Items Tagged ‘heart failure’

September 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Reuters
Experimental Virus Being Tested as Cancer Treatment

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic are starting a second round of human clinical trials to test if an engineered strain of measles virus is an effective cancer treatment. The trial follows a successful first round of testsReuters logo where a woman went into complete remission after a massive dose of the virus eradicated cancer in her body. Ben Gruber reports.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage:

NBC News (KTTC), IBM Takes On Cancer, A new collaboration between the Mayo Clinic and IBM brings the Watson supercomputer to best match cancer patients with the estimated 178,000 ongoing medical trials, suited to their needs. KTTC's Devin Bartolotta reports.

ABC News, Cancer Survivor Saved by Measles Virus Raises Funds for Expanded Trial, After battling blood cancer for 10 years, Stacy Erholtz has no signs of the disease, thanks to an experimental treatment that used an engineered version of the measles virus. Now, a year after finishing her treatment, the 50-year-old mother of three is transitioning from patient to advocate, working with the Rochester, Minnesota-based Mayo Clinic to expand the tiny trial that saved her life.

AOL News, WPXI, Thanhnien News, The Northwestern, WTSP, Post Crescent, WSB Radio, Statesman, Courier-Journal, MSN UK, Bing, Yahoo! News, Yahoo! Finance, Yahoo! Canada

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in Sept. 4, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Jacksonville health care facilities collaborate to save bone marrow patients' lives
by Colleen Jones

Nearly every day in Jacksonville, there is a patient going through some part of the bone marrow transplant process: diagnosis, match-making or implantation. Three health care providers recently teamed up for a Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logocommunitywide bone marrow donor drive to benefit the Bone Marrow Transplant program of Mayo Clinic in Florida, Wolfson Children’s Hospital and Nemours Children’s Clinic…“Moments usually aren’t critical, but days are,” said Dr. Vivek Roy, medical director for Mayo’s adult bone marrow transplant program. “If we pool our resources, we find it works for us all.”

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: The Blood and Marrow Transplantation Program of Mayo Clinic, Nemours Children's Clinic, Jacksonville, and Wolfson Children's Hospital has been awarded a three-year accreditation renewal by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT). The foundation awarded the accreditation renewal after thorough site visits at all collection, transplantation and laboratory facilities at the three locations. More information about the program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Huffington Post
The Shrinking Middle Class of Physical Activity
by Brad Stulberg

…In other words, the vast majority of the country's economic growth is going to those who are already wealthy, the middle class is shrinking, and the gap between rich and poor is widening. There is evidenceHuffington Post Healthy Living that people who are of a higher socioeconomic status have a greater likelihood of adhering to health guidelines than those who are not. Note: This article was co-authored by Dr. Michael Joyner, who is an anesthesiologist and physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Alyson Gonzalez

 

Washington Post
Treadmill desk to counteract the sedentary lifestyle of sitting all day
by Christie Aschwanden

As an avid runner, cyclist and skier, I get plenty of exercise, but the research shows that a five-mile run at Washington Post newspaper logothe end of the day won’t erase the health risks — such as an increased risk of diabetes, hypertension and obesity — wrought by eight hours of sedentary time, says Mayo Clinic physician and researcher James Levine, popularizer of the treadmill desk.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Previous Coverage in Sept. 4, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: ABC News, ABC-15, ABC15 Arizona, Advocate Health Care, Al Jazeera America, alternative medicine, alzheimer's disease, American Medical Association, AOL News, Argus Leader, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University


June 19th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Effort Seeks to Reduce Ear-Tube Surgeries for Small Children
By Sumathi Reddy

Parents of young, otherwise healthy children fear them like the plague: ear infections…Contributing to a desire by doctors and parents to avoid surgery are concerns about the use of general anesthesia in young children. Researchers and doctors are exploring devices that would enable ear-tube procedures to be The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoperformed using alternatives. Preceptis Medical, a Plymouth, Minn., company, is testing a device, the Hummingbird, that uses nitrous oxide instead of general anesthesia in clinical trials at four sites, including the Mayo Clinic…Randall Flick, director of the Mayo Clinic Children's Center, said his and other studies show the risk seems to occur after multiple exposures.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Randall Flick, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic Children's Center. For 150 years, Mayo Clinic has provided trusted answers for children and their parents. Mayo Clinic Children's Center includes providers from over 40 medical and surgical specialties, all focused on children's health care needs.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Traci Klein

 

Science Friday
Pre-Surgery Routine Needs an Update

Says Doc, For years, patients preparing for colon surgery have been told to stick to a liquid diet and do a colon cleanse. The only problem? There's not much science to back up those suggestions, says Robert Science FridayCima of the Mayo Clinic. He and his Mayo colleagues subscribe instead to the “enhanced recovery” approach, which spares patients the fasting and heavy narcotics in favor of regular meals and over-the-counter painkillers. Surgery is like running a marathon, he says, and the body needs to be in a normal state to brace for the big event.

Reach: Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4pm Eastern time as part of NPR's 'Talk of the Nation' programming. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand.

