Items Tagged ‘Glaucoma’

March 7th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Steamboat Today
Yampa Valley Medical Center announces new partnership with the Mayo Clinic

...Yampa Valley Medical Center has announced a new partnership with the Mayo Clinic that will give physicians here the ability to consult with thousands of the clinic's specialists across the country. "We couldn't be more proud to have this relationship with this organization," hospital CEOSteamboat Today newspaper logo Frank May said Wednesday morning in a packed conference room as he was flanked by the Mayo Clinic's vice president and medical director. "This elevates our game."

Reach: Steamboat Today is a daily newspaper serving Steamboat Springs and the surrounding areas in Routt County, Colo. with a circulation of 7,000. Its website receive more than 30,500 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Post BulletinHeard on the Street: Mayo Clinic adds Colorado health-care provider as new member

Context: Mayo Clinic and Yampa Valley Medical Center officials announced this week that the Steamboat Springs hospital is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The network connects Mayo Clinic and health care providers who are interested in working together to enhance the delivery of locally provided high quality health care. Yampa Valley Medical Center is the second hospital in Colorado to be invited to join the network. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Wall Street Journal
The Debate Over Juice Cleanses and Toxin Removal
by Melinda Beck

…Consuming more vegetables is great, mainstream doctors and nutritionists agree. But they dismiss the detox claims as a confusing jumble of The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoscience, pseudoscience and hype. They argue that humans already have a highly efficient system for filtering out most harmful substances—the liver, kidneys and colon..."Nobody has ever been able to tell me what these toxins are," says Donald Hensrud, an internist and nutrition specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D., is Chair, Mayo Clinic Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine in Minnesota. Dr. Hensrud's research focuses on obesity, nutrition and disease prevention, physical activity and health promotion, and clinical preventive medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Traci Klein

 

Philadelphia Inquirer
Getting Teeth Pulled Before Heart Surgery May Pose Serious Risks

If you're a heart patient, you might be wise to wait to have any infected teeth pulled if you're about to have cardiac surgery, a new study suggests. Philadelphia InquirerIn a small, retrospective study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that 8 percent of heart patients who did not wait to have teeth pulled suffered major adverse health outcomes, such as a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or death.

Circulation: The Philadelphia Inquirer has a daily circulation of more than 350,000 readers. Philadelphia Inquirer - Online has more than 1.7 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Winnipeg Free PressNewsMedical.NetNew Jersey HeraldMyFoxTampaBayHealthYahoo!.netUPI.comKEYC (Mankato)Tech Times, State ColumnMedical ResearchYahoo! Health, NIH Medline Plus, MSN.com, ScienceDaily, CBSAtlanta.com, WDAM.com (Mississippi), KNOE.com (Louisiana), MyFoxDFW (Dallas based in Las Vegas), MyFoxNewYork, HawaiiNewsNow 

Previous Coverage in Feb. 28, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To pull or not to pull? That is a common question when patients have the potentially dangerous combination of abscessed or infected teeth and the need for heart surgery.  In such cases, problem teeth often are removed before surgery, to reduce the risk of infections including endocarditis, an infection of the inner lining of the heart that can prove deadly.  But Mayo Clinic research suggests it may not be as simple as pulling teeth: The study found that roughly 1 in 10 heart surgery patients who had troublesome teeth extracted before surgery died or had adverse outcomes such as a stroke or kidney failure. The findings are published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Pulling Problem Teeth Before Heart Surgery to Prevent Infection May Be Catch-22

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

FOX9
INVESTIGATORS: Radiation and records

…Former Airman Nathan Edward Morris must run a medical drill once every four months. Blood is drawn, an MRI is taken and the oncologist My Fox KMSP TCwill read the results Morris believes can be linked back to what might be called friendly fire from 11 years ago…Morris's tumor is so invasive that only a surgeon at the Mayo Clinic was willing to operate on it last July…Doctors believe they were able to cut most of the cancer out…Morris finds himself back at Mayo Clinic so often. The system of sashaying patients from appointment to appointment is incredibly slick and is specifically designed so the sick don't have to wait for days to get results -- but every minute spent waiting is one that makes Morris "nervous."

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes. FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m.

Follow-up story: FOX9, Airman gets brain tumor resolution

Context: Nathan Morris is a patient of Mayo Clinic oncologist and neurologist Derek Johnson, M.D.  Dr. Johnson's research is part of Mayo's Neuro-Oncology Program. The goal of the Neuro-Oncology Program of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is to identify prevention and treatment strategies that improve the survival and quality of life for patients with primary brain tumors.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

 

KTTC
Small business start-ups finding success in Rochester
by Devin Bartolotta

The Rochester Area Economic Development, Inc. (RAEDI) held its annual meeting Thursday. It was all about the future of Rochester. "Growing the companies that are from here and want to stay here, you have the opportunity to create a new legacy," said Peter Barth, keynote speaker atKTTC today's meeting…"I think it's going to be a really positive change. Rochester, until now, has been dominated by a single industry or maybe two. And I think having these small satellite industries build up around Mayo Clinic will be really healthy," said Dr. Russell.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: RAEDI's primary goal is to attract, retain and assist the growth/expansion of base business within the Rochester Area. Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides infrastructure that enables entrepreneurism for the Rochester community.   Founded by RAEDI, City of Rochester, Mayo Clinic Treasury Services and Mayo Clinic Ventures, the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides collaborative space for new companies, venture capital firms and entrepreneurs.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

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Tags: : KING 5 Wash., ABC News, acne, advisory board, Aftonbladet, Alice Echo News Journal, All Access, allParenting, Altoona Herald, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, anxiety


February 21st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic updates its model for the modern age
by Lori Sturdevant

Milestone anniversaries can be useful things. Take this season’s 150th anniversary of the cold January 1864 day when Dr. W.W. Mayo placed an ad in area newspapers announcing that his medical Star Tribune commentaries logopractice was open for business in downtown Rochester and the Mayo Clinic was born. A burst of high-risk, high-opportunity change is hard upon the health care industry in general and Mayo Clinic in particular. That makes this a fine time for Mayo folk to reflect on how their mammoth enterprise became famous for the best in medical care, and how that story might guide what comes next.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Lori Sturdevant writes editorials and a weekly column about topics she has covered for more than 30 years, state government and politics.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Commemorates 150th Anniversary in 2014

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Karl Oestreich

KAAL
ABC 6 Exclusive Interview with Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. Noseworthy

KAAL-TV 6In an exclusive interview ABC 6 News Anchor Ellery McCardle sits down with Mayo Clinic President & CEO Dr. John Noseworthy. In a three part conversation, they talked about the changes Mayo will experience, including the possibility of layoffs, the organizations future expansion in new cities and countries, and concerns of people who may be worried about such a large expansion. Part 1, Part 2Part 3

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich

Yahoo! Homepage Centerpiece
Why a cat bite could land you in the hospital: Surprising results from new study
by Eric Pfeiffer

Cat lovers might want to take extra caution the next time they tempt the wrath of their favorite pet feline. A new study produced by the Mayo Clinic has found that cat bites are potentially more seriousLogo of Yahoo News than most individuals, and medical experts, previously thought.

Reach: Yahoo! reaches more than a half a billion across devices and around the globe. According to news sources, roughly 700 million people visit Yahoo websites every month.

Additional coverage:
Wall Street Journal (Video), Cat Bites Pose Little-Known Dangers, Cats can reduce stress and lift spirits, but there can be serious risks involved with keeping felines in the house. A new study from the Mayo Clinic reveals cat bites can be very difficult to treat. Anna Mathews reports on Lunch Break.

Wall Street Journal, Cat Bites Pose Little-Known Dangers by Anna Mathews, A new study by researchers at the Mayo Clinic has found that of 193 patients who came in for cat bites on their hands over a three-year period, 30% had to be hospitalized for an average stay of 3.2 days…"Cat bites can be very serious, and when you do get an infection, it can be very difficult to treat," said Brian T. Carlsen, a Mayo surgeon who was an author of the study. That's particularly true with a hand injury because of the structure of the tendons and joints, he said.

