Items Tagged ‘Dr. James Levine’

February 5th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo chief John Noseworthy talks about the future of health care
By Joe Carlson

Dr. John Noseworthy is best known as president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, but he’s also a governor with the WorStar Tribune Business section logold Economic Forum (WEF). At the group’s 46th annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, earlier this month Noseworthy spoke on a WEF panel with U.S. Health and Human
Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell and others about the future of health care. In a phone interview after the discussion, Noseworthy talked about Mayo’s work for Medicare’s value-based purchasing program on hip and knee surgeries, and whether the developing world can benefit from lessons learned in expensive health care systems in developed nations like the U.S.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

HealthLeaders Media — Mayo chief John Noseworthy talks about the future of healthcare

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Device experiment program saves lives, speeds products to market: Mayo is part of a plan to get devices to market faster. 
By Jim Spencer

Ron Hall owes his life to Mayo Clinic surgeon Gustavo Oderich and a Food and Drug Administration early feasibility study that helps get medical Star Tribune Business section logodevices to market faster. In December, the 80-year-old Blue Earth County man was preparing for a wrist operation when a test showed that the major artery carrying blood through his stomach was at high risk of rupturing. Hall and his wife first thought of going to the Department of Veterans Affairs for treatment. “Then my brain clicked on that we were near the Mayo Clinic,” said Val Hall, Ron’s spouse. “And we got referred there.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Gustavo Oderich, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vascular surgeon. Dr. Oderich conducts ongoing clinical research focused on complex aortic aneurysms and treatment of mesenteric artery disease.

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic's new Jacoby Center for Breast Health consolidates services in one spot
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville’s new Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health should create a more efficientFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo, more integrated approach to breast care, said Sarah A. McLaughlin, a breast surgeon with Mayo. The new center, which consolidates all of Mayo’s operations involving breast health on one floor, was funded by a $5 million gift from philanthropists Robert E. and Monica Jacoby of Ponte Vedra Beach.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Washington Times Online, Sun Herald Online, Tampa Tribune Online

Context: Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus today announced the opening of the Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health, which was funded by a $5 million gift from Robert E. and Monica Jacoby of Ponte Vedra, Florida. The new 16,000-square-foot  multidisciplinary breast center offers patients a comprehensive array of diagnostic, treatment and after-care services for all types of breast disease, including breast cancer, in a single location. “As a state-designated Cancer Center of Excellence, Mayo Clinic continues to expand and enhance comprehensive cancer care services to make them available to more patients in Jacksonville as well as all of Florida and the Southeast,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “The Jacoby Center for Breast Health will have a positive impact on patients seeking high quality breast health care. We greatly appreciate the generous gift from the Jacoby family that has made the new breast health center possible on our Florida campus.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

New York Times blog
Pursuing the Dream of Healthy Aging
by Jane Brody

“Aging is by far the best predictor of whether people will develop a chronic disease like atherosclerotic heart disease, stroke, New York Times Well Blog Logocancer, dementia or osteoarthritis,” Dr. James L. Kirkland, director of the Kogod Center on Aging at the Mayo Clinic, said in an interview. “Aging way outstrips all other risk factors.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D. leads the  Mayo Clinic Kogod Center on Aging. Dr. Kirkland's research focuses on the impact of cellular aging (senescence) on age-related dysfunction and chronic diseases, especially developing methods for removing these cells and alleviating their effects. Senescent cells accumulate with aging and in such diseases as dementias, atherosclerosis, cancers, diabetes and arthritis.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

 

Wall Street Journal
The Small Warnings Before Cardiac Arrest
by Ron Winslow

…Say someone has a brief episode of chest pain during exercise for the first time and goes without further symptoms and, after having no further symptoms, suffers sudden cardiac arrest three weeks later. “Should that person have called 911, or soughtWSJ Banner assistance from his or her physician?” asks Roger White, an anesthesiologist and cardiac arrest expert at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. “That sort of question is left completely unanswered.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context:  Roger White, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. White's research focuses on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

NPR
Boosting Life Span By Clearing Out Cellular Clutter
by Nell Greenfieldboyce

Mice were much healthier and lived about 25 percent longer when scientists killed off a certain kind of cell that accumulates in NPR Shots Health Newsthe body with age… These are cells that have stopped dividing, though not necessarily because the cells themselves are old. "It's a normal cell that experienced an unusual amount of stress, and it decided to stop dividing," says Jan van Deursen, who studies senescent cells at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: NPR's Shots blog provides news about health and medicine. The blog has more than 68,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Fast Company, Newsweek, The Telegraph UK, The Atlantic, Yahoo News, HealthDay, nature.com, The Mirror UK, The Independent UK, Fortune

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells – cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age – negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects. “Cellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‘emergency brake’ used by damaged cells to stop dividing,” says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. “While halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‘emergency brake’ has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

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Tags: "un-Minnesotan.", ABC News, ADHD may Link to Obesity, alcohol during pregnancy, Argentina News, Austin Daily Herald, Baby & Kids Expo, Baltimore Sun blog, Bloomberg News online, Brainerd Daily Dispatch, C.T.E., caffeine


November 25th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

 

Happy Thansgiving

Washington Post
How you can figure out whether you’re too fat with a single piece of string
by Darla Cameron

