Items Tagged ‘Dr. James Levine’

April 29th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

 

Huffington Post
Melanoma Really Does Suck
by Brigitte Cutshall

Jimmy Carter is lucky. He was treated here in Atlanta at Emory for melanoma that had spread to his brain and was eligible to be involved with a new immunotherapy drug. My friend Rene is not so lucky. She’s been dealing with melanoma (multiple lesions) in the brain for about 18 months. The Mayo Clinic has been a great support to her and her family.HuffPost Healthy Living

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Other Mayo-related coverage in Huffington Post:

Huffington Post — 9 Superfoods You Should be Eating With Hypothyroidism

Huffington Post — 8 Seemingly Innocent Things That Are Sabotaging Your Sleep, Big Time

Huffington Post — 4 All-Natural Seasonal Allergy Remedies And One Big Myth

Huffington Post, 10 Things That Happen to Your Body When You Walk

Context: Melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, develops in the cells (melanocytes) that produce melanin — the pigment that gives your skin its color. Melanoma can also form in your eyes and, rarely, in internal organs, such as your intestines. The exact cause of all melanomas isn't clear, but exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight or tanning lamps and beds increases your risk of developing melanoma. Limiting your exposure to UV radiation can help reduce your risk of melanoma. At Mayo Clinic, dermatologists,oncologists, pediatric oncologists, pathologists,general surgeons, and plastic and reconstructive surgeons form a multidisciplinary team to provide whole-person care for those with melanoma. 

Contacts: Rhoda Fukushima Madson, Joe Dangor

 

HealthLeaders Media
3 Hospitals Wooing Patients with Virtual Tours
by Marianne Aiello

Mayo Clinic created its Periscope account in June 2015 with the goal of using it to stream behind-the-scenes tours, educational discussions with Mayo specialists, and live events. In July, it broadcast a 22-minute HealthLeadersguided tour of its Rochester, MN campus that showed off facilities and shared facts about the health system's history. "Mayo Clinic has patients from every U.S. state and over 140 countries every year, and we saw the opportunity to help those considering Mayo Clinic get a preview of what they can expect when they come here," Lee Aase, director of Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, told HealthLeaders in July.

Reach:  HealthLeaders Media has more than 40,000 readers each month and is targeted to senior executives with leading hospitals, health systems, health plans, physician organizations, and allied and ancillary service providers and provides in-depth, informed reports on the nation's most innovative and entrepreneurial healthcare service organizations across the continuum of care.

Context: You can find a virtual tour of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., on Mayo's YouTube Channel. Other virtual Mayo tours can be accessed on Mayo's Periscope page.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Wall Street Journal
New Tools Help Patients Make Tough Decisions In the ER
by Laura Landro

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is developing several such aids, including one for patients with low-risk chest pain. Dr. Hess and his team developed a decision aid, Chest PainWSJ Banner Choice, that includes information on the diagnosis, displays a patient’s 45-day risk of a heart attack and options for care. These include admission to an observation unit for tests, follow-up with a heart doctor within 24 to 72 hours—or letting the ER doctor make the decision. “Our goal is not to put the decisions in patient’s laps so they feel abandoned, but to involve them in the decision process to the degree they wish,” Dr. Hess says.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional video coverage: WSJ interview with Dr. Hess

Other Mayo-related coverage in The Wall Street Journal:

Wall Street Journal — Telemedicine Advocates Look to Expand Nursing Licenses’ Range

Wall Street Journal — Clues to a Family’s Heart Disease

Context:  Patients who arrive at the emergency department with low-risk chest pain and talk through treatment options with a physician show improved knowledge of their health status and follow-up options, compared with patients who received standard counseling from a physician, according to Mayo Clinic research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 65th Annual Scientific Session. Chest pain accounts for about 8 million emergency department visits each year in the U.S., but more than 90 percent of those patients are not experiencing a heart attack, says Erik Hess, M.D., lead author and emergency medicine physician at Mayo Clinic. “An electrocardiogram and blood tests can tell us if a patient is having a heart attack. Further testing may be needed to tell us if a patient faces an increased risk of heart attack in the near future. We wanted to know if there is value in discussing this further testing with patients.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Elizabeth Zimmerman Young

 

C-SPAN
Health Care in the U.S.

Dr. John Noseworthy talks about trends in health care and how the Affordable Care Act is affecting U.S. hospitals.

C-SpanReach: C-Span's Washington Journal focuses on the day's top Washington, D.C. public affairs stories. Some topics covered on the program include campaign finance, energy prices, and special interest groups. Washington Journal is watched predominantly by adults over 35 years old interested in public affairs.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

HealthDay
Nipple-Preserving Mastectomies Appear Safe for High-Risk Women: Study

"Nipple-sparing mastectomy is gaining wide acceptance because of its superior cosmetic results, but pockets of the medical community remain skeptical that it is the right choice for the BRCA population," said study lead author Dr. James Jakub, a breast surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Other coverage:

Medscape — More Proof: Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy Safe for BRCA Carriers

Health Day Logo

Context: Protective mastectomies that preserve the nipple and surrounding skin prevent breast cancer as effectively as more invasive surgeries for women with a genetic mutation calledBRCA that raises their risk of developing breast cancer, a multi-institution study led by Mayo Clinic found. The research should reassure patients and surgeons that nipple-sparing mastectomies, which leave women with more natural-looking breasts than other mastectomies, are a safe way to reduce breast cancer risk in BRCA carriers, the authors say. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Breast Surgeons in Dallas. “Nipple-sparing mastectomy is gaining wide acceptance because of its superior cosmetic results, but pockets of the medical community remain skeptical that it is the right choice for the BRCA population,” says study lead author James Jakub, M.D., abreast surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “This is the largest study of its kind to address the controversy, and to show that nipple-sparing mastectomy is as effective at preventing breast cancer as traditional mastectomy.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo Clinic Ventures Firm Explores Commercialization Of Gut Microbe Treatment
by Don Jacobson