MPR Blog, Roses are red, violets are blue, it’s Valentine’s Day, the rest’s up to you… 3) LOVE AND MARRIAGE GO TOGETHER LIKE … CATS AND THE WEB (OF YOUR HAND)?... An elusive regional angle for a cat story on the Internet — it’s a writer’s dream. Don’t put your hand near that cat’s mouth; you don’t know where it’s been! In a three-year retrospective study published in the February issue of The Journal of Hand Surgery, researchers reviewed records of 193 people who came to Mayo Clinic Hospital with cat bites to the hand. Additional coverage: CBS DenverWebProNews 

Context: Dogs aren’t the only pets who sometimes bite the hands that feed them. Cats do too, and when they strike a hand, can inject bacteria deep into joints and tissue, perfect breeding grounds for infection. Cat bites to the hand are so dangerous, 1 in 3 patients with such wounds had to be hospitalized, a Mayo Clinic study covering three years showed. Two-third of those hospitalized needed surgery. Middle-aged women were the most common bite victims, according to the research, published in the Journal of Hand Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: When Cats Bite: 1 in 3 Patients Bitten in Hand Hospitalized, Infections Common

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: "sitting disease", 1500 ESPN, 1500 ESPN Garage Logic, 150th anniversary, 26.2 with Donna, AARP, Abbott Northwestern, ABC News, ABC15, ADHD, Affordable care act, Alaska Public Radio


February 14th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

USA Today
A cat bite can turn into a hospital stay, study says
by Mary Bowerman

A cat bite on the hand can turn into a hospital stay, according to a new study. A recent Mayo Clinic study shows that one out of three people who sought treatment for a cat bite to the hand wereUSA Today NEW hospitalized. Published in February in the Journal of Hand Surgery the study looked at 193 patients who received treatment for a cat bite on the hand from January 2009 through 2011. Two thirds of those hospitalized during the study required surgery to flush out the infection in the wounds and middle-aged women were the most common bite victims.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Additional Cat Bite Study Coverage:

NY Times
Beware of a Cat’s Bite
by Nicholas Bakalar

…In a three-year retrospective study published in the February issue of The Journal of Hand Surgery, researchers reviewed records NYTof 193 people who came to Mayo Clinic Hospital with cat bites to the hand…“Redness, swelling, increasing pain, difficulty in moving the hand and drainage from the wound are all signs that there may be an infection and that treatment should be sought,” said the senior author of the study, Dr. Brian T. Carlsen, a hand surgeon at the Mayo Clinic. 

FOX NewsCat bites can lead to serious severe infections, hospitalization, Research published in the Journal of Hand Surgery, found that one out of three people who sought treatment for a cat bite on the hand were hospitalized, reported USA Today…"The bites lead toFox News dot com serious infections that can require multiple hospitalizations, antibiotics and sometimes surgery," study researcher Dr. Brian Carlsen, an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic, told USA Today.

KARE 11HealthDayU.S. News & World ReportDetroit Free PressWMAZHealthWFMY News 2Winona Daily NewsLa Crosse TribuneYahoo! HealthTech TimesMinnPostCare2CBS NewsKTTCKSAZ Ariz.ScienceNewsUniversity HeraldBakersfield CalifornianMedPage TodayYahoo! FranceANSA,(Italian wire agency)

Context: Dogs aren’t the only pets who sometimes bite the hands that feed them. Cats do too, and when they strike a hand, they can inject bacteria deep into joints and tissue, perfect breeding grounds for infection.Cat bites to the hand are so dangerous, 1 in 3 patients with such wounds had to be hospitalized, a Mayo Clinic study covering three years showed. Two-third of those hospitalized needed surgery. Middle-aged women were the most common bite victims, according to the research, published in the Journal of Hand Surgery. More information can be found here on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Star Tribune
UnitedHealth-Mayo venture Optum Labs adds partners
by Jackie Crosby

