Items Tagged ‘heart failure’

September 23rd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Buzzfeed
27 College Health Tips They Won’t Teach You At Orientation
by Caroline Kee

Spoiler alert: it’s probably mono. BuzzFeed Health spoke to Dr. Pritish Tosh, infectious disease specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and germ expert Kelly Reynolds, PhD, director of environmental health sciences at the University of Arizona, about how collegeBuzzFeed Logo students can stay healthy when the odds (and germs) are against them.

Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic sets schedule for $100M expansion — with work starting soon
by Alexa Epitropoulos

Mayo Clinic is beginning construction on the first building within its $100 million three-building expansion project in October – and it's setting its sights on more expansion in the future. The CEO of Mayo Clinic's Jacksonville campus, Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, said work on the 150,000-Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logosquare-foot destination medical center will have just under a two-year timeline, with the projected completion being summer 2018. That building has a number of unique features, including specialized care for patients with neurological problems, as well as patients who require neurosurgery, hematology and oncology. It will also have a chemotherapy section, which Farrugia says will be private and include an outdoor patio.

Additional coverage:
Becker’s Hospital Review, Jacksonville Mayo Clinic sets schedule for $100M expansion

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. Earlier this year, Mayo Clinic announced that it will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast. 

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

WJCT Jacksonville
First Coast Connect: From Illegal Immigrant To Brain Surgeon
by Kevin Meerschaert

He jumped a California border fence in 1987, one day after his 19th birthday. Speaking no English and having no money, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa spent the first years in this country working migrant jobs while raising the money for tuition at Joaquin Delta Community College. … screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-8-48-16-pmRecently Dr. Q joined the staff at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville as Chairman of Neurologic Surgery.

Reach: WJCT-FM is the NPR affiliate for the Jacksonville market. WJCT-FM Online has more than 259,000 unique visitors each month.

Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, recently joined Mayo Clinic as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

KSTP
10-Year-Old Minn. Girl Undergoes Facial Reconstructive Surgery after Near-Fatal Farm Accident

Doctor Uldis Bite, a plastic surgeon, took Amber Rose’s case. Now 10 years old, Amber Rose was about to embark on yet another journey; one her
KSTP-5 Twin Citiesfamily wanted to share and they invited 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS to come along. A 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus, helped Dr. Bite plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery Amber Rose was about to have. On an early July morning, almost exactly three years to the date of her accident, Amber Rose walked nervously into Mayo Clinic, her entire family by her side.

Reach: KSTP-TV is the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis that broadcasts on channel 5. KSTP-TV Online has more than 503,000 unique visitors each month. It is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., and is the only locally-owned and operated broadcasting company in the Twin Cities. KSTP-TV first broadcast in April 1948, and was the first television station to serve the upper Midwest.

Context: Last year, after receiving care at "numerous hospitals" and from "dozens of doctors," the Kordiaks were told nothing else could be done for their daughter. Then, "with fingers crossed, Jen reached out to Mayo Clinic," where a team led by Uldis Bite, M.D., came up with a new plan for Amber Rose. Dr. Bite used "a 3-D model, made on the Mayo campus" to help plan out the extensive facial reconstruction surgery. And last July — nearly three years to the day after the accident — Amber Rose underwent the 15-hour procedure. Six weeks later, at a follow-up appointment, Dr. Bite was pleased with the results. As was Amber Rose. "My nose looks way better," she said. "Nobody will stare at me." You can read more about Amber Rose's story at In the Loop.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

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Tags: 873 AM, ABC15 Arizona, advisory board, aging, AIN Online, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, American Trucker, Angie Murad, artificial Intelligence, AsiaOne, awake brain surgery


August 5th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
A “breathholding time” for Alzheimer’s research as trials focus on seeking a cure
by Tara Bahrampour

Despite the paucity of new drugs, researchers say this is an exciting time in the field. “It’s a breathholding time for the field; I think the field is in so much of a need of some kind of positive indication that we are on the right track,” said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. “I think we can have a little more optimism about drug trials that areWashington Post newspaper logo coming down the road.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Previous coverage in the July 29, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

US News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report Announces the 2016–17 Best Hospitals

U.S. News & World Report today released its 27th annual Best Hospitals rankings to help patients make more informed health care decisions. U.S. News compared nearly 5,000 medical centers nationwide in 25 US News Health Care Logospecialties, procedures and conditions. This year the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, is No. 1 on the Honor Roll, which has been expanded to highlight 20 hospitals delivering exceptional treatment across multiple areas of care. The Cleveland Clinic is No. 2, followed by Massachusetts General Hospital at No. 3. U.S. News also recognized 504 Best Regional Hospitals in states and metro areas.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Additional coverage: KTTC-TV, Wisconsin State Journal, MassLive.com, WebMD, Post-Bulletin, Healio, STATMedscapeKIMT-TV, Pioneer Press, WXOW-TV LaCrosse, Twin Cities Business, KMSP-TV, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, Bring Me The News, Boston magazine, KAAL-TV, Denver Post, MedCity Beat, FOX NewsKNUJ-Radio, Nephrology News, Minnesota Monthly, WCCO-AM

Context: Mayo Clinic was named the best hospital in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published online today. In addition, Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in more specialties than any other hospital in the country. Mayo Clinic took the No. 1 spot in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. It also ranked No. 1 in the Phoenix metro area and in the Jacksonville metro area. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Florida Times-Union
U.S. News & World Report calls Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville the best hospital in Florida
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville is ranked the top hospital in Florida In U.S. News & World Report’s annual evaluation of top hospitals, released online Tuesday. Gianrico Farrugia, who became CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville in January 2015, called the rankings “remarkably gratifying news for us,” adding that it is “great news for Jacksonville and Northeast Florida.” He said Mayo has been investing heavily inFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo “people, space and technology” as it continues to establish itself as a destination regional hospital. In March Farrugia announced that Mayo in Jacksonville would begin $100 million in major construction projects this year.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in Florida and the Jacksonville metro area in U.S. News & World Report’sannual list of top hospitals published online today. In addition to the Florida ranking, Mayo Clinic’s Rochester, Minnesota, campus was named the best hospital in the nation onU.S. News & World Report’s Honor Roll of America’s Best Hospitals. The Rochester campus also took the No. 1 spot in Minnesota, and Mayo Clinic’s campus in Arizona was ranked No. 1 in that state and in the Phoenix metro area. “The rankings reflect the dedication of our exceptional staff in providing outstanding care and service to our patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “Mayo Clinic is a special place because of our employees, and I congratulate each of them on this honor.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic New Network.

Additional coverage: WJCT-TVSouth Florida Business Journal, First Coast News, WOKV-Radio, News Talk Florida, Jacksonville Business Journal

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Phoenix Business Journal
U.S. News & World Report unveils Best Hospitals in Arizona
by Angela Gonzales

U.S. News & World Report released its 27th annual Best Hospitals rankings in an effort to help patients make more informed health care decisions. Nationally, Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, made the top Phoenix Business Journalspot on the Honor Roll, which has been expanded to highlight 20 hospitals delivering exceptional treatment across multiple areas of care. The Cleveland Clinic is No. 2, followed by Massachusetts General Hospital at No. 3, Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore at No. 4 and UCLA Medical Center at No. 5.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Additional coverage: tucson.com

Context: Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix is ranked No. 1 in Arizona and the Phoenix metro area in the annual U.S. News & World Report America’s Best Hospital List released today. Since opening a clinic in Scottsdale in 1987 and hospital in Phoenix in 1998, Mayo Clinic has grown to become a vital part of Arizona and the Southwest, bringing  many medical innovations to Arizona including:

  • Proton beam therapy – part of Mayo Clinic’s National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center, this therapy is a more precise radiological cancer treatment using specialized “pencil beam” technology to eradicate hard-to-reach tumors
  • Regenerative medicine – harnessing the potential to repair diseased, injured or congenitally defective tissues and organs
  • Individualized medicine – bringing forward the latest discoveries in genomics-based tests
  • And, soon, the expansion of the Mayo Medical School to Arizona - ushering new ideas to improve quality, outcomes and cost, and to prepare future doctors to not only deliver, but to administer care

More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Mankato Free Press
Mayo a high performer in heart, hip care
by Brian Arola

Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato was honored for its heart failure and hip replacement care in new ratings released this week. The recognition came as part of the U.S. News & World Report’s annual honor roll of best hospitals. The report measures quality based on survival rates, re-admissions and volume. The Mankato Mayo didn’t have top marks in all the categories but managed a good enough showing to earn aMankato Free Press “high performing” distinction — defined as far better than the average hospital.

Reach:  The Mankato Free Press has a daily circulation of about 20,000 and has more than 139,000 unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato was rated High Performing in heart failure and hip replacement by U.S. News & World Report’s 2016-17 Best Hospitals for Procedures & Conditions, which was published online today. These ratings focus on how well hospitals performed in nine common inpatient procedures and conditions. “Mayo Clinic has a deep commitment to delivering high-value care to the patients of our region as a trusted community partner,” says James Hebl, M.D., regional vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System Southwest Minnesota Region. “While no single set of measures can perfectly represent health care quality, this tremendous recognition is something we are very proud of and highlights our primary value: the needs of the patient come first. We owe this success to our dedicated employees who provide outstanding care and the full range of health care needs for our patients and their families.” More information can be found in Mayo Clinic Health System's press room.

Additional coverage: Mankato TimesKEYC-TV

Contact:  Micah Dorfner

 

La Crosse Tribune
Gundersen, Mayo-Franciscan get US News' hospital kudos
by Mike Tighe

La Crosse isn’t a bad place to experience heart failure, with both Gundersen Health System and Mayo Clinic Health System-Franciscan Healthcare getting atta-boys for handling faulty tickers in U.S. News and La Crosse TribuneWorld Report’s annual list of the best hospitals in the country.

Reach: La Crosse Tribune is a daily newspaper in La Crosse, WI with a daily circulation of more than 20,000. Its website receives more than 154,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: WKBT-TV

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System in La Crosse was rated High Performing in heart failure by U.S. News & World Report’s 2016-17 Best Hospitals for Procedures & Conditions, which was published online today. These ratings focus on how well hospitals performed in nine common inpatient procedures and conditions. “Mayo Clinic has a deep commitment to delivering high-value care to the patients of our region as a trusted community partner,” says Amy Noel, regional vice president of surgical specialties at Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare. “While no single set of measures can perfectly represent health care quality, this tremendous recognition is something we are very proud of and highlights our primary value: the needs of the patient come first. We owe this success to our dedicated employees who provide outstanding care and the full range of health care needs for our patients and their families.” More information can be found in Mayo Clinic Health System's press room.

Contact:  Rick Thiese

 

Star Tribune
Why are women losing the battle of the bulge?
by Allie Shah

The nation as a whole continues to struggle with obesity, with 35 percent of men considered obese. But while men’s obesity rates appear to have stabilized, women’s are still rising, the CDC report shows. Dr. Maria Collazo-Clavell, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic who works with overweight and obese patients, has been working in the obesity research field for 20 years. She said the recent findings give her pause aboutStar Tribune Logo whether public health officials are taking the right approach to tackling obesity. “All of that makes you question: Are you on the right track?” she said. “The data would say no.” That so many women are obese is cause for alarm not only because of the increased health risks for them but also for those around them, Collazo-Clavell said.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Maria Collazo-Clavell, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Collaz0-Clavell's research interests include the clinical study of obesity and its complications, particularly Type 2 diabetes Mellitus. The emphasis involves the outcomes of varied weight loss interventions in improving the established medical conditions as well as discovering and better defining the potential complications of these interventions. Interventions studied include dietary modification, behavioral therapy, medical therapies, and surgeries for weight loss.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Florida Times-Union
Health Notes: MayoClinic researcher receives major award for Alzheimer's research
by Charlie Patton

Guojun Bu, a neuroscientist at Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus, last week received the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease, one of the most prestigious awards Florida Times-Union newspaper logogiven annually to a top scientist in this field of study. The award was presented to Bu at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. Over the past 20 years, Bu and his medical research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles that have been cited more than 10,000 times.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a neuroscientist onMayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease ─ one of the most prestigious awards given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. The award was presented to Dr. Bu recently at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. Over the past 20 years, Dr. Bu and his medical research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles that have been cited more than 10,000 times. Colleagues and other Alzheimer’s researchers say his team’s contributions to Alzheimer’s research rank among the most significant in the field. “We are very proud of Dr. Bu and his outstanding research team,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “At Mayo Clinic, we are grounded in research, so that we can continually advance the science of healing. Our world-class physicians and scientists strive every day to work toward solving the most complex and deadly health issues, such as Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: Albert Lea Tribune, Allentown Morning Call, alzheimer's disease, Arcadia, Best Hospitals, Boston Magazine, Breast Cancer, Bring Me the News, calorie intake, CBS News, Chippewa Herald, concussions


July 15th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Today.com
12-year-old boy finally goes home — with a new heart
by Gabrielle Frank

For three years, the Panama native had suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy, a condition that affects the heart's ability to pump blood. Gonzalez-Salas received his new heart last July, but because transplant surgeries are not done in Panama, doctors at the Mayo Clinic requestedToday Show Health & Wellness Logo he and his parents stay in Rochester, Minnesota for a year…"Speaking for our surgeons, cardiologists, nurses, and the whole care team, it has been an honor to care for Joseph and his family over the last two years," said Dr. Jonathan Johnson, Gonzalez-Salas' pediatric cardiologist.

Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show.

Previous Coverage in July 8, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Jonathan Johnson, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist and hear transplant surgeon. Dr. Johnson's research encompasses several different areas of pediatric cardiology. Dr. Johnson's primary focus is researching clinical outcomes in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease, as well as those with cardiomyopathy or heart failure, or those who have required heart transplantation or ventricular assist device (VAD) placement. Dr. Johnson is also interested in cardiac imaging, including fetal, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and studies how these imaging modalities can be used to improve patient outcomes.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

Huffington Post
Mayo Clinic Putting a Spin on the Typical Pitch Competition
by Jason Grill

It’s hard to imagine that any American has not heard of the Mayo Clinic. However, if you have not, it’s a nonprofit that is heavily Huffington Post Logoinvolved in clinical practice, education and research that works with individuals who need medical care or healing. The Mayo Clinic is based in Rochester, Minnesota. Now what many, if not all Americans, don’t know is the Mayo Clinic has a Center of Innovation and a Mayo Clinic Ventures operation that is turning pitch competitions upside down with the Think Big Challenge. Talk about flying under the radar.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Additional coverage: Twin Cities Business

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation and Mayo Clinic Ventures today announced the second Mayo Clinic Think Big Challenge, a national competition for innovators and entrepreneurs. This year, one business or entrepreneur will earn the opportunity to license Mayo Clinic technology, lead a team and score a $50,000 cash prize. The 2016 Mayo Clinic Think Big Challenge opens today at transformconference.mayo.edu/thinkbig. Application deadline is Aug. 15. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Live Science
Everything You Need to Know About Flexibility Exercise
by Rachael Rettner

Flexibility exercises stretch your muscles and may improve your range of motion at your joints…Dynamic stretches are intended to get your muscles used to the types of movement you'll be doing during some other part of your workout, said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the LiveScience LogoMayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. For example, if you plan to do an aerobic activity such as running, warm up with some dynamic stretches for your legs (see some examples below).

 

Live Science
The 4 Types of Exercise You Need to Be Healthy
by Rachael Rettner

When you think of exercise, you may imagine strenuous activities such as running or biking — the ones that make you breathe hard, turn flush and drip with sweat. But aerobic activity is only one type of exercise, and although it is critical for boosting fitness, there are actually three other types of exercise that are also important: strength training, balance training and flexibility training. "While aerobic exercise is very important, it's not as effective for overall health" when done alone compared with when people include all four types of exercise in their routine, said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. "They all kind of go together" and complement each other, Laskowski said.

 

Live Science
Aerobic Exercise: Everything You Need to Know
by Rachel Rettner

Doing aerobic exercise can also have other long-term advantages. A recent study of 1.4 million people in the United States and Europe found that LiveScience Logohigh amounts of aerobic exercise were linked with a reduced risk of 13 types of cancer… Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota, recommended that people use the mantra, "start out low, and progress slow." This means starting with a level of activity that's fairly light, and gradually increasing the duration and intensity of your exercise sessions.

 

LiveScience
Strength Exercise: Everything You Need to Know
by Rachel Rettner

Strength exercise, or resistance training, works your muscles by using resistance, like a dumbbell or your own body weight. This type of exercise increases lean muscle mass, which is particularly important for weight loss, because lean muscle burns more calories than other types of tissue. … It's very important that you have the correct form and body position when you do resistance training. "If you do some of these exercises poorly, with bad technique, you can injure yourself," said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. You may need to work with a professional trainer, or watch exercise videos online, to make sure you use the correct technique.

 

LiveScience
Balance Exercise: Everything You Need to Know
by Rachel Rettner

…These exercises are also important for reducing injury risk. For example, if you sprain your ankle, you could be at risk for reinjury if you don't retrain your balance, said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. That's LiveScience Logobecause when you sprain your ankle, the muscles around the joint stop contracting in a coordinated fashion, and this destabilizes the joint, Laskowski said. If you do balance exercises after the injury, it retrains the muscles to contract together, which better stabilizes the joint during movements and prevents reinjury, he said.

Reach: LiveScience has more than 9.7 million unique visitors to its site each month. Geared toward a general consumer audience, LiveScience addresses the intellectually curious audience hungry for ideas, events, culture and things that cross the line from being merely academic to being cool, engaging and relevant in their lives.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

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Tags: aerobic exercise, Affordable care act, Aries Merr, Associated Press, balance, balance exercise, BCIndian.com, Boston Scientific, BuzzFeed, cancer moonshoot, Center for Individualized Medicine, Center of Innovation


June 18th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In The News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

MSNBC Morning Joe
Mayo clinic offers patient care to Walmart employees

Dr. John Noseworthy talks about the Mayo Clinic's relationship with Walmart and why they will offer patient care to theMorning Joe MSNBC company's employees.

Reach: MSNBC provides in-depth analysis of daily headlines, political commentary and informed perspectives. MSNBC’s home on the Internet is tv.msnbc.com. Joe Scarborough hosts “Morning Joe,” with co-hosts Mika Brzezinski and Willie Geist, featuring interviews with top politicians and newsmakers, as well as in-depth analysis of the day’s biggest stories. Morning Joe has about 375,000 viewers daily.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contact: Traci Klein

 

FOX News
Sunday Morning Futures, Joining me now is Dr. John Noseworthy

He is president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic. And he is with us on set. Good to see you, John. Thanks so much for joining Sunday Morning Futures Fox Newsus…So I want to get your take, really, on a couple of things. I want to talk about the subsidies issue and this pending Obamacare care ruling. But I also want to ask you about innovation, what you're doing at Mayo and, really, what's happening in health care today.

Reach:  Fox News Channel (FNC) is a cable and satellite television news channel owned by the Fox Entertainment Group, a subsidiary of News Corporation. Maria Bartiromo has covered business and the economy for more than 25 years and was one of the building blocks of business cable network CNBC. During her 20-year tenure as the face of CNBC, she launched the network’s morning program, Squawk Box; anchored The Closing Bell with Maria Bartiromo; and was the anchor and managing editor of the nationally syndicated On the Money with Maria Bartiromo, formerly The Wall Street Journal Report with Maria Bartiromo. Bartiromo joined FOX Business Network (FBN) as Global Markets Editor in January 2014.  She is the anchor of Opening Bell with Maria Bartiromo on FBN (weekdays from 9-11 AM/ET) and Sunday Morning Futures with Maria Bartiromo (Sundays at 10 AM/ET) on FOX News Channel (FNC).

Additional Coverage:
Wall Street Journal
How Mayo, Kaiser Permanente Keep Health Costs Down

At WSJ's CFO Conference, Wall Street Journal Video logoPresident and CEO of Mayo Clinic John H. Noseworthy, M.D. and Chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson discussed their cost-saving health care systems.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. 

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville to create lung restoration center
by Charlie Patton

In 2014, the number of people on the waiting list for a lung transplant in the U.S. outnumbered the number of donor lungs available by about 650. The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville and United Therapeutics Corp., a biotechnology company, are collaborating now on the creation of a lungFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo restoration center on Mayo’s Jacksonville campus that should ultimately double the number of lungs available for transplant in the U.S. “This is a big deal,” said Gianrico Farrugia, chief executive officer of Mayo in Jacksonville. “… This is not Mayo or United Therapeutics benefiting. This is the whole country benefiting.” Additional coverage: Jacksonville Business Journal, Jacksonville Post, MyInforms.com, Jacksonville City and Press, Phys.Org

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, and United Therapeutics Corporation (NASDAQ: UTHR) announced recently a collaboration to build and operate a lung restoration center on the Mayo campus. The goal is to significantly increase the volume of lungs for transplantation by preserving and restoring selected marginal donor lungs, making them viable for transplantation. The restored lungs will be made available to patients at Mayo Clinic and other transplant centers throughout the United States. Construction of the center is expected to be completed in late 2017. Financial details of the agreement were not disclosed. “This collaboration is exciting because it allows Mayo Clinic to bring the latest advances in life-saving technology to transplant patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida. “Ultimately, this relationship will help Mayo Clinic expand its reach to patients who could benefit from this innovation. Increasing the number of lungs available for transplantation provides more options for patients suffering from pulmonary disease.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

ABC 15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic has heart failure treatment options

David Fortuin, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of ABC affiliate, channel 15 in ArizonaSonoran Living Live to discuss treatment options for patients with heart failure.   Surgery is an excellent option for heart failure patients -- if they can tolerate it.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: F. David Fortiun, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's top-ranked team of cardiologists diagnoses and treats many heart conditions, including many rare and complex disorders. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Star Tribune
NBA commissioner calls Minneapolis practice site a catalyst

It had been a busy few hours for NBA commissioner Adam Silver. Tuesday night he had presented the Golden State Warriors the Larry O'Brien trophy after their series-deciding victory in Cleveland. Wednesday morning he was at TheStar Tribune newspaper logo Courts at Mayo Square, the  new 107,000-square-foot Taj Mahal-like practice facility for the Timberwolves and Lynx. The grand opening was attended by Silver, WNBA president Laurel Richie, Wolves and Lynx owner Glen Taylor and Mayo CEO Dr. John Noseworthy. Afterward, Silver called the facility — which he said was the most impressive he had seen — a catalyst for better things to come for a Wolves franchise that hasn’t seen the playoffs since 2004, but is set to pick first in next week’s draft.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
NBA.com, Three Questions With Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine

Star TribuneHartman: NBA chief Silver impressed by where Wolves stand

Star Tribune (AP), Timberwolves hope new practice center marks the end of decade-long doldrums; teaming with Mayo

Star TribuneGallery: Wolves, with partner Mayo Clinic, open Mayo Clinic Square

Star Tribune, Wolves and Lynx open new Mayo Clinic practice facility

USA Today, KTTC, KTTC, KAAL, The Herald S.C., Washington Post, Pioneer Press, FOX9, FOX Sports, Sun Times Minneapolis, NBA.com, BringMeTheNews, KARE11, Canis Hoopus

Context: DigniMayo Clinic Square Courts logotaries from the worlds of medicine, sports, business and politics hit the court today, Wednesday, June 17, to dedicate Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis. The event was the first in a series of grand-opening events marking the strategic collaboration of Mayo Clinic, the Minnesota Timberwolves and Minnesota Lynx. "At Mayo Clinic we pride ourselves in teamwork," said John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. "We are proud to be part of the team that made this day possible." More information about Mayo Clinic Square can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

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June 12th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

Boston Globe
In the future, treatments tailored to patients
by Robert Weisman

Holly Boehle came to the Mayo Clinic in 2013 with an aggressive breast cancer, preparedBoston Globe Logo for almost anything. Still, she was surprised when doctors wanted to remove cells from her tumor and transplant them into “avatar mice.” Researchers then injected different cancer drugs into the mice to test which shrank the tumors, helping doctors select the best treatment for Boehle. Ultimately, Boehle, a 44-year-old school administrator in Zeeland, Mich., underwent surgery and received a combination of drug infusions based partly on the responses of the mice. Her cancer has been in remission for the past year.

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Context: Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. More information on Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine can be found here.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

HealthDay
Falls Are Leading Cause of Childhood Injuries, Expert Says
by Mary Dallas

Falls are the leading cause of childhood injuries, and most of them occur in the home, a pediatricHealth Day Logo trauma expert said. Many people associate falls with playgrounds, but kids can tumble off changing tables. They can also fall out of infant seats, shopping carts and windows, resulting in serious injuries, according to Dr. Christopher Moir, a pediatric surgeon at the Mayo Clinic Children Center in Rochester, Minn. Falling from windows often results in more serious injuries, according to Moir.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: US News & World Report, Duluth News Tribune, The News Tribune Wash., Rehab Management, KLKN Neb., Sioux City Journal, Gulf Times Qatar, Arizona Daily Sun, Doctors Lounge

Context:  When people think of kids and trauma, they often think about car accidents. “However, in reality, falls are the leading cause of childhood injury and most of them happen around the home,” says Christopher Moir, M.D., pediatric surgeon at Mayo Clinic Children's Center, who has cared for a wide variety of injuries related to falls. There are approximately 8,000 children treated in emergency rooms for falls every day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At Mayo Clinic’s Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center, 35 percent of the children cared for in 2014 were the result of a fall. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Moir, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

KESQ Calif.
Miracle walk down the aisle
by Alexandra Pierce

Walking their daughter down the isle is something many fathers dream about. But for one heart failure patient from Omaha, Nebraska, it looked like he wasn't going to be able to do that on his little girl's big day. In March, Andre PearsonKESQ-2 Palm Springs went to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota where he was treated for severe heart failure. His heart wasn't pumping blood… After being reevaluated, his medical team at the Mayo Clinic decided he was well enough to make the trip to Desert Ridge Estate in Indio, where his daughter was getting married. "They told me they had a meeting earlier that morning and said that they came up with something so I could see my daughter's wedding. They told me they were going to fly me out here to California to see the wedding," Pearson said.

Reach: KESQ-TV is the ABC affiliate for the Palm Springs, CA market.

Additional Coverage: FOX News, Mayo Clinic News Network: Heart failure patient surprises daughter at wedding; CNN, FOX4News, MyFOXHouston, MPRWOWT Omaha, BuzzFeed, Mirror UK, WISH TV Ind., WPXI Pittsburgh, co New Zealand, KMTV

Context: Andre Pearson, a heart failure patient who has been at Mayo Clinic since March, initially was too ill to leave the Rochester, Minn., hospital to go to his daughter’s wedding in California. He had resigned himself to watching it online. But a few days before the Saturday evening ceremony, with Mr. Pearson doing well, his care team decided to explore whether it might be possible for him to make the trip after all. With the right game plan in place, they determined that it was possible. A Mayo staff member accompanied him; and Mr. Pearson surprised his daughter, Alexandra, by arriving the evening before the wedding in Indio, Calif., and promising to walk her down the aisle."I can't help but cry, but it's tears of joy," Mr. Pearson said Thursday, after learning that he had received medical clearance to leave the hospital for the wedding and his travel plans were under way. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Arizona Horizon
ASU/Mayo Medical School

There have bArizona PBSeen some important recent advances in the plan for a medical school at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona. ASU president Michael Crow and Dr. Wyatt Decker, vice president of the Mayo Clinic and Chief Executive Officer for Arizona, will give us an update.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent of the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Additional coverage: Arizona Public Media

Context: Mayo Medical School announced that its planned expansion in Scottsdale, Arizona has received licensure by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, the group responsible for regulating private postsecondary degree-granting institutions within the state of Arizona. “This is a major milestone in our journey to open a full four-year branch campus of Mayo Medical School in Scottsdale,” says Wyatt Decker, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Earlier this month, Mayo Medical School leaders announced they had also received endorsement for the expansion from the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting body for medical education. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Arizona Republic
Phoenix Mayo Clinic's $180 million cancer-fighting center set to open in March
by Ken Alltucker

…Mayo Clinic's $180 million-plus proton facility will be the latest addition to a metro region teeming with cancer-Arizona Republic newspaper logocare options, and the facility will be closely watched by doctors, patients and health insurers because of its sheer size, unique treatment and cost… Mayo Clinic officials said they expect that more families like the Greens will be able to stay in metro Phoenix for proton treatment rather than travel out of state. Dr. Sameer Keole, who will head Mayo Clinic's proton center, said Mayo Clinic and Phoenix Children's Hospital last year recommended about 10 children get proton therapy out of state, which can be costly.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: The Town Talk La., Des Moines Register, DOTmed, Coloradoan, News-Messenger Ohio

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduces its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota beginning this June and Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

FOX9 Mpls./St. Paul
Juicy J stuffed turkey burger

Chef Jen from the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program cooked for us a healthy Juicy J Stuffed Turkey Burger. The My Fox KMSP TCprogram emphasizes how combining nutrition, physical activity and resiliency can have a powerful effect on improving health.

Reach:  FOX 9 News broadcasts in Minneapolis-St.Paul, the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program was developed by passionate health and wellness professionals. The program is grounded in science and research. More information about the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Cathy Kennedy

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic joins move to get new drugs to market faster
by Lee Schafer

The Mayo Clinic has jumped into an interesting little experiment in drug development that might best be called micro pharma. Mayo is one of the partners in a new company calledStar Tribune Business section logo Vitesse Biologics, which is more or less just a virtual umbrella company that will itself give birth to at least five new companies. Each one of these micro pharma companies will consist mostly of a single drug development research project.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context:  Baxter Ventures, the venture arm of Baxter International Inc. (NYSE:BAX), Mayo Clinic and Velocity Pharmaceutical Development, LLC (“VPD”) today announced the formation of Vitesse Biologics, LLC, (“Vitesse”). Vitesse is a unique collaboration model initiated by Baxter Ventures to focus on the development of antibody and protein-based therapeutics in the areas of immunology, hematology, and oncology. Following the spin-off of Baxter BioScience as Baxalta Incorporated, anticipated to take place by mid-2015, the Vitesse relationship will be managed by the planned venture arm, Baxalta Ventures, for the new company.  The collaboration model, which represents a new method of drug development, was designed to incent each partner to advance promising therapies quickly through the development process. Each partner will provide its recognized expertise to enhance the target selection, target optimization, expression and product development process. Baxter BioScience will provide global commercialization, antibody and protein development and manufacturing capabilities; Mayo Clinic researchers will execute the early stage clinical trials; VPD will be responsible for target identification, selection of early stage drug candidates and will lead the design and execution of pre-clinical and clinical protocols. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Brian Kilen

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February 26th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

 

 

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

CBS News
Man gains sight with bionic eye

Man gains sight with bionic eye, Allen Zderad was recently able to see his wife of 45 years for the first time in a decade. The Minnesota man seemed to burst into simultaneous laughter and tears as he caught a glimpse of her with his new "bionic eye."… Now CBS News Logowith the help of a recently developed medical device, Zderad's vision of the world has changed. He's one of just a handful of people in the world to get the "bionic eye" device known as Second Sight Argus II retinal prosthesis system. Zderad's was implanted by Dr. Raymond Iezzi of the Mayo Clinic.

Reach:
CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

 

CNN Headline News
Blind Man Sees Wife

A Minnesota man who had a bionic eye implant is seeing his wife for the first time in ten years. So he can now make out forms and CNN Logoshapes and send a signal to his optic nerve. His sight began to fail just 20 years ago. Now Diane is commenting on the Mayo Clinic’s Facebook page, writing “you are really awesome, Mayo Clinic.” He said seeing the wife for the first time. First time in ten years.

Reach:
 CNN.com has 74.2 million unique visitors to its website each month.

 

ABC News Good Morning America
Bionic Eye Lets Blind Man See Wife For 1st Time In 10 Years
by Liz Neporent

ABC News logoIt was love again at first sight for a man who went blind 10 years ago. Allen Zderad, a 68-year-old retiree from Minnesota, saw his wife for the first time in more than a decade thanks to a bionic eye implanted by doctors at the Mayo Clinic earlier this month.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KARE11, NBC News, Post-Bulletin, Que! Espanol, The Telegraph, Business 2 Community, Telegraph UK, Daily Mail UK, International Business Times, GMA Network, The West Australian, My FOX Philly, Global News Canada, TIME, Mashable, RYOT, KTLA Calif., Independent UK, Metro UK, Gaming News, FOX News, Yahoo! News, My FOX Chicago, KELO Land S.D., NY Daily News, Daily Caller, Popular Mechanics, PopSugar US News & World Report, Irish Times, hln.com, The Guardian Nigeria, Herald Sun Australia, ABC15 Arizona, MindBodyGreen, Times Live, NewsMax, Cult of Mac, euronews.com, MedPage Today

Context: It’s a medical story, a science and technology advancement and a romance wrapped into one moment: when a man who is blind sees his wife again for the first time in a decade. Allen Zderad began to have serious vision problems about 20 years ago due to retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease affecting the retina. There is no effective treatment or cure. It ended his professional career and after a decade he was effectively blind, unable to see anything other than very bright light. He adjusted, even continuing woodworking by developing his sense of touch and spatial relationships. But he was unable to see his family, including ten grandchildren or his wife, Carmen. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nelllis

 

Wall Street Journal
New Screening Tests for Hard-to-Spot Breast Cancers
by Melinda Beck

…Past versions of MBI exposed patients to too much radiation to use for regular screenings. A new version developed at the Mayo Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logoClinic in Rochester, Minn., uses a lower dose. In a study of 1,585 women with dense breasts published in the American Journal of Roentgenology this month, Deborah Rhodes, a Mayo Clinic internist, and colleagues found that MBI detected nearly four times as many invasive breast cancers as mammography, with fewer unnecessary biopsies. As of now, only about 100 hospitals offer the newest MBI technology, which is made by GE Healthcare and Gamma Medica Inc.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: A new breast imaging technique pioneered at Mayo Clinic nearly quadruples detection rates of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue, according to the results of a major study published recently in the American Journal of RoentgenologyMolecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is a supplemental imaging technology designed to find tumors that would otherwise be obscured by surrounding dense breast tissue on a mammogram. Tumors and dense breast tissue can both appear white on a mammogram, making tumors indistinguishable from background tissue in women with dense breasts. About half of all screening-aged women have dense breast tissue, according to Deborah Rhodes, M.D., a Mayo Clinic Breast Clinic physician and the senior author of this study. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sam Smith, Traci Klein, Joe Dangor
Florida Times-Union
Health notes: Mayo Clinic researchers have identified a possible cause of pancreatic cancer

A research team led by investigators from Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville and the University of Oslo in Norway have identified a molecule that pushes normal pancreatic cells to transform their shape, laying the groundwork for deFlorida Times-Union newspaper logovelopment of pancreatic cancer — one of the most difficult tumors to treat.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context:  A research team led by investigators from Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida, and the University of Oslo, Norway, have identified a molecule that pushes normal pancreatic cells to transform their shape, laying the groundwork for development of pancreatic cancer — one of the most difficult tumors to treat. Their findings, reported in Nature Communications, suggest that inhibiting the gene, protein kinase D1 (PKD1), and its protein could halt progression and spread of this form of pancreatic cancer, and possibly even reverse the transformation. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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September 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Reuters
Experimental Virus Being Tested as Cancer Treatment

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic are starting a second round of human clinical trials to test if an engineered strain of measles virus is an effective cancer treatment. The trial follows a successful first round of testsReuters logo where a woman went into complete remission after a massive dose of the virus eradicated cancer in her body. Ben Gruber reports.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage:

NBC News (KTTC), IBM Takes On Cancer, A new collaboration between the Mayo Clinic and IBM brings the Watson supercomputer to best match cancer patients with the estimated 178,000 ongoing medical trials, suited to their needs. KTTC's Devin Bartolotta reports.

ABC News, Cancer Survivor Saved by Measles Virus Raises Funds for Expanded Trial, After battling blood cancer for 10 years, Stacy Erholtz has no signs of the disease, thanks to an experimental treatment that used an engineered version of the measles virus. Now, a year after finishing her treatment, the 50-year-old mother of three is transitioning from patient to advocate, working with the Rochester, Minnesota-based Mayo Clinic to expand the tiny trial that saved her life.

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Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Jacksonville health care facilities collaborate to save bone marrow patients' lives
by Colleen Jones

Nearly every day in Jacksonville, there is a patient going through some part of the bone marrow transplant process: diagnosis, match-making or implantation. Three health care providers recently teamed up for a Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logocommunitywide bone marrow donor drive to benefit the Bone Marrow Transplant program of Mayo Clinic in Florida, Wolfson Children’s Hospital and Nemours Children’s Clinic…“Moments usually aren’t critical, but days are,” said Dr. Vivek Roy, medical director for Mayo’s adult bone marrow transplant program. “If we pool our resources, we find it works for us all.”

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: The Blood and Marrow Transplantation Program of Mayo Clinic, Nemours Children's Clinic, Jacksonville, and Wolfson Children's Hospital has been awarded a three-year accreditation renewal by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT). The foundation awarded the accreditation renewal after thorough site visits at all collection, transplantation and laboratory facilities at the three locations. More information about the program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Huffington Post
The Shrinking Middle Class of Physical Activity
by Brad Stulberg

…In other words, the vast majority of the country's economic growth is going to those who are already wealthy, the middle class is shrinking, and the gap between rich and poor is widening. There is evidenceHuffington Post Healthy Living that people who are of a higher socioeconomic status have a greater likelihood of adhering to health guidelines than those who are not. Note: This article was co-authored by Dr. Michael Joyner, who is an anesthesiologist and physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Alyson Gonzalez

 

Washington Post
Treadmill desk to counteract the sedentary lifestyle of sitting all day
by Christie Aschwanden

As an avid runner, cyclist and skier, I get plenty of exercise, but the research shows that a five-mile run at Washington Post newspaper logothe end of the day won’t erase the health risks — such as an increased risk of diabetes, hypertension and obesity — wrought by eight hours of sedentary time, says Mayo Clinic physician and researcher James Levine, popularizer of the treadmill desk.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Previous Coverage in Sept. 4, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

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June 19th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Effort Seeks to Reduce Ear-Tube Surgeries for Small Children
By Sumathi Reddy

Parents of young, otherwise healthy children fear them like the plague: ear infections…Contributing to a desire by doctors and parents to avoid surgery are concerns about the use of general anesthesia in young children. Researchers and doctors are exploring devices that would enable ear-tube procedures to be The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoperformed using alternatives. Preceptis Medical, a Plymouth, Minn., company, is testing a device, the Hummingbird, that uses nitrous oxide instead of general anesthesia in clinical trials at four sites, including the Mayo Clinic…Randall Flick, director of the Mayo Clinic Children's Center, said his and other studies show the risk seems to occur after multiple exposures.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Randall Flick, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic Children's Center. For 150 years, Mayo Clinic has provided trusted answers for children and their parents. Mayo Clinic Children's Center includes providers from over 40 medical and surgical specialties, all focused on children's health care needs.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Traci Klein

 

Science Friday
Pre-Surgery Routine Needs an Update

Says Doc, For years, patients preparing for colon surgery have been told to stick to a liquid diet and do a colon cleanse. The only problem? There's not much science to back up those suggestions, says Robert Science FridayCima of the Mayo Clinic. He and his Mayo colleagues subscribe instead to the “enhanced recovery” approach, which spares patients the fasting and heavy narcotics in favor of regular meals and over-the-counter painkillers. Surgery is like running a marathon, he says, and the body needs to be in a normal state to brace for the big event.

Reach: Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4pm Eastern time as part of NPR's 'Talk of the Nation' programming. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand.

Context: Robert Cima, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic surgeon and chair of Mayo’s surgical quality subcommittee.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KSTP
Burnsville Father and Son Hope for Gift of Life
by Naomi Pescovitz

As Minnesota families celebrate dads this Father's Day, a Burnsville family is especially grateful for another year together. Last winter, David Costello's double organ transplant saved his life. This year, theKSTP-TV Eyewitness News Log Costellos are hoping for the gift of life once again. David Costello waited four and a half years to finally get the call. "My phone lit up, the ID said Mayo Clinic," Costello said.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: Mayo Clinic Transplant Center, with transplant services in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, performs more transplants than any other medical center in the world.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Orlando Business Journal
Brevard County hospital first in C. Fla. to join Mayo Clinic network
by Matthew Richardson

Parrish Medical Center in Brevard County has formed a partnership with Mayo Clinic— the first hospital in the Central Florida area to do sOrlando Business Journal newspaper logoo, reports News 13. Parrish is now the 29th member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, under the umbrella of the original Mayo Clinic. The century-old, renowned nonprofit is focused on medical care and research, helping millions every year.

Additional coverage:

Florida Today, Parrish to benefit from Mayo's expertise

Bay News 9Parrish Medical Center joins Mayo Clinic network

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Context: Mayo Clinic and Parrish Medical Center officials have announced Parrish Medical Center (PMC) as the 29th member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. PMC is the first Central Florida member of the network and the third in Florida. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

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April 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic builds 'Better' app to expand its name with consumers
By Dan Browning

The Mayo Clinic wants to help you feel “Better.” That’s the name of a new mobile app service launched by the Rochester-based health care provider, in partnershipStar Tribune Business section logo with a Silicon Valley venture capital firm and an accomplished tele-medicine entrepreneur. It’s part of Mayo’s overarching goal to put the clinic’s expertise into the hands of 200 million consumers.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

KAALMayo Launches New App to Reach Patients Worldwide

Bloomberg BusinessweekEngadgetMobi health newsPost-BulletinTech CrunchHIS Talk Mobile

Context: Better, a consumer health start-up, and Mayo Clinic have launched a new way for people to navigate the complexity of the healthcare system simply and quickly.  Through a mobile device, Better provides tailored Mayo Clinic health information, 24/7 access to the clinic's experienced and highly-skilled nurses, and a Better Personal Health Assistant who helps simplify and manage people's care so they can use their time to focus on being well. More information about Better can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Florida Times Union
Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville receives $39.5 million grant for stroke study
by Charlie Patton

…the Mayo Clinic in Florida has received a $39.5 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to conduct a seven-year clinical trial Florida Times-Union newspaper logoto look at the question of whether the use of medication is as effective in preventing stroke for someone with carotid stenosis, the narrowing of a carotid artery, as surgery and the placement of a stent, a small mesh tube that holds the artery open. Leading the study, which will be called the CREST-2, will be Thomas Brott, a neurologist who is director of research at Mayo’s Jacksonville campus, and his colleague, neurologist James Meschia.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
Jacksonville Business JournalJacksonville's Mayo Clinic gets $39.5 million stroke study grant, The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke is funding a seven-year study at the Mayo Clinic in Florida examining whether medication is as effective in preventing stroke as is surgery or stents. Thomas Brott, a neurologist who is director of research at Mayo’s Jacksonville campus, and neurologist James Meschia will lead the study,  according to the Florida Times-Union.

Post-BulletinWTEV FlaHealth-News.wsDaily Star UKTelegraph UK
St. Augustine RecordWJXX Fla.WJCT Fla

Context: Is medicine as safe and effective as surgery or stenting in preventing a stroke caused by the buildup of plaque in the carotid artery? Thomas G. