Items Tagged ‘Dr. James Levine’

September 4th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

New York Times
New Alternatives to Statins Add to a Quandary on Cholesterol
By Gina Kolata

Doctors have long faced a conundrum in prescribing statins to lower cholesterol and heart attack risk: The drugs are cheap and effective for most people, and large, rigorous clinical trials have found minimal side effects. But as many as 25 percent of those who try them complain of muscle The New York Times newspaper logopain. Others stop taking the drugs because, they say, they cause a hazy memory or sleep problems, among other side effects not documented in studies...At the Mayo Clinic here, Dr. Stephen L. Kopecky, who directs a program for statin-intolerant patients, says he is well aware that middle-age and older adults who typically need statins may blame the drugs for aches, pains and memory losses that have other causes. He also knows his patients peruse the Internet, which is replete with horror stories about the dangers of statins.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage:
Star Tribune  — Pricey new cholesterol drugs pose new dilemma in treatment; Houston Chronicle, Massachusetts TelegramNewsmax Health 

Related coverage:
The Science Times — New Drug To Lower Bad Cholesterol Levels; Healthcare Business Daily News

Context: Doctors in the Statin Intolerance Service within the Cardiovascular Health Clinic at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota treat people who have statin side effects or a family history of statin intolerance. Steven Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. His research interests include cardiovascular clinical trials primarily in coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Reuters
New guidelines for cancer doctors aim to make sense of gene tests
by Julie Steenhuysen

"It's like having an all-you-can-eat buffet, and is that a good thing?" said Dr. Noralane Lindor, an oncologist and geneticist from Mayo Clinic Reuters LogoCenter for Individualized Medicine and an ASCO Prevention Committee member. Lindor was one of several authors of the guidelines issued on Monday by ASCO and published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Context: Noralane Lindor, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and genticist. Her research interests include cancer genetics, with an emphasis on hereditary predisposition to cancers, as well as the clinical translation of genetic findings to medical care.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

KIMT
Do you have good posture?
by DeeDee Stiepan

The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is offering posture screenings for people to see how good or bad their posture is and how poor posture can take its toll. “YouKIMT know, our body is kind of like a stack of Jenga blocks and as we lean forward we’re putting a lot of strain on our back and that creates chronic back pain. It actually creates compression into our organs as well and so we’re not breathing as effectively,” explains Jane Hein, a Wellness Physical Therapist at The Healthy Living Center.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage:  Arizona Daily Sun

Related coverage:
Fox 2 St. Louis — The Mayo Clinic’s “Healthy Living Program; KITV, NC8 Washington D.C., Fox 2 News Detroit

Context: Jane Hein is a wellness physical therapist with the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Arizona Republic’s Living Well
Proton Beam Therapy at Mayo Clinic
by Susan Lynne Fuchs

The first services – adult and pediatric radiation oncology – have been launched at the Valley’s newest cancer center, a $310 million, 400,000-Arizona Republic newspaper logosquare-foot facility rising on Mayo Clinic’s northeast Phoenix campus.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:
Arizona Republic — Arizona Cancer Center faces crowded cancer-care market by Ken Alltucker – The five-story, 220,000-square-foot center, which opened to patients Aug. 24, follows the path of other major cancer-care providers whose facilities have sprouted in metro Phoenix in recent years. Banner MD Anderson, Mayo Clinic and Cancer Treatment Centers of America all have poured tens of millions of dollars into openings or expansions.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota this past June and in Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Rochester Magazine
Mayo's "renegade" research team
by Paul Scott

Montori’s think-tank-within-a-clinic is known as the Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit, or KER Unit, for short. It’s the sort of official sounding name that nearly begs for a disco ball until you realize it’s actually pronounced “Care Unit,” and that it has been responsible for aRochester Magazine logo globally-contagious shift in thinking about what matters the most in medicine.

Reach: Rochester Magazine is a monthly publication that serves the residents and visitors of Rochester, Minnesota. The magazine averages more than 56,000 readers each month.

Context: Victor Montori, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Montori's research takes place in the Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Montori is interested in how knowledge is produced, disseminated and taken up in practice — and how this leads to optimal health care delivery and patient outcomes. Dr. Montori also serves as director of community engagement and of late stage translational research for the Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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August 14th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
When Patients Manage Doctors
by Sumathi Reddy

Victor Montori, professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., talks about the “work of being a patient,” WSJ Bannerwhich involves more than keeping up with one’s medications. Patients must also educate themselves about the health care they need, said Dr. Montori, who is also lead investigator of the clinic’s Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit, which seeks ways to adapt care for individual patient’s needs.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Victor Montori, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Montori is interested in how knowledge is produced, disseminated and taken up in practice — and how this leads to optimal health care delivery and patient outcomes. More about his research can be found here.

Contact: Traci KleinDuska Anastasijevic

 

NY Times
Walking vs. Elliptical Machine, Redux
by Gretchen Reynolds

…Minute for minute, using an elliptical machine is likely to burn more calories than walking. According to recent estimates by the Mayo Clinic, a The New York Times newspaper logo160-pound person using an elliptical machine for an hour would burn 365 calories. The same person walking for an hour would burn 314 calories. (If that person used a stair-stepping machine, he or she would burn 657 calories, by the Mayo calculations.)

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Related coverage:

ABC News: Good Morning America — Walking vs. the Elliptical: Which Burns More Calories? Which burns more calories: walking or using an elliptical? Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Co-Director Ed Laskowski weighs in.

Context: To learn more about the estimated number of calories burned while doing various exercises for one hour, check out this chart from Mayo Clinic.

Contacts: Rhoda MadsonTraci Klein

 

MORE magazine
What You Should Do At Every Age
by Ginny Graves

Move more, sit less… Every week, get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity and two or more days of strength training that hits each muscle group. And keep this in mind: Adults who sit for more than 11 hours a day have a 12 percent iMORE Magazinencreased risk of dying prematurely. “Standing or, better yet, moving should be your default mode whenever possible,” says James Levine, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Reach: More magazine has a monthly circulation of 750,000.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Levine currently serves as a principal investigator for National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded studies focused on improving health for immigrant families through increased activity and better nutrition, interactions between sleep and obesity, and multilevel approaches to reduce obesity in working mothers and their children. More about Dr. Levine's research can be found here.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo cancer doctors criticize high drug prices
by Paul Scott

A provocative commentary this month in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings has drawn national media attention toward the high cost of cancer Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperdrugs. Mayo Clinic hematologist Dr. Vincent Rajkumar said he knew that the 118-signature petition calling for cheaper cancer drugs would attract attention, but he could not have prepared for what awaited him as he returned to the U.S. a week after the story broke.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional coverage:

KARE11 — Mayo doctor challenges high cost of cancer drugs 

Previous coverage in August 7, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in July 30, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in July 24, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: A group of 118 of the nation's leading cancer experts have drafted a prescription for reducing the high cost of cancer drugs and voiced support for a patient-based grassroots movement demanding action on the issue. Their recommendations and support are outlined in a commentary, co-authored by the group, in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.  "High cancer drug prices are affecting the care of patients with cancer and our health care system," says lead author Ayalew Tefferi, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic. "The average gross household income in the U.S. is about $52,000 per year. For an insured patient with cancer who needs a drug that costs $120,000 per year, the out-of-pocket expenses could be as much as $25,000 to $30,000 – more than half their average household income." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

The Wall Street Journal
How Does 305-Pound Jets Star D’Brickashaw Ferguson Eat His Way Into Game Shape?
by Stu Woo

Since the Jets drafted him with the fourth overall pick of the 2006 NFL Draft, D’Brickashaw Ferguson hasn’t missed a snap for the team, starting in 144 straight games at left tackle…In an effort to understand how an NFL player eats his way into playing shape during training camp, we askedWSJ Banner Ferguson and a nutrition specialist, Luke Corey of the Mayo Clinic, to analyze his diet. According to the clinic, Corey is an “expert in sports nutrition, weight management and general wellness.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Luke Corey is a nutrition specialist with Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Program health care providers (physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, nurses and a sport psychology counselor) work collaboratively and individually to offer educational information to athletes, parents, coaches and their professional colleagues.

Contacts: Rhoda MadsonTraci Klein

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Tags: AARP Espanol, ABC News, ABC News Good Morning America, acute liver failure, Albert Lea Tribune, Albuquerque Journal, alzheimers, Amyloid Predicts Cognitive Decline, At-Home STD Testing, athlete’s foot, Austin Daily Herald, Bill George


July 17th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
How Quickly Are You Growing Old?
by Sumathi Reddy

Feel like you’re 40 years old going on 60? Or maybe, 40 going on 21? Age may be just a number, but medical experts increasingly are saying it might not always be the right number to gauge your health… Measuring the pace of aging inWSJ Banner young people could prove useful to study lifestyle interventions, such as diet and exercise, but are less likely to prompt drug interventions, said James Kirkland, director of the Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging at Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: The Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging at Mayo Clinic is an innovative center where education, research and medical practice come together to improve the quality of life from birth through the sunset years. The goal of the Kogod Center on Aging is to discover and develop interventions to increase health span — the healthy, productive time in life — and improve the quality of life for older adults. James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., is the executive director of the Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Duska Anastasijevic

 

USA Today
Minnesota boy who got brain infection after swimming dies
by Mary Bowerman

A 14-year-old Minnesota teen infected with a rare brain infection while swimming in a lake died Thursday, his family said in a statement… The organism enters the brain through the nasal cavity, typically from jumping or diving into water, accordUSA Today newspaper logoing to Jessica Sheehy, a physician assistant and infectious diseases specialist at Mayo Clinic Health System.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage: 

Mankato Free Press, Health officials offer precautions on deadly lake infection

Context: Jessica Sheehy, P.A.-C. is a physician assistant and infectious diseases specialist at Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato.

Contact: Micah Dorfner

 

WEAU Eau Claire
From A to Z-- how to stay tick free

It’s July – the month when 40 percent of tick bites occur in the upper Midwest. But fans of the great outdoors can fully enjoy all their favorite activities without fear if they take the proper steps to protect themselves. To help, Mayo Clinic hasWEAU Eau Claire Logo developed “The ABCs of Ticks” flash cards. "People are always asking questions about ticks, how do I avoid them, how can I avoid tick-borne diseases," Dr. Bobbi Pritt with Mayo Clinic's Clinical Parasitology Laboratory said. "So we wanted to create easy-to-follow ABCs about ticks."

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse.

Context: Mayo Clinic reports that in the summer months, its physicians see an increase in patients being treated, and even hospitalized, for tick-borne illnesses. In the upper Midwest, 40 percent of tick bites occur in July. However, even avid fans of the great outdoors can fully enjoy all their favorite activities without fear if they take the proper steps to protect themselves. To protect you against tick-borne diseases, the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and its reference laboratory Mayo Medical Laboratories have developed “The ABCs of Ticks” flash cards. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Gina Chiri-Osmond, Susan Barber Lindquist

 

News4Jax
Exercise in the summer

The extreme heat can put a strain on your heart, cause heat exhaustion, or heat stroke. Here to tell us what we need to News Jax 4 Logoknow is a cardiologist from Mayo Clinic, Dr. Amy Pollak.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Amy Pollak, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, ABCs about ticks, aging in young people, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Antidepressants Linked To Birth Defects, Anxiety Coach mobile phone app, aortic stenosis, aquatic exercise, Aspen Ideas Festival, Australian Broadcast Corporation, Beat the Blues, Big Blue Dragon Boat Festival


June 18th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In The News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

MSNBC Morning Joe
Mayo clinic offers patient care to Walmart employees

Dr. John Noseworthy talks about the Mayo Clinic's relationship with Walmart and why they will offer patient care to theMorning Joe MSNBC company's employees.

Reach: MSNBC provides in-depth analysis of daily headlines, political commentary and informed perspectives. MSNBC’s home on the Internet is tv.msnbc.com. Joe Scarborough hosts “Morning Joe,” with co-hosts Mika Brzezinski and Willie Geist, featuring interviews with top politicians and newsmakers, as well as in-depth analysis of the day’s biggest stories. Morning Joe has about 375,000 viewers daily.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contact: Traci Klein

 

FOX News
Sunday Morning Futures, Joining me now is Dr. John Noseworthy

He is president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic. And he is with us on set. Good to see you, John. Thanks so much for joining Sunday Morning Futures Fox Newsus…So I want to get your take, really, on a couple of things. I want to talk about the subsidies issue and this pending Obamacare care ruling. But I also want to ask you about innovation, what you're doing at Mayo and, really, what's happening in health care today.

Reach:  Fox News Channel (FNC) is a cable and satellite television news channel owned by the Fox Entertainment Group, a subsidiary of News Corporation. Maria Bartiromo has covered business and the economy for more than 25 years and was one of the building blocks of business cable network CNBC. During her 20-year tenure as the face of CNBC, she launched the network’s morning program, Squawk Box; anchored The Closing Bell with Maria Bartiromo; and was the anchor and managing editor of the nationally syndicated On the Money with Maria Bartiromo, formerly The Wall Street Journal Report with Maria Bartiromo. Bartiromo joined FOX Business Network (FBN) as Global Markets Editor in January 2014.  She is the anchor of Opening Bell with Maria Bartiromo on FBN (weekdays from 9-11 AM/ET) and Sunday Morning Futures with Maria Bartiromo (Sundays at 10 AM/ET) on FOX News Channel (FNC).

Additional Coverage:
Wall Street Journal
How Mayo, Kaiser Permanente Keep Health Costs Down

At WSJ's CFO Conference, Wall Street Journal Video logoPresident and CEO of Mayo Clinic John H. Noseworthy, M.D. and Chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson discussed their cost-saving health care systems.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville to create lung restoration center
by Charlie Patton

In 2014, the number of people on the waiting list for a lung transplant in the U.S. outnumbered the number of donor lungs available by about 650. The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville and United Therapeutics Corp., a biotechnology company, are collaborating now on the creation of a lungFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo restoration center on Mayo’s Jacksonville campus that should ultimately double the number of lungs available for transplant in the U.S. “This is a big deal,” said Gianrico Farrugia, chief executive officer of Mayo in Jacksonville. “… This is not Mayo or United Therapeutics benefiting. This is the whole country benefiting.” Additional coverage: Jacksonville Business Journal, Jacksonville Post, MyInforms.com, Jacksonville City and Press, Phys.Org

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, and United Therapeutics Corporation (NASDAQ: UTHR) announced recently a collaboration to build and operate a lung restoration center on the Mayo campus. The goal is to significantly increase the volume of lungs for transplantation by preserving and restoring selected marginal donor lungs, making them viable for transplantation. The restored lungs will be made available to patients at Mayo Clinic and other transplant centers throughout the United States. Construction of the center is expected to be completed in late 2017. Financial details of the agreement were not disclosed. “This collaboration is exciting because it allows Mayo Clinic to bring the latest advances in life-saving technology to transplant patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida. “Ultimately, this relationship will help Mayo Clinic expand its reach to patients who could benefit from this innovation. Increasing the number of lungs available for transplantation provides more options for patients suffering from pulmonary disease.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

ABC 15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic has heart failure treatment options

David Fortuin, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of ABC affiliate, channel 15 in ArizonaSonoran Living Live to discuss treatment options for patients with heart failure.   Surgery is an excellent option for heart failure patients -- if they can tolerate it.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: F. David Fortiun, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's top-ranked team of cardiologists diagnoses and treats many heart conditions, including many rare and complex disorders. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Star Tribune
NBA commissioner calls Minneapolis practice site a catalyst

It had been a busy few hours for NBA commissioner Adam Silver. Tuesday night he had presented the Golden State Warriors the Larry O'Brien trophy after their series-deciding victory in Cleveland. Wednesday morning he was at TheStar Tribune newspaper logo Courts at Mayo Square, the  new 107,000-square-foot Taj Mahal-like practice facility for the Timberwolves and Lynx. The grand opening was attended by Silver, WNBA president Laurel Richie, Wolves and Lynx owner Glen Taylor and Mayo CEO Dr. John Noseworthy. Afterward, Silver called the facility — which he said was the most impressive he had seen — a catalyst for better things to come for a Wolves franchise that hasn’t seen the playoffs since 2004, but is set to pick first in next week’s draft.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
NBA.com, Three Questions With Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine

Star TribuneHartman: NBA chief Silver impressed by where Wolves stand

Star Tribune (AP), Timberwolves hope new practice center marks the end of decade-long doldrums; teaming with Mayo

Star TribuneGallery: Wolves, with partner Mayo Clinic, open Mayo Clinic Square

Star Tribune, Wolves and Lynx open new Mayo Clinic practice facility

USA Today, KTTC, KTTC, KAAL, The Herald S.C., Washington Post, Pioneer Press, FOX9, FOX Sports, Sun Times Minneapolis, NBA.com, BringMeTheNews, KARE11, Canis Hoopus

Context: DigniMayo Clinic Square Courts logotaries from the worlds of medicine, sports, business and politics hit the court today, Wednesday, June 17, to dedicate Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis. The event was the first in a series of grand-opening events marking the strategic collaboration of Mayo Clinic, the Minnesota Timberwolves and Minnesota Lynx. "At Mayo Clinic we pride ourselves in teamwork," said John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. "We are proud to be part of the team that made this day possible." More information about Mayo Clinic Square can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

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June 12th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Boston Globe
In the future, treatments tailored to patients
by Robert Weisman

Holly Boehle came to the Mayo Clinic in 2013 with an aggressive breast cancer, preparedBoston Globe Logo for almost anything. Still, she was surprised when doctors wanted to remove cells from her tumor and transplant them into “avatar mice.” Researchers then injected different cancer drugs into the mice to test which shrank the tumors, helping doctors select the best treatment for Boehle. Ultimately, Boehle, a 44-year-old school administrator in Zeeland, Mich., underwent surgery and received a combination of drug infusions based partly on the responses of the mice. Her cancer has been in remission for the past year.

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. More information on Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine can be found here.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

HealthDay
Falls Are Leading Cause of Childhood Injuries, Expert Says
by Mary Dallas

Falls are the leading cause of childhood injuries, and most of them occur in the home, a pediatricHealth Day Logo trauma expert said. Many people associate falls with playgrounds, but kids can tumble off changing tables. They can also fall out of infant seats, shopping carts and windows, resulting in serious injuries, according to Dr. Christopher Moir, a pediatric surgeon at the Mayo Clinic Children Center in Rochester, Minn. Falling from windows often results in more serious injuries, according to Moir.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: US News & World Report, Duluth News Tribune, The News Tribune Wash., Rehab Management, KLKN Neb., Sioux City Journal, Gulf Times Qatar, Arizona Daily Sun, Doctors Lounge

Context:  When people think of kids and trauma, they often think about car accidents. “However, in reality, falls are the leading cause of childhood injury and most of them happen around the home,” says Christopher Moir, M.D., pediatric surgeon at Mayo Clinic Children's Center, who has cared for a wide variety of injuries related to falls. There are approximately 8,000 children treated in emergency rooms for falls every day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At Mayo Clinic’s Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center, 35 percent of the children cared for in 2014 were the result of a fall. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Moir, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

KESQ Calif.
Miracle walk down the aisle
by Alexandra Pierce

Walking their daughter down the isle is something many fathers dream about. But for one heart failure patient from Omaha, Nebraska, it looked like he wasn't going to be able to do that on his little girl's big day. In March, Andre PearsonKESQ-2 Palm Springs went to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota where he was treated for severe heart failure. His heart wasn't pumping blood… After being reevaluated, his medical team at the Mayo Clinic decided he was well enough to make the trip to Desert Ridge Estate in Indio, where his daughter was getting married. "They told me they had a meeting earlier that morning and said that they came up with something so I could see my daughter's wedding. They told me they were going to fly me out here to California to see the wedding," Pearson said.

Reach: KESQ-TV is the ABC affiliate for the Palm Springs, CA market.

Additional Coverage: FOX News, Mayo Clinic News Network: Heart failure patient surprises daughter at wedding; CNN, FOX4News, MyFOXHouston, MPRWOWT Omaha, BuzzFeed, Mirror UK, WISH TV Ind., WPXI Pittsburgh, co New Zealand, KMTV

Context: Andre Pearson, a heart failure patient who has been at Mayo Clinic since March, initially was too ill to leave the Rochester, Minn., hospital to go to his daughter’s wedding in California. He had resigned himself to watching it online. But a few days before the Saturday evening ceremony, with Mr. Pearson doing well, his care team decided to explore whether it might be possible for him to make the trip after all. With the right game plan in place, they determined that it was possible. A Mayo staff member accompanied him; and Mr. Pearson surprised his daughter, Alexandra, by arriving the evening before the wedding in Indio, Calif., and promising to walk her down the aisle."I can't help but cry, but it's tears of joy," Mr. Pearson said Thursday, after learning that he had received medical clearance to leave the hospital for the wedding and his travel plans were under way. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Arizona Horizon
ASU/Mayo Medical School

There have bArizona PBSeen some important recent advances in the plan for a medical school at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona. ASU president Michael Crow and Dr. Wyatt Decker, vice president of the Mayo Clinic and Chief Executive Officer for Arizona, will give us an update.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent of the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Additional coverage: Arizona Public Media

Context: Mayo Medical School announced that its planned expansion in Scottsdale, Arizona has received licensure by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, the group responsible for regulating private postsecondary degree-granting institutions within the state of Arizona. “This is a major milestone in our journey to open a full four-year branch campus of Mayo Medical School in Scottsdale,” says Wyatt Decker, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Earlier this month, Mayo Medical School leaders announced they had also received endorsement for the expansion from the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting body for medical education. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Arizona Republic
Phoenix Mayo Clinic's $180 million cancer-fighting center set to open in March
by Ken Alltucker

…Mayo Clinic's $180 million-plus proton facility will be the latest addition to a metro region teeming with cancer-Arizona Republic newspaper logocare options, and the facility will be closely watched by doctors, patients and health insurers because of its sheer size, unique treatment and cost… Mayo Clinic officials said they expect that more families like the Greens will be able to stay in metro Phoenix for proton treatment rather than travel out of state. Dr. Sameer Keole, who will head Mayo Clinic's proton center, said Mayo Clinic and Phoenix Children's Hospital last year recommended about 10 children get proton therapy out of state, which can be costly.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: The Town Talk La., Des Moines Register, DOTmed, Coloradoan, News-Messenger Ohio

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduces its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota beginning this June and Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

FOX9 Mpls./St. Paul
Juicy J stuffed turkey burger

Chef Jen from the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program cooked for us a healthy Juicy J Stuffed Turkey Burger. The My Fox KMSP TCprogram emphasizes how combining nutrition, physical activity and resiliency can have a powerful effect on improving health.

Reach:  FOX 9 News broadcasts in Minneapolis-St.Paul, the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program was developed by passionate health and wellness professionals. The program is grounded in science and research. More information about the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Cathy Kennedy

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic joins move to get new drugs to market faster
by Lee Schafer

The Mayo Clinic has jumped into an interesting little experiment in drug development that might best be called micro pharma. Mayo is one of the partners in a new company calledStar Tribune Business section logo Vitesse Biologics, which is more or less just a virtual umbrella company that will itself give birth to at least five new companies. Each one of these micro pharma companies will consist mostly of a single drug development research project.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context:  Baxter Ventures, the venture arm of Baxter International Inc. (NYSE:BAX), Mayo Clinic and Velocity Pharmaceutical Development, LLC (“VPD”) today announced the formation of Vitesse Biologics, LLC, (“Vitesse”). Vitesse is a unique collaboration model initiated by Baxter Ventures to focus on the development of antibody and protein-based therapeutics in the areas of immunology, hematology, and oncology. Following the spin-off of Baxter BioScience as Baxalta Incorporated, anticipated to take place by mid-2015, the Vitesse relationship will be managed by the planned venture arm, Baxalta Ventures, for the new company.  The collaboration model, which represents a new method of drug development, was designed to incent each partner to advance promising therapies quickly through the development process. Each partner will provide its recognized expertise to enhance the target selection, target optimization, expression and product development process. Baxter BioScience will provide global commercialization, antibody and protein development and manufacturing capabilities; Mayo Clinic researchers will execute the early stage clinical trials; VPD will be responsible for target identification, selection of early stage drug candidates and will lead the design and execution of pre-clinical and clinical protocols. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Brian Kilen

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June 4th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In The News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

AP
Study: Many Cancer Patients Could Be Spared Brain Radiation
by Marilynn Marchione

A major study could change care for many of the hundreds of thousands of people each year who have cancer that spreads to the brain from other sites. Contrary to conventional wisdom, radiation therapy to the whole brain did not improve survival, and it harmed memory, speech andAssociated Press Wire Service Logo thinking skills, doctors found. "This is the classic question: Which is worse, the disease or the treatment?" said one study leader, Dr. Jan Buckner of the Mayo Clinic. Radiation helped control the cancer, "but at the cost of cognitive decline."

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional coverageAguas Digital, MedBroadcast, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Huffington Post, Yahoo! Canada, Houston Chronicle, Medscape, US News & World Report, Voice of America, OncLive, MedPage TodayNBC News, Brain Radiation: The Treatment is Worse Than the Illness, Study Finds

Context: A new study presented at the 2015 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology suggests that the practice should be reconsidered. More than 650,000 patients a year in the U.S. are diagnosed and treated for cancers that spread to the brain. For about 200,000 of these patients, those with 1-3 small brain metastases, a combination of whole brain radiation therapy and radiosurgery, a highly focused form of radiation therapy, have been the standard of care. While whole brain radiation therapy improves tumor control it did not improve survival and it was shown to have deleterious effects on patients cognitive abilities. “This is the classic question: Which is worse, the disease or the treatment,?” said Jan Buckner, M.D., an oncologist at Mayo Clinic and senior author of the study. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Today.com
17 exceptionally easy ways to relax — from people who know how to chill

Send out good vibes…"I pause and think of a few people who love me and trust my intentions," says Dr. Amit Sood, a professor of medicine at the Today Show HealthMayo Clinic. "I send silent good wishes to the person in front of me."


Reach:  
NBC News Digital reaches an audience of more than 58 million unique visitors.

Context: In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living, Mayo Clinic stress management and resiliency expert Amit Sood, M.D., draws on decades of groundbreaking research to offer readers a scientifically proven, structured and practical approach to reducing stress. He explains the brain’s two modes — focused mode and default mode — and how an imbalance between the two produces unwanted stress, and he shares new insights about how the mind works, including its natural tendency to wander. In this easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Sood provides actionable steps to cultivate emotional and mental strength, find greater fulfillment and nurture a kind disposition.  You can learn more about Dr. Sood at Resilient Living.

Contact: Brian Kilen

 

Wall Street Journal
Medicine Shows Growing Potential to Repair and Regenerate Body Parts
by Diane Cole

The idea of the body healing itself may be close to making a huge leap forward. Much closer than we think. The rapidly evolving field of regenerative medicine—including stem cells, 3-D printing and bioengineering, among other technologies—is helping rScreen Shot 2015-06-04 at 12.30.23 AMepair, and even regenerate,
body parts and tissues damaged by disease, trauma or age. “Regenerative medicine is not trying to create the bionic man but to harness the healing powers of the human body and buttress them,” says Andre Terzic, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine in Rochester, Minn. That means treating chronic or degenerative ailments and replacing failing organs. In the U.S. alone, more than 120,000 people are on organ-transplant waiting lists.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: A unique aspect of the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine is that its activities are not just laboratory based or clinic based. They're both — and everything in between. Efforts in each of the center's programs, which build on Mayo's extensive research resources and clinical practice, span the full spectrum of discovery science, translational research and clinical application. Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D., has pioneered regenerative medicine at Mayo Clinic. He has authored more than 450 publications, advancing diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for heart failure. His works include team-science efforts in the discovery of genes for dilated cardiomyopathy and atrial fibrillation. He led efforts in the development of next-generation regenerative solutions, including first-in-class products for heart repair. His scientific manuscripts have been cited more than 10,000 times.

Contact: Jennifer Schutz

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic's proton beam pricing wins praise
by Paul Scott

…So it comes as some surprise to learn, as reported last week in the Wall Street Journal, that Mayo Clinic plans to charge insurers no more for Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperproton therapy than it charges for IMRT. The policy, while established within Mayo since 2010, appears to have gone largely unstated in the reporting on plans for proton beam therapy centers at Mayo. In a 2012 response to the Emanuel piece, Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy did not mention the policy.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Previous Coverage on Proton Beam Therapy

Context: Mayo Clinic hosted a grand opening event for the Richard O. Jacobson Building, home to the Mayo Clinic proton beam therapy program on May 9. The new facility will begin treating patients in late June. More information can be found onMayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

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May 28th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Wall Street Journal
Big Bets on Proton Therapy Face Uncertain Future

Six new proton-beam centers are set to start delivering state-of-the-art radiation to cancer patients around the country by year’s end. Ten more are expected by 2018, bringing the U.S. total to 30—many the size of a football field and costing between $100 million and $200 million to build.The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoThe projects, long in the works, will enter an uncertain market. Proton-beam therapy, a highly precise form of radiation, has been dogged by a lack of evidence that it is better than traditional radiation despite costing significantly more… Some hospitals have turned to private donations, rather than private equity, to finance proton operations. Next month, the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., plans to start treating patients at its $180 million proton center, one of two built with the help of a $100 million gift.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic hosted a grand opening event for the Richard O. Jacobson Building, home to the Mayo Clinic proton beam therapy program on May 9. The new facility will begin treating patients in late June. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Joe Dangor, Jim McVeigh, Traci Klein

 

Health Leaders Media
Shriners Hospitals joins Mayo Clinic network to enhance physician collaboration

Mayo Clinic expertise will now be available to patients and providers at Shriners Hospitals for Children as part of a new network relationship HealthLeadersbetween the health care systems. Shriners Hospitals, with 22 locations throughout North America, announced Tuesday that it has joined the national Mayo Clinic Care Network.

Reach: HealthLeaders magazine focuses on the healthcare industry and has a monthly circulation of more than 40,000. HealthLeaders Online receives more than 43,000 unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Tampa Bay Business Journal, Shriners Hospitals joins Mayo Clinic network; Tampa Tribune, Tampa Bay Times, Benzinga

Context: Mayo Clinic and Shriners Hospitals for Children today announced Shriners Hospitals for Children as a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of organizations committed to better serving patients and their families through physician collaboration. The network will allow Shriners Hospitals for Children, a national health care system, to offer providers and patients convenient access to additional expertise from Mayo Clinic. The closer relationship will enhance the delivery of local care and promote peace of mind as providers and patients make health care decisions. “With Mayo Clinic’s similar mission of providing the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research, a relationship will give Shriners Hospitals the opportunity to further transform children’s lives,” said Dale W. Stauss, Chairman of the Board of Directors for Shriners Hospitals for Children. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Fast Company
The $6.5 Billion, 20-Year Plan To Transform An American City
by Neal Ungerleider

The Mayo Clinic is located in the small city of Rochester (pop. 111,000), about a two-hour drive from Minneapolis, Minnesota. And it is, right this minute, competing fiercely for a small-but-extremely-lucrative slice of the global medical tourism industry. The wealthy American, European,Fast Company east Asian, and Gulf Arab patients who have been the clinic’s bread and butter have been instead choosing to get treatment abroad or at domestic rivals like Baltimore’s Johns Hopkins University or the Cleveland Clinic. But that may be changing—and the reason, if not the construction, is simple: the Destination Medical Center.

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Additional coverage:  Builder Magazine

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC) is an innovative economic development initiative to secure Minnesota's status as a global medical destination now and in the future. The latest updates on DMC can be found on the DMC blog.

Contact: Jamie Rothe

 

Star Tribune
Doctor burnout is a rising problem in Minnesota medicine
by Jeremy Olson

… Mayo Clinic researchers, however, found that doctors can shield patients for only so long, and that left undetected burnout can lead to Star Tribune newspaper logomedication errors and other mistakes. “By the time you start seeing effects on patients, physicians have gotten so rundown that they’re just not able to buffer patients from what they’re feeling anymore,” said Dr. Colin West, a Mayo internist who has co-written several burnout studies.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Burnout is a common problem among U.S. doctors and studies suggest it adversely impacts quality of care and patient satisfaction. Many factors impact how physicians perceive their career. A new study suggests there’s an interesting correlation between physician burnout and the effectiveness of their supervisors. That’s what researchers found at Mayo Clinic when they undertook a large internal study on the satisfaction of physicians and the leadership qualities of their supervisors. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

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May 7th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

CBS News
Some jobs may protect against memory decline
by Amy Kraft

Although education is a well-known faCBS News Logoctor that influences a person's risk of dementia, this new study shows that an individual's job is also important. "Those occupations that were more intellectually tasking really showed bigger effects on protection than did just education," Dr. Ronald C. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Rochester, Minnesota, told CBS News. The study, published in the journal Neurology, mirrors similar findings by Petersen and colleagues at the Mayo Clinic that said creative hobbies such as pottery, painting and woodworking could help keep a person's brain sharp as they age.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Joe Dangor

 

USA Today
NFL: Concussions have been decreasing
by Jeff Miller

Studies of the long-term health of football players echo this news. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, NFLUSA Today Newspaper Logoplayers enjoy longer lives than the similarly aged population in society at large. The Mayo Clinic conducted the most reliable investigation on the long-term effects of football when it studied more than 400 high school players for decades, and found no increased risk of neuro­degenerative diseases compared with their classmates.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Context: High School Football and Risk of Neurodegeneration: A Community-Based Study, appeared in the April 2012 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Mayo Clinic Proceedings is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal that publishes original articles and reviews dealing with clinical and laboratory medicine, clinical research, basic science research and clinical epidemiology. Proceedings is sponsored by the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research as part of its commitment to physician education. It publishes submissions from authors worldwide. The journal has been published for more than 80 years and has a circulation of 130,000. Articles are available online at http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org.

Contacts: Sharon TheimerDuska Anastasijevic

 

Arizona Daily Star
TMC embracing its status as last locally owned hospital
by Stephanie Innes

Tucson Medical Center is not afraid of the health-care Goliaths. Officials with the 70-year-old nonprofit hospital said Friday theyArizona Daily Star Newspaper Logo will ally with the world-renowned Mayo Clinic by joining its network of hospitals…Like TMC, the Mayo Clinic decided to buck the trend of mergers and acquisitions. The Mayo Clinic Care Network was the alternative, Mayo Clinic in Arizona CEO Dr. Wyatt Decker said Friday as he celebrated the new alliance with TMC.

Additional coverage:
Tucson News Now, TMC partnering with Mayo Clinic
Arizona Daily Star, Tucson Medical Center to announce Mayo alliance
KPLC La., KFVS Mo., WAFB La., WBRC Al., WMFB S.C., Yuma News Now, HealthLeaders Media

Context: Mayo Clinic officials today announced Tucson Medical Center as a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of organizations committed to better serving patients and their families through collaboration. Members of the network have access to Mayo Clinic knowledge and expertise to give their patients additional peace of mind when making health care decisions, while continuing to offer the highest quality and value of care close to home. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

HealthDay
Little Risk of Vitamin D Toxicity, Study Says

The risk for developing vitamin D toxicity is rare, researchers have found. With vitamin D supplementation on the rise, investigators set out to Health Day Logoassess the odds of developing dangerously high blood calcium levels…"We found that even in those with high levels of vitamin D over 50 ng/mL, there was not an increased risk of hypercalcemia, or elevated serum calcium, with increasing levels of vitamin D," study co-author Dr. Thomas Thacher, a family medicine expert at the Mayo Clinic, said in a journal news release. 

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: US News & World ReportHealio Endocrine Today,  MedPage Today

Context: Over the past decade, numerous studies have shown that many Americans have low vitamin D levels and as a result, vitamin D supplement use has climbed in recent years. Vitamin D has been shown to boost bone health and it may play a role in preventing diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease and other illnesses. In light of the increased use of vitamin D supplements, Mayo Clinic researchers set out to learn more about the health of those with high vitamin D levels.  They found that toxic levels are actually rare. Their study appears in the May issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

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April 2nd, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

WCCO
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Study Gives Researchers New Hope
by Angela Davis

It’s a disease with no cure and limited treatment, but this week the Mayo Clinic announced the findings of a major study that is giving Alzheimer’s researchers new hope. The study is published in the latest edition of the journal “Brain.” It describes what MayoCBS Minnesota researchers have learned about proteins in the brain that fuel the progression of Alzheimer’s Disease. WCCO’s Angela Davis talked with a neurologist about the significance of this breakthrough. For decades, doctors have known two proteins, amyloid and tau, that contribute to memory loss, but their relationship has been focus of debate. Dr. David Knopman is a part of a team of neurologists at Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Previous Coverage in March 26, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: By examining more than 3,600 postmortem brains, researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Jacksonville, Florida, and Rochester, Minnesota, have found that the progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives the cognitive decline and memory loss seen in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid, the other toxic protein that characterizes Alzheimer’s, builds up as dementia progresses, but is not the primary culprit, they say. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Star Tribune
Health beat: Cancer drug costs are an ill lacking a cure
by Jeremy Olson

Dr. Vincent Rajkumar has little incentive to care about the skyrocketing cost of cancer drugs. Prescribing them like a drunken sailor won’t change his Mayo Clinic salary. Warning patients about sticker prices Star Tribune Health Varietywon’t change their demand for drugs that offer hope of survival. But after seeing cancer drug costs escalate 10- to 20-fold in the last 15 years, the hematologist decided enough is enough. Calling it a “moral obligation,” Dr. Rajkumar and a Houston colleague wrote an article in Mayo Clinic Proceedings challenging the rising costs and calling out drug companies for practices that extend patents and inflate profits.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Increasingly high prices for cancer drugs are affecting patient care in the U.S. and the American health care system overall, say the authors of a special article published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. “Americans with cancer pay 50 percent to 100 percent more for the same patented drug than patients in other countries,” says S. Vincent Rajkumar, M.D., of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, who is one of the authors. “As oncologists we have a moral obligation to advocate for affordable cancer drugs for our patients.” More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Reuters
Building Pathways: How a Native Oncologist Makes a Difference With Cancer Care, Prevention

Judith Kaur first began to think of herself as a healer at five years old. She says her grandmother, Ada, introduced her to nature and medicine by listening to animals outside and picking plants in the yard…Today, Dr. Judith Salmon Kaur (Choctaw/Cherokee) is oneReuters of only two American Indian medical oncologists in the country. Now an oncology professor at the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Rochester, Minnesota, she also directs the clinic's Native American outreach programs.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Context: Judith Kaur, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic oncologist who is affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Kaur is the medical director for the Native American Programs of the Mayo Comprehensive Cancer Center. All three Mayo sites are involved in outreach to American Indians and Alaska Natives through these programs. More information on Dr. Kaur's research can be found here.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon TheimerJoe Dangor

 

FOX News Latino
Opinion: Angelina Jolie’s transparency sheds light on standard but unknown procedure for high-risk women
by Jamie Bakkum-Gamez gynecologic oncologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

On Tuesday, Angelina Jolie Pitt publicly announced that she had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to decrease her risk of developing ovarian cancer, a highly Fox News Latinolethal cancer that at present has no screening test to detect it at an early, curable stage. Jolie Pitt has shared that she inherited a mutation in the BRCA1 gene. Women with a BRCA1 gene mutation have a remarkably high lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 40-50 percent as well as a nearly 80 percent lifetime risk of breast cancer.

Reach: Fox News Latino is a news website for Latinos in the United States. The website receives more than 207,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:

Nature, Gene counsellors expect resurgence of 'Jolie effect' 

KTTC, Plainview woman living with BRCA1 gene takes preventative action 

Context: Jamie Bakkum-Gamez, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and gynecologic surgeon. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Bakkum-Gamez, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

 

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