Context: Robert Cima, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic surgeon and chair of Mayo’s surgical quality subcommittee.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KSTP
Burnsville Father and Son Hope for Gift of Life
by Naomi Pescovitz

As Minnesota families celebrate dads this Father's Day, a Burnsville family is especially grateful for another year together. Last winter, David Costello's double organ transplant saved his life. This year, theKSTP-TV Eyewitness News Log Costellos are hoping for the gift of life once again. David Costello waited four and a half years to finally get the call. "My phone lit up, the ID said Mayo Clinic," Costello said.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: Mayo Clinic Transplant Center, with transplant services in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, performs more transplants than any other medical center in the world.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Orlando Business Journal
Brevard County hospital first in C. Fla. to join Mayo Clinic network
by Matthew Richardson

Parrish Medical Center in Brevard County has formed a partnership with Mayo Clinic— the first hospital in the Central Florida area to do sOrlando Business Journal newspaper logoo, reports News 13. Parrish is now the 29th member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, under the umbrella of the original Mayo Clinic. The century-old, renowned nonprofit is focused on medical care and research, helping millions every year.

Additional coverage:

Florida Today, Parrish to benefit from Mayo's expertise

Bay News 9Parrish Medical Center joins Mayo Clinic network

Post-Bulletin, KROC AM, Becker’s Hospital ReviewStamford Advocate, Cincinnati Finance, EMoney Daily,Virtual-Strategy magazine, Townhall Finance, Review Seeker, News13 Fla., MoneyShow.com, Minyanville, KVVU Las Vegas, Financial Content, KAIT 8 Ark., Florida Today

Context: Mayo Clinic and Parrish Medical Center officials have announced Parrish Medical Center (PMC) as the 29th member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. PMC is the first Central Florida member of the network and the third in Florida. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 2014 Practice Greenhealth Emerald Award., : ABC News Radio, A TransAtlantic Cardiovascular risk Calculator for Rheumatoid Arthritis, ABC, ABC News, ABC15 in Arizona, Adam Scott, addictions, aging, Albert Lea Tribune, Apple, Arizona Republic


April 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic builds 'Better' app to expand its name with consumers
By Dan Browning

The Mayo Clinic wants to help you feel “Better.” That’s the name of a new mobile app service launched by the Rochester-based health care provider, in partnershipStar Tribune Business section logo with a Silicon Valley venture capital firm and an accomplished tele-medicine entrepreneur. It’s part of Mayo’s overarching goal to put the clinic’s expertise into the hands of 200 million consumers.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

KAALMayo Launches New App to Reach Patients Worldwide

Bloomberg BusinessweekEngadgetMobi health newsPost-BulletinTech CrunchHIS Talk Mobile

Context: Better, a consumer health start-up, and Mayo Clinic have launched a new way for people to navigate the complexity of the healthcare system simply and quickly.  Through a mobile device, Better provides tailored Mayo Clinic health information, 24/7 access to the clinic's experienced and highly-skilled nurses, and a Better Personal Health Assistant who helps simplify and manage people's care so they can use their time to focus on being well. More information about Better can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Florida Times Union
Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville receives $39.5 million grant for stroke study
by Charlie Patton

…the Mayo Clinic in Florida has received a $39.5 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to conduct a seven-year clinical trial Florida Times-Union newspaper logoto look at the question of whether the use of medication is as effective in preventing stroke for someone with carotid stenosis, the narrowing of a carotid artery, as surgery and the placement of a stent, a small mesh tube that holds the artery open. Leading the study, which will be called the CREST-2, will be Thomas Brott, a neurologist who is director of research at Mayo’s Jacksonville campus, and his colleague, neurologist James Meschia.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
Jacksonville Business JournalJacksonville's Mayo Clinic gets $39.5 million stroke study grant, The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke is funding a seven-year study at the Mayo Clinic in Florida examining whether medication is as effective in preventing stroke as is surgery or stents. Thomas Brott, a neurologist who is director of research at Mayo’s Jacksonville campus, and neurologist James Meschia will lead the study,  according to the Florida Times-Union.

Post-BulletinWTEV FlaHealth-News.wsDaily Star UKTelegraph UK
St. Augustine RecordWJXX Fla.WJCT Fla

Context: Is medicine as safe and effective as surgery or stenting in preventing a stroke caused by the buildup of plaque in the carotid artery? Thomas G. Brott, M.D., a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida, aims to find out. “It’s a critical question. The quality medicines we have today may mean that it is not necessary to perform invasive procedures on patients who do not have warning signs of stroke,” Dr. Brott says. “More than 100,000 carotid surgeries and carotid artery stentings are performed each year in the United States on such patients at risk — and that may not be necessary.” More information, including a video interview with Dr. Brott, about the international study to test best approach to stroke prevention can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

USA TODAY
Apathy could signal brain shrinkage in old age
by Mary Bowerman

A new study suggests that as people age, they should be aware of symptoms of apathy, which may indicate a decrease in brain volume and possible brain disease...Apathy, which has similar symptoms to depression, is hard to measureUSA Today newspaper logo because the symptoms are more subtle and complex, according to Ronald Petersen, the director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who is not associated with the study.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Additional coverage: KARE11

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic


Post-Bulletin
Back and Forth: The early home of Dr. Henry Plummer
by Harley Flathers

Dr. Henry Stanley Plummer, the famed Mayo Clinic physician, was born March 3, 1874 to Dr. Albert and Isabelle Plummer in the little community of Hamilton. This Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperlittle village lies a mile and a half east and a mile south of Racine on the Mower-Fillmore County road. Sonja Hoag, a retired Mayo Clinic nurse, and her retired husband, many years a preacher, live in the home where Plummer was born.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Related coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic mobile exhibit kicks off Monday

Mayo Clinic kicks off a free, mobile 150th-anniversary tour Monday in Kingman, Ariz., at Kingman Regional Medical Center, a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The exhibit is scheduled to visit more than 40 communities in Minnesota, Missouri, Colorado, California, North Dakota, Washington, Illinois, Nebraska, Maryland, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky and Michigan, along with Washington, D.C., Winnipeg and Toronto, Canada.