Everybody knows that having a a bit of belly -- or more -- could be bad for your health, but is that always true? According to new research, one way to answer that question is pretty simply: measure the broadest part of your waist and hips with a piece of string. “If it takesWashington Post newspaper logo more string to measure waist than hips that’s bad, and it relates to a higher rate of death,” said Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, a Mayo Clinic researcher and lead author on a study exploring the relationship between body mass index and weight distribution.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez studies obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up. This recent study was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. More information about the study can be found in the abstract and in the summary for patients.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Reuters
Are Pets In The Bedroom A Problem For Sleep?
by Lisa Rapaport

There are many potential health benefits to pet ownership, but a good night’s sleep may not necessarily be one of them, a small study suggests…Reuters LogoEven though pets have the potential to jostle their humans or make noise that keeps people awake, the question of whether pets might contribute to sleeping problems isn’t one doctors regularly ask patients, said lead study author Dr. Lois Krahn, a specialist in sleep medicine and psychiatry at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Medical Daily, Business Insider, CANOE, Yahoo! , NEWSMAXDispatch Tribunal 

Context: This study was recently published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. According to the study, the presence of pets in the bedroom can alter the sleep environment in ways that could affect sleep. Data were collected by questionnaire and interview from 150 consecutive patients seen at the Center for Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Seventy-four people (49%) reported having pets, with 31 (41% of pet owners) having multiple pets. More than half of pet owners (56%) allowed their pets to sleep in the bedroom. Fifteen pet owners (20%) described their pets as disruptive, whereas 31 (41%) perceived their pets as unobtrusive or even beneficial to sleep. Lois Krahn, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic sleep medicine specialist. Mayo Clinic doctors and other staff trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults in the Sleep Disorders Center at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

KJZZ Ariz.
Joseph Sirven: The Power of Thanks

It was the end of the appointment. My patient was seeing me after successful surgery to eliminate a nonmalignant tumor causing his epilepsy.  He stood up to leave and said, "Doc, do you mind if I give you a hug because saying thank you just doesn't seem enough?"KJZZ NPR -AZ Logo

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Context: Joseph Sirven, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

 

Men’s Health
Why You Shouldn’t Take Herbal Viagra
by Cindy Kuzma

… Unlike the real Viagra, you don’t need a prescription for these pills—you can pick them up at your local drugstore, gas station, or even online. Mens Health LogoSure, these supplements are often cheaper than what your doctor can order up, and you don’t have to talk to him or her about your sex life to procure them. But you’re putting your health at risk if you take them, says Landon Trost, M.D., a urologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Here’s why.

Reach:  Mens' Health is a monthly magazine with an audience of more than 1.8 million readers. The magazine was established in 1986 and written to help men take control of their physical, mental and emotional lives.

Context: Landon Trost, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic urologist. Mayo Clinic urologists diagnose and treat problems involving the male and female urinary tract and the male reproductive organs. Unlike most other medical subspecialists, urologists provide care throughout the life cycle — from newborns to elderly. Because of the broad range of clinical problems they encounter, urologists have a familiarity with many other medical fields — such as internal medicine, pediatrics, gynecology, geriatrics and oncology — in addition to surgical training.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

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Tags: 3D Print, 9News, ABC15 Phoenix, alcoholic hepatitis, Allergic Living, amnestic MCI, Annals of Internal Medicine, anorexia/cachexia, antibiotic resistance, Antibiotics in meat, Asthma Meds, Augusta Chronicle


November 20th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

WBNG 12 Action News
Local provider joins Mayo Clinic network
by Nick Papantonis

…“Joining the Mayo Clinic Care Network was a natural fit for Guthrie, and we feel it makes sense for both our organizations,” said Joeseph Scopelliti, M.D., president and CEO of Guthrie. For its part, the Mayo Clinic network will have access to the expertise from Guthrie’s fourWBNG CBS NY hospitals and 290 physicians. “This relationship gives us the opportunity to build on our uniquely similar cultures,” said David Hayes, M.D., medical director of the Mayo network.

Reach: WBNG-TV is the CBS-affiliated television station for the Eastern Twin Tiers of Southern Upstate New York and Northern Pennsylvania.

Additional coverage: My Twin Tiers, Elmira Star-Gazette, Corning Leader, My Twin Tiers, Steuben Courier Advocate, WENY NY, Morning Times, Time Warner Cable News, Press Connects

Context: Guthrie and Mayo Clinic announced this week that Guthrie has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of health care providers committed to better serving patients and their families through collaboration. Guthrie, the first health care organization based in Pennsylvania and New York to join the network, will be its 36th member. The formal agreement gives Guthrie access to the latest Mayo Clinic knowledge and promotes physician collaboration that complements local expertise. “Joining the Mayo Clinic Care Network was a natural fit for Guthrie, and we feel it makes sense for both our organizations,” says Joseph Scopelliti, M.D., president and CEO, of Guthrie. “We share a history with Mayo Clinic, as Guthrie was modeled after Mayo when Dr. Guthrie returned here from his residency training in Rochester, Minnesota, over 100 years ago.” More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukishima Madson

 

News4Jax
Positively Jax: Mother receives lifesaving heart transplant
by Francesca Amiker