Despite the presence of 100 trillion bacteria and other microorganisms that make up the human microbiome, how or even whether they may have a role to play in combatting a litany of maladies has never really Twin Cities Business Magazine Logobeen seriously considered. But that is quickly changing as the Mayo Clinic and the pharmaceutical industry continue a pattern of ever-bigger venture capital investments into a growing coterie of biotech companies at the cutting edge of microbiome research, which some are actually calling the next big thing in biotech. One such company is San Francisco-based Second Genome, which first became a Mayo Clinic Ventures portfolio company in 2014 as part of a clinical research collaboration. Last week, it was announced Mayo extended its venture stake in Second Genome as part of a $42.6 million Series B financing round led by Big Pharma giants Pfizer and Roche.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: Second Genome, Inc., a leader in the development of novel medicines through innovative microbiome science, entered into an extensive partnership with the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine in 2014 to support the development of therapeutic products for multiple disease indications, starting with inflammatory bowel disease, metabolic disorders, and colorectal cancer. "The microbiome is an important area of medical research for Mayo Clinic, and this collaboration represents a broad and significant effort in our attempt to develop therapeutics targeting microbiome-mediated pathways," says Heidi Nelson, M.D., director of the Microbiome Program in the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine. "We believe that Second Genome's drug discovery capability complements our clinical expertise, and our hope is that together we can develop new treatment approaches for patients across a wide range of diseases with significant unmet clinical need. The ultimate goal is to improve the lives of patients."

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

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Tags: AARP.org, advance care planning, Allergy Remedies, alzheimer's disease, Amber Gerber, anti-inflammatory benefits of honey, Astra Zeneca, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, Benzinga, Berg’s Phase II study, brain aneurysm, brain hemorrhage


April 22nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Florida Times-Union
Renowned neurosurgeon recruited by Mayo Clinic
by Charlie Patton

Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, a brilliant neurosurgeon with a fascinating personal story, has been hired as the William J. and Charles H. Mayo Professor and chair of Neurologic Surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. “I think by any measure this is aFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo remarkably accomplished surgeon,” said Gianrico Farrugia, CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. “Any place in the world would be pleased to have him coming ... It’s a real coup to have him coming to Florida. I think he will have a remarkable impact on Jacksonville”. His recruitment is part of a strategy that Mayo in Jacksonville has been pursing for the last 15 months of increasing its status as a destination medical center for the Southeast United States and Latin America, Farrugia said.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, will join Mayo Clinic as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus in September, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Florida Times Union
Mayo Clinic researcher honored with prestigious award
by Charlie Patton

In 2011, Rademakers’ lab identified a mutation of the C9orf72 gene, which turned out to be the most common cause of both Florida Times-Union newspaper logofrontotemporal dementia and of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often called Lou Gehrig’s disease. Her lab has since discovered several genetic factors that help explain why some people with the mutation develop ALS while others develop frontotemporal dementia and still others develop both.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! News — Two Researchers to Receive $100,000 Potamkin Prize for Dementia Research

Context: Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D., a neurogeneticist on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive one of the highest honors in neuroscience: the 2016 Potamkin Prize for Research in Pick’s, Alzheimer’s and Related Diseases. The $100,000 prize is an internationally recognized tribute for advancing dementia research. It recognizes major contributions to the understanding of the causes, prevention, treatment and cure for Pick's, Alzheimer's and related diseases. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic parasite researcher is ticked off by her work
by Allie Shah

A giant plush-toy tick hovers over Dr. Bobbi Pritt from atop the high-powered microscope at her Mayo Clinic office. She pays it no mind as she examines slides of various parasites, describing each creature in a merry tone of voice. “This one is the head ofStar Tribune Variety Logo
a tapeworm that lives inside your gut,” she chirped. “It basically just gets longer and longer and it kind of just absorbs the food that you’re eating. So you’re eating for two.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Bobbi Pritt, M.D., Mayo Clinic Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, research focus is in clinical parasitology, vector-borne diseases, trainee education and appropriate test utilization. As director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory in Mayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Dr. Pritt has coordinated the development of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for multiple tick and mosquito-borne pathogens such as Plasmodium knowlesi, Borrelia mayonii, Borrelia miyamotoi, Powassan virus and chikungunya virus. She is author of the Parasite Wonders blog where she posts a weekly parasite case.  You can also learn about the ABCs of ticks on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

 

Twin Cities Business
Q&A: How Mayo Is Integrating 3D Printing Into The Operating Room
by Sam Schaust

The emerging technology is revolutionizing the way surgeons tackle complicated operations, and the practice of simulating Twin Cities Business Magazine Logosurgeries with anatomically correct, patient-specific models is becoming a tactic widely adopted by medical professionals at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. Dr. Jonathan “Jay” Morris, a diagnostic and interventional neuroradiologist, and Dr. Jane Matsumoto, a pediatric radiologist, head the organization’s burgeoning 3D printing lab. (They instead call it “the anatomical modeling lab.”)