Context: On July 1, 1907, Dr. Henry Plummer and Mabel Root, Dr. Plummer's assistant, inaugurated Mayo's system of patient registration and medical record keeping. The single-unit record was central to the new system. It brought together all of a patient's records -- clinical visits, hospital stays, laboratory tests and notes -- in a single file that traveled with the patient and was stored in a central repository. This simple system quickly became the standard for medical record keeping around the world. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. 

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein


ABC15 Ariz.
Mayo Clinic's Simulation Center helps with team approach to medicine, reenacts real-life scenarios

ABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizona

Mayo Clinic cardiologist, David Fortuin, M.D., joined the cast of Sonoran Living Live to talk about Mayo Clinic's Multidisciplinary Simulation Center and how it's used to perfect Mayo's team approach to patient care.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: F. David Fortuin, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Carol Benson

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: ABC News, ABC15 in Arizona, About.com, acute pancreatitis, Alexa Ray Joel, allergy sufferers, Almanac, alzheimer's disease, APOE4, astigmatism, Austin Daily Herald, back pain


April 4th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Fox Business
Part 1 -- Mayo Clinic CEO: We need to modernize the delivery system, Medicare  

Fox Business
Part 2 -- Top institutions squeezed by rising health-care costs 

Fox Business
Part 3 -- Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, American Action Forum president Douglas Holtz-Eakin discuss health-care spending    

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's
Fox Businessstudios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy recently joined Maria Bartiromo on Fox Business’s “Opening Bell” to discuss the Affordable Care Act, the need to modernize the health care delivery system and Medicare and Mayo Clinic's role in health care innovation.

Dr. Noseworthy explained that the health care delivery system must be modernized. He highlighted three ways Mayo Clinic is doing this:

  1. Mayo Clinic’s focus on providing the highest quality and safest care
  2. Expanding Mayo’s reach through the Mayo Clinic Care Network
  3. Identifying and investing in what patients need in the future through research activities and work in the science of health care delivery, including Mayo’s strategic research alliance with Optum Labs

Public Affairs Contacts:  Chris Gade, Bryan Anderson

 

KMUW Wichita Public Radio
Topeka Hospital to Collaborate with Mayo Clinic

Topeka's Stormont-Vail HealthCare has become the first health system in Kansas to partner with the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The deal will give local patients access to the expertiseKMUW Wichita Public Radio of the medical staff at the Mayo Clinic.

 

Reach: KMUW-FM 89.1 is a non-commercial NPR News/Talk and Variety music public radio station out of Wichita State University in the Wichita, Kan. area.

Additional Coverage:
Topeka Capital-Journal
Editorial: Local health care community takes another big step

The health of the local health care community just keeps improving. The latest advancement on that front was revealed Tuesday when officials of Stormont-Vail HealthCare and the world-renown Mayo Clinic, based in Rochester, Minn., announced they had entered a partnership that will give local physicians access to the clinic’s physicians for consultations.

Post-BulletinMayo Clinic Care Network now in 14 states, Mexico; WIBW Kan.Wichita EagleTopeka Capital-JournalNews Medical

Context:  Stormont-Vail HealthCare and Mayo Clinic officials announced April 1 that the Topeka-based health system has become a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and families. Stormont-Vail HealthCare is the first health system in Kansas to join the network. The Mayo Clinic Care Network is a network of like-minded organizations which share a common commitment to improving the delivery of health care in their communities through high-quality, data-driven, evidence-based medical care. More information about the announcement can be found here on Mayo Clinic Care Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

KARE
Mayo Clinic patient celebrates junior prom bedside

KARE 11A heart transplant didn't stop Bree Hanson from celebrating her junior prom.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Context: At Mayo Clinic Transplant Center a team of doctors trained in heart and blood vessel disease (cardiologists), transplant surgery, infectious diseases, mental health conditions (psychiatrists) and other areas evaluate patients to determine if they are eligible for a heart transplant.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

KPHO Ariz.
Looking inside Mayo Clinic's Proton Therapy Cancer Center by Greg Argos, Though it's not going to accept patients until 2016, CBS 5 News took an exclusive look inside the Mayo Clinic's $400 million dollar proton therapy center. "There are only about 12 sites in the country that will have proton beam therapy now, and this will be the only site in ArizonaCBS5AZ-KPHO that has proton therapy," explained Dr. Steve Schild, an Oncologist and the Department Chair for the Mayo Clinic's new center.

Reach: KPHO-5 is the CBS affiliate in Phoenix and is owned by Meredith Corporation.

Context: Mayo Clinic is launching a Proton Beam Therapy Program to provide the latest cancer treatment for Mayo patients. New treatment facilities will be built on the Minnesota and Arizona campuses. Treatment for patients will be available beginning in 2015 in Minnesota and 2016 in Arizona. Proton beam therapy will be used to treat many kinds of cancers located deep within the body and close to critical organs and body structures, especially in children and young adults.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Post BulletinDr. John Noseworthy: Rochester, Mayo Clinic have grown up together
by Dr. John Noseworthy

For 150 years, the city of Rochester and Mayo Clinic have had a partnership like none other. We've grown up together. We could not have asked for a better place to call home throughout our history or a better place to invest in our future to benefit Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperour patients, employees and the community. During the last legislative session, Gov. Mark Dayton and the legislature determined there was a compelling public interest to authorize public investments in Rochester to help support the significant investments by Mayo Clinic to strengthen and secure Minnesota as a global destination medical center.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Additional Coverage:

Post Bulletin
, DMC special report: Road map to the future by Jay Furst, Twenty years from now, Rochester will have about 35,000 more people, the Rochester area will have 35,000 to 45,000 more jobs, and Mayo Clinic will remain a world-class destination for health care, according to Destination Medical Center promoters. How will this happen, and who's drawing up the plan? Today, in a 24-page special report called "DMC: Road Map to the Future," the Post-Bulletin lays out the plan envisioned by Mayo, city and county officials, and business leaders.