Months after News4Jax first aired the story about a local mother in need of a heart transplant, she received the news that her life depended on it. Laquisha Mathis, a mother of five has been living with cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. In February she was told she had six News Jax 4 Logomonths to live, unless she received a lifesaving heart transplant. At the time under her health care policy she was unable to receive the transplant but thanks to her determined doctors and the stories on News4Jax, she says she is now receiving a second chance at life. Last week Mathis received the news she’s been praying for, a heart transplant.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: This young Jacksonville mother of five who was told she only had a few months to live back in February unless she received a heart transplant. The patient, who originally had several obstacles preventing her from being listed for a new heart, eventually was listed thanks to support from Mayo Clinic’s Florida transplant team and received her new heart on Nov. 4 after a more than two month wait. At Mayo Clinic, an integrated team of doctors trained in heart disease (cardiologists), heart and lung surgery (cardiac and thoracic surgeons), infectious disease management, and other specialties evaluates you and treats your condition. Mayo Clinic doctors work with doctors from many other areas to provide the most appropriate heart care.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Washington Post
Here’s what happens to your body after you down an energy drink. It’s kind of scary
by Ariana Cha

There's been a lot of controversy about caffeine-spiked energy drinks in recent years following a spate of deaths aWashington Post newspaper logond overdoses related to the beverages. In one of the most heartbreaking cases, 14-year-old Anais Fournier of Maryland died after consuming two 24-ounce cans of an energy drink. Food and Drug Administration has been studying such cases to try to determine if there's a causal link and, if so, what to do about it…In an effort to get more information about exactly happens in your body after you consume one of the drinks, Mayo Clinic researcher Anna Svatikova and her colleagues recruited 25 volunteers.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Additional coverage:

Star Tribune — To Your Health: Drinking even just one energy drink a day may boost heart disease risk, Yahoo!

Previous coverage

Context: New research shows that drinking one 16-ounce energy drink can increase blood pressure and stress hormone responses significantly. This raises the concern that these response changes could increase the risk of cardiovascular events, according to a study presented this week at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015. The findings also are published in the Journal of the American Medical Association“In previous research, we found that energy drink consumption increased blood pressure in healthy young adults,” says Anna Svatikova, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiology fellow and the first author. “We now show that the increases in blood pressure are accompanied by increases in norepinephrine, a stress hormone chemical, and this could predispose an increased risk of cardiac events – even in healthy people.” More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Economic development chief is the force driving Rochester's $6B rebirth
by Matt McKinney

A pair of tennis shoes tucked into her bag, a water bottle at the ready, Lisa Clarke steps into a meeting in a busy morning full of them and drops a
Star Tribune newspaper logowell-worn line. “It’s a good day to be in Rochester,” she says, flashing a broad smile at those in attendance. The extra shoes come in handy when she’s hurrying through the city’s skyways to her next thing. A packed schedule came with the job, as did a long title: executive director of the Destination Medical Center’s Economic Development Agency.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contact: Jamie Rothe

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Tags: 24New Canada, 4-Traders, Albany Daily Star, Albert Lea Tribune, Almanac TPT, alternative medicine, alzheimer's disease, Arizona Big Media, Arizona Republic, AZ Republic, Becker’s Hospital Review, Bloomberg


October 29th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Scientists Probe Indoor Work Spaces for Clues to Better Health
by Sumathi Reddy

… Clinical trials are due to get underway early next year at the Well Living Lab, a new, 7,500-square-foot research facility adjacent to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., designed to study indoor environments with the aim of creating healthier spaces.WSJ Banner Sensors throughout the building monitor factors ranging from noise levels to air quality and temperature; other sensors in furniture will tell how long people stay seated and their posture. “The ultimate goal is to improve health,” said Brent Bauer, medical director of the Well Living Lab and professor of medicine for the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. “If we spend 90% of our time in an indoor environment there are almost endless opportunities to find better ways to do what we’re doing inside the building,” he said.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has anaverage circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Exposure to indoor environments is at an all-time high. In fact, Americans spend more than 90 percent of their time indoors, whether at home, work, school, retail stores, fitness centers, health care facilities and more. But what many people don’t realize is that buildings, and everything in them, can affect human health and well-being. Today marked the opening of the Well Living Lab, a new research facility dedicated to studying these environments and creating healthier indoor spaces in which to live, work and play. “There is a growing awareness and body of scientific evidence that indoor, built environments can affect human health and well-being, with the perception often being that indoor environments have a negative impact on health,” said Brent Bauer. M.D., medical director of the Well Living Lab and professor of medicine for Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. “But new knowledge shows that by building healthier indoor environments, we can actually preserve and enhance human health and quality of life.” More information about the Well Living Lab can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

MPR
What is the best research on breast cancer screenings?