An ambitious health care research initiative launched last year between Optum and the Mayo Clinic has landed seven new partners with interests in public health, pharmaceuticals and the Star-Tribune-Logo-300x45biosciences. The addition of groups that include pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and the University of Minnesota Nursing School is a sign that newly formed Optum Labs, based in Cambridge, Mass., is working to swiftly assemble the pieces for what it describes as an open center for research and innovation.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Minneapolis / St. Paul Business JournalCalgary Herald

Context: Optum Labs, the collaborative research and innovation center founded by Optum and Mayo Clinic, announced this week the addition of seven new charter partners committed to improving the quality and value of patient care. The announcement follows the recent addition of AARP as Founding Consumer Advocate Organization of the collaborative. John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO, offers his perspective on the announcement in Mayo's the Future of Health Care blog.

Public Affairs Contact: Josh Derr

Star Tribune
Sports fuel orthopedics boom, provide Mayo entry downtown
by Jeremy Olson

…Minnesota has seen some $66 million in capital projects related to orthopedic care between 2008 and 2012. And it is why the Mayo Clinic – after years of flirting with a Star Tribune Logomedical presence in the Twin Cities – broke through last week with the announcement of a downtown Minneapolis sports medicine center in league with the Minnesota Timberwolves. “The growth is being driven by a more active population that happens to be in competitive sports or fitness activities,” said Dr. Michael Stuart, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center who is in Sochi now as a team doctor for USA Hockey. “I have a 65-year-old patient who plays 120 softball games a year.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related sports medicine coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Our View: Sports medicine clinic is a slam dunk for Mayo Clinic

Star Tribune, Block E ready for its renovation

NBA.comColumn: Love's Role In Practice Facility Important To Him, Timberwolves

Previous Coverage in Mayo Clinic in the News

Context: Mayo Clinic and the Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx announced in early February a partnership which extends the Mayo Model of Care for patients in sports medicine to the Twin Cities. The collaboration includes: 1) the opening of a Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at 600 Hennepin, 2) designating Mayo as the preferred medical provider for the teams, and 3) utilizing the teams’ international reach to educate the public about numerous health and wellness topics.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic, Minnesota Timberwolves & Lynx Announce Collaboration

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Duluth News Tribune
Director hopes to hit home run with documentary about Chisholm doctor
By John Lundy

Twenty-five years after the movie “Field of Dreams” gave birth to the ethereal character “Moonlight” Graham, another film is being made about the real Dr. Archibald Graham, a short-lived baseball player and longtime Chisholm doctor. This film, a documentary, will explore theDuluth News Tribune long relationship between Graham and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester.  We found out that he had come down here to the Mayo Clinic from Chisholm approximately 90 times,” said Mark Flaherty, a film producer and director who works for the clinic.

Reach: The Duluth News Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 26,800 and a Sunday circulation of more than 39,400. Its website receives more than 116,500 visitors each month.

Related Coverage:

Duluth News Tribune, Filmmaker seeks help, The Mayo Clinic is looking for help from Chisholm-area residents with its documentary on Doc Graham. Mark Flaherty, the film’s producer and director, is looking for photos, films, letters and other mementos associated with Graham. He will scan and immediately return photos and letters; films will be copied and returned.

Context: Most people are at least familiar with the name "Moonlight" Graham as a character in the book Shoeless Joe and the film “Field of Dreams," but fewer people know that "Moonlight” Graham was an actual person, not a fictional character. And long-time residents of the Chisholm, Minn., area who remember Dr. Archibald Graham as their beloved hometown doctor will have an opportunity to provide photos, film and other information as part of an upcoming documentary film on this remarkable man. Find out more information on Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Seeks Input For Film About 'Doc' Graham.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: 12News Arizona, African-American, Albany Herald, American Academy of Ophthalmology, ANSA, antiandrogen therapy, Antonita Slaughter, athletes and concussions, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, au Claire Leader-Telegram, babies, Bakersfield Californian


January 31st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Modern Healthcare
Symptoms, diagnosis and a prescription: How we can modernize healthcare in America
by Dr. John Noseworthy

Modern Healthcare

It is a tough time in many ways for our country—and for patients. The slow economy, the rapid growth in our aging population, the rising cost of healthcare and the new healthcare law have come together to make this a time of great change in how healthcare is delivered and paid for in the U.S.