Post BulletinWhat is DMC: The facts, The concept of Destination Medical Center is simple — to transform Mayo Clinic and Rochester into a more attractive destination for medical patients and providers. But the structure of the $6 billion, 20-year public-private investment is not simple at all…The eight-member Destination Medical Center Corp. board will guide the use of all public funding, andwill oversee the operation of the nonprofit Destination Medical Center Corp. It's also responsible for approving the overall DMC Development Plan. Four members of the DMCC were chosen by the governor, three are representatives of local government and one is a Mayo Clinic representative.

Post BulletinA DMC magic wand by Jeff Hansel, Richard Dooley and his wife, Karol, have been staying at the Hope Lodge in Rochester while he undergoes prostate cancer therapy at Mayo Clinic. Dooley said he loves "everything" about Mayo Clinic and Rochester. "We both love the town. It's nice and clean and neat and everybody's respectful and nice," Dooley said…If Solis had a magic wand, he said, he would have Mayo introduce a "Louder than a Bomb" poetry program to both Mayo Clinic patients and to Rochester community members. That program has helped young people close to dropping out of school get energized, Solis said. He'd like to see local poets read to Mayo patients, and Mayo patients encouraged to write and read poetry.

Post BulletinMayo Clinic expansion already underway, more likely by Jeff Hansel, With the Destination Medical Center plan in the books, Mayo Clinic has already shifted into growth mode. The nonprofit has several projects underway, or planned in the near future. "There are current projects taking place at Mayo Clinic that will continue to enhance the patient experience and increase the quality of care delivered to patients for generations to come," said Mayo spokeswoman Kelley Luckstein. The latest is at Mayo Medical Laboratories which plans a 66,000-square-foot, two-story addition to the Superior Drive Support Center.

Post BulletinMayo reaching out in other areas by Jeff Hansel, Even as it is making plans to expand in Rochester, Mayo Clinic is reaching out elsewhere in an effort to connect with more patients. Among those efforts are a sports medicine and athletic training center called Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis, the continued growth of the Mayo Clinic Care Network and even the recent purchase of 187 acres in Onalaska, Wis., for a possible new facility.

Post BulletinDEED, DMC job projections similar by Brent Pearson, he Mayo Clinic has a major effect on the economy of southeastern Minnesota, with a proposed $5 billion expansion of the world-renowned medical center likely to stimulate further growth. Destination Medical Center is a plan to expand the Mayo Clinic's Rochester campus and further enhance the region's position as a global destination for health-care services. Mayo officials estimate the expansion will create between 25,000 and 30,000 direct jobs, another 10,000 to 15,000 indirect jobs, and 1,800 to 2,200 construction jobs over the next 20 years.

BringMeTheNews, Construction jobs aplenty in southeast Minnesota by Jessica Mador, There are new signs of growth in Rochester this spring, partly spurred by the Mayo Clinic’s plans for a new $5 billion flagship campus makeover. The Mayo project calls for doubling the size of its existing Minnesota campus. According to Mayo, the clinic already employs 40,600 Minnesotans, 33,400 of whom work in Rochester. And as MPR News reports, the clinic’s makeover plan includes $327 million in state aid, largely to fund improvements to public facilities in the city.

Post Bulletin, DMC to bring thousands of jobs by Bryan Lund, The Destination Medical Center could have a significant impact on Rochester's employment landscape, if the estimates of Mayo Clinic officials come to fruition. The DMC initiative's website says the project will create thousands of permanent, well-paying jobs in the area over the next couple decades. Some of those are directly related to DMC, such as additional physicians and medical support staff, while others are predicted to come as a result of growth in the area's economy indirectly associated with DMC.

Post-Bulletin, Letter: DMC planners must consider needs of disabled, I hope the Destination Medical Center planners consider the needs of people with disabilities. The Mayo Clinic has restroom facilities for people with special needs. A few other places have them as well. Fortunately, the new senior center is planning to have companion restroom facilities for people who need assistance in a rest room.

MPR, More construction workers needed in Rochester as housing market recovers by Elizabeth Baier, It's a good time to be a construction worker in southeastern Minnesota. With home construction on the rise, the job forecast is good in the construction and trade industries. Over the next two decades, more workers will be needed to help Rochester keep pace with the expected growth. During that time, the city is expected to grow by 32,000 residents, in part because of Mayo Clinic's $5 billion plan to remake its flagship campus. The plan includes $327 million in state aid, largely to fund improvements to public facilities in the city. Additional coverage: St. Cloud Times

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 3-D printing, ABC 15 Phoenix, ABC News, ABC15, Abigail Van Buren, ACA, Affordable care act, allergy season, allergy shots, allergy shots versus pill, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's disease and walking pace


January 17th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

January 17, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

NY Times
Ask Well: Is there any scientific study to substantiate the claim that older people (over 45) should limit high-impact exercises like jogging, sprinting, etc…?

...Running and similar high-impact activities likewise have a salutary effect on bone density, said Dr. Michael Joyner, an exercise physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and an expert on aging athletes, of whom he is one. Over all, he continued, he is “skeptical” of the ideaNYT that older people should avoid high-impact activities. “A lot of concerns about age-appropriate exercise modalities have turned out to be more speculative than real over the years,” he said, adding that during his research and personal workouts, he’s seen many seasoned adults pounding the pavement without ill effects.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Bryan Anderson

WCVB Boston
Shoulder replacement can ease pain, improve motion in RA patients

… Despite surgical challenges with some rheumatoid arthritis patients, the procedure improves WCVB-Bostonrange of motion and reduces pain in nearly all cases, especially for those with intact rotator cuffs, a Mayo Clinic study shows. The findings are published in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. “I think it’s quite encouraging,” says senior author John Sperling, M.D., an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Additional coverage: WTAE PittsburghOrthopedics Today, Jersey Tribune, Medical XpressScience DailyOncology Nurse Advisory 

Reach: WCVB-TV is an ABC affiliate that broadcasts to Needham, Mass., and the surrounding area.

Context:  John Sperling, M.D., is an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Shoulder arthritis is a common problem for rheumatoid arthritis patients: the pain and difficulty moving their arms can grow so severe that daily tasks and sleep become difficult.  If medication and physical therapy aren’t enough, shoulder replacement surgery is a common next step. Despite surgical challenges with some rheumatoid arthritis patients, the procedure improves range of motion and reduces pain in nearly all cases, especially for those with intact rotator cuffs, a Mayo Clinic study shows. The findings are published in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery.

News Release: Mayo Study Finds Shoulder Replacement Eases Pain, Improves Motion in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Star Tribune
Stress can be as contagious as germs
by Jeff Strickler

…Secondhand stress — tension that we pick up from the people and activities around us — is a natural defense mechanism that helped keep our ancestors alive, said Dr. Amit Sood, an expertStar-Tribune-Logo-300x45 on stress at the Mayo Clinic. But as soon as we pick up that tension, we risk becoming carriers, passing it on to any friends, family members or co-workers — and, yes, even strangers — who we encounter.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician and stress management expert. Dr. Sood is the author of The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Becoming Overwhelmed

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

MPR
The challenge of living well with ALS, but also accepting the inevitable
by Cathy Wurzer

This is part of our continuing series of stories about Bruce Kramer, the former dean of the College of Education, Leadership and Counseling at the University of St. Thomas, as he copes MPR-News-300x45with life after being diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. Bruce Kramer was diagnosed with the incurable disease ALS in 2010. Since then, he's been involved in a couple of drug trials. And about two months ago, Mayo Clinic doctors implanted a device in his diaphragm that has improved his breathing.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Previous Coverage in Mayo Clinic in the News

Context: Bruce Kramer of Minneapolis received a medical diagnosis that changed his life in an instant. Kramer, who was 54 at the time, had noticed his left foot feeling heavy and a little floppy. His ordinarily muscular thighs would tremble noticeably, and he had taken a couple of falls and found it tough to get back up…Jeffrey Strommen, M.D., the Mayo Clinic physician overseeing Kramer's use of the DPS, says, "he's more energetic. He feels stronger and we do have some evidence, albeit, limited that this may actually prolong survival." Dr. Strommen is a Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation specialist.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram
Companies are offering lower-calorie products to help combat the country’s obesity epidemic. But is it enough to win the battle?

... Those companies had pledged in 2010 to cut 1 trillion calories by 2012 and 1.5 trillion by 2015…That’s good news, said Diane Dressel, a dietitian at Mayo Clinic Health System inLeader Telegram EauClaire, where she also is coordinator for the hospital’s weight management services.

Circulation: The Leader-Telegram is the largest daily newspaper in west-central Wisconsin. It covers 12 counties with circulations of 23,500 weekdays and 29,800 Sundays.

Context:  Diane Dressel is a dietitian at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, where she also is coordinator for the hospital’s weight management services.

Public Affairs Contact:  Paul Meznarich 

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 100 Best Companies to Work For, ABC News, ABC15, ADHD, Agencia Digital de Noticias Sureste, Air Force Master Sgt. Lori Jung, alzheimer's disease, American Stroke Association, AP, Artículo 7, ASCO Post, Associated Press


July 17th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

July 19, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations 

NBC News
Memory loss worries may indicate Alzheimer’s risk

Dr. Ronald Petersen is interviewed as well as a Mayo Clinic patient. Researchers at Brigham and Women’s hospital in Boston asked 200 healthy volunteers to report concerns about their own memory and then received a brain scan looking for build up of amyloid plaque, a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Those most anxious about their memory also had the highest levels of plaque. NBC’s Dr. Nancy Snyderman reports.

Reach:  NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams continues to be the top rated evening newscast with more than 7.9 million viewers each night.

Additional Coverage:

Reuters
Some, mild slips of memory may be very early Alzheimer's

AP, NECN, FOX News

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Nick Hanson

NY Times
Dementia’s Signs May Come Early
by Pam Belluck

…And, in a significant shift highlighted at the conference, leading Alzheimer’s researchers are identifying a new category called “subjective cognitive decline,” which is people’s own sense that their memory and thinking skills are slipping even before others have noticed.  “The whole field now is moving to this area, and saying ‘Hey, maybe there is something to this, and maybe we should pay attention to these people,’ ” said Dr. Ronald C. Petersen, chairman of the advisory panel to the federal government’s new National Alzheimer’s Project. Dr. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s center, said preliminary results of a Mayo study of healthy older adults in Minnesota suggested something similar.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services. Richard Caselli, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Dr. Caselli's research focuses on cognitive aging and the changes that can be detected before the symptomatic onset of memory loss and related symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Nick Hanson, Jim McVeigh, Lynn Closway

NPR
Patients Seek A Different Approach To Hip Replacement Surgery
by Pattie Neighmond

Every year more than a quarter of a million Americans have total hip replacement surgery. It's almost always a successful operation that frees patients from what's often described as disabling pain…Critics say the increased interest in anterior approach surgery may be more due to marketing from doctors, hospitals and companies that sell specialized operating tables and other gear rather than any benefits to patients. Clinical trials comparing the two methods are underway at the Mayo Clinic and at the Hospital for Special Surgery, but it may well be five years before that data is available. In the meantime, doctors says it's important to look at the big picture. Today "most healthy patients recover quickly, no matter which surgical technique is used," says orthopedic surgeon Mark Pagnano with the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The NPR Shots Blog covers news about health and medicine. It is written and reported by NPR’s Science Desk.

Context: Mark Pagnano, M.D. is an orthopedic surgeon who also has an appointment with Mayo Clinic's Young Hip Clinic. The Young Hip Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota evaluates and treats young people who have hip pain. The clinic focuses on alternatives to hip replacement or joint preservation surgery.

Public Affairs Contacts: Dana Sparks, Brian Kilen

NBCNews.com
Can Big Data solve the mystery of suicide?
By Helen Popkin

Everywhere on the Internet, we're trailed by bots that inspect our searches and social chatter, attempting to predict what we're going to buy, watch or who we might date next. But in the middle of all that commerce-friendly jibber jabber, some people are saying, in not so many words, "I am going to kill myself." What if a computer program could spot those cries for help as well?... Even outside the military population, doctors miss cues. A review of studies by the Mayo Clinic found approximately 44 percent of people who commit suicide visited their primary care physician, and 20 percent visited a mental health care worker in the month before their deaths.

Reach: NBC News Digital reaches an audience of more than 58 million unique visitors.

Context: Suicide is the 11th leading cause of death in the United States. Every year, millions of Americans think about taking their own lives. Sadly, each year tens of thousands die by suicide. While suicides can be a shock to family and friends, some warning signs exist. Often a simple question from a family doctor can be enough to start a person toward help and treatment. A review in the August issue 2011 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings by researchers at Mayo Clinic and the University of Washington, Seattle highlights the opportunity that primary care physicians have to establish a successful treatment plan for these patients. Dr. Timothy Lineberry is a Mayo Clinic suicide prevention expert.

News Release: Mayo Clinic: Primary Physicians May Hold Key to Suicide Prevention

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Everyday Health
Need a New Hip? Press 'Print'
by Dr. Sanjay Gupta

Thousands of hip replacements are performed every year. These operations are life-changers for people with osteoarthritis and other conditions, ridding them of pain and returning them to an active life…Brooke was born with a misshapen pelvis. By the time she was in her 20’s, she was already severely debilitated by arthritis in her hips…Her doctors at Mayo Clinic were able to spare Brooke all those surgeries by turning to a new technology: 3-D printing…“You press print and a 3-D model is made,” says orthopedic surgeon Christopher Beauchamp, MD.

Reach: Everyday Health Media, LLC is a provider of online consumer health content across a broad portfolio of over 25 websites that span the health spectrum — from lifestyle offerings in pregnancy, diet and fitness to in-depth medical content for condition prevention and management.

Context: Joint replacements have been around for a long time. Most people with conditions such as osteoarthritis can expect good results if they have one. But what about those who have complicated cases or unusual deformities that a standard replacement can’t fix? In the past that’s meant few options, but now, doctors at Mayo Clinic in Arizona are using 3D printers to enable customized joint replacement surgeries. Many patients, who were previously out of luck, can now have a successful surgery and better quality of life.

Mayo Clinic News Network Package: 3D Printer Uses CT Scan to Print Out Model of Hip Joint Before Surgery (pkg)

Public Affairs Contact: Dana Sparks

Everyday Health
Stem Cells Heal a Damaged Heart
by Dr. Sanjay Gupta

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have made a breakthrough in doing that. They have trained stem cells harvested from a person’s bone marrow to become heart cells, by treating them with certain proteins that trigger heart development. They refer to these stem cells as “smart” stem cells. “This study helps us move beyond the science fiction notion of research,” said Andre Terzic, MD, PhD of Mayo Clinic, the study’s senior author.

Context: Physicians and researchers in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic say their work is developing completely new ways to treat and manage chronic diseases like diabetes, heart failure, or even degenerative nerve, bone and joint conditions. And in December, international experts will meet at the World Stem Cell Summit, to continue exploring and sharing ideas about the future of regenerative medicine. Here are some 101 basics of how this science benefits patients.