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: Not all great advances in surgery happen in the operating room. Some are coming off the printer – a 3D printer. At Mayo Clinic, radiologists and surgeons are teaming up to discover every possible detail about complex cases before the operation. In some situations, it means patients experience less pain, shorter hospital stays and quicker recoveries. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Ethan Grove, Dennis Douda

 

Post Bulletin
Mayo Clinic doctor wins award for MS research
by Brett Boese

A Mayo Clinic doctor will be honored this week in Canada for her groundbreaking research on multiple sclerosis. Dr. Claudia Lucchinetti will be given the 2016 John Dystel Prize for MS Research Tuesday at the American Academy of Neurology annualLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper meeting in Vancouver. She'll be given $15,000 for the award, the second time a Mayo doctor has been honored by the group since its inception in 1995.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: Claudia Lucchinetti, M.D., will be awarded the 2016 John Dystel Prize for Multiple Sclerosis Research for her outstanding contributions to understanding and treating multiple sclerosis. Dr. Lucchinetti is one of only a few neurologists in the world with expertise in neuroinflammation, and her research has led to paradigm shifts in our understanding of central nervous system demyelinating diseases over the past two decades. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: 3D printing lab, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC15's Rally for Red, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's Prevention Registry, amyloid beta production, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), anatomical modeling lab, AOL News, Aol.On


April 8th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Jimmy Kimmel Live
Jimmy Kimmel and Guillermo Learn How to Wash Their Hands

Washing your hands is very important. Jimmy wanted to make sure he was doing it right, so we got in touch with a doctor at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota named Dr Poland. He is a specialist in infectious disease and he flew all the way to LA just to teach Jimmy and Guillermo how to wash their hands.Jimmy Kimmel Live

Reach: Jimmy Kimmel Live averages more than 2.4 million viewers each night.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research. Dr. Poland recently appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live to demonstrate the proper hand washing technique.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Tampa Bay Times
Experts say research shows promise for a breast cancer vaccine
by Kathleen McGrory

There are vaccines to help the body fight off measles, mumps and the flu. But breast cancer? That's exactly the technology a Florida-based company is hoping to bring to the market in the Tampa Bay Timesnot-so-distant future. The company, TapImmune Inc., is teaming up with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville to test two vaccines that could help the body fend off certain types of breast, ovarian and lung cancers. Mayo plans to launch a 280-patient clinical trial on one of the vaccines this summer. "There's a lot of potential," said Keith Knutson, the Mayo faculty member who designed the vaccine.

Reach: The Tampa Bay Times has a daily circulation of more than 166,000 readers and serves readers in the greater St. Petersburg, Tampa, and Clearwater, Florida market. Its website has more than 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Arizona Republic
Ask a Doc: Going vegan? Consider this

Question: Could vegans be at risk for deficiency of essential nutrients? Answer: The health benefits of a whole foods plant-based diet are well-known, but the question of essential nutrients remains….The Mayo Clinic review team recommends that health care providers monitor vegan patients for adequate blood levels of vitamin B-12, iron, ferritin, calcium and vitamin D.Arizona Republic newspaper logo

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: The health benefits of a plant-based diet is well-known, but the question remains: Could vegans be at risk for deficiency of essential nutrients? A retrospective review by Mayo Clinic physicians recently published in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association indicated that vegans should ensure adequate intake of a few nutrients. “We found that some of these nutrients, which can have implications in neurologic disorders, anemia, bone strength and other health concerns, can be deficient in poorly planned vegan diets,” says Heather Fields, M.D., Community and Internal Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Contrary to popular belief, "Vegans have not been shown to be deficient in protein intake or in any specific amino acids." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

NPR
New Advances In The Understanding And Treatment Of Migraines

Severe, throbbing head pain, sensitivity to light, nausea…these are just some of the symptoms the 36 million migraine sufferers in the U.S. regularly endure…Interview with Dr. David Diane Rehm Show LogoDodick  director, migraine program at the Mayo Clinic; chair, American Migraine Foundation.

Reach: Each week, more than 2.4 million listeners across the country tune in to The Diane Rehm Show, which has grown from a small local morning call-in show on Washington’s WAMU 88.5 to one of public broadcasting’s most listened-to programs.

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an expert in concussion care and director of the Mayo Clinic Concussion Program.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

WCCO-TV
Mayo Clinic Center Reaches Out To Young Athletes

Athletic training continues to get more sophisticated and more specialized. That is why the Mayo Clinic Center in downtown Minneapolis held a clinic Monday to bring in experts to talk to high school kids about what it really means to be a “healthy” athlete in a variety of ways. The hottest topics in high school sports are changing. The athletes of today are getting moreWCCO logo information on the total being, meaning nutrition, athleticism and over-specialization.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Context: Mayo Clinic now extends its global expertise in sports medicine to the Twin Cities with the opening of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine located at Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis, across the street from Target Center. Mayo's Sports Medicine practice also offers athletes of all ages and abilities performance training programs.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

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Tags: 6681 liver transplants performed at Mayo Clinic campuses, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, Aberdeen News, Adding chemotherapy to radiation to brain tumors, AJMC.com, amyloid plaques, amyloid-beta peptides, Ann-Marie Knight, April is National Donate Life Month, Arizona Republic, Attn.com


April 1st, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Cancer Treatment’s New Direction
by Ron Winslow

Evan Johnson had battled a cold for weeks, endured occasional nosebleeds and felt so fatigued he struggled to finish his workouts at the gym. But it was the unexplained bruises and chest pain that ultimately sent the then 23-year-old senior at theWSJ Banner University of North Dakota to the Mayo Clinic. There a genetic test revealed a particularly aggressive form of acute myeloid leukemia..…Dr. Kasi and his Mayo colleagues—Naseema Gangat, a hematologist, and Shahrukh Hashmi, a transplant specialist—are among the authors of an account of Mr. Johnson’s case published in January in the journal Leukemia Research Reports.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Naseema Gangat, M.B.B.S., is a Mayo Clinic hematologist, Shahrukh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic hematologist and transplant specialist and Pashtoon Kasi is a Mayo oncology fellow. Evan Johnson’s case was published in the the journal Leukemia Research Reports and is an example of Mayo Clinic’s multidisciplinary-team based care approach. 