On Monday morning, Kerri Miller and her guests try to bring clarity these new MPR News logoevidence-driven guidelines. Dr. Nancy Keating is a primary care physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and Dr. Sandhya Pruthi, who specializes in breast cancer research at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, join Miller to sort through the latest research on breast cancer screenings.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: The American Cancer Society (ACS) has updated its recommendations for breast cancer screening for women at average risk of the disease. The recommendations strongly support the value of mammograms and provide some further direction for women at both ends of the age spectrum. Sandhya Pruthi, M.D., a Breast Clinic physician and Mayo Clinic Cancer Center researcher says,"This is an important paper and we are pleased that ACS has paid attention to and respected patient preferences and values in its recommendation. While the ACS now recommends annual screening mammograms for women who have no risk factors at age 45, it did recommend that women age 40 and up still receive an annual screening mammograms if they choose to seek screening. This shared-decision making approach between a patient and her provider is something we support at Mayo Clinic. Overall, the new ACS recommendations reaffirm that screening mammography for women in their 40s is associated with a decrease in breast cancer deaths." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

KIMT 
Special day for special kid

A Minnesota toddler who has battled brain cancer for more than half his life had a very special day on Monday in Rochester. Vito from Waconia rang a bell at MayoKIMT Clinic to signify the end of his proton beam therapy in Rochester. The now two-year-old was first diagnosed with Medullblastoma at 11 months old and we are told that type of cancer is usually treated with giving radiation to the brain. However, that can be difficult for someone with a developing brain, like Vito. That’s why the family decided to come to Mayo so doctors could focus their treatment, with the proton beam, on specific areas of the brain.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage:

KTTC — 2-year-old boy celebrates completion of proton beam therapy; KWWL Iowa, KOMU Mo., KJRH Okla.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota this past June and in Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Billboard magazine
Meet Music's Top Throat Doctors Who've Saved the Voices of Adele, Sam Smith and More
by Carolina Buia

DAVID LOTT, Phoenix  Specializing in regenerative ­medicine, Lott, the Mayo Clinic’s ­director of its head and neck ­regeneration program, has developed a process to re-create parts of the voice box and vocal folds using stem cells and 3D printing. Although the technology is still in the investigation stage, he plans to offer Billboard magazine logothe treatment to patients (which includes opera and Broadway stars) in 2016…“By addressing the physical and mental aspects of the pain in addition to retraining her vocal system, she could speak with confidence,” he says.

Reach: Billboard has served the entertainment business since 1894. Beginning as a weekly for the bill posting and advertising business, Billboard and its popular music charts have evolved into the primary source of information on trends and innovation in music, serving music fans, artists, top executives, tour promoters, publishers, radio programmers, lawyers, retailers, digital entrepreneurs and many others. Written for music industry professionals and fans. Functions as the trade journal for the music and entertainment industries. Contents provide news, reviews and statistics for all genres of music, including music videos, related internet activity and retail updates. The weekly publication has an audience of 18,000 and its website receives more than 24.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Davi Lott, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic ENT who is dedicated to investigating disorders of the larynx (voice box) and airway. This includes bioengineering of laryngeal and tracheal tissues, laryngeal transplantation techniques and immunotherapy, laryngeal cancer, and functional outcomes of various laryngeal surgical procedures. Read more about Dr. Lott's research here.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Florida Times-Union
Lead Letter: Mayo Clinic is a leader in telemedicine
by Sarvam P. TerKonda, medical director, Connected Care, Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus

The Federal Communications Commission and Mayo Clinic recently sponsored a forum for Florida policy makers on the future of telemedicine — delivery of patientFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo care through a secure video or computer link… Studies have shown that for management of chronic conditions that become more prevalent with age, such as congestive heart failure, diabetes and stroke, outcomes are improved when patients and their local caregivers can be connected remotely to specialty care.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Sarvam TerKonda, M.D., is Mayo Clinic's medical director for Connected Care at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Connected Care integrates new care and service delivery models into traditional outpatient and inpatient care.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: "habit cough" (HC), "non-activity thermogenesis, A.L.S., AARP, Abnormal Thyroid Function, Advance Directives Task Force, Alzheimer's Caregivers, Alzheimer's disease (AD), anaplastic thyroid cancer, Apervita, Apnea Treatment Vacuum, Arizona Capital Times


October 16th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

 

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would   like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.  Thank you.

Editor, Karl OestreichAssistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Teamwork is the key to unlocking the brain's secrets
by John Noseworthy

Right now you’re using millions of cells in your brain to translate these words into conscious thought. UnderstandStar Tribune commentaries logoing language. Summoning memories. Feeling emotion. Solving problems. These are merely a fraction of the marvels made possible by the human brain. It’s the most complex and least understood part of our bodies. Despite all of the incredible medical advances made to improve our health over the last century, the brain’s inner workings, relatively speaking, remain mostly a mystery.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic, St. Vincent's to be partners on cancer center in Riverside
By Charlie Patton

St. Vincent’s HealthCare and the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville agreed to collaborate on a new cancer clinic which will be located on the campus of Florida Times-Union newspaper logoSt. Vincent’s Medical Center Riverside. St. Vincent’s will build and equip the 11,500-square-foot clinic and provide administrative and support staff. The Mayo Clinic will provide the physicians for what will be called the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s Riverside.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

Jacksonville Business Journal — Mayo Clinic, St. Vincent’s HealthCare to partner in cancer care; WJAX Fla., My InforumsBecker’s Hospital Review 

Context: Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a ministry of Ascension Health, are collaborating to bring Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked cancer services to patients in a newly built medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. The goal is to offer Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center’s programs and services to more patients directly in the community. Construction of the 11,500-square-foot medical suite is expected to be completed in summer of 2016. Financial details of the agreement will not be disclosed. “We are thrilled to collaborate with a local health system that is known worldwide for delivering superior cancer care,” says Michael Schatzlein, M.D., President and CEO of St. Vincent’s HealthCare. “Every year, thousands of patients travel across the globe to be treated by Mayo Clinic physicians, and, now, St. Vincent’s will offer our patients the same high-quality care right here on our Riverside campus.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

USA Today
Health: Schoolchildren get into stand-up act
by Karen Weintraub

By now, most adults have gotten the message that slumping in a desk chair all day long isn’t very healthy. Over the last fivUSA Today newspaper logoe years, standing desks have gone from an office oddity to a staple…James Levine said his own research and others’ suggests that children benefit from any extra time to burn off energy. “If you give children the opportunity to move while learning, they will do so,” said Levine, co-director of obesity solutions at the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University. “They’ll double the amount of daily movement.”

