnosis and their doctors...Dr. Judy Boughey, a breast surgeon at Mayo Clinic who was not involved in the study, said breast cancer patients often have various reasons for either opting for or avoiding surgery to remove a healthy breast.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Previous Coverage

Context: Unique laboratory testing during breast cancer lumpectomies to make sure surgeons remove all cancerous tissue spares patients the need for a repeat lumpectomy in roughly 96 percent of cases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, a success rate much higher than the rate nationally, a Mayo study shows. During the years reviewed, 13.2 percent of breast cancer lumpectomy patients nationally had to return to the operating room within a month of their initial surgery, compared to 3.6 percent at Mayo in Rochester, which uses a technique called frozen section analysis to test excised tissue for cancer while patients are still on the operating table. The findings are published in the journal Surgery. More information on this study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

US News & World Report
Air Travel Safe After Chest Surgery, Surgeon Says

If you're returning home after having chest surgery at an out-of-town hospital, flying is as safe as driving, an expert says. It's widely believed that ground travel is safer than air US News & World Report Logotravel after chest surgery, but a study by Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon Dr. Stephen Cassivi found that isn't true. He also concluded there is no reason to wait for weeks after chest surgery to fly home.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage:
HealthDay, Air Travel Safe After Chest Surgery, Surgeon Says
Health.com, MSN Healthy Living, Philadelphia Inquirer, HHS Healthfinder.gov, Newsday, Yahoo! Health, Winnipeg Free Press Ciencias Medicas News

Context: Summer travel isn’t for vacation alone. For some people, it may include a trip to an out-of-town hospital for surgery. If you are traveling for chest surgery, you may wonder whether it is safer to return home by car or plane. A new Mayo Clinic study found that, contrary to conventional wisdom, air travel is just as safe as ground travel after chest surgery, and there is often no reason to wait for weeks after an operation to fly home. Lead study author Stephen Cassivi, M.D., a Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon, offers these five tips for safer, more comfortable travel home after surgery on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Star Tribune
Miracle fruit: Is the coconut all it's cracked up to be?
By Allie Shah

…“I always say: If all else fails, try coconut,” said Oprish, who recently wrote about the wonders of coconut for the Twin Cities Moms blog. The 33-year-old is part of a consumer movement that is transforming a tropical fruit once maligned for its high fat content into aStar Tribune Health newspaper logo super food embraced by people who swear by its therapeutic powers. The coconut’s healing abilities are said to be vast — from bad-breath-erasing mouthwash to Alzheimer’s treatment. As with other so-called miracle foods, “things start snowballing, and that’s what happened with coconut,” said Dr. Donald Hensrud of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a preventive medicine expert at Mayo Clinic and medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet; David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist and Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. helps people sort through the facts and figures from the fads and the hype to learn more about nutrition and diet.

Public Affairs Contacts: Joe Dangor, Duska Anastasijevic, Ginger Plumbo

 

KARE11
Mayo Clinic says sideline test detects youth concussions
by Renee Tessman

On the sidelines of youth sports, a new Mayo Clinic study shows a simple test, known as KARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paulthe King-Devick,can detect concussions. Dr. Amaal Starling of the Mayo Clinic is co-author of the study. She said for youth athletes, "This is really the first accurate, rapid, cost effective, removal-from-play tool that is available for concussion screen."

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional Coverage:
KSTP, Forum at Edina High School Addresses Concussions in Sports
Healio Optometry News, King-Devick test effective in detecting concussions for adolescents, study finds

Context:  A rapid, easy-to-administer eye movement test is showing great promise as a sideline concussion test for youth sports, a Mayo Clinic study finds. In the study, Mayo Clinic researchers assessed high school hockey players using the King-Devick test. The test requires an athlete to read single-digit numbers displayed on cards. After suspected head trauma, the athlete is given the test, which takes about two minutes, and the results are compared to a baseline test administered previously. If the time needed to complete the test takes longer than the baseline test time, the athlete should be removed from play until evaluated by a medical professional. Amaal Starling, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist and a co-author of the study. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Post-Bulletin
Back and Forth: Mayo’s 150 Years Included Dr. Donald Balfour
by Harley Flathers

One of the many people we might describe as a "Rock" at Mayo Clinic shortly after entering the 20th century was Dr. Donald C. Balfour, an early associate with Drs. Will andLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Charlie Mayo...Balfour took a liking to Dr. Will and Hattie Mayo's daughter Carrie…One of the Balfour daughters, Mary, married the late Henry Frederic Helmholz Jr., who died Jan. 6, 2012, at age 100. Their daughter, Martha Mayo Helmholz-Anderson, told me Balfour was a loving grandfather.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

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Tags: 2018 Super Bowl, ABC News, ABC Salud, accidents, Affordable care act, air travel, Al Schilmoeller, Arizona ABC 15, atrial fibrillation, AVM, back pain remedies, Barbara McCarthy


May 15th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


NY Times
AGING AMERICA: Exercise as the Fountain of Youth

…Exercise may be the closest thing we have to a fountain of youth, one of the best ways to age happy and well. "The mantra now is, exercise is a drug" — able, like some medications

The New York Times newspaper logo are, to prevent and treat a host of age-related ailments, said Dr. Andrea Cheville, a Mayo Clinic expert on exercise in the elderly.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Star Tribune (AP), KAAL, ABC News, Huffington Post Canada, Monterey Herald, Ottawa Citizen

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is an expert on exercise in the elderly.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KSTP
On the Road with Jason Davis: Mayo Clinic Celebrates 150 Years