Reach: Modern Healthcare, published by Crain Communications, is a healthcare news weekly that provides hospital executives with healthcare business news. The magazine specifically covers healthcare policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and healthcare from a business perspective. It also publishes a daily e-newsletter titled Modern Healthcare’s Daily Dose. The weekly publication has a circulation of more than 70,000 and its online site receives more than 29,700 unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer,  Karl Oestreich

Reuters
U.S. says results encouraging for healthcare delivery reforms
By David Morgan

The Obama administration on Thursday reported what it called encouraging results from efforts to reduce healthcare costs and improve the quality of care for more than 5 million Medicare beneficiaries under Obamacare. As part of President Barack Obama's healthcare reform law, the Reutersefforts center around more than 360 accountable care organizations (ACOs), which are networks of doctors, hospitals and other providers specially organized to help move Medicare away from traditional fee-for-service medicine..."Today's report reflects important steps. More work is needed to modernize our antiquated Medicare payment system and base payment on evidence-based quality measures and proven patient outcomes," said Dr. John Noseworthy, chief executive of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, which is not part of the government's program.

Reach: Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing newsworld newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal financestock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, videomobile, and interactive television platforms.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

MPR
Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy on the State of the Union

By Tom Crann

Minnesota got a brief shout-out in the State of the Union speech last night when President Obama pointed to the founder of Punch Pizza for the company's minimum wage practices. But Dr. John Noseworthy, President and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, was also at theMPR-News-300x45 address. Noseworthy spoke with MPR News' Tom Crann the State of the Union, the Affordable Care Act and the Mayo Clinic's 150th anniversary.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage: KAALPost-Bulletin, KTTCKIMT, C-SPAN

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Celebrates 150th Year Anniversary
by Ellen Galles

The Mayo Clinic is celebrating 150 years. In that time, the clinic has brought the world dozens of medical breakthroughs like cortisone and the heart-lung machine. But some of the most KSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logimportant medical breakthroughs could be yet to come…Doctors like Anthony Windebank are researching to see if stem cells can be used to regenerate vital organs in patients who have heart disease, kidney disease and Lou Gehrig's Disease.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Additional Sesquicentennial coverage: Post-BulletinKSTP morning show, Politico

Context: On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe.

This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Commemorates 150th Anniversary in 2014

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Florida Times-Union
Progress for Jacksonville, but big hurdles ahead, quality-of-life report says
by Steve Patterson

…“We see Jacksonville’s potential and have raised our expectations. This community demands to reach a higher standard,” said William Rupp, CEO of Mayo Clinic, who chaired the committeeFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo behind JCCI’s 29th annual progress report.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Aguas Digital.com, Albert Lea Tribune, alcohol, Amber Sherman, Ana Gregg, Anti-VEGF drugs, AP, Assisi Heights, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atlanta storm, Austin Daily Herald, Bemidji Pioneer


January 24th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Bloomberg Radio

Mayo CEO Says Better Healthcare Strengthens Economies (Audio)

Dr. John Noseworthy, president and chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic, says investment in healthcare allows individuals benefit from the prosperity they deserve. The 2014 World Economic Forum is addressing how developing and emerging economies can learn from developed nations and leapfrog to a better future.Bloomberg Davos

Reach:  Kathleen Hays is the host of “The Hays Advantage” on Bloomberg Radio, a weekday program that brings in-depth insight and analysis to important economic, market and policy issues. Recognized as one of the top economic reporters and anchors in the country, Hays has covered the U.S. economy and the Federal Reserve for more than 20 years. She joined Bloomberg in 2006 after years as an on-air and online economics correspondent at CNN, CNNfn, and CNBC, where she served as a host, correspondent and commentator for numerous programs. The Hays Advantage appears on Bloomberg 1130-am in New York City, on 1200-am and 94.5-fm in Boston and on SiriusXm satellite radio on Channel 119.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Fox Business

Can our health-care system sustain the expansion of Medicaid?

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy on the future of health care.


Reach:
 FoxNews.com hFox Businessas more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's studios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

USA TODAY

Fish on the brain: Can eating it keep Alzheimer's at bay?
 By Nanci Hellmich

…Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, says there have been conflicting reports on this topic but this latest research "would suggest there iUSA Today NEWs a positive relationship between omega-3 fatty acid-rich diets and the preservation of brain volume in aging. The take-home message is to eat a heart-healthy diet that includes fish. I'd also recommend physicalexercise and engagement in intellectual activity."

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

ABC News
Higher Risk of Death From Heart Attack Linked to Hospital Hours (Video)

When it comes to a heart attack, the difference between life and death may hinge on timing, according to the Mayo Clinic. Researchers found a 5 percent higher chance of death — almost 2,000 more ABC Newsdeaths a year — within 30 days of the heart attack if a person arrived at the hospital at night or on the weekend… “There are fewer staff and resources at night and on weekends — that’s true,” said Dr. Atsushi Sorita, the study’s lead author.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: USA TODAYToronto StarHealthDayNBC NewsEast Idaho NewsTIMEWRCB Tenn.Health NewslineHealthCanalNews-MedicalThe Globe and MailCoshocton TribuneCincinnati.comAd Hoc News (Berlin)Aetna InteliHealth

Context: More people die and emergency hospital treatment takes longer for heart attack victims who arrive at the hospital during off-hours (nights and weekends), compared with patients who arrive during regular daily hours, according to a Mayo Clinic study published online in the British Medical Journal on Jan. 21. Read, view and listen to more about the study on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

Orlando Sentinel
As women seek preventive breast-cancer surgery, hospitals move to combine procedures
by David Breen

…Now surgeons at Florida Hospital Celebration Health have joined others throughout the country by offering what had been separate surgeries — mastectomy and breast reconstruction, and removal of the ovaries — in a single session…Dr. Sarah McLaughlin, a surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, sees a growing trend toward combining the procedures, estimating that she takes part inOrlando Sentinel six to 10 of them a year. It's a preferable option for many patients, she said, provided they are strong enough to deal with a surgery session that can last five to six hours.

Reach: The Orlando Sentinel has a daily circulation of more than 162,000. The newspaper serves central Florida. It's website has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Sarah McLaughlin, M.D., is a surgeon with the Breast Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Whether you're facing noncancerous (benign) breast conditions, abnormal mammogram results, or newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer, the Breast Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Florida focuses on the needs of breast cancer patients. Mayo Clinic is one of the few places in the world where you can access all the specialists needed for comprehensive care "under one roof."

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

Star Tribune
Mayo wins FDA approval to test stem cell technique for heart patients
By Dan Browning

A decade-long Mayo Clinic research project on using stem cells to repair damaged heart tissue has won federal approval for human testing, a step that could have implications for millions of Americans Star Tribune Healthwith heart disease. 
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a multistate ­clinical trial of 240 patients with chronic advanced symptomatic heart failure to see if the new procedure produces a significant improvement in heart function, Mayo officials announced Friday.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: KTTC,  Imperial Valley NewsPost-BulletinKAALMedical Daily

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Bob Nellis, Jennifer Schutz

 

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Tags: 2014 World Economic Forum, ABC News, Ad Hoc News, adverse health events, Aetna InteliHealth, alzheimer's disease, Anesthesiology News, Argus Leader, Arizona Daily Star, Arizona Telemedicine Program, Ashville Citizen-Times, Atlanta Journal-Constitution


November 8th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

November 8, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

KMSP Twin Cities
OPERATION MAGIC: Magician's journey may be best trick of all
by Jeff Baillon

He got his start some 50 years ago. Peter Gloviczki traveled the world with his bag of tricks, and after all that time and all those miles, it's plain to see he still loves to be in front of a crowd…In 1981, Gloviczki said goodbye to the spotlights, packed away his magic hat and moved to Rochester, where he's lived ever since. He came to Minnesota to pursue his true passion -- he traded in his wand for a scalpel.....left the stage for the operating room at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes. FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m.

Context: Peter Gloviczki, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vascular surgeon. The Mayo Clinic Gonda Vascular Center is devoted to providing state-of-the-art diagnosis and treatment in a compassionate environment for patients with vascular diseases. Mayo Clinic vascular and endovascular surgeons treat blood vessel and lymphatic system conditions (vascular diseases).

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

NPR
Bariatric Surgery Can Keep Pounds Off For Years
by Nancy Shute

Weight-loss surgery is becoming increasingly popular because it's the only treatment that pretty much guarantees weight loss. There is very little evidence on how it will affect people's health over the long haul…Parents and doctors should think about non-medical reasons why surgery may help teenagers, according to Michael Sarr, a bariatric surgeon at the Mayo Clinic. He wrote an editorial in JAMA Pediatrics arguing that having to go through adolescence weighing 300 or 400 pounds can result in "psychosocial retardation." Additional coverage: Bariatric News

Reach: The NPR Shots Blog covers news about health and medicine. It is written and reported by NPR’s Science Desk.

Context: Michael Sarr, M.D., is a bariatric surgeon at Mayo Clinic. The Division of Gastroenterologic and General Surgery at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., has one of the largest and most experienced groups of gastroenterologic and general surgeons in the United States. The 16 staff surgeons perform more than 7000 operations annually and have a combined 172 years of experience.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

US News & World Report
The Push to Personalize Medicine
by Laura McMullen

At the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow Forum, industry experts discuss how to increase the value of care through personalization…While using gene sequencing seems to be valuable for patients, their families and medical institutions, the high cost seems to be slowing down its progression to the use by everyday patients. But as Gianrico Farrugia, director of the Center for Individualized Medicine at Mayo Clinic, pointed out: “It’s happening now. The future is now, it’s just uneven. This unevenness will level out.”

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is director of the Center for Individualized Medicine at Mayo Clinic. The center seamlessly integrates the latest genomic and clinical sciences to transform health care. Mayo Clinic has a rich tradition of providing exceptional individualized and tailored medical care to its patients. The center provides another chapter in a 150-year patient care history by integrating up-to-date knowledge of genes and the human genome into personalized care for each Mayo patient.

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Sam Smith

NY Times
Tapping Medical Marijuana’s Potential
by Jane Brody

Marijuana has been used medically, recreationally and spiritually for about 5,000 years. Known botanically as cannabis, it has been called a “crude drug”: marijuana contains more than 400 chemicals from 18 chemical families. More than 2,000 compounds are released when it is smoked, and as with tobacco, there are dangers in smoking it…Dr. J. Michael Bostwick, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said the classification was primarily political and ignored more than 40 years of scientific research, which has shown that cellular receptors for marijuana’s active ingredients are present throughout the body. Natural substances called cannabinoids bind to them to influence a wide range of body processes.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: J. Michael Bostwick, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist. Dr. Bostwick wrote about medical marijuana in the Feb. 2012 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

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Tags: ABC News, ABC15, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, American Society of Nephrology's Kidney Week 2013, Arizona Business Magazine, Arthritis Today, ASU News, bariatric surgery, Bellingham Herald, Bloomberg, Bradly Narr


April 14th, 2010

Acquired Childhood Glaucoma More Prevalent Than Congenital Glaucoma

By Admin

Acquired childhood glaucoma is more prevalent than congenital types of glaucoma, according to the results of a population-based study reported in the April issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

"Childhood glaucoma is an uncommon pediatric condition often associated with significant visual loss," write Elisabeth P. Aponte, MD, from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and colleagues. "It consists of a heterogeneous group of diseases leading to optic neuropathy and visual field changes that can be categorized into primary, secondary, and acquired subtypes. Primary glaucoma in children is generally divided into primary congenital glaucoma (from birth to early childhood) and juvenile primary open-angle glaucoma (4 years to early adulthood)."

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Tags: Glaucoma, MD, P. Aponte