Mayo Clinic News Network Package: Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine 101 (Medical Edge TV)

Public Affairs Contact: Dana Sparks

US News & World Report
The Personalization of Medicine
by Katherine Hobson

…Just this past May, the Food and Drug Administration approved two drugs for advanced melanoma driven by certain mutations that join a crop of new therapies approved in the last few years. Also, in May, the Mayo Clinic launched an Individualized Medicine Clinic at its three locations in Minnesota, Arizona and Florida aimed at getting cutting-edge guidance to cancer patients who have failed standard treatments and to people with mysterious ailments that may have a genetic cause.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context:  Mayo Clinic has always been a destination for patients seeking answers. Now, Mayo is taking that concept to the next level with the public launch of its Individualized Medicine Clinic — at all three of its campuses, in Minnesota, Florida and Arizona.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Launches Individualized Medicine Consulting Clinic

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Pioneer Press (AP)
Mayo Clinic gets a silver in US News ranking

Johns Hopkins Hospital has regained its place atop U.S. News & World Report's annual rankings of the nation's best hospitals, one year after its 21-year stint at the top of the rakings was broken… The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., was ranked third, followed by the Cleveland Clinic and UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

KEYC Mankato
Mayo Clinic Health System Mankato Ranked High in State
Mayo Clinic Health System Mankato is ranked 14th among the state's hospitals according to a U.S. News and World Report released today. With nearly 160 hospitals in Minnesota, the report came as good news to the hospital staff.

Reach: KEYC-12, is a Fox affiliate whcih broadcasts from Mankato, Minn.

WEAU Eau Claire
Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire ranked among best in state

Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire is ranked No. 4 in Wisconsin and is recognized among the Best Hospitals in northwest Wisconsin in the newly released 24th U.S. News & World Report annual America’s Best Hospitals list… “This national recognition from U.S. News underscores the commitment our staff makes to care for patients,” says Randall Linton, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic Health System’s northwest Wisconsin region.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Phoenix Business Journal
13 Phoenix-area hospitals ranked as best by U.S. News & World Report
by Angela Gonzales

Of all 56 hospitals in the Phoenix metro area, 13 were named best regional hospitals by U.S. News & World Report. At the top of the list was Mayo Clinic, which touts 10 nationally ranked specialties and three high-performing specialties.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Jacksonville Business Journal
Baptist, Mayo Clinic among top 5 hospitals in Florida
by Michael Clinton

Several of Jacksonville’s hospital systems ranked among the best in Florida in an annual ranking of the best hospitals in the nation. Baptist Medical Center and Mayo Clinic tied as the No. 1 hospitals in Jacksonville and No. 4 in Florida on the U.S. News & World Report annual Best Hospitals study, released today.

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Nephrology News
Cleveland Clinic loses #1 ranking to Mayo for nephrology care

Medscape Today
Mayo Clinic Keeps Top Spot for Diabetes in US News Rankings

Additional US News Best Hospitals Coverage: MSNBC, Star Tribune, KARE 11, CNN, Chicago Tribune, Twin Cities Business, FierceHealthcare, Post-Bulletin, FOX47, KTTC, Action News Jax, Huffington Post, Health Leaders Media, Arizona Daily Star, CBS News, KTLA, WXOW, Action News Jax

Context: Mayo Clinic was highly rated in the 24th U.S. News & World Report annual America's Best Hospitals list released today. As in 2012, Mayo earned the No. 3 overall spot on the "Best Hospitals" list. Mayo ranked No. 1 in the nation in five clinical areas — gynecology, diabetes and endocrinology, gastroenterology, nephrology and pulmonology. In addition, Mayo is ranked No. 2 in five additional specialties — cardiology & heart surgery, ear, nose & throat, geriatrics, neurology & neurosurgery and orthopedics. Mayo Clinic earned the No. 1 spot in Minnesota, ranked No. 1 in Arizona and specifically in the Phoenix metro area, and earned the No. 1 rank as best hospital in the Jacksonville area.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Lauded in Quality Rankings, Most Recently by U.S. News & World Report

News Release: Mayo Clinic Ranked No. 1 in Arizona and Phoenix by U.S. News & World Report

News Release: U.S. News & World Report Ranks Mayo Clinic No. 1 in Jacksonville and a Leading Cancer Hospital Nationally

News Release: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Mankato rank among best in Wisconsin, Minnesota regions

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson (Mayo Clinic in Rochester), Jim McVeigh (Mayo Clinic in Arizona), Kevin Punsky (Mayo Clinic in Florida), Micah Dorfner (Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato, Minn.), Susan Barber-Lindquist (Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Clarie, Wisc.)

KSTP
Doctors, Deputies Warn Against Cliff Jumping
by Josh Rosenthal

…That's largely because the water below the cliff is a maximum of 14-feet deep, and it's only three-feet deep close to shore. Deputies have handed out more than 100 citations to people jumping off the cliff, which is on private property, in just the last month. "We had 18 just yesterday," Englund said. "This is a big problem for us out here." It's a big problem at the Mayo Clinic Health System in Cannon Falls, too. "This is very dangerous," Trauma Program Coordinator Angela Schrader said. "The impact can be lifetime on a lot of these patients."

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: Angela Schraeder is the Trauma Program coordinator at Mayo Clinic Health System in Cannon Falls, Minn.

Public Affairs Contact: Kristy Jacobson

Post-Bulletin
Destination Medical Center: Hold on to your hats
by Jeff Hansel

The Minnesota Legislature's passage of Destination Medical Center means the project no longer belongs to Mayo Clinic. In many ways, it belongs as much to Rochester residents themselves, who, through their votes, control the Rochester City Council. City Council members will measure, critique and approve expansion proposals submitted by Mayo and private developers over the next 20 years. 

Additional stories from Post-Bulletin Related to DMC Report:
A new model of health care — for the well, Pediatrics a key part of Mayo Clinic's Destination Medical Center The affluent will be big part of Destination Medical Center, Rochester seeks to become biotech destination  

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC), an economic development initiative designed to secure Mayo Clinic and Minnesota’s future as a global medical destination, passed on May 20 as part of the Minnesota Legislature’s tax bill. It will help fund the public infrastructure required to keep pace with an estimated $5 billion private investment by Mayo Clinic and other private entities over the next 20 years.