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

New York Times
On C.T.E. and Athletes, Science Remains in Its Infancy
by Benedict Carey

In the best study to determine risk so far, published in December, a research team at a Mayo Clinic bank in Jacksonville found The New York Times newspaper logoC.T.E. in 21 of 66 brains of people who had played contact sports. It found no evidence of the disorder in 198 people with no record of playing such sports. But the authors said they had no way to know whether those 21 former athletes had symptoms linked to C.T.E.; some had other neurological disorders as well when they died. “These are very early days, and we badly need larger studies, that include both athletes and nonathletes,” said Dr. Dennis Dickson, the study’s senior author.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Related coverage:

Washington Post — Dale Earnhardt Jr. plans to donate his brain for concussion research

Previous coverage in March 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth. About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic will begin construction on two new buildings, costing $100 million, this year
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville announced Tuesday that it will begin $100 million in major construction projects this year. It will begin construction this summer on what Mayo officials are calling “a destination medical building” that will provideFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo integrated services for complex cancers, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. The 150,000-square-foot building will have four stories with the potential to add 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit in the first year after the building opens.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

WJXT-TV Jacksonville — Mayo Clinic announces $100M expansion;  WOKV-RadioJacksonville Daily Record, Jacksonville Business Journal, First Coast News, Twin Cities Business, WOKV-TV Florida

Context: Advancing its position as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience. This summer, Mayo Clinic will begin constructing an innovative destination medical building that will provide integrated services needed for complex cancer, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. Initially rising four stories, the 150,000-square-foot building has the potential for 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit the first year the building opens. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Fast Company
Mayo Clinic Technology Said To Alleviate Nausea From VR
by Dahniel Terdiman

VR sickness could soon be a thing of the past, thanks to new technology developed at the famed Mayo Clinic. Today, the clinic Fast Companyannounced that it has licensed its patented galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) technology to the Los Angeles-based entertainment company vMocion. GVS is aimed at helping to alleviate the nausea problem many people have when using virtual reality systems. The idea is to incorporate GVS into a platform, known as 3v—which stands for virtual, vestibular, and visual—into VR and augmented reality systems, giving users what they call a three-dimensional movement experience.

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Additional coverage: Forbes, Electronic Specifier, Engadget, (e) Science News, Digital Journal, Tech Crunch

Context:  Mayo Clinic and Mocion, LLC, an entertainment technology company, today announced it is making available Mayo Clinic’s patented Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation (GVS) technology specifically for use in virtual reality and augmented reality. vMocion’s 3v™ Platform (which stands for virtual, vestibular and visual) incorporates this patented GVS technology, which adds a complete sense of three-dimensional movement for the first time into a virtual reality or augmented reality environment. vMocion has been granted the exclusive, global, perpetual license for Mayo Clinic’s GVS patents and algorithms within all media and entertainment categories and will offer the 3v Platform to other media and entertainment companies through a licensing agreement. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: "MoodCheck", acute myeloid leukemia, AdWeek, Albuquerque Journal, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Anesthesiology News, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, benchmarks of good health, bioengineer replacement tissue, bladder cancer, BLR.com


March 19th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

ESPN
Latest studies: Brain disease from contact sports more common
by Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada

Latest studies: Brain disease from contact sports more common. Armed with the new definition, researchers at the Mayo Clinic searched for signs of CTE among thESPN Outside the Linese 7,000 brains that are preserved at the clinic's Jacksonville, Florida, location. Kevin Bieniek, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Mayo Clinic's Department of Neuroscience, initially narrowed the number to a more manageable 1,800 in an effort to limit his sample to people who participated in contact sports. Bieniek then spent months combing through medical records, obituaries and other resources.

Reach: ESPN Outside the Lines is a sports program that focuses on the most significant sports news of the day. The program airs at 1 pm ET each week day and at 9 am ET on Sundays. ESPN averaged 2.1 million viewers in 2015.

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth. About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

US News & World Report
Asians and Obesity: Looks Can Be Deceiving
by Anna Medaris Miller

While only 11 percent of Asian-Americans are obese, they develop obesity-related complications – namely, hypertension and diabetes – at lower BMIs than do people of other backgrounds,
US News Wellness Logoresearch shows… "The educated [Asian] population knows that they're getting diabetes and hypertension and all these things at a much lower BMI, but if you're in a culture where everybody's really fat and you're thin, you tend to go around and think, 'Well, I'm protected,'" says Dr. Michael Jensen, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who studies how body fat, and its distribution, influences health. "But [you] may not be.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includeshttp://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

US News & World Report
What to Eat, Drink and Do to Relieve Constipation
by Michael O. Schroeder

“Exercises help the intestines squeeze and relax and act more normally,” says Dr. Amy Foxx-Orenstein, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona.  For those with limited mobility, she adds, Pilates done lying on the floor or tai chi can alsoUS News Wellness Logo assist in stimulating blood flow and intestinal activity, which may help get things going.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Finance Canada

Context: Amy Foxx-Orienstein, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

The Boston Globe
A new antidote to aging
by Kevin Hartnett

In a sense, your body is a junkyard, slowly filling up with defective cells that clutter your vital organs. The accumulation of Boston Globe Logothese cells—known as senescent cells—has long been thought to be an important reason why people deteriorate physically as they age. “The removal of cells had the same effect as not accumulating senescent cells to begin with,” says Jan van Deursen, a researcher at the Mayo Clinic and coauthor of the paper. “It had profound beneficial effects.”

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Related coverage: MoneyLife, BCIndian.com

Previous coverage in Feb. 5, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells – cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age – negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects. “Cellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‘emergency brake’ used by damaged cells to stop dividing,” says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. “While halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‘emergency brake’ has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic, Boston Scientific team up to develop devices
By Joe Carlson

Passing a wire through a diseased heart valve is a bit like threading a wet noodle into a garden hose while the tap water is flowing. Passing a wire across a heavily calcified heart valve is the first step in many modern procedures to repair or replace it.Star Tribune newspaper logo But threading it through the jet of blood streaming out of the patient's narrowed valve can be a major technical challenge, especially since knocking bits of built-up calcium can trigger serious health problems. Doctors at Mayo Clinic recently had an idea: What if they could aim the wire at the valve using a special catheter with a small funnel on the end to capture the blood flow and center the gadget right above the jet? That idea will be put to use in a human clinical trial later this year as part of a collaboration between Mayo and Boston Scientific Corp. — a long-running collaboration being publicly unveiled Wednesday morning.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
Boston Business Journal — Boston Scientific to speed up research thanks to suspension of device tax

HIT ConsultantMedical Physics Web, Post Bulletin, KTTC, Twin Cities Business, Star Tribune, MedCity News

Context: Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) and Mayo Clinic announced this week a continuing collaboration where the two organizations share intellectual property and stimulate the rapid development of medical devices to address unmet clinical needs. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

KTTC-TV
Mayo Clinic to open a nanotechnology lab on Jacksonville, FL campus; will enhance cancer research efforts by Frannie Smith

Mayo Clinic is expanding its cancer research efforts with the opening of a nanotechnology lab at the Florida campus. Mayo KTTC TV logoClinic's location in Jacksonville, Florida has been given a $2 million grant from the state to open up the lab. The lab is a key part of Mayo's nanomedicine program.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: With support from the state of Florida, Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has opened a state-of-the-art laboratory for nanotechnology research, an emerging field of science that studies and applies materials that are the size of an atom. The laboratory is a key part of Mayo Clinic’s new Translational Nanomedicine Program. The goal is to develop, test and apply tiny materials in diagnosing and treating patients, particularly those with cancer. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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February 26th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Florida Times-Union
Stenting and surgery equally effective in treating a narrowed carotid artery, according to study
by Charlie Patton

Stenting and surgery are equally effective at reducing the risk of stroke in someone with a narrowed carotid artery, Thomas Brott, a physician who is a professor of neurosciences at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, told participants in the AmericanFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo Heart Association’s International Stroke Conference in Los Angeles Thursday… “The second phase completes a story, and the results are very encouraging,” Brott told the Times-Union this week.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Medscape, Medical News Today, HealthDay, com, Healio.com, Health.com, Doctors Lounge, US News & World ReportNew Hampshire VoiceBismarck Tribune, Arizona Daily Star, La Crosse Tribune, MedPage Today, The Daily StarMedPage Today 

Context: Stenting and surgery are equally effective at lowering the long-term risk of stroke from a narrowed carotid artery, according to results of CREST – a 10-year, federally funded clinical trial led by researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida. The results were published recently online in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at theAmerican Heart Association’s International Stroke Conference in Los Angeles. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

NBC News
Want to Reduce Your Cholesterol? Doctors Suggest Lowering Stress

As millions of Americans tackle high cholesterol, experts say one of the most significant risk factors — stress — is often NBC News With Lester Holt Logooverlooked. Interview with Dr. Stephen Kopecky.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: Stephen Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

KJZZ Ariz.
Phoenix Mayo Clinic Opens New Cancer Center, Proton Beam Therapy Program
 by Andrew Bernier

Traditional radiation treatment for cancer can hurt as many healthy cells as cancerous ones. Now a Valley hospital is opening a new cancer center linked to a national network which includes pencil-thin radiation targeting often deadly tumors. The MayoKJZZ NPR -AZ Logo Clinic Cancer Center in north Phoenix provides a dedicated facility to the hospital's practicing oncologists. Ruben Mesa, director of the Cancer Center, said having a common facility can better unite doctors and researchers working on a wide variety of cancers.

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Additional coverage: AZ Bio.org

Previous coverage

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota in 2015 and in Arizona in by mid March 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

New York Times
I Don’t Drink Coffee. Should I Start?
by Daniel Victor

As someone who doesn’t drink coffee, I’m sometimes forced to ponder whether I’ve escaped an unhealthy addiction or if I’ve New York Times Well Blog Logojust been asleep my whole life…“There aren’t any guidelines to help guide you on this,” said Dr. Donald Hensrud, director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. “This is kind of an individual decision.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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February 12th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Forbes
A New Bacteria Causing Lyme Disease Discovered - Borrelia mayonii
by Judy Stone

There’s a new Borrelia bacterium on the block, joining its cousin in causing Lyme disease. B. mayonii has recently been identified as a new cause of Lyme in the Midwest. Researchers at the Mayo clinic were testing blood of people with suspectedForbes magazine logo Lyme, and came across unexpected findings in six of 9000 patients tested between 2012-14.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KSTP.com, NBCNews.com, CBS News, WCCO.com,US News & World Report, NPR, Time, FOX News, Newsweek, Latinos Health, Reuters, MPR, Allentown Morning Call, TeenVogue.com, The Indian Republic, Medical DailyKAAL-TV.com, Doctors Lounge, Huffington Post, The Inquisitr, Post Bulletin, Daily Mail, The Scientist Magazine, WebMD

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and health officials from Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin, have discovered a new bacterial species that causes Lyme disease in people. The new species has been provisionally named Borrelia mayonii. Prior to this finding, the only species believed to cause Lyme disease in North America was Borrelia burgdorferi. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

 

Science Friday
Can the Placebo Effect Have Real Clinical Value?
by Jo Marchant

Bonnie Anderson didn’t notice the water on her kitchen floor until it was too late. ...But the water purifier had been leaking and she slipped on the Science Fridaywet tiles, landing flat on her back. Unable to move, Bonnie felt an excruciating pain in her spine…’”Bonnie’s surgeon at the Mayo Clinic, David Kallmes, says he too had seen “positive” results from the procedure, with around 80 percent of his patients getting substantial benefit from it. But nonetheless he was starting to have doubts. The amount of cement that surgeons injected didn’t seem to matter much. And Kallmes knew of several cases in which cement was accidentally injected into the wrong part of the spine, and yet the patients still improved. “There were clues that maybe there was a lot more going on than just the cement,” he says.

Reach: Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4pm Eastern time as part of NPR's 'Talk of the Nation' programming. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand.

Context: David Kallmes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon and radiologist.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Reader’s Digest
Sitting Is Killing You: What One Office Decided to Do About It
by James A. Levine, MD, Ph.D.

…I have spent the last 25 years running the anti-chair movement from my laboratory at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. I’ve learned that people with obesity who lived in the same environment as people who are lean sit 2 hours and 15 minutesReaders Digest Logo more a day than lean people.

Reach:  Reader's Digest has a circulation of more than 3.4 million and is published 10 times per year. Its website has nearly 1.7 million unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:
My Palm Beach Post — 5 reasons why sitting too much is killing you

Context: James Levine, M.D. PH.D. is a world authority on obesity, serving as a named expert at the United Nations, an invitee to the President's Cancer Panel, and a consultant to governments internationally. He is the Dr. Richard F. Emslander Professor of Endocrinology and Nutrition Research at Mayo Clinic. He holds five tenured professorships at ASU, is the Dean's Distinguished Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, and the Regents Professor at Umea University, Sweden. He also serves as the co-director of Obesity Solutions, a collaboration between Mayo Clinic and ASU, and is the international director of Obesity Solutions' sister center in Sweden.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

USA Today
Study finds dementia rates falling steadily
by Liz Szabo

— A long-running study has found that dementia rates fell steadily over the past four decades, most likely due to declining USA Today newspaper logoates of heart disease…."We’ve been preaching for years that what’s good for the heart is good for the brain," said Ronald Petersen, who directs the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. "Maybe our efforts to watch our diet and exercise are having a spillover effect, leading to less dementia."

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Wall Street Journal
Stress Raises Cholesterol More Than You Think
by Betsy McKay

Christopher Edginton was taking medication and trying to improve his diet when his cholesterol shot uWSJ Bannerp anyway four years ago. His doctor suggested a new approach….“Stress will make your cholesterol go up,” says Stephen Kopecky, a preventive cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who is treating Mr. Edginton. “Without a doubt, that has been underrecognized.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Stephen Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. His research interests include cardiovascular clinical trials primarily in coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Traci Klein

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February 5th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo chief John Noseworthy talks about the future of health care
By Joe Carlson

Dr. John Noseworthy is best known as president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, but he’s also a governor with the WorStar Tribune Business section logold Economic Forum (WEF). At the group’s 46th annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, earlier this month Noseworthy spoke on a WEF panel with U.S. Health and Human
Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell and others about the future of health care. In a phone interview after the discussion, Noseworthy talked about Mayo’s work for Medicare’s value-based purchasing program on hip and knee surgeries, and whether the developing world can benefit from lessons learned in expensive health care systems in developed nations like the U.S.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

HealthLeaders Media — Mayo chief John Noseworthy talks about the future of healthcare

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Device experiment program saves lives, speeds products to market: Mayo is part of a plan to get devices to market faster. 
By Jim Spencer

Ron Hall owes his life to Mayo Clinic surgeon Gustavo Oderich and a Food and Drug Administration early feasibility study that helps get medical Star Tribune Business section logodevices to market faster. In December, the 80-year-old Blue Earth County man was preparing for a wrist operation when a test showed that the major artery carrying blood through his stomach was at high risk of rupturing. Hall and his wife first thought of going to the Department of Veterans Affairs for treatment. “Then my brain clicked on that we were near the Mayo Clinic,” said Val Hall, Ron’s spouse. “And we got referred there.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Gustavo Oderich, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vascular surgeon. Dr. Oderich conducts ongoing clinical research focused on complex aortic aneurysms and treatment of mesenteric artery disease.