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage:

Reuters — Fidgeting while you work might be good for you;  Business Insider, Philly Voice, Philadelphia Inquirer, Grand Forks Herald

Context: James Levine, M.D. PH.D. is a world authority on obesity, serving as a named expert at the United Nations, an invitee to the President's Cancer Panel, and a consultant to governments internationally. He is the Dr. Richard F. Emslander Professor of Endocrinology and Nutrition Research at Mayo Clinic. He holds five tenured professorships at ASU, is the Dean's Distinguished Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, and the Regents Professor at Umea University, Sweden. He also serves as the co-director of Obesity Solutions, a collaboration between Mayo Clinic and ASU, and is the international director of Obesity Solutions' sister center in Sweden.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

U.S. News & World Report
Mayo Clinic CEO: Health Care Focuses on Outcomes, Sharing Knowledge
by Steve Sternberg

…U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow keynote speaker Dr. John Noseworthy, president and chief executive officer at Mayo Clinic, spoke with U.S. US News Health LogoNews about some of the changes affecting the nation's health care system and Mayo's approach to improving health care for tens of thousands of patients inside – and outside – its walls. (The interview has been edited for clarity and length.)

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy is the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow keynote speaker.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Karl Oestreich 

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October 9th, 2015

In the News Mayo Clinic Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo CliniMayo Clinic in the News Logoc in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Forbes
How To Start Up Without Breaking Down
by Sarah Hedgecock

…Dr. Amit Sood, a Mayo Clinic physician and stress expert, gave some advice to Tran and any other entrepreneurs iForbes magazine logon
the room who may feel like their own companies are being taken out of their control: Don’t lose sight of why you’re doing what you’re doing. “You’re here helping the physicians experience low burnout and thereby delivering better care,” Sood told Tran. “If you can keep that meaningful to you, you’ll have much more resilience.”

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment. Dr. Sood talked to three 30 Under 30 alums at Forbes 30 Under 30 Summit about learning how to build a company while remaining emotionally healthy.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Fast Company
Mayo Clinic Launches Ambitious Study On How Being Indoors All The Time Affects Us
by Elizabeth Segran

…So who would subject themselves to this level of scrutiny for the good of science? The Mayo Clinic is tapping local communities that would be Fast Companywilling to be guinea pigs for different experiments. "Many people involved with Mayo see their mission as contributing to the furthering of medical science," Dr. Brent Bauer, medical director of the lab, tells Fast Company. "We've found that med students and Mayo employees are generally happy to participate in experiments like this."

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Additional coverage from Transform 2015:

Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal New Mayo Clinic lab is what the 'Big Brother' house wishes it could be 

KAAL — Medical Innovators Meet In Rochester For Major Conference 

MedCity News — Why I should have brought a box of tissues to Mayo Transform

MedCity News  If we don’t go outdoors enough, let’s optimize the indoors: Mayo Clinic and Delos debut Well Living Lab at Transform 

MedCity News — Common Practice’s conversational game ‘My Gift of Grace’ in action at Mayo Transform

Wired — Why the Mayo Clinic Modeled Its New Lab on a Stuffy Office 

Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal — Mayo Clinic names Big Challenge winners; Post-Bulletin, Modern Healthcare

Context: Exposure to indoor environments is at an all-time high. In fact, Americans spend more than 90 percent of their time indoors, whether at home, work, school, retail stores, fitness centers, health care facilities and more. But what many people don’t realize is that buildings, and everything in them, can affect human health and well-being. The Well Living Lab is a new research facility dedicated to studying these environments and creating healthier indoor spaces in which to live, work and play. More information about the Well Living Lab,Mayo Clinic Think Big Challenge and Transform 2015 can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Brian Kilen, Duska Anastasijevic

 

Florida Times-Union
Telemedicine evolving, impacting health care of state's over 65s
by Charlie Patton

The Federal Communication Commission brought its Connect2HealthFCC task force to the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville on WedneFlorida Times-Union newspaper logosday for a Broadband Health Summit… Telemedicine — the delivery of health care using telecommunications technologies such as video-conferencing — is something the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville has been doing since the 1990s, said Sarvam P. TerKonda, the clinic’s medical director for connected care in Florida.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: News4Jax, WJCT

Context: Sarvam TerKonda, M.D., is Mayo Clinic's medical director for Connected Care at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Connected Care integrates new care and service delivery models into traditional outpatient and inpatient care.

Contact: Cindy Weiss

 

Pioneer Press
Are heart problems more prevalent in runners?
by Richard Chin

…Some of these studies suggest a J- or U-shaped curve of the effects of exercise, in which mortality rates or heart problems are lowest for people Pioneer Press Sportswho engage in moderate levels of exercise, but they seem to rise at the ends of the spectrum in physical activity, among those who were sedentary or who are high-volume or high-intensity athletes. The studies "raise intriguing possibilities," but it's not time to hang up your running shoes, according to Todd Miller, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and medical director of Mayo's Sports Cardiology Clinic.

Reach: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has readers of more than 308,000 and has more than 511,111 Sunday newspaper readers. Its TwinCities.com website has more than 2.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Todd Miller, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and director of Mayo Clinic's Sports Cardiology Clinic.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

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October 1st, 2015

In the News Mayo Clinic Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

 

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

 

 

 

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor: Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
How One Family Faced Difficult Decisions About DNA Sequencing
by Amy Dockser Marcus

… Giusti realized that whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing—sequencing someone’s complete DNA or an impoWSJ Bannerrtant section of it—might yield information about the family’s cancer risk, particularly for her daughter, Nicole, 21, and her 18-year-old son, David. So, Ms. Giusti proposed an idea to A. Keith Stewart, the director of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine: sequence my immediate family, and let’s study all the information. Dr. Stewart, curious about why identical twins got two different types of cancer, agreed.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine is solving the clinical challenges of today and tomorrow by bringing the latest discoveries from the research laboratory to your doctor's fingertips in the form of new genomics-based tests and treatments. A. Keith Stewart, M.D. is the center's director.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
The Price We Pay for Sitting Too Much
by Sumathi Reddy

New research is helping medical experts devise formulas for how long a typical office worker should spend sitting and standing… Michael WSJ BannerJensen, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who specializes in obesity and diabetes, uses various ways to reduce daily sitting time that he also recommends to his patients. When he has meetings with just one or two people, he finds a place where they can walk together instead of sitting. And he tells his patients who are parents to use their children’s athletic events as a time to be on their feet. “There’s no reason you have to sit and watch those games,” Dr. Jensen said.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage:

Good Morning America — Debunking Fitness Myths: Standing Desks; The Australian

Context: Michael Jensen, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab studies the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Star Tribune
Mayo receives $9M federal innovation grant
by Jeremy Olson

Mayo Clinic will receive up to $9 million in federal funding to help affiliated doctors and clinics outside Rochester adopt some of the team-basedStar Tribune newspaper logo medical techniques and integrated care that have been hallmarks of its success… “Health care is too expensive,” said Dr. Kari Bunkers, medical director for Mayo’s Office of Population Health Management. “This is our effort at reducing the high cost of health care and implementing a model that delivers more for less.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Wall Street Journal — Grants Aim to Boost Patient Care 

Context: The Mayo Practice Transformation Network is one of 39 health care collaborative networks selected to participate in the Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative, announced today by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell. Mayo Clinic will receive up to $9.7 million to provide technical assistance support to help equip clinicians in the Mayo Practice Transformation Network with tools, information and network support needed to improve quality of care, increase patients’ access to information and spend health care dollars more wisely. This initiative is a collaboration between the Mayo Clinic Office of Population Health Management (OPHM) and the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery (CSHCD). It is led by principal investigator Nilay Shah, Ph.D., health services researcher in the CSHCD, and co-principal investigator Kari Bunkers, M.D., primary care physician in the Mayo Clinic Health System and medical director of the OPHM. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Elizabeth Zimmerman Young

 

Reuters
Kids with asthma fare worse when they live with smokers
by Lisa Rapaport

Kids with asthma are more likely to have breathing problems and be hospitalized when they live with a smoker, a research review suggests…For Reuters Logoasthmatic kids, breathing in cigarette smoke was also linked to a more than tripled risk of poor lung function and 32 percent higher odds of wheezing symptoms. While the risk of smoke exposure exacerbating asthma symptoms is well known, fresh evidence on the extent of the danger posed to children may help convince some parents to abandon their cigarettes, said senior study author Dr. Avni Joshi, an allergist and immunologist at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Canada, International Business Times, HealthDay, Nursing Times, CBS News, Medical Express, KYTX TexasUniversity Herald, US News & World Report, com, Medscape, Philadelphia InquirerKIMT 

Context: The risk for hospitalization doubles for kids with asthma who are exposed to secondhand smoke, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic Children’s Research Center. “The results of this review serve as a reminder to parents of just how dangerous it is to expose their children to secondhand smoke,” says Avni Joshi, M.D., senior author and pediatric allergist and immunologist at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center. “We knew that kids should not be exposed to tobacco, but how bad their asthma is likely to be with tobacco exposure was not clear. This study helped us quantify that risk, and so it informs as well as empowers us with the risk assessment. A child is twice as likely to end up in the hospital with an asthma flare if family members continue to smoke.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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September 25th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor: Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

MPR
Ceiling cracks: Women step into Mayo Clinic's top academic posts
by Elizabeth Baier

Heidi Nelson still remembers the doubters after she became Mayo Clinic's first female surgeon a quarter century ago. She haMPR2d to win credibility with colleagues — and find ways to convince patients she was the surgeon. "I had to develop a strategy where I'd walk into a room with my card, and I would engage them with eye contact and with verbal presence ... I'm Dr. Heidi Nelson, I'm a colorectal surgeon on staff. I'm here to answer questions and care for you. Here's my card,'" she recalled recently.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Sharonne Hayes, M.D., Mayo Clinic Director of Diversity and Inclusion, says encouraging and including contributions from diverse individuals is critical to Mayo's future. Mayo will be better positioned to reach its full potential and to better serve its patients when we actively bring together individuals with diverse thoughts, ideas and backgrounds; and put them to work to help create better solutions. Heidi Nelson, M.D., is chair of Mayo Clinic's Department of Surgery. Claudia Lucchinetti, M.D., is chair of Mayo Clinic's Department of Neurology.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

News4Jax
'Success Kid' helps save his father's life
by Vic Micolucci

…Besides the money, Justin says more than 500 strangers contacted Mayo Clinic to be News Jax 4 Logopotential donors. And in August, the Griner family got the call they had been waiting for: the kidney was available. It came from a matching organ donor who recently passed away. Hours later, Justin arrived at Jacksonville's Mayo Clinic and got the transplant he so desperately needed. "He's had a very good result at this point in time," said Kris Croome, MD, transplant surgeon with Mayo Clinic Jacksonville. "His kidneys started working right away."

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Success Kid was first chronicled in an ABCNews.com story (via “Good Morning America”) about raising money via GoFundMe for a kidney transplant for his dad and recently having that transplant at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. Mayo Clinic doctors and surgeons have experience diagnosing and treating people who have kidney disease. Each year doctors and surgeons care for more than 30,000 people who have kidney disease.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

MedCity News
Mayo Clinic’s Farrugia on the future of precision medicine: Patients are ready to engage
by Meghana Keshavan

Gianrico Farrugia, CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida, laid out his vision of the immediate future of precision medicine at this week’s Individualizing Medicine Conference inMedCity News Minnesota. He discussed the issues around patient engagement, reimbursement, data security and salience of President Barack Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative. In terms of immediate potential, Farrugia said there are five fields worth watching: Pharmacogenomics, Liquid biopsy, Non-invasive prenatal testing, Whole genome sequencing, Microbiome.

Reach: MedCity News focuses on business, innovation and influence in healthcare. Its websites has more than 72,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:

KTTC — Health specialists talk 'Precision Medicine' at conference held at Mayo Civic Center 

Medical Daily — From Preventing Side Effects To Sequencing Babies, 5 Ways Precision Medicine Will Change How Doctors Treat Patients 

MedCity News — Illumina launching ‘PopArray’ consortium to develop population health genomics test

Context: Mayo Clinic Vice President Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. addressed participants in his keynote address at the 4th annual Individualizing Medicine Conference. The core of his talk highlighted five areas in which the knowledge and know-how from the human genome will be most impactful in patient care, not just at Mayo Clinic, but anywhere in the nation and globally. “What’s in it for you?” he asked the crowd of health providers at the Mayo Civic Center in Rochester, Minn. “Individualized or precision medicine offers help for your medical practice today. You can take advantage of these advances to help your patients, to better diagnose, treat or prevent illness right now.” More information, including a video interview with Dr. Farrugia, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Action News Jax
Doctors hope new breast cancer vaccine will save lives
by Brittany Jones

Part of a nearly $13.3 million Department of Defense grant will used  in our area to develop a vaccine for breast cancer. Currently, 280 patients are participating in the trial. Dr. ActionNewsJaxKeith Knutson has been working with breast cancer patients for about ten years. "In addition to me being touched, the burden breast cancer has on society keeps me going," said Knutson.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The clinical trial, which will enroll 280 patients at multiple clinical sites, is expected to begin early in 2016. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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September 11th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Arizona Republic
Kidney transplant puts Olympian hurdler Aries Merritt's 2016 hopes back on track
by Ken Alltucker and Jeff Metcalfe

After his sister greeted him with a hug at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport last weekend, they drove immedArizona Central-Arizona Republic logoiately to Mayo Clinic in Phoenix where they both underwent a final battery of tests before Tuesday’s transplant surgery. Merritt and Hubbard, who both spoke with The Arizona Republic, were still both slightly sore but in good spirits less than 48 hours after Mayo surgeons performed the successful surgeries. They were scheduled to be discharged from the hospital Thursday evening.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: USA Today (Arizona Republic)

Context: Mayo Clinic, with transplant services in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, performs more transplants than any other medical center in the world. Since performing the first clinical transplant in 1963, Mayo's efforts to continually improve and expand organ transplantation have placed Mayo at the leading edge of clinical and basic transplant research worldwide.

Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Lynn Closway

 

Washington Post
Is thyroid cancer the ‘good’ cancer? It doesn’t feel that way when you get it
by Emily Mullin

… Robert Smallridge, deputy director of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Jacksonville, Fla., says patients often come to him very worried even Washington Post newspaper logothough they’ve been told that thyroid cancer is the “good” cancer. This dichotomy often makes them feel that they’re not entitled to complain or even feel bad. “They’re told they’re supposed to feel lucky, but they don’t. They have cancer,” says Smallridge, who is president of the American Thyroid Association.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Robert Smallridge, M.D., is an endocrinologist with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, which combines personalized cancer treatment with leading-edge research to provide patients with unparalleled cancer care.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

FOX Business
NYC takes on salt

Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy on the health risks of too much salt and the Mayo Clinic’s partnership to create the company Helix.Fox Business

Reach: Maria Bartiromo joined FOX Business Network as Global Markets Editor in January 2014. She is the anchor of Mornings with Maria from 6-9 am ET and hosts Sunday Morning Futures from 10-11 am ET on Fox News Channel every Sunday.

Related coverage:

MSNBC Morning Joe
How to identify and precent doctor burnout

The Mayo Clinic's Dr. John Noseworthy and author Quint Studer join Morning Joe to discuss physician burnout and what factors indicate Morning Joe MSNBCburnout.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Reach: MSNBC provides in-depth analysis of daily headlines, political commentary and informed perspectives. MSNBC’s home on the Internet is tv.msnbc.com. Joe Scarborough hosts “Morning Joe,” with co-hosts Mika Brzezinski and Willie Geist, featuring interviews with top politicians and newsmakers, as well as in-depth analysis of the day’s biggest stories. Morning Joe has about 375,000 viewers daily.

Contact: Traci Klein

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September 4th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

New York Times
New Alternatives to Statins Add to a Quandary on Cholesterol
By Gina Kolata

Doctors have long faced a conundrum in prescribing statins to lower cholesterol and heart attack risk: The drugs are cheap and effective for most people, and large, rigorous clinical trials have found minimal side effects. But as many as 25 percent of those who try them complain of muscle The New York Times newspaper logopain. Others stop taking the drugs because, they say, they cause a hazy memory or sleep problems, among other side effects not documented in studies...At the Mayo Clinic here, Dr. Stephen L. Kopecky, who directs a program for statin-intolerant patients, says he is well aware that middle-age and older adults who typically need statins may blame the drugs for aches, pains and memory losses that have other causes. He also knows his patients peruse the Internet, which is replete with horror stories about the dangers of statins.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage:
Star Tribune  — Pricey new cholesterol drugs pose new dilemma in treatment; Houston Chronicle, Massachusetts TelegramNewsmax Health 

Related coverage:
The Science Times — New Drug To Lower Bad Cholesterol Levels; Healthcare Business Daily News

Context: Doctors in the Statin Intolerance Service within the Cardiovascular Health Clinic at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota treat people who have statin side effects or a family history of statin intolerance. Steven Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. His research interests include cardiovascular clinical trials primarily in coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Reuters
New guidelines for cancer doctors aim to make sense of gene tests
by Julie Steenhuysen

"It's like having an all-you-can-eat buffet, and is that a good thing?" said Dr. Noralane Lindor, an oncologist and geneticist from Mayo Clinic Reuters LogoCenter for Individualized Medicine and an ASCO Prevention Committee member. Lindor was one of several authors of the guidelines issued on Monday by ASCO and published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Context: Noralane Lindor, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and genticist. Her research interests include cancer genetics, with an emphasis on hereditary predisposition to cancers, as well as the clinical translation of genetic findings to medical care.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

KIMT
Do you have good posture?
by DeeDee Stiepan

The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is offering posture screenings for people to see how good or bad their posture is and how poor posture can take its toll. “YouKIMT know, our body is kind of like a stack of Jenga blocks and as we lean forward we’re putting a lot of strain on our back and that creates chronic back pain. It actually creates compression into our organs as well and so we’re not breathing as effectively,” explains Jane Hein, a Wellness Physical Therapist at The Healthy Living Center.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage:  Arizona Daily Sun

Related coverage:
Fox 2 St. Louis — The Mayo Clinic’s “Healthy Living Program; KITV, NC8 Washington D.C., Fox 2 News Detroit

Context: Jane Hein is a wellness physical therapist with the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Arizona Republic’s Living Well
Proton Beam Therapy at Mayo Clinic
by Susan Lynne Fuchs

The first services – adult and pediatric radiation oncology – have been launched at the Valley’s newest cancer center, a $310 million, 400,000-Arizona Republic newspaper logosquare-foot facility rising on Mayo Clinic’s northeast Phoenix campus.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:
Arizona Republic — Arizona Cancer Center faces crowded cancer-care market by Ken Alltucker – The five-story, 220,000-square-foot center, which opened to patients Aug. 24, follows the path of other major cancer-care providers whose facilities have sprouted in metro Phoenix in recent years. Banner MD Anderson, Mayo Clinic and Cancer Treatment Centers of America all have poured tens of millions of dollars into openings or expansions.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota this past June and in Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Rochester Magazine
Mayo's "renegade" research team
by Paul Scott

Montori’s think-tank-within-a-clinic is known as the Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit, or KER Unit, for short. It’s the sort of official sounding name that nearly begs for a disco ball until you realize it’s actually pronounced “Care Unit,” and that it has been responsible for aRochester Magazine logo globally-contagious shift in thinking about what matters the most in medicine.

Reach: Rochester Magazine is a monthly publication that serves the residents and visitors of Rochester, Minnesota. The magazine averages more than 56,000 readers each month.

Context: Victor Montori, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Montori's research takes place in the Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Montori is interested in how knowledge is produced, disseminated and taken up in practice — and how this leads to optimal health care delivery and patient outcomes. Dr. Montori also serves as director of community engagement and of late stage translational research for the Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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