KSTP's Jason Davis goes on the road to Arizona, Florida and Minnesota fKSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logor his feature on Mayo Clinic. This was Davis's last report for his On the Road series before retiring at the end of May 2014 after nearly four decades with KSTP.  This year, one of Minnesota's best known institutions celebrates its 150th anniversary. It was in 1864 that Dr. William Worral Mayo started his small clinic in Rochester, and just how that small practice grew into a world-renowned facility is a fascinating story. Jason Davis went on the road to learn about the past, present and future of Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Additional Mayo Clinic 150th Anniversary and history of Mayo coverage:

KTTC, Mayo Clinic celebrates 150 years by Courtney Sturgeon

KARE11, Recovering Brokaw hosts Mayo's 150th anniversary 

KTTC, The early beginnings of the Mayo Clinic Mid-century advancements, Recent history

KTTC, Dr. John Noseworthy reflects on 150 years of Mayo Clinic success 

MPR, Mayo's mark: 5 innovations that changed health care 

Post-Bulletin, Jordanian king touched many in Rochester 

Post-Bulletin, Descendants of Dr. W.W. Mayo visit family home 

Post-Bulletin, Massive medical team focused 'millimeter by millimeter' to separate twins 

Post-Bulletin, 150th anniversary: Mayo Clinic helped U.S., allies win World War II 

Post-BulletinOddchester: 150 years in less than three hours

Greenhouse Grower, Mayo Clinic Will Promote Coreopsis ‘Electric Avenue’ As Its Flower Of Hope

Perishable NewsMayo Clinic Chooses Yellow Coreopsis As Its 'Flower Of Hope'

WCCO, Star Tribune, Big News Network, WCCO AM, Coon Rapids Herald, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin

Context: On July 1, 1907, Dr. Henry Plummer and Mabel Root, Dr. Plummer's assistant, inaugurated Mayo's system of patient registration and medical record keeping. The single-unit record was central to the new system. It brought together all of a patient's records -- clinical visits, hospital stays, laboratory tests and notes -- in a single file that traveled with the patient and was stored in a central repository. This simple system quickly became the standard for medical record keeping around the world. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Rebecca Eisenman, Kelley Luckstein

 

FOX47
Mayo Clinic announces campaign to raise $3 billion
by Mary McGuire

Mayo Clinic is looking to the future in a big way as it launches a camFox 47 TV station logopaign to raise $3 billion. It's all part of the "You are ... the campaign for Mayo Clinic" being announced Thursday. The goal of the campaign is to raise $3 billion by the end of 2017 to strengthen patient care, research and education at Mayo.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Becker’s Hospital Review, KROC-AM

Previous coverage

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care, Mayo Clinic today announced a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on the Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic trial: Massive blast of measles vaccine wipes out cancer
by Dan Browning

Stacy Erholtz was out of conventional treatment options for blood cancer last June when she underwent an exStar Tribune Health newspaper logoperimental trial at the Mayo Clinic that injected her with enough measles vaccine to inoculate 10 million people. The 50-year-old Pequot Lakes mother is now part of medical history…But the experiment provides the “proof of concept” that a single, massive dose of intravenous viral therapy can kill cancer by overwhelming its natural defenses, according to Dr. Stephen Russell, a professor of molecular medicine who spearheaded the research at Mayo.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
KARE11Minn. woman's cancer in remission thanks to measles 

Washington Post, Woman’s cancer killed by measles virus in unprecedented trial

MPR, How the Mayo Clinic handles potential patients in clinical trials

USA TODAY, Massive dose of measles vaccine clears woman's cancer

WGN-TV, Mayo Clinic: Woman’s cancer cured with huge dose of measles vaccine

International Business Times UK, Mayo Clinic Landmark Trial: Measles Vaccine Wipes out Cancer in Patient

Daily BeastMeasles Vaccine Killed Patient's Cancer

MashableMeasles Vaccine Wipes Out Cancer in Groundbreaking Test

UPI.com, Massive dose of measles vaccine knocks out woman's cancer

azcentral.comMeasles vaccine cures woman's cancer in study

Reuters, CNN, International Business Times, La Parisienne (France), Le Monde (France), Telegraph (UK), Globe and Mail, Fox 19 (OH), Examiner, Detroit Free Press, Green Bay Press Gazette, ABC 15 Arizona, Fox News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, News 4 Jax, L’Economiste, 11 Alive Atlanta, Le Figaro (France), Yahoo! France, Le Huffington Post, ABC.es (Spain), Access Atlanta, Honolulu Star-Advertiser, Yahoo! Health, Business Standard India, France 24, Yahoo! News UK & Ireland (AFP), Yahoo! MexicoKTTCNational PostDaily MailThe BlazeThe Daily BeastRefinery 29

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: 11 Alive Atlanta, 3-D printing, 3D printers, Abbigail Carlsen, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC.es (Spain), ABC15, Access Atlanta, Advanced Primary Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic in Florida, aerobic activity, aging, American Academy of Neurology


April 4th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Fox Business
Part 1 -- Mayo Clinic CEO: We need to modernize the delivery system, Medicare  

Fox Business
Part 2 -- Top institutions squeezed by rising health-care costs 

Fox Business
Part 3 -- Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, American Action Forum president Douglas Holtz-Eakin discuss health-care spending    

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's
Fox Businessstudios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy recently joined Maria Bartiromo on Fox Business’s “Opening Bell” to discuss the Affordable Care Act, the need to modernize the health care delivery system and Medicare and Mayo Clinic's role in health care innovation.

Dr. Noseworthy explained that the health care delivery system must be modernized. He highlighted three ways Mayo Clinic is doing this:

  1. Mayo Clinic’s focus on providing the highest quality and safest care
  2. Expanding Mayo’s reach through the Mayo Clinic Care Network
  3. Identifying and investing in what patients need in the future through research activities and work in the science of health care delivery, including Mayo’s strategic research alliance with Optum Labs

Public Affairs Contacts:  Chris Gade, Bryan Anderson

 

KMUW Wichita Public Radio
Topeka Hospital to Collaborate with Mayo Clinic

Topeka's Stormont-Vail HealthCare has become the first health system in Kansas to partner with the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The deal will give local patients access to the expertiseKMUW Wichita Public Radio of the medical staff at the Mayo Clinic.

 

Reach: KMUW-FM 89.1 is a non-commercial NPR News/Talk and Variety music public radio station out of Wichita State University in the Wichita, Kan. area.

Additional Coverage:
Topeka Capital-Journal
Editorial: Local health care community takes another big step

The health of the local health care community just keeps improving. The latest advancement on that front was revealed Tuesday when officials of Stormont-Vail HealthCare and the world-renown Mayo Clinic, based in Rochester, Minn., announced they had entered a partnership that will give local physicians access to the clinic’s physicians for consultations.

Post-BulletinMayo Clinic Care Network now in 14 states, Mexico; WIBW Kan.Wichita EagleTopeka Capital-JournalNews Medical

Context:  Stormont-Vail HealthCare and Mayo Clinic officials announced April 1 that the Topeka-based health system has become a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and families. Stormont-Vail HealthCare is the first health system in Kansas to join the network. The Mayo Clinic Care Network is a network of like-minded organizations which share a common commitment to improving the delivery of health care in their communities through high-quality, data-driven, evidence-based medical care. More information about the announcement can be found here on Mayo Clinic Care Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

KARE
Mayo Clinic patient celebrates junior prom bedside

KARE 11A heart transplant didn't stop Bree Hanson from celebrating her junior prom.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Context: At Mayo Clinic Transplant Center a team of doctors trained in heart and blood vessel disease (cardiologists), transplant surgery, infectious diseases, mental health conditions (psychiatrists) and other areas evaluate patients to determine if they are eligible for a heart transplant.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

KPHO Ariz.
Looking inside Mayo Clinic's Proton Therapy Cancer Center by Greg Argos, Though it's not going to accept patients until 2016, CBS 5 News took an exclusive look inside the Mayo Clinic's $400 million dollar proton therapy center. "There are only about 12 sites in the country that will have proton beam therapy now, and this will be the only site in ArizonaCBS5AZ-KPHO that has proton therapy," explained Dr. Steve Schild, an Oncologist and the Department Chair for the Mayo Clinic's new center.

Reach: KPHO-5 is the CBS affiliate in Phoenix and is owned by Meredith Corporation.

Context: Mayo Clinic is launching a Proton Beam Therapy Program to provide the latest cancer treatment for Mayo patients. New treatment facilities will be built on the Minnesota and Arizona campuses. Treatment for patients will be available beginning in 2015 in Minnesota and 2016 in Arizona. Proton beam therapy will be used to treat many kinds of cancers located deep within the body and close to critical organs and body structures, especially in children and young adults.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Post BulletinDr. John Noseworthy: Rochester, Mayo Clinic have grown up together
by Dr. John Noseworthy

For 150 years, the city of Rochester and Mayo Clinic have had a partnership like none other. We've grown up together. We could not have asked for a better place to call home throughout our history or a better place to invest in our future to benefit Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperour patients, employees and the community. During the last legislative session, Gov. Mark Dayton and the legislature determined there was a compelling public interest to authorize public investments in Rochester to help support the significant investments by Mayo Clinic to strengthen and secure Minnesota as a global destination medical center.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Additional Coverage:

Post Bulletin
, DMC special report: Road map to the future by Jay Furst, Twenty years from now, Rochester will have about 35,000 more people, the Rochester area will have 35,000 to 45,000 more jobs, and Mayo Clinic will remain a world-class destination for health care, according to Destination Medical Center promoters. How will this happen, and who's drawing up the plan? Today, in a 24-page special report called "DMC: Road Map to the Future," the Post-Bulletin lays out the plan envisioned by Mayo, city and county officials, and business leaders.

Post BulletinWhat is DMC: The facts, The concept of Destination Medical Center is simple — to transform Mayo Clinic and Rochester into a more attractive destination for medical patients and providers. But the structure of the $6 billion, 20-year public-private investment is not simple at all…The eight-member Destination Medical Center Corp. board will guide the use of all public funding, andwill oversee the operation of the nonprofit Destination Medical Center Corp. It's also responsible for approving the overall DMC Development Plan. Four members of the DMCC were chosen by the governor, three are representatives of local government and one is a Mayo Clinic representative.

Post BulletinA DMC magic wand by Jeff Hansel, Richard Dooley and his wife, Karol, have been staying at the Hope Lodge in Rochester while he undergoes prostate cancer therapy at Mayo Clinic. Dooley said he loves "everything" about Mayo Clinic and Rochester. "We both love the town. It's nice and clean and neat and everybody's respectful and nice," Dooley said…If Solis had a magic wand, he said, he would have Mayo introduce a "Louder than a Bomb" poetry program to both Mayo Clinic patients and to Rochester community members. That program has helped young people close to dropping out of school get energized, Solis said. He'd like to see local poets read to Mayo patients, and Mayo patients encouraged to write and read poetry.

Post BulletinMayo Clinic expansion already underway, more likely by Jeff Hansel, With the Destination Medical Center plan in the books, Mayo Clinic has already shifted into growth mode. The nonprofit has several projects underway, or planned in the near future. "There are current projects taking place at Mayo Clinic that will continue to enhance the patient experience and increase the quality of care delivered to patients for generations to come," said Mayo spokeswoman Kelley Luckstein. The latest is at Mayo Medical Laboratories which plans a 66,000-square-foot, two-story addition to the Superior Drive Support Center.

Post BulletinMayo reaching out in other areas by Jeff Hansel, Even as it is making plans to expand in Rochester, Mayo Clinic is reaching out elsewhere in an effort to connect with more patients. Among those efforts are a sports medicine and athletic training center called Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis, the continued growth of the Mayo Clinic Care Network and even the recent purchase of 187 acres in Onalaska, Wis., for a possible new facility.

Post BulletinDEED, DMC job projections similar by Brent Pearson, he Mayo Clinic has a major effect on the economy of southeastern Minnesota, with a proposed $5 billion expansion of the world-renowned medical center likely to stimulate further growth. Destination Medical Center is a plan to expand the Mayo Clinic's Rochester campus and further enhance the region's position as a global destination for health-care services. Mayo officials estimate the expansion will create between 25,000 and 30,000 direct jobs, another 10,000 to 15,000 indirect jobs, and 1,800 to 2,200 construction jobs over the next 20 years.

BringMeTheNews, Construction jobs aplenty in southeast Minnesota by Jessica Mador, There are new signs of growth in Rochester this spring, partly spurred by the Mayo Clinic’s plans for a new $5 billion flagship campus makeover. The Mayo project calls for doubling the size of its existing Minnesota campus. According to Mayo, the clinic already employs 40,600 Minnesotans, 33,400 of whom work in Rochester. And as MPR News reports, the clinic’s makeover plan includes $327 million in state aid, largely to fund improvements to public facilities in the city.

Post Bulletin, DMC to bring thousands of jobs by Bryan Lund, The Destination Medical Center could have a significant impact on Rochester's employment landscape, if the estimates of Mayo Clinic officials come to fruition. The DMC initiative's website says the project will create thousands of permanent, well-paying jobs in the area over the next couple decades. Some of those are directly related to DMC, such as additional physicians and medical support staff, while others are predicted to come as a result of growth in the area's economy indirectly associated with DMC.

Post-Bulletin, Letter: DMC planners must consider needs of disabled, I hope the Destination Medical Center planners consider the needs of people with disabilities. The Mayo Clinic has restroom facilities for people with special needs. A few other places have them as well. Fortunately, the new senior center is planning to have companion restroom facilities for people who need assistance in a rest room.

MPR, More construction workers needed in Rochester as housing market recovers by Elizabeth Baier, It's a good time to be a construction worker in southeastern Minnesota. With home construction on the rise, the job forecast is good in the construction and trade industries. Over the next two decades, more workers will be needed to help Rochester keep pace with the expected growth. During that time, the city is expected to grow by 32,000 residents, in part because of Mayo Clinic's $5 billion plan to remake its flagship campus. The plan includes $327 million in state aid, largely to fund improvements to public facilities in the city. Additional coverage: St. Cloud Times

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March 14th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Twin Cities Business
Mayo's Operating Profits Climb 55%; CEO Talks Strategy
By Jake Anderson and Dale Kurschner

Mayo Clinic said it beat expectations in 2013, and CEO John Noseworthy, who recently spoke to Twin Cities Business about the future of health care, highlighted ongoing initiatives. “The strong commitment of our entire organization has allowed us to respond successfully to unprecedented Twin Cities Businesschange in health care,” Dr. Noseworthy said. “We have changed the very definition of Mayo Clinic and stayed true to our core mission and values.”

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: As Mayo Clinic recognizes its Sesquicentennial year, the not-for-profit organization reached a record 63 million people in 2013. The strong performance was bolstered by successful implementation of new care delivery models — such as the Mayo Clinic Care Network — that provide knowledge to patients, physicians and consumers in traditional and new ways. “Expanding our reach is not a new goal for us,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “In fact, as we consider our history, growth has been a constant for 150 years.”

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Reports Strong Performance in 2013, Reaching More Than 63 Million People

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

Star Tribune
Stand up for yourself and your health
by Allie Shah

As a health reporter, I’ve read the research, from the National Institutes of Health to the Mayo Clinic to the American Cancer Society, all of which Star Tribune Logowarns that prolonged sitting leads to increased risks of heart disease, cancer and diabetes… So I set out to stand as much as I could for two straight days. No sitting at my desk. No sitting during meetings or meals or TV time. To help prepare for my 48-hour standoff, I consulted with a pioneer — the man who jump-started the anti-sitting movement: Dr. James Levine of the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University, a world-renowned obesity expert and among the first to use a treadmill desk.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

MinnPost
Mayo takes a big step in growing sports-medicine field with pro teams, Block E clinic
by Pat Borzi

The last thing the Mayo Clinic needs is a higher profile. Who around the world hasn’t heard of Mayo? For more than a century, Mayo’s innovative care and research brought heads of state, the rich and famous, and foreign royalty to its Rochester, Minn., campus for checkups and treatment… MinnPost“It’s a comprehensive service, one-stop shopping where you can get all your fitness-related needs met, from diagnosis of an injury to treatment of an injury to recommendations regarding injury prevention,” said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo’s Sports Medicine Center.

Reach:  MinnPost is a nonprofit, nonpartisan enterprise which provides news and analysis based on reporting by professional journalists, most of whom have decades of experience in the Twin Cities media. MinnPost averages more than 78,000 unique visitors to its site each month.. In Dec. 2013, MinnPost also had 27,300 followers on Twitter and its main Facebook page was liked by 9,500-plus readers.

Context: Mayo Clinic and the Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx announced in early February a partnership which extends the Mayo Model of Care for patients in sports medicine to the Twin Cities. The collaboration includes: 1) the opening of a Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at 600 Hennepin, 2) designating Mayo as the preferred medical provider for the teams, and 3) utilizing the teams’ international reach to educate the public about numerous health and wellness topics.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic, Minnesota Timberwolves & Lynx Announce Collaboration

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Steam Boat Today
Our View: Mayo network enhances patient care

The recently announced partnership between Yampa Valley Medical Center and the Mayo Clinic is good news, further solidifying the local Steamboat Today newspaper logohospital’s reputation for excellence and enhancing patient access to high-quality health care. As the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, YVMC is one of 26 medical centers nationwide and only the second hospital in Colorado to achieve this distinction.

Reach: Steamboat Today is a daily newspaper serving Steamboat Springs and the surrounding areas in Routt County, Colo. with a circulation of 7,000. Its website receives more than 30,500 unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic and Yampa Valley Medical Center officials announced this week that the Steamboat Springs hospital is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The network connects Mayo Clinic and health care providers who are interested in working together to enhance the delivery of locally provided high quality health care. Yampa Valley Medical Center is the second hospital in Colorado to be invited to join the network. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Arizona Central Sports
Concussion in sports documentary receives premiere at Valley’s Mayo Clinic
by Paola Boivin

My Sunday best …A powerful documentary by an Academy Award nominee made its U.S. premiere Saturday night at an unlikely place: the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix. “Head Games: The Global Concussion Crisis” delivers an unfiltered lookedArizona Republic at one of the more-troubling story lines in today’s sports world…Following the documentary was a panel I was lucky enough to moderate and included Nowinski; former ASU and NFL standout Mike Haynes; neurologist David Dodick, director of the Concussion and Headache Program at the Mayo Clinic; and director Steve James, who also directed the Academy Award nominated “Hoop Dreams.” Additional coverage: Sports Business Daily

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona will hosted a special sneak preview of the highly anticipated documentary, Head Games: The Global Concussion Crisis. 

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March 7th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Steamboat Today
Yampa Valley Medical Center announces new partnership with the Mayo Clinic

...Yampa Valley Medical Center has announced a new partnership with the Mayo Clinic that will give physicians here the ability to consult with thousands of the clinic's specialists across the country. "We couldn't be more proud to have this relationship with this organization," hospital CEOSteamboat Today newspaper logo Frank May said Wednesday morning in a packed conference room as he was flanked by the Mayo Clinic's vice president and medical director. "This elevates our game."

Reach: Steamboat Today is a daily newspaper serving Steamboat Springs and the surrounding areas in Routt County, Colo. with a circulation of 7,000. Its website receive more than 30,500 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Post BulletinHeard on the Street: Mayo Clinic adds Colorado health-care provider as new member

Context: Mayo Clinic and Yampa Valley Medical Center officials announced this week that the Steamboat Springs hospital is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The network connects Mayo Clinic and health care providers who are interested in working together to enhance the delivery of locally provided high quality health care. Yampa Valley Medical Center is the second hospital in Colorado to be invited to join the network. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Wall Street Journal
The Debate Over Juice Cleanses and Toxin Removal
by Melinda Beck

…Consuming more vegetables is great, mainstream doctors and nutritionists agree. But they dismiss the detox claims as a confusing jumble of The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoscience, pseudoscience and hype. They argue that humans already have a highly efficient system for filtering out most harmful substances—the liver, kidneys and colon..."Nobody has ever been able to tell me what these toxins are," says Donald Hensrud, an internist and nutrition specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D., is Chair, Mayo Clinic Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine in Minnesota. Dr. Hensrud's research focuses on obesity, nutrition and disease prevention, physical activity and health promotion, and clinical preventive medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Traci Klein

 

Philadelphia Inquirer
Getting Teeth Pulled Before Heart Surgery May Pose Serious Risks

If you're a heart patient, you might be wise to wait to have any infected teeth pulled if you're about to have cardiac surgery, a new study suggests. Philadelphia InquirerIn a small, retrospective study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that 8 percent of heart patients who did not wait to have teeth pulled suffered major adverse health outcomes, such as a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or death.

Circulation: The Philadelphia Inquirer has a daily circulation of more than 350,000 readers. Philadelphia Inquirer - Online has more than 1.7 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Winnipeg Free PressNewsMedical.NetNew Jersey HeraldMyFoxTampaBayHealthYahoo!.netUPI.comKEYC (Mankato)Tech Times, State ColumnMedical ResearchYahoo! Health, NIH Medline Plus, MSN.com, ScienceDaily, CBSAtlanta.com, WDAM.com (Mississippi), KNOE.com (Louisiana), MyFoxDFW (Dallas based in Las Vegas), MyFoxNewYork, HawaiiNewsNow 

Previous Coverage in Feb. 28, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To pull or not to pull? That is a common question when patients have the potentially dangerous combination of abscessed or infected teeth and the need for heart surgery.  In such cases, problem teeth often are removed before surgery, to reduce the risk of infections including endocarditis, an infection of the inner lining of the heart that can prove deadly.  But Mayo Clinic research suggests it may not be as simple as pulling teeth: The study found that roughly 1 in 10 heart surgery patients who had troublesome teeth extracted before surgery died or had adverse outcomes such as a stroke or kidney failure. The findings are published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Pulling Problem Teeth Before Heart Surgery to Prevent Infection May Be Catch-22

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

FOX9
INVESTIGATORS: Radiation and records

…Former Airman Nathan Edward Morris must run a medical drill once every four months. Blood is drawn, an MRI is taken and the oncologist My Fox KMSP TCwill read the results Morris believes can be linked back to what might be called friendly fire from 11 years ago…Morris's tumor is so invasive that only a surgeon at the Mayo Clinic was willing to operate on it last July…Doctors believe they were able to cut most of the cancer out…Morris finds himself back at Mayo Clinic so often. The system of sashaying patients from appointment to appointment is incredibly slick and is specifically designed so the sick don't have to wait for days to get results -- but every minute spent waiting is one that makes Morris "nervous."

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes. FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m.

Follow-up story: FOX9, Airman gets brain tumor resolution

Context: Nathan Morris is a patient of Mayo Clinic oncologist and neurologist Derek Johnson, M.D.  Dr. Johnson's research is part of Mayo's Neuro-Oncology Program. The goal of the Neuro-Oncology Program of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is to identify prevention and treatment strategies that improve the survival and quality of life for patients with primary brain tumors.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

 

KTTC
Small business start-ups finding success in Rochester
by Devin Bartolotta

The Rochester Area Economic Development, Inc. (RAEDI) held its annual meeting Thursday. It was all about the future of Rochester. "Growing the companies that are from here and want to stay here, you have the opportunity to create a new legacy," said Peter Barth, keynote speaker atKTTC today's meeting…"I think it's going to be a really positive change. Rochester, until now, has been dominated by a single industry or maybe two. And I think having these small satellite industries build up around Mayo Clinic will be really healthy," said Dr. Russell.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: RAEDI's primary goal is to attract, retain and assist the growth/expansion of base business within the Rochester Area. Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides infrastructure that enables entrepreneurism for the Rochester community.   Founded by RAEDI, City of Rochester, Mayo Clinic Treasury Services and Mayo Clinic Ventures, the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides collaborative space for new companies, venture capital firms and entrepreneurs.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

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February 28th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

LA Times
Bit by bit, a more fit workplace
by Rene Lynch

Nearly all of us need to make more time for fitness. Finding that time, though, can seem impossible. But what if you could wedge that workout in at work? If it sounds far-fetched (or a great way to get yourself fired), listen up. Dr. James Levine, an obesity expert at theLogo for Los Angeles Times newspaper Mayo Clinic, says Americans don't need to log more time at a gym. Instead, they need to banish their sedentary ways by incorporating easy bursts of activity from dawn to dusk.

Reach: The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Related coverage:

ABC NewsABC NewsFitness Trackers Get Stylish, But Accuracy May Need Work, Experts Say by Liz Neporent…To think it all started with a pair of "magic underwear." Dr. James Levine, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, studies the relationship between movement performed outside the gym and obesity. About a decade ago, he rigged up an undergarment with sensors designed to catch the body's every little shift in movement.

ABC NewsABC News Radio, Fitness Trackers Get Stylish, but Accuracy May Need Work, Activity trackers -- wearable devices that count steps and measure calorie burn -- are going through a boom. Sales of the devices last year topped $330 million, according the market research group NPD, and consumers have more than two dozen brands and styles to choose from, including shoe chips, bracelets, anklets, pendants and clip-ons…Dr. James Levine, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, studies the relationship between movement performed outside the gym and obesity. Additional coverage: Good Morning America

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Jim McVeigh

HealthDay
Getting Teeth Pulled Before Heart Surgery May Pose Serious Risks
by Randy Dotinga

…In a small, retrospective study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that 8 percent of heart patients who did not wait to have teeth pulled suffered major adverse health outcomes, such as a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or death. "Guidelines from the American College of Health DayCardiology and American Heart Association label dental extraction as a minor procedure, with the risk of death or non-fatal heart attack estimated to be less than 1 percent," study co-author Dr. Mark Smith said in a statement. Additional coverage:  KSAZ Ariz.US News & World ReportFOX NewsMedicineNet.comForbes.comWMCTV.comFox5Vegas.com19ActionNews.comWDAM.comHHS HealthFinder.gov

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: To pull or not to pull? That is a common question when patients have the potentially dangerous combination of abscessed or infected teeth and the need for heart surgery.  In such cases, problem teeth often are removed before surgery, to reduce the risk of infections including endocarditis, an infection of the inner lining of the heart that can prove deadly.  But Mayo Clinic research suggests it may not be as simple as pulling teeth: The study found that roughly 1 in 10 heart surgery patients who had troublesome teeth extracted before surgery died or had adverse outcomes such as a stroke or kidney failure. The findings are published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Pulling Problem Teeth Before Heart Surgery to Prevent Infection May Be Catch-22

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic had strong 2013 despite challenges
by Jeff Kiger
Despite the uncertainty of the health-care market, Mayo Clinic revenues grew by 6 percent to $9.4 billion in 2013. CEO and President John Noseworthy and Chief Administration OfficerLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper Jeff Bolton discussed highlights of Mayo Clinic's 2013 financial results Wednesday during a brief telephone press conference.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional coverage: Star Tribune, Net income up 55 percent at Mayo Clinic for 2013; KTTC, Star Tribune (PDF), FOX47, Post-Bulletin, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

Context: As Mayo Clinic recognizes its Sesquicentennial year, the not-for-profit organization reached a record 63 million people in 2013. The strong performance was bolstered by successful implementation of new care delivery models — such as the Mayo Clinic Care Network — that provide knowledge to patients, physicians and consumers in traditional and new ways. “Expanding our reach is not a new goal for us,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “In fact, as we consider our history, growth has been a constant for 150 years.”

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Reports Strong Performance in 2013, Reaching More Than 63 Million People

Public Affairs Contacts: Karl Oestreich, Bryan Anderson

Harvard Business Review
How Mayo Clinic Is Using iPads to Empower Patients
by David Cook, Joseph Dearani

Throughout the world, companies are embracing mobile devices to set customer expectations, enlist them in satisfying their own needs, Harvard Business Review Logoand get workers to adhere to best practices. An effort under way at the Mayo Clinic shows how such technology can be used to improve outcomes and lower costs in health care.

Reach: Harvard Business Review – Online provides editorial content designed to complement the coverage found in its parent print publication, which focuses on business management. The site receives more than 232,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: David Cook, M.D., Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine, conducts research in medical education. Joseph Dearani, M.D. is chair of Cardiovascular Surgery, Minnesota.

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February 21st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic updates its model for the modern age
by Lori Sturdevant

Milestone anniversaries can be useful things. Take this season’s 150th anniversary of the cold January 1864 day when Dr. W.W. Mayo placed an ad in area newspapers announcing that his medical Star Tribune commentaries logopractice was open for business in downtown Rochester and the Mayo Clinic was born. A burst of high-risk, high-opportunity change is hard upon the health care industry in general and Mayo Clinic in particular. That makes this a fine time for Mayo folk to reflect on how their mammoth enterprise became famous for the best in medical care, and how that story might guide what comes next.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Lori Sturdevant writes editorials and a weekly column about topics she has covered for more than 30 years, state government and politics.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Commemorates 150th Anniversary in 2014

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Karl Oestreich

KAAL
ABC 6 Exclusive Interview with Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. Noseworthy

KAAL-TV 6In an exclusive interview ABC 6 News Anchor Ellery McCardle sits down with Mayo Clinic President & CEO Dr. John Noseworthy. In a three part conversation, they talked about the changes Mayo will experience, including the possibility of layoffs, the organizations future expansion in new cities and countries, and concerns of people who may be worried about such a large expansion. Part 1, Part 2Part 3

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich

Yahoo! Homepage Centerpiece
Why a cat bite could land you in the hospital: Surprising results from new study
by Eric Pfeiffer

Cat lovers might want to take extra caution the next time they tempt the wrath of their favorite pet feline. A new study produced by the Mayo Clinic has found that cat bites are potentially more seriousLogo of Yahoo News than most individuals, and medical experts, previously thought.

Reach: Yahoo! reaches more than a half a billion across devices and around the globe. According to news sources, roughly 700 million people visit Yahoo websites every month.

Additional coverage:
Wall Street Journal (Video), Cat Bites Pose Little-Known Dangers, Cats can reduce stress and lift spirits, but there can be serious risks involved with keeping felines in the house. A new study from the Mayo Clinic reveals cat bites can be very difficult to treat. Anna Mathews reports on Lunch Break.

Wall Street Journal, Cat Bites Pose Little-Known Dangers by Anna Mathews, A new study by researchers at the Mayo Clinic has found that of 193 patients who came in for cat bites on their hands over a three-year period, 30% had to be hospitalized for an average stay of 3.2 days…"Cat bites can be very serious, and when you do get an infection, it can be very difficult to treat," said Brian T. Carlsen, a Mayo surgeon who was an author of the study. That's particularly true with a hand injury because of the structure of the tendons and joints, he said.

MPR Blog, Roses are red, violets are blue, it’s Valentine’s Day, the rest’s up to you… 3) LOVE AND MARRIAGE GO TOGETHER LIKE … CATS AND THE WEB (OF YOUR HAND)?... An elusive regional angle for a cat story on the Internet — it’s a writer’s dream. Don’t put your hand near that cat’s mouth; you don’t know where it’s been! In a three-year retrospective study published in the February issue of The Journal of Hand Surgery, researchers reviewed records of 193 people who came to Mayo Clinic Hospital with cat bites to the hand. Additional coverage: CBS DenverWebProNews 

Context: Dogs aren’t the only pets who sometimes bite the hands that feed them. Cats do too, and when they strike a hand, can inject bacteria deep into joints and tissue, perfect breeding grounds for infection. Cat bites to the hand are so dangerous, 1 in 3 patients with such wounds had to be hospitalized, a Mayo Clinic study covering three years showed. Two-third of those hospitalized needed surgery. Middle-aged women were the most common bite victims, according to the research, published in the Journal of Hand Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: When Cats Bite: 1 in 3 Patients Bitten in Hand Hospitalized, Infections Common

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January 24th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Bloomberg Radio

Mayo CEO Says Better Healthcare Strengthens Economies (Audio)

Dr. John Noseworthy, president and chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic, says investment in healthcare allows individuals benefit from the prosperity they deserve. The 2014 World Economic Forum is addressing how developing and emerging economies can learn from developed nations and leapfrog to a better future.Bloomberg Davos

Reach:  Kathleen Hays is the host of “The Hays Advantage” on Bloomberg Radio, a weekday program that brings in-depth insight and analysis to important economic, market and policy issues. Recognized as one of the top economic reporters and anchors in the country, Hays has covered the U.S. economy and the Federal Reserve for more than 20 years. She joined Bloomberg in 2006 after years as an on-air and online economics correspondent at CNN, CNNfn, and CNBC, where she served as a host, correspondent and commentator for numerous programs. The Hays Advantage appears on Bloomberg 1130-am in New York City, on 1200-am and 94.5-fm in Boston and on SiriusXm satellite radio on Channel 119.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Fox Business

Can our health-care system sustain the expansion of Medicaid?

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy on the future of health care.


Reach:
 FoxNews.com hFox Businessas more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's studios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

USA TODAY

Fish on the brain: Can eating it keep Alzheimer's at bay?
 By Nanci Hellmich

…Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, says there have been conflicting reports on this topic but this latest research "would suggest there iUSA Today NEWs a positive relationship between omega-3 fatty acid-rich diets and the preservation of brain volume in aging. The take-home message is to eat a heart-healthy diet that includes fish. I'd also recommend physicalexercise and engagement in intellectual activity."