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich

Bloomberg
U.S. Blood Supply Threatened as Donors Face Iron Losses
by Michelle Cortez

…In the U.S., 70 percent of the blood supply comes from repeat donors. Limiting their giving may hamper a system that already suffers shortages. The Mayo Clinic predicts a 10 percent drop in its supply from its restrictions on donors after finding that one-third had iron deficiency. “We want to make sure we don’t have a group of people walking around being iron deficient,” said Manish Gandhi, the medical director of the Mayo Clinic’s blood donation center. “Blood donation in the U.S. is an altruistic thing. We need to focus on what we should be doing to protect these wonderful donors.”

Circulation: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Context: Manish Gandhi, M.D. is medical director of the Blood Donor Center at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Approximately 80,000 units of blood products are transfused at Mayo Clinic in Rochester annually. For more interesting facts about donating blood, click here.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Action News Jax
Mayo Clinic CEO talks about health care
by Catherine Varnum

The CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville talked one on one with Action News about the proposed health care reform plan. "We can't continue as we are," said Dr. William Rupp. He's the CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Florida. He's been watching the news closely over the last few months, trying to figure out how the Mayo Clinic will be affected by Obama's proposed health care plan. "I think there's still a lot of confusion about what actually is going to come out," said Dr. Rupp.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Fla.

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

WEAU
Mechanical heart gives local man a second chance
by Courtney Everett

In our Health Alert, according to the Centers for Disease Control, about 5.7 million people in the United States have heart failure. But, a mechanical device is giving people with heart failure a new chance at life…Many hospitals don't have the capability to do this surgery, but Mayo Clinic Health System is helping patients with the devices and plans to open a special center this fall. "We will be a share cared center and what that means is that we will care for the patient in conjunction with the center that put the device,” said Dr. Kincaid.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Context: Cardiologist Daniel Kincaid, M.D., discusses how the ventricular assist device --VAD -- works. Beginning this fall, patients will be able to receive follow-up VAD care at the Cardiac Center at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Wisc. For patient David Evans, this partial mechanical heart is a lifesaver until he hopefully receives a heart transplant someday.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber-Lindquist

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

View full entry

Tags: 3-D printing, Action News Jacksonville, Action News Jax, Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, alzheimer's disease, American City Business Journals, Angela Schraeder, AP, Arizona Daily Star, Associated Press, Barb Spurrier, Best Hospitals


April 11th, 2013

Mayo study: ‘Smart’ stem cells help heart failure patients

By Logan Lafferty

Treating heart failure patients with a special type of stem cell can improve their condition, according to a new Mayo Clinic study published this week…Dr. Andre Terzic, who led the research and is director of Mayo's Center for Regenerative Medicine, said it is the first published study in which smart stem cells were tested on humans. "I think it's an exciting time where regenerative medicine is no longer science fiction but it's increasingly becoming considered as a viable option for our patients, in particular the patients [who] have many unmet needs that current therapies cannot address," Terzic said.

 

MPR by Elizabeth Dunbar

View full entry

Tags: Dr. Andre Terzic, heart failure, Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine, MPR, smart stem cells, stem-cell


January 2nd, 2013

The Future of Medicine Is Now

By Logan Lafferty

In our era of instant gratification, the world of medicine seems like an outlier. The path from a promising discovery to an effective treatment often takes a decade or more…After years of controversy, gene therapy is poised to become a viable option for a variety of often life-threatening medical conditions, especially those resulting from a single defective gene. Last month, the European Union approved Glybera for treatment of a rare genetic disease, making it the first gene-therapy medicine approved in the Western world. The approval comes amid a flurry of research showing broader promise for the approach in a range of disorders, from a rare form of blindness to hemophilia to heart failure. Though outright cures are still elusive, gene therapy "is beginning to emerge as a meaningful clinical" strategy, says Stephen J. Russell, director of molecular medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Wall Street Journal

View full entry

Tags: blindness, defective gene, gene therapy, Glybera, heart failure, hemophelia, molecular medicine, Stephen J. Russell, Wall Street Journal


March 20th, 2012

People Who Feel Dizzy When They Stand Up More Likely to Develop Heart Failure

By Admin

Ever feel lightheaded or dizzy from standing up too quickly? According to a new study, you might be more likely to suffer from heart failure…People experiencing orthostatic hypotension should speak with their doctor to see if a more serious underlying health problem - such as heart failure or dehydration - is the cause, according to the Mayo Clinic. People experiencing a mild sensation of dizziness should sit or lie down immediately, and the symptoms will usually disappear.

 

CBS News by Ryan Jaslow   3/20/12

View full entry

Tags: heart failure, orthostatic hypotension


February 3rd, 2012

New Heart Failure Risks: Fractures and Memory Problems

By Admin

Two new studies shine a light on some lesser known consequences of heart failure: fractures and memory problems. About 5 million people in the U.S. have heart failure, according to the American Heart Association…Martha Grogan, MD, says the new studies tell us two important things about heart failure that we didn’t know before.  Now “we need to think more about screening for osteoporosis and preventing fractures in people with heart failure. We also need a heightened awareness of the [mental] limitations of these patients.” She is an assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minn.

WebMD, by Denise Mann, 02/02/2012

View full entry

Tags: american heart association, fractures, heart failure, Martha Grogan, Mayo Medical School, memory problems