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic's new Jacoby Center for Breast Health consolidates services in one spot
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville’s new Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health should create a more efficientFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo, more integrated approach to breast care, said Sarah A. McLaughlin, a breast surgeon with Mayo. The new center, which consolidates all of Mayo’s operations involving breast health on one floor, was funded by a $5 million gift from philanthropists Robert E. and Monica Jacoby of Ponte Vedra Beach.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Washington Times Online, Sun Herald Online, Tampa Tribune Online

Context: Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus today announced the opening of the Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health, which was funded by a $5 million gift from Robert E. and Monica Jacoby of Ponte Vedra, Florida. The new 16,000-square-foot  multidisciplinary breast center offers patients a comprehensive array of diagnostic, treatment and after-care services for all types of breast disease, including breast cancer, in a single location. “As a state-designated Cancer Center of Excellence, Mayo Clinic continues to expand and enhance comprehensive cancer care services to make them available to more patients in Jacksonville as well as all of Florida and the Southeast,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “The Jacoby Center for Breast Health will have a positive impact on patients seeking high quality breast health care. We greatly appreciate the generous gift from the Jacoby family that has made the new breast health center possible on our Florida campus.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

New York Times blog
Pursuing the Dream of Healthy Aging
by Jane Brody

“Aging is by far the best predictor of whether people will develop a chronic disease like atherosclerotic heart disease, stroke, New York Times Well Blog Logocancer, dementia or osteoarthritis,” Dr. James L. Kirkland, director of the Kogod Center on Aging at the Mayo Clinic, said in an interview. “Aging way outstrips all other risk factors.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D. leads the  Mayo Clinic Kogod Center on Aging. Dr. Kirkland's research focuses on the impact of cellular aging (senescence) on age-related dysfunction and chronic diseases, especially developing methods for removing these cells and alleviating their effects. Senescent cells accumulate with aging and in such diseases as dementias, atherosclerosis, cancers, diabetes and arthritis.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

 

Wall Street Journal
The Small Warnings Before Cardiac Arrest
by Ron Winslow

…Say someone has a brief episode of chest pain during exercise for the first time and goes without further symptoms and, after having no further symptoms, suffers sudden cardiac arrest three weeks later. “Should that person have called 911, or soughtWSJ Banner assistance from his or her physician?” asks Roger White, an anesthesiologist and cardiac arrest expert at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. “That sort of question is left completely unanswered.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context:  Roger White, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. White's research focuses on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

NPR
Boosting Life Span By Clearing Out Cellular Clutter
by Nell Greenfieldboyce

Mice were much healthier and lived about 25 percent longer when scientists killed off a certain kind of cell that accumulates in NPR Shots Health Newsthe body with age… These are cells that have stopped dividing, though not necessarily because the cells themselves are old. "It's a normal cell that experienced an unusual amount of stress, and it decided to stop dividing," says Jan van Deursen, who studies senescent cells at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: NPR's Shots blog provides news about health and medicine. The blog has more than 68,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Fast Company, Newsweek, The Telegraph UK, The Atlantic, Yahoo News, HealthDay, nature.com, The Mirror UK, The Independent UK, Fortune

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells – cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age – negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects. “Cellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‘emergency brake’ used by damaged cells to stop dividing,” says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. “While halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‘emergency brake’ has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

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November 25th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

 

Happy Thansgiving

Washington Post
How you can figure out whether you’re too fat with a single piece of string
by Darla Cameron

Everybody knows that having a a bit of belly -- or more -- could be bad for your health, but is that always true? According to new research, one way to answer that question is pretty simply: measure the broadest part of your waist and hips with a piece of string. “If it takesWashington Post newspaper logo more string to measure waist than hips that’s bad, and it relates to a higher rate of death,” said Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, a Mayo Clinic researcher and lead author on a study exploring the relationship between body mass index and weight distribution.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez studies obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up. This recent study was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. More information about the study can be found in the abstract and in the summary for patients.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Reuters
Are Pets In The Bedroom A Problem For Sleep?
by Lisa Rapaport

There are many potential health benefits to pet ownership, but a good night’s sleep may not necessarily be one of them, a small study suggests…Reuters LogoEven though pets have the potential to jostle their humans or make noise that keeps people awake, the question of whether pets might contribute to sleeping problems isn’t one doctors regularly ask patients, said lead study author Dr. Lois Krahn, a specialist in sleep medicine and psychiatry at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Medical Daily, Business Insider, CANOE, Yahoo! , NEWSMAXDispatch Tribunal 

Context: This study was recently published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. According to the study, the presence of pets in the bedroom can alter the sleep environment in ways that could affect sleep. Data were collected by questionnaire and interview from 150 consecutive patients seen at the Center for Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Seventy-four people (49%) reported having pets, with 31 (41% of pet owners) having multiple pets. More than half of pet owners (56%) allowed their pets to sleep in the bedroom. Fifteen pet owners (20%) described their pets as disruptive, whereas 31 (41%) perceived their pets as unobtrusive or even beneficial to sleep. Lois Krahn, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic sleep medicine specialist. Mayo Clinic doctors and other staff trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults in the Sleep Disorders Center at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

KJZZ Ariz.
Joseph Sirven: The Power of Thanks

It was the end of the appointment. My patient was seeing me after successful surgery to eliminate a nonmalignant tumor causing his epilepsy.  He stood up to leave and said, "Doc, do you mind if I give you a hug because saying thank you just doesn't seem enough?"KJZZ NPR -AZ Logo

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Context: Joseph Sirven, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

 

Men’s Health
Why You Shouldn’t Take Herbal Viagra
by Cindy Kuzma

… Unlike the real Viagra, you don’t need a prescription for these pills—you can pick them up at your local drugstore, gas station, or even online. Mens Health LogoSure, these supplements are often cheaper than what your doctor can order up, and you don’t have to talk to him or her about your sex life to procure them. But you’re putting your health at risk if you take them, says Landon Trost, M.D., a urologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Here’s why.

