Mayo Clinic In The News

Items Tagged ‘Dr. James Levine’

February 26th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

 

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

CBS News
Man gains sight with bionic eye

Man gains sight with bionic eye, Allen Zderad was recently able to see his wife of 45 years for the first time in a decade. The Minnesota man seemed to burst into simultaneous laughter and tears as he caught a glimpse of her with his new "bionic eye."… Now CBS News Logowith the help of a recently developed medical device, Zderad's vision of the world has changed. He's one of just a handful of people in the world to get the "bionic eye" device known as Second Sight Argus II retinal prosthesis system. Zderad's was implanted by Dr. Raymond Iezzi of the Mayo Clinic.

Reach:
CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

 

CNN Headline News
Blind Man Sees Wife

A Minnesota man who had a bionic eye implant is seeing his wife for the first time in ten years. So he can now make out forms and CNN Logoshapes and send a signal to his optic nerve. His sight began to fail just 20 years ago. Now Diane is commenting on the Mayo Clinic’s Facebook page, writing “you are really awesome, Mayo Clinic.” He said seeing the wife for the first time. First time in ten years.

Reach:
 CNN.com has 74.2 million unique visitors to its website each month.

 

ABC News Good Morning America
Bionic Eye Lets Blind Man See Wife For 1st Time In 10 Years
by Liz Neporent

ABC News logoIt was love again at first sight for a man who went blind 10 years ago. Allen Zderad, a 68-year-old retiree from Minnesota, saw his wife for the first time in more than a decade thanks to a bionic eye implanted by doctors at the Mayo Clinic earlier this month.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KARE11, NBC News, Post-Bulletin, Que! Espanol, The Telegraph, Business 2 Community, Telegraph UK, Daily Mail UK, International Business Times, GMA Network, The West Australian, My FOX Philly, Global News Canada, TIME, Mashable, RYOT, KTLA Calif., Independent UK, Metro UK, Gaming News, FOX News, Yahoo! News, My FOX Chicago, KELO Land S.D., NY Daily News, Daily Caller, Popular Mechanics, PopSugar US News & World Report, Irish Times, hln.com, The Guardian Nigeria, Herald Sun Australia, ABC15 Arizona, MindBodyGreen, Times Live, NewsMax, Cult of Mac, euronews.com, MedPage Today

Context: It’s a medical story, a science and technology advancement and a romance wrapped into one moment: when a man who is blind sees his wife again for the first time in a decade. Allen Zderad began to have serious vision problems about 20 years ago due to retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease affecting the retina. There is no effective treatment or cure. It ended his professional career and after a decade he was effectively blind, unable to see anything other than very bright light. He adjusted, even continuing woodworking by developing his sense of touch and spatial relationships. But he was unable to see his family, including ten grandchildren or his wife, Carmen. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nelllis

 

Wall Street Journal
New Screening Tests for Hard-to-Spot Breast Cancers
by Melinda Beck

…Past versions of MBI exposed patients to too much radiation to use for regular screenings. A new version developed at the Mayo Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logoClinic in Rochester, Minn., uses a lower dose. In a study of 1,585 women with dense breasts published in the American Journal of Roentgenology this month, Deborah Rhodes, a Mayo Clinic internist, and colleagues found that MBI detected nearly four times as many invasive breast cancers as mammography, with fewer unnecessary biopsies. As of now, only about 100 hospitals offer the newest MBI technology, which is made by GE Healthcare and Gamma Medica Inc.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: A new breast imaging technique pioneered at Mayo Clinic nearly quadruples detection rates of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue, according to the results of a major study published recently in the American Journal of RoentgenologyMolecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is a supplemental imaging technology designed to find tumors that would otherwise be obscured by surrounding dense breast tissue on a mammogram. Tumors and dense breast tissue can both appear white on a mammogram, making tumors indistinguishable from background tissue in women with dense breasts. About half of all screening-aged women have dense breast tissue, according to Deborah Rhodes, M.D., a Mayo Clinic Breast Clinic physician and the senior author of this study. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sam Smith, Traci Klein, Joe Dangor
Florida Times-Union
Health notes: Mayo Clinic researchers have identified a possible cause of pancreatic cancer

A research team led by investigators from Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville and the University of Oslo in Norway have identified a molecule that pushes normal pancreatic cells to transform their shape, laying the groundwork for deFlorida Times-Union newspaper logovelopment of pancreatic cancer — one of the most difficult tumors to treat.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context:  A research team led by investigators from Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida, and the University of Oslo, Norway, have identified a molecule that pushes normal pancreatic cells to transform their shape, laying the groundwork for development of pancreatic cancer — one of the most difficult tumors to treat. Their findings, reported in Nature Communications, suggest that inhibiting the gene, protein kinase D1 (PKD1), and its protein could halt progression and spread of this form of pancreatic cancer, and possibly even reverse the transformation. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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Tags: 2015 Imagine Solutions Conference, ABC News, ABC News Good Morning America, ABC15 Arizona, adrenaline, adverse medical events, African Descendants MERG, Al Jazeera America, alzheimer's disease, American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Z1071 trial, American Journal of Roentgenology, American Live Wire