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

ABC News
Higher Risk of Death From Heart Attack Linked to Hospital Hours (Video)

When it comes to a heart attack, the difference between life and death may hinge on timing, according to the Mayo Clinic. Researchers found a 5 percent higher chance of death — almost 2,000 more ABC Newsdeaths a year — within 30 days of the heart attack if a person arrived at the hospital at night or on the weekend… “There are fewer staff and resources at night and on weekends — that’s true,” said Dr. Atsushi Sorita, the study’s lead author.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: USA TODAYToronto StarHealthDayNBC NewsEast Idaho NewsTIMEWRCB Tenn.Health NewslineHealthCanalNews-MedicalThe Globe and MailCoshocton TribuneCincinnati.comAd Hoc News (Berlin)Aetna InteliHealth

Context: More people die and emergency hospital treatment takes longer for heart attack victims who arrive at the hospital during off-hours (nights and weekends), compared with patients who arrive during regular daily hours, according to a Mayo Clinic study published online in the British Medical Journal on Jan. 21. Read, view and listen to more about the study on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

Orlando Sentinel
As women seek preventive breast-cancer surgery, hospitals move to combine procedures
by David Breen

…Now surgeons at Florida Hospital Celebration Health have joined others throughout the country by offering what had been separate surgeries — mastectomy and breast reconstruction, and removal of the ovaries — in a single session…Dr. Sarah McLaughlin, a surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, sees a growing trend toward combining the procedures, estimating that she takes part inOrlando Sentinel six to 10 of them a year. It's a preferable option for many patients, she said, provided they are strong enough to deal with a surgery session that can last five to six hours.

Reach: The Orlando Sentinel has a daily circulation of more than 162,000. The newspaper serves central Florida. It's website has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Sarah McLaughlin, M.D., is a surgeon with the Breast Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Whether you're facing noncancerous (benign) breast conditions, abnormal mammogram results, or newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer, the Breast Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Florida focuses on the needs of breast cancer patients. Mayo Clinic is one of the few places in the world where you can access all the specialists needed for comprehensive care "under one roof."

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

Star Tribune
Mayo wins FDA approval to test stem cell technique for heart patients
By Dan Browning

A decade-long Mayo Clinic research project on using stem cells to repair damaged heart tissue has won federal approval for human testing, a step that could have implications for millions of Americans Star Tribune Healthwith heart disease. 
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a multistate ­clinical trial of 240 patients with chronic advanced symptomatic heart failure to see if the new procedure produces a significant improvement in heart function, Mayo officials announced Friday.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTC,  Imperial Valley NewsPost-BulletinKAALMedical Daily

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Bob Nellis, Jennifer Schutz

 

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Tags: 2014 World Economic Forum, ABC News, Ad Hoc News, adverse health events, Aetna InteliHealth, alzheimer's disease, Anesthesiology News, Argus Leader, Arizona Daily Star, Arizona Telemedicine Program, Ashville Citizen-Times, Atlanta Journal-Constitution


January 10th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

 

 

January 10, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Meet the Press
Obamacare’s Impact: Two Doctors Discuss

Meet the Press

Drs. Delos Cosgrove and John Noseworthy of the Cleveland Clinic and Mayo Clinic discuss the impact of Obamacare.

Reach: NBC's Meet The Press reaches more than 2.6 million total viewers each week.

Additional coverage:  NBC News (Transcript)ABC News (AP)Post-BulletinHealthLeaders Media NewsMaxBusinessWeekRTT NewsKansas City Star (AP)Crain’s Cleveland Business, Minneapolis /St. Paul Business JournalNewsMaxKTTC

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Chris Gade

New York Times
For Sleep Apnea Patients, a Possible Alternative to Masks

by Catherine St. Louis

…The mask is unwieldy and uncomfortable, however; one study found that46 percent to 83 percent of patients with obstructive sleep apnea do not wear it diligently. Now scientists may have found an alternative, at least for some patients: a pacemaker-like device NYT bannerimplanted in the chest that stimulates a nerve in the jaw, helping to keep part of the upper airway open…“This is a new paradigm of surgical treatment that seems to effectively control obstructive sleep apnea in selected patients,” said Dr. Sean M. Caples, a sleep specialist in the division of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. “It’s very exciting.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Sean Caples, D.O., is a Mayo Clinic sleep expert with Mayo's Sleep Medicine Center and a specialist in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine.

Public Affairs Context: Alyson Gonzalez

NY Times
High-Dose Vitamin E Slows Decline of Some Alzheimer's Patients in Study
by Pam Belluck

Does vitamin E help people with Alzheimer’s disease? For years, scientists have been trying to find out, guessing that the vitamin’s antioxidant properties might be beneficiaNYTl. But the results from clinical trials have been mixed and — following a report that high doses of vitamin E may increase the risk of death — cautionary…But other studies have found that vitamin E failed to delay dementia in people without symptoms or with mild cognitive impairment, which may precede Alzheimer’s. “It was dead stone cold in the M.C.I. trial,” said the leader of that study, Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s center. “You couldn’t have found a closer match to placebo.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: APArab NewsFOX News LatinoVoice of RussiaChicago TribuneReutersStar TribuneSouth China Morning Post

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Traci Klein

MPR
What's a sign of heart attack? Anything

Former Mayor R.T. Rybak was in obvious good health when he suffered a serious heart attack last weekend. If someone as seemingly fit as Rybak could be vulnerable, who is safe? We asked two Mayo cardiologists fMPR-News-300x45or perspective on heart disease…Dr. Charanjit (Chet) Rihal: Interventional cardiologist at Mayo Clinic and chairman of Mayo's Cardiovascular Division; Dr. Sharonne Hayes: Cardiologist at Mayo Clinic and the founder of Mayo's Women's Heart Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: 2014 Diversity Champions, A.L.S., Abba Zubair, ABC News, ABC NEWS (AP), ABC Radio News, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Amit Sood, Antonita Slaughter, AP, Arab News