Reach:  Mens' Health is a monthly magazine with an audience of more than 1.8 million readers. The magazine was established in 1986 and written to help men take control of their physical, mental and emotional lives.

Context: Landon Trost, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic urologist. Mayo Clinic urologists diagnose and treat problems involving the male and female urinary tract and the male reproductive organs. Unlike most other medical subspecialists, urologists provide care throughout the life cycle — from newborns to elderly. Because of the broad range of clinical problems they encounter, urologists have a familiarity with many other medical fields — such as internal medicine, pediatrics, gynecology, geriatrics and oncology — in addition to surgical training.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

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November 20th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

WBNG 12 Action News
Local provider joins Mayo Clinic network
by Nick Papantonis

…“Joining the Mayo Clinic Care Network was a natural fit for Guthrie, and we feel it makes sense for both our organizations,” said Joeseph Scopelliti, M.D., president and CEO of Guthrie. For its part, the Mayo Clinic network will have access to the expertise from Guthrie’s fourWBNG CBS NY hospitals and 290 physicians. “This relationship gives us the opportunity to build on our uniquely similar cultures,” said David Hayes, M.D., medical director of the Mayo network.

Reach: WBNG-TV is the CBS-affiliated television station for the Eastern Twin Tiers of Southern Upstate New York and Northern Pennsylvania.

Additional coverage: My Twin Tiers, Elmira Star-Gazette, Corning Leader, My Twin Tiers, Steuben Courier Advocate, WENY NY, Morning Times, Time Warner Cable News, Press Connects

Context: Guthrie and Mayo Clinic announced this week that Guthrie has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of health care providers committed to better serving patients and their families through collaboration. Guthrie, the first health care organization based in Pennsylvania and New York to join the network, will be its 36th member. The formal agreement gives Guthrie access to the latest Mayo Clinic knowledge and promotes physician collaboration that complements local expertise. “Joining the Mayo Clinic Care Network was a natural fit for Guthrie, and we feel it makes sense for both our organizations,” says Joseph Scopelliti, M.D., president and CEO, of Guthrie. “We share a history with Mayo Clinic, as Guthrie was modeled after Mayo when Dr. Guthrie returned here from his residency training in Rochester, Minnesota, over 100 years ago.” More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukishima Madson

 

News4Jax
Positively Jax: Mother receives lifesaving heart transplant
by Francesca Amiker

Months after News4Jax first aired the story about a local mother in need of a heart transplant, she received the news that her life depended on it. Laquisha Mathis, a mother of five has been living with cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. In February she was told she had six News Jax 4 Logomonths to live, unless she received a lifesaving heart transplant. At the time under her health care policy she was unable to receive the transplant but thanks to her determined doctors and the stories on News4Jax, she says she is now receiving a second chance at life. Last week Mathis received the news she’s been praying for, a heart transplant.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: This young Jacksonville mother of five who was told she only had a few months to live back in February unless she received a heart transplant. The patient, who originally had several obstacles preventing her from being listed for a new heart, eventually was listed thanks to support from Mayo Clinic’s Florida transplant team and received her new heart on Nov. 4 after a more than two month wait. At Mayo Clinic, an integrated team of doctors trained in heart disease (cardiologists), heart and lung surgery (cardiac and thoracic surgeons), infectious disease management, and other specialties evaluates you and treats your condition. Mayo Clinic doctors work with doctors from many other areas to provide the most appropriate heart care.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Washington Post
Here’s what happens to your body after you down an energy drink. It’s kind of scary
by Ariana Cha

There's been a lot of controversy about caffeine-spiked energy drinks in recent years following a spate of deaths aWashington Post newspaper logond overdoses related to the beverages. In one of the most heartbreaking cases, 14-year-old Anais Fournier of Maryland died after consuming two 24-ounce cans of an energy drink. Food and Drug Administration has been studying such cases to try to determine if there's a causal link and, if so, what to do about it…In an effort to get more information about exactly happens in your body after you consume one of the drinks, Mayo Clinic researcher Anna Svatikova and her colleagues recruited 25 volunteers.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Additional coverage:

Star Tribune — To Your Health: Drinking even just one energy drink a day may boost heart disease risk, Yahoo!

Previous coverage

Context: New research shows that drinking one 16-ounce energy drink can increase blood pressure and stress hormone responses significantly. This raises the concern that these response changes could increase the risk of cardiovascular events, according to a study presented this week at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015. The findings also are published in the Journal of the American Medical Association“In previous research, we found that energy drink consumption increased blood pressure in healthy young adults,” says Anna Svatikova, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiology fellow and the first author. “We now show that the increases in blood pressure are accompanied by increases in norepinephrine, a stress hormone chemical, and this could predispose an increased risk of cardiac events – even in healthy people.” More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Economic development chief is the force driving Rochester's $6B rebirth
by Matt McKinney

A pair of tennis shoes tucked into her bag, a water bottle at the ready, Lisa Clarke steps into a meeting in a busy morning full of them and drops a
Star Tribune newspaper logowell-worn line. “It’s a good day to be in Rochester,” she says, flashing a broad smile at those in attendance. The extra shoes come in handy when she’s hurrying through the city’s skyways to her next thing. A packed schedule came with the job, as did a long title: executive director of the Destination Medical Center’s Economic Development Agency.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contact: Jamie Rothe

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