February 19th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

 

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

USA Today
Man gets bionic eye, sees wife for first time in a decade

A technological breakthrough is allowing a grandfather who's been blind for 10 years to see again. USA Today Newspaper Logo

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Additional Coverage:

KARE
Man gets bionic eye, sees wife for first time in decade

A blind Forest Lake man's sight is restored after he became the first person in Minnesota, and 15th person in the country, to receive KARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paula bionic eye…Allen Zderad, 68, hadn't seen his wife or grandchildren in more than a decade, until the new device was turned on at Mayo Clinic earlier this month. “Yeah," Zderad exclaimed, as his wife of 45 years slowly came into focus. He then could find no more words, embracing her. "It's crude, but it's significant. It works," he rejoiced, through tears.

WXOW, WIXA, News 10, KTTC

Context: Raymond Iezzi, Jr., M.D., is a Mayo Clinic ophthalmologist. Mayo Clinic eye experts provide comprehensive care for people who seek answers about conditions and diseases of their eyes. Each year doctors in the Mayo Clinic Department of Ophthalmology help nearly 80,000 people who need healing. Dr. Iezzi's clinical interests include retinal degenerative diseases as well as all aspects of vitreoretinal surgery, with a special interest in complex retinal detachment repair associated with diabetes, trauma and proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
Innovation Is Sweeping Through U.S. Medical Schools

Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logoCritics have long faulted U.S. medical education for being hidebound, imperious and out of touch with modern health-care needs. The core structure of medical school—two years of basic science followed by two years of clinical work—has been in place since 1910. Now a wave of innovation is sweeping through medical schools, much of it aimed at producing young doctors who are better prepared to meet the demands of the nation’s changing health-care system…. “The reality is that most medical schools are teaching the same way they did one hundred years ago,” says Wyatt Decker, chief executive of the Mayo Clinic’s operations in Arizona, which include a medical school in Scottsdale, Ariz., that is scheduled to enroll its first class in 2017. “It’s time to blow up that model and ask, ‘How do we want to train tomorrow’s doctors?’ ”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic College of Medicine is developing leaders in medical and biomedical research careers.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Jim McVeigh

 

Wall Street Journal
Can 3-D Printing of Living Tissue Speed Up Drug Development?

Every year, the pharmaceutical industry spends more than $50 billion on research and Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logodevelopment. But the path to drug approval by the Food and Drug Administration is laden with abrupt failures in late-phase testing. Only one in 5,000 drugs will make it to market, according to one estimate…Christopher Moir, a professor of pediatric surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., says he has used 3-D printing to produce plastic models of organs used to prepare for surgeries. “Bioprinting is going to be a huge aspect in terms of implants and surgeries,” Dr. Moir says.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Kelley Luckstein

 

Wall Street Journal
How to Make Surgery Safer

Hospitals are trying to make it safer for patients to go under the knife. Surgery can beWall Street Journal Life and Culture logo risky by its very nature, and the possibility of error or negligence makes it even more so. According to an analysis last year in the journal Patient Safety in Surgery, 46% to 65% of adverse events in hospitals are related to surgery, especially complex procedures... Two studies published in early February in the Journal of the American Medical Association appeared to challenge the approach, finding that outcomes have improved in hospitals generally in recent years whether they participated in NSQIP or not. One, by researchers at the Mayo Clinic, compared billing claims data between participating and nonparticipating hospitals and found no statistically significant differences in the likelihood of complications, or death.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic is one of the largest and most experienced surgical practices in the world. Mayo has more than 300 surgeons and 122 operating rooms among its three locations in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Mayo surgeons perform high volumes of complex operations. In 2005, Mayo Clinic surgeons treated nearly 73,000 patients using the latest technology and innovative procedures. Mayo Clinic evaluates quality by looking at outcome measures, process measures, patient satisfaction and quality rankings.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Sharon Theimer

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Tags: 'Jolie effect', 26.2 with Donna Marathon, 3-D Printing of Living Tissue, a broken heart, AARP Public Policy Institute, ABC News, ABC15, ABC2News, acute cerebellar ataxia, Alzheimer's Association, Alzheimer's Research, Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic


February 12th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

US News & World Report
Avatar Mice: How These Rodents Are Advancing Cancer Therapies

…The trial Boehle enrolled in is called BEAUTY, which stands for "breast cancer genome guided therapy." Launched in 2013​, it's ​​​​based at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Using avatar mice – mice with patients’ tumor samples growing inside of US News Health Logo
them – researchers are able to study various treatments and determine which might be best tailored to each patient. “When we treat the mice with drugs, that is very much a mirror of what happens in patients,” says Judy Boughey, ​a breast surgeon at the Mayo Clinic. Boughey is a co-director of the study, which enrolled 140 breast cancer patients.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: The Breast Cancer Genome-Guided Therapy (BEAUTY) study is designed to help researchers better understand why standard chemotherapy eradicates breast cancer in some women but fails in others. The long-term goal is to enable individualized treatment for each woman with breast cancer by using the genetic information found in blood samples and tumor biopsies to predict the most effective therapies. Judy Boughey, M.D. and Matthew Goetz, M.D. are co-chairs of the study.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Sam Smith

 

Huffington Post
Why Some Vaccines Require More Than One Dose
by Sarah Klein

Despite being declared beaten in 2000, measles is back, due largely to deHuffington Post Healthy Living Logoclining
vaccination rates in parts of the United States. "We should not be in this boat," Dr. Pritish Tosh, an infectious diseases physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic, told The Huffington Post. "This is a completely preventable disease."

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context:  Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Globe and Mail
Could we stop the anti-vaxxers if we said measles contains gluten?

... An infectious-disease specialist armed with meticulous resGlobe and Mail Logoearch makes a sober presentation. She quotes Roberto Cattaneo, a molecular biologist at the Mayo Clinic who has spent 30 years studying measles, which he calls “the most transmissible virus we know.” She leans authoritatively on the chair’s desk, and speaks to him directly. “Let me make my case to parents,” she pleads.

Circulation: The Globe and Mail is Canada’s national newspaper and has a daily circulation of more than 306,000. The Globe and Mail Online has more than 840,000 unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: Roberto Cattaneo, Ph.D. studies measles and other small enveloped RNA viruses with the primary goal of generating new knowledge.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Forbes
Measles Outbreak in Dollars and Cents: It Costs Taxpayers Bigtime

“These outbreaks have economic costs. They are disruptive,” said Gregory Poland, Forbes magazine logohead of the Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. “The smaller ones have cost a couple hundred dollars in public resources, and one cost nearly a million dollars. It’s on the lesser side – health is more important – but it consumes public health resources that could be applied to the other pressing problems we face.”

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D., studies the immunogenetics of vaccine response in adults and children. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Traci Klein

 

MPR
Measles outbreak sparks call to limit vaccination exemptions

"We actually suffer from this liberal exemption rule," said Dr. Robert Jacobson, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic. "We could be doing better with our vaccination rates."MPR News logo

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Robert Jacobson, M.D. is a pediatrician with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center and also leads the Employee and Community Health (ECH) Research Initiative at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Jacobson says measles is a horrific disease and up to 40 percent of patients may need hospitalization. More information about measles can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley LucksteinBob Nellis

 

WJXT
Measles Outbreak

News Jax 4 LogoThe latest on the growing measles outbreak. Dr. Vandana Bhide, Mayo Clinic is on the show.


Reach:
WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Vanda Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in Hospital Internal Medicine in Florida.

Additional Measles Coverage:

INFORUM, Measles outbreak sparks call to limit vaccination exemptions

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, ALS research, Alzheimer's Complex Genetic Networks, American Board of Medical Specialties, American Journal of Roentgenology, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Android Authority, anorexia, Apple's HealthKit, Arab News, Ariz., Asperger’s syndrome


February 6th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, director, media relations

 

AP
Obama Proposes 'Precision Medicine' To End One-Size-Fits-All
by Lauran Neergaard

President Barack Obama is calling for an investment to move away from one-size-fits-all-medicine, toward an approach that tailors treatment to your genes…People with aAssociated Press Wire Service Logo rare form of cystic fibrosis now can choose a drug designed specifically to target the genetic defect causing their illness. Some medical centers, such as the Mayo Clinic, have opened "individualized medicine clinics."

Additional coverage: NY Times, WAVY Va., Star Tribune, KTTC, KMSP, ABC News, Bloomberg, Politico, Daily Mail UK

 

Florida Times-Union
New approach enables Mayo Clinic neurologist to diagnose a rare genetic condition
by Charlie Patton

When Dustin Bennett was 18 months old, his mother realized there was something wrong with him, that he was suddenly having a hard time keeping his balance when he stood upright…Finally, at the suggestion of one of the many physicians she consulted, the Bennetts made the trip from their home in Pearson, Ga., Florida Times-Union newspaper logoto Jacksonville so they could consult with Mayo Clinic neurologist Zbigniew Wszolek.

Additional coverage on this topic: Medical Xpress

Reach: 
The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Florida Times-Union
Guest column: Precision medicine is future of health care
by Physician Gianrico Farrugia, CEO of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville

Florida Times UnionMayo Clinic has built a national research program and a national referral medical clinic to advance the benefits of these discoveries, which already are beginning to benefit patients on our Jacksonville campus. We consider precision medicine a priority and an essential part of the future of medical practice.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

 

Bloomberg
Obama Plans $215 Million Precision Medicine Effort for Cures
by Caroline Chen

Obama’s proposed funding may not be enough to support the project. “I think the polite way to say it is that it’s a good start,” said Gianrico Farrugia, chief executive Bloomberg news logoofficer of Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and former director of Mayo’s Center for Individualized Medicine. “It is certainly really encouraging that there is alignment between the NIH and the White House, and it kick starts the thing we need to do, but it’s an initial investment just to start things,” Farrugia said by telephone.

Reach: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Additional coverage: International Business Times, com, HealthData Management, HealthDay, FOX News, ABC News, KAAL, KMSP, Star Tribune, Chicago Tribune, Al Jazeera America

 

Star Tribune
Mayo genetic data bank could boost Obama's new 'precision medicine initiative'
by Jim Spencer

…“If we have a big data set, a big pool of people that’s varied, then that allows us to really map out not only the genome of one person, but now we can start seeing Star Tribune newspaper logoconnections and patterns and correlations that helps us refine exactly what it is that we’re trying to do with respect to treatment,” the president said at a White House ceremony, attended by Mayo Vice President Dr. Gianrico Farrugia.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for 150 years at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. More information about the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Mayo Clinic's response to President Obama's precision medicine initiative can be found here.

Previous Coverage on Precision Medicine in January, 22, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Bob Nellis, Sam Smith, Kevin Punsky

 

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Tags: 9News Colo., ABC News, ABC7News Calif., Action News Jacksonville, Affordable care act, Al Jazeera America, All Access, alzheimers, American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), American Heart Month, antibiotic-resistant infections, AP


January 15th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

TODAY
A walk a day may keep early death away
by Bill Briggs

…An adult with a BMI of 30 or higher is considered obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An adult Today Show Healthwith a BMI between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight. "This study adds to the mounting evidence that movement and activity makes a difference in your health, even if you are not at your ideal weight," said Dr. Edward Laskowski, a professor in the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Mayo Clinic, and co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Reach: The TODAY Show reaches an average daily audience of 4.25 million viewers each week. Today Health is the online portal of the Today Show.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

HealthDay
Study Says Biopsies Are Safe
by Robert Preidt

Cancer biopsies do not cause the disease to spread, says a new study that dispels a common myth. "This study shows that physicians and patients should feel reassured that a biopsy is very safe," said study senior investigator Dr. Michael Wallace, aHealth Day Logo gastroenterologist and professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Vancouver Desi, Science Daily, Science Codex, Medical Xpress, HON.ch, Houston Northwest Medical Center, Noticia al Dia, Oncology Nurse Advisor, Stone Hearth News, Science Newsline, HealthCanal, Transplant Views, Dallas Sun, Winnipeg Free Press, Science Blog, Examiner Toronto

Context:  A study of more than 2,000 patients by researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida, has dispelled the myth that cancer biopsies cause cancer to spread. In the Jan. 9 online issue of Gut, they show that patients who received a biopsy had a better outcome and longer survival than patients who did not have a biopsy. The researchers studied pancreatic cancer, but the findings likely apply to other cancers because diagnostic technique used in this study — fine needle aspiration — is commonly used across tumor types, says the study’s senior investigator and gastroenterologist Michael Wallace, M.D., M.P.H., professor of medicine. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

WEAU Eau Claire
Half Moon Dragon Boat Festival in Eau Claire to benefit hospice
How do you tame a dragon? You can't do it without a paddle. At least, that's according to Mayo Clinic Health System. The Half WEAU Eau Claire LogoMoon Dragon Boat Festival is coming to Eau Claire on Saturday, August 8th, 2015 at Half Moon Beach. Proceeds will help families dealing with the loss of loved ones through hospice care.… John Dickey is the Chief Administrative Officer of Mayo Clinic Health System's northwest region. He said the event will raise awareness of hospice care for people in the final stages of life.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse.

Additional coverage:WQOW Eau ClaireHospice care to benefit from dragon boat races
held in Eau Claire

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Health system plans boat festival to raise funds for bereavement services

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System is sponsoring its inaugural Half Moon Dragon Boat Festival on Saturday, Aug. 8, to raise awareness for hospice care for people at the end of their life. Funds raised will support a bereavement program for families and all community members following the loss of a loved one. For more information, visit mayoclinichealthsystem.org/halfmoondragon.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

KPHO Phoenix
Free help offered to free yourself from cancer by Juan Magana. The Mayo Clinic wrapped up a weekend-long event in north Phoenix to help patients and family members, who are currently fighting cancer or have been cured, deal with the emotional rollercoaster. The Living With and Overcoming My Cancer CBS5AZ-KPHOSymposium brought out cancer experts to answer questions people had. "We're thrilled to put this on and to give them a sense of community," said Dr. Ruben Mesa, the director of the Mayo Cancer Clinic. "

Reach: KPHO-5 is the CBS affiliate in Phoenix and is owned by Meredith Corporation.

Additional coverage: WBRC Alabama

Context: Ruben Mesa, M.D., is a chair of Hematology/Oncology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center with a multisite presence. Its three campuses — in Scottsdale, Ariz., Jacksonville, Fla., and Rochester, Minn. — give the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center a broad geographic reach, enabling it to serve diverse patient populations around the world.  Eunice Nishimura is a Mayo Clinic patient and is a a stage 4 lung cancer survivor. You can read more about her cancer journey on Sharing Mayo Clinic.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
New CEO for Mayo Clinic Health System in Waycross by Colleen Michele Jones

Mayo Clinic has named Dr. John Presutti as chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoHealth System in Waycross, effective March 2, 2015. Presutti succeeds Kenneth Calamia, who will retire from Mayo Clinic at the end of 2015.

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: Mayo Clinic has named John Presutti, D.O., as chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic Health System in Waycross (Georgia), effective March 2, 2015. Dr. Presutti succeeds Kenneth Calamia, M.D., who will retire from Mayo Clinic at the end of 2015. “Dr. Presutti is a wonderfully gifted and proven physician leader,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida. “He brings energy and passion to his work and is committed to building upon Dr. Calamia’s successful leadership and involvement in the Waycross community.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Yahoo! Health
Got The Flu? Here's When To Head To The ER… It’s important to be aware of what can happen if an illness progresses, according to a new overview in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. In the piece, senior author Steve Peters, M.D., a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Mayo Clinic, says that deadlyYahoo Health Logo sepsis is a very real risk in infections such as the flu. We caught up with him for a download on sepsis and other common flu complications — and when to get yourself or a loved one to the ER, stat.

Reach: Yahoo! reaches more than a half a billion across devices and around the globe. According to news sources roughly 700 million people visit Yahoo websites every month.

Context: Sepsis can be a dangerous complication of almost any type of infection, including influenza, pneumonia and food poisoningurinary tract infections; bloodstream infections from wounds; and abdominal infections. Steve Peters, M.D., a pulmonary and critical care physician at Mayo Clinic and senior author of a recent sepsis overview in the medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, explains sepsis symptoms and risk factors, the difference between severe sepsis and septic shock, and how sepsis is typically treated. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: 2014 Mankato Meltdown, 26.2 with Donna Marathon, 4029 TV, 5 KJZZ, ABC News, ABC15 Phoenix, Acento Veintiuno, advisory board, aging, American College of Cardiology, American Spectator, Anesthesia News


December 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

This will be our last installment of our weekly highlights in 2014. We'll be back in early January 2015. Happy Holidays.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

NY Times
Ask Well: Why Do My Knees Make Noise When I Squat?
By Anahad O’Connor

That noise coming from your knees can be unnerving. But unless it is accompanied by pain, discomfort or swelling, there is no need to worry about it, New York Times Well Blogsaid Dr. Michael Stuart, a professor of orthopedic surgery and co-director of sports medicine at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Michael Stuart, M.D. is co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

MPR
John Noseworthy on the future of Mayo Clinic, health care

John Noseworthy, president and CEO of Mayo Clinic, joins The Daily Circuit to talk about the future of Mayo, the future of health care and how the two MPR Daily Circuit Logointersect.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Other Coverage with Dr. Noseworthy:

Dalhousie University
John Noseworthy (MD’75, PGM’78): Digital Doctoring
by Mark Campbell

Dalhousie University AlumniIn 2007, Mayo Clinic approached Dr. John Noseworthy (MD’75, PGM’78), then medical director of its Department of Development, and a team of leaders with a question: what would the world’s largest, integrated, nonprofit medical group look like in the year 2020? “We spent almost a year looking into that,” recalls Dr. Noseworthy. “We came back and said Mayo Clinic is known for caring for the sick face-to-face – for patients coming to us. As we enter a digital world, how are we going to extend our reach to serve people who do not need, or cannot come, to see us?”

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

 

MPR
Mayo Clinic expansion plan is a vision for urban and walkable development
by Liz Baier

When planners of Minnesota's largest economic development project unveil a final draft this afternoon of the city's massive expansion project, they will present a new vision for downtown city life. The $6 billion Destination Medical Center aims to make Rochester a global health care hub. But it alsoMPR News Logo would make big changes to the city, among them.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Related Coverage:
KAAL, DMC Plans for Downtown Rochester Unveiled

KSTP, KAAL, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

Context: The development plan proposed at the DMCC Board meeting  Dec. 17 is a BIG PLAN (694 pages) in support of a bold vision. And what everyone wants to know is: What’s going to happen and how much will it cost? More information can be found on the DMC blog.

Public Affairs Contact: Jamie Rothe

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Attorney Christina Zorn appointed Mayo Florida chief administrative officer
by John Burr

Mayo Clinic has appointed an attorney,Christina Zorn, as chief administrative officer and vice chair of administration at Mayo's Jacksonville campus. Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logoShe will serve as administrative partner to Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., the incoming vice president of Mayo Clinic and CEO of the Jacksonville campus, according to a news release. Zorn begins work Jan. 1.

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union

Related Coverage:Jacksonville Business Journal, 2014's retirement of the year: Bill Rupp by Colleen Jones. Mayo Clinic will have a new leader to start the new year. Bill Rupp, who has led the institution's Jacksonville campus since 2008, announced in August that he will retire from his post as vice president and CEO Dec. 31.

Context: Mayo Clinic recently appointed Christina Zorn, J.D., as chief administrative officer of its campus in Jacksonville, Fla., and vice chair of Administration, Mayo Clinic. She will serve as administrative partner to Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., incoming vice president of Mayo Clinic and chief executive officer of the Jacksonville campus, as previously announced. Zorn assumes her new role on Jan. 1. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

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November 13th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Today Show
Allergic to Penicillin? You're Probably Not

Most people who think they are allergic to penicillin in fact are not, researchers said Friday. It’s something doctors have suspected for a long time, but the researchers say they were surprised by just how manyTODAY Show people weren’t allergic to the antibiotic: it was 94 percent of them. Dr. Thanai Pongdee, an allergist at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida and colleagues tested 384 people who said they were allergic to penicillin. Tests showed 94 percent of them were in fact, not allergic.

Reach: The TODAY Show reaches an average daily audience of 4.25 million viewers each week.

Additional coverage:

NBC News, Allergic to Penicillin? Maybe Not by Judy Silverman. Most people who think they are allergic to penicillin in fact are not, researchers said Friday. It’s something doctors have suspected for a long time, but the researchers say they were surprised by just how many people weren’t allergic to the antibiotic: it was 94 percent of them. Dr. Thanai Pongdee, an allergist at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida and colleagues tested 384 people who said they were allergic to penicillin. Tests showed 94 percent of them were in fact, not allergic.

Bayou Buzz La., WRC NBC Washington DCBreaking News, Daily Mail UK, Allergy/Immunology, KVOA Tucson, Pharmaceutical Journal

Context: Thanai Pongdee, M.D., is an allergist at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida. This study was presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting, Nov. 6-10, 2014 in Atlanta.

Public Affairs Contact: Cindy Weiss

 

Huffington Post
5 Benefits Of Being A Curious Person

by Leigh Weingus… It can help protect your brain.Keeping your brain mentally stimulated is a lifelong enterprise,” David Knopman, a professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, said, according to Bloomberg. “If one can remain intellectually active and stimulated throughout one’s lifespan, that’s protective against late-life dementia. Staying mentally active is definitely good for youHuffington Post Healthy Living Logor brain.”

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

Public Relations Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

US News & World Report
10 Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Prostate Cancer
by Kristine Crane

… Does my cancer need to be treated? “Active surveillance” is a buzz term in prostate cancer care because many men with the disease can practice it for years without treatment. “If you have low-grade, low-stage cancer, you may elect to do nothing,” says Erik Castle, a urologic surgeon and urology professor at the Mayo Clinic in US News HealthPhoenix.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: MSN

Context: Erik Castle. M.D. is a urologic surgeon at Mayo Clinic's campus in Phoenix, Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

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November 6th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Boston Globe
Yes, sitting at work is bad, but is standing actually better?
By Deborah Kotz

…In a June study, 28 office workers who were given a sit/stand desk for a month reduced their time spent in a sedentary position by 38 Boston Globe Logominutes a day compared to when they used a traditional desk. They also reported a mood boost, increased energy, and reduced fatigue. “I think it’s correct to say we’re in the middle of a ‘stand up movement,’ but the emphasis needs to be on movement,” said the study author Dr. James Levine, director of the Mayo Clinic/Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative. “I don’t want people to think that they should stand up like still soldiers. That is not a good idea.”

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 215,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: Boston Globe10 ways companies can encourage workers to move

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

 

MPR
Glen Campbell's public decline with Alzheimer's documented in new film

…MPR's Cathy Wurzer spoke with Kim Campbell and Dr. Ronald Petersen, Director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. He was one of MPR News logoGlen Campbell's doctors.  A new documentary about the life and career of music icon Glen Campbell opens in theaters  nationwide. "I'll Be Me" is not an ordinary music biopic because Campbell was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 2011 and decided to deal with it publicly. The film documents his emotional "Goodbye Tour" and how his wife Kim became his caregiver.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Glen Campbell film called touching

KTTC, Country star Glen Campbell's family and doctor talk about Mayo's role in fight with Alzheimer's

Pioneer Press'Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me' is moving, funny portrait of country star's struggle with Alzheimer's

Context: This film will increase awareness of Alzheimer’s impact on patients and their caregivers and is a call to action for our nation to find a cure for this disease.  Our future depends on us pushing the boundaries of knowledge and discovery of cures for this and other devastating diseases,” says John Noseworthy, MD, president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. Dr. Ronald Petersen is director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. The Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center is part of a network of 28 centers around the country sponsored by the National Institute on Aging.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Prevention
8 Things Your Sleep Habits Say About You

by Jordan Davidson…The symptom: You slept your way through 3 ham sandwiches and an entire pound cPrevention logoake. What it might mean: Parasomnia and REM Behavior Disorder (RBD). Erik St. Louis, a Mayo Clinic sleep physician, recently ended up with a patient who spread jelly on his Nook and left it in the fridge. Sleepwalkers may make a snack, take a walk, and then return to bed with no idea they ever left. The really scary ones drive.

Reach: Prevention is published monthly with a circulation of 2.8 million.  Prevention - Online has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month and has 9.3 million average page views each month.

Context: Erik St. Louis, M.D. is a physician with the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treat about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Public Affairs Contact: Alyson Gonzalez

 

Wall Street Journal
Just How Fast a Marathoner Could Wozniacki Be?
By Matthew Futterman

Tennis star Caroline Wozniacki stunned the endurance world Sunday when she finished the New York City Marathon in 3 hours 26 minutes 33 The Wall Street Journal Logoseconds. It was her first marathon. She never did a training run longer than 13 miles, and she played in the WTA Tour Finals in Singapore the previous weekend. How fast would Woz be if she tried? Pretty darn fast. Michael Joyner, a physician at the Mayo Clinic aWSJ Daily Fixnd veteran marathoner who specializes in time extrapolations, posited that at 5 feet 10, Wozniacki would most likely be better suited to swimming or rowing. Still, Joyner added, Wozniacki could get 10% better from training and another 10% better by getting super-skinny. Or, “if she was a closet aerobic animal you might get 25%,” he wrote in an email.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

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October 30th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

USA TODAY
Could a robot do your job?

... And doctors, long thought immune to being automated, now face competition, including a machine that replaces an anesthesiologist in lowUSA Today Newspaper Logo -risk colonoscopy procedures.... Starting next year, The Mayo Clinic in Minnesota will use Watson to sort through 8,000 Mayo studies and approximately 170,000 ongoing studies worldwide to match patients to clinical trials.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Previous Coverage in Sept. 11, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic and IBM  are using  Watson, the IBM cognitive computer, to match patients more quickly with appropriate clinical trials, beginning with research studies in cancer. A proof-of-concept phase is currently underway. “In an area like cancer —where time is of the essence — the speed and accuracy that Watson offers will allow us to develop an individualized treatment plan more efficiently so we can deliver exactly the care that the patient needs,” says Steven Alberts, M.D., chair of medical oncology at Mayo Clinic. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Star Tribune
Mayo scores major dementia grants
by Dan Browning

After more than a decade of work on what’s been called “the most common disease no one has ever heard of” — frontotemporal dementia — Mayo Clinic Star Tribune newspaper logohas been chosen to participate in a set of federal research projects that could help unlock a broad set of related brain disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease...“What is really striking is that four major grants have now been funded in [this] area, which is tens of millions of dollars [over five years],” said Dr. Brad Boeve of Mayo Clinic, one of the nation’s leading FTD researchers and principal investigator for one of the new grants.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:

Florida Times-Union
Mayo researchers getting funds for ALS, dementia research
by Steve Patterson

Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville are getting about $6 million in new grants to study a genetic breakdown tied to bothFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo Lou Gehrig’s disease and a form of dementia, clinic officials said Thursday. The work could lead to new testing and treatment approaches to the affliction based around a particular gene, called C9ORF72.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

KIMT, Mayo Clinic awarded grant for dementia research by DeeDee Stiepan…“We really want to eradicate these genes from the devastating effects that can occur in people who are already known to have these mutations, as well as those families who may, through obviously no fault of their own, pass it on to their children,” explains Dr. Bradley Boeve, a Professor of Neurology at Mayo Clinic.

Augustine Record, Mayo researchers getting funds for ALS, dementia research by Steve Patterson. Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville are getting about $6 million in new grants to study a genetic breakdown tied to both Lou Gehrig’s disease and a form of dementia, clinic officials said Thursday…The research will build on earlier work by another Mayo scientist, Leonard Petrucelli, who last year focused attention on buildups of proteins where the C9ORF72 mutation is found.

KTTC, WQOW Eau Claire, Post-BulletinKansas City Star, Miami Herald, The Telegraph Ga., Post-Bulletin, Daily Journal

Context: Mayo Clinic has been awarded two grants for large, five-year projects on frontotemporal dementia (FTD), characterized by degeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. While rare, it may strike people in their twenties, even in their teens. The projects are funded by the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS). The grants, allocated to the research teams at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota and Jacksonville, Florida, cover a wide spectrum of FTD research, to advance their studies aimed at improving the diagnosis and treatment of patients suffering from this disorder. More information on the grants can be found here and here on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic  (Minnesota) and Kevin Punsky (Florida)

 

Star Tribune
Schafer: Mayo Clinic surgeon, scientist team up as entrepreneurs
by Lee Schafer

Rakesh Suri and Jordan Miller are the kind of entrepreneurs who are easy to cheer for. Suri is a heart surgeon at the Mayo Clinic, and Miller is a Star Tribune Business section logoscientist who arrived in Rochester 5 ½ years ago to help with a research program into cardiac valve disease. Admittedly they are not typical business underdogs, not as top-of-the-profession staff at the renowned Mayo Clinic. What’s to like is how they want to take something out of the lab to help people live longer. And starting a company seems to be the only practical way to get that done.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Rakesh Suri, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiac surgeon and is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic Transplant Center.  Jordan Miller, PhD, is an in the Division cardiovascular surgery researcher with an academic appointment of Assistant Professor in the Departments of Surgery and Physiology. His research program focuses on three main areas: 1) understanding mechanisms contributing to aortic valve and atherosclerotic plaque calcification, 2) identification of reciprocal regulators of skeletal and cardiovascular calcification, and 3) understanding mechanisms contributing to vasomotor dysfunction in health and disease.

Public Affairs Contacts:  Sharon Theimer, Traci Klein

 

New Yorker
Breaking Away
by David Gendelman

…They also likely thought about the advantages gained by staying with the main pack, like protection from the wind provided by the runners in front. There’s also The New Yorker magazine logo“a psychic edge,” Michael Joyner, a physiologist at the Mayo Clinic, said. “People get in a rhythm. You’re feeding off other people. All of the signals that the average person would describe as painful, the élite is using as a red line. They’re running right on the edge. When you’re with somebody else, your perception of the effort you require, your perception of fatigue, might be less. You might be able to stay in the zone longer.”

Reach: The New Yorker is a weekly magazine with a circulation of more than one million readers. The magazine covers culture, art, fiction, business, politics, science and technology. It reports on current ideas and evolving issues, often with a touch of humor. Launched in 1925, it is published by Condé Nast Publications. Its mission is to report and reflect on the world at large with wit, sophistication and originality. The New Yorker's website has more than 722,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

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October 16th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Exercise, Diet and Sleep Can Improve MS Symptoms
by Laura Landro

Exercise, sleep and a low-salt diet may be part of the solution for multiple sclerosis patients. Researchers are increasingly looking to lifestyle, diet and exercise, including salsa dancing, to help mitigate the often-debilitating effects of MS, which include problems with muscle control, balance, visionThe Wall Street Journal newspaper logo and thinking.…While quitting smoking, getting more sleep and reducing excess salt “are general health strategies that are good for us anyway, they are actually making a difference with respect to the behavior of the disease,” says Dean Wingerchuk, a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Phoenix.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Dean Wingerchuk, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Star Tribune (Post-Bulletin)
Mayo's airborne blood bank celebrates 30 years

On May 20, 2012, Nels Gunderson hung in the balance between life and death. His survival depended on access to first responders, rapid medical Star Tribune newspaper logostabilization and an airborne blood bank carried by the Mayo One medical helicopter. It also depended on the helicopter conveying him quickly from his back yard in Osseo, Wis., to the Mayo Clinic Hospital, Saint Marys Campus, about 90 miles away, where a surgical team was working on him less than two hours after his son dialed 911. Thirty years ago this month, Mayo One flew its first patient. To celebrate its anniversary, the airborne service offered a glimpse inside the flying hospital.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Medical helicopter safety remains Mayo One priority by Jeff Hansel… In fact, many of the safety features recommended in 2009 by Mayo One medical-helicopter experts after a spate of fate crashes around the country have been instituted. For example, said Glenn Lyden, spokesman for Mayo Clinic Medical Transport, the use of night-vision goggles has increased among providers of medical-helicopter services.

Context: Mayo Clinic Medical Transport provides ground and air medical transport services from bases in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Public Affairs Contact: Glenn Lyden

 

Forbes
Customer Service Beyond Coupling: From Four Seasons' Hospitality To Mayo Clinic's Healthcare
by Micah Solomon

Mayo Clinic, the extraordinary Rochester, Minnesota based hospital and healthcare organization, provides what can be called “destination medicine,” as Leonard Berry terms it: the collaboration of experts from a range of specialties to provide diagnosis and treatment or a treatment plan for what are often very serious cases.Forbes magazine logo

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 mllion unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:

FierceHealthcareMayo Clinic looks to changing demographics in customer service approach by Zack Budryk, A patient experience approach by the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota may represent a new front in healthcare customer service, according to Forbes. The clinic's approach, "destination medicine," brings together experts from a broad spectrum of specialties and, because entire families often visit the clinic, Mayo's room design keeps large groups of relatives and friends in mind. The design includes features like specially shaped sofas that can seat as many as a dozen visitors.

Context: Thousands of people come to Mayo Clinic each day for diagnosis and treatment of a medical problem. Many people make their own appointments and some are referred by a doctor. Most people are treated on an outpatient basis, meaning their evaluation, tests and treatments are done in the clinic, and they return to their home or lodging at the end of the day.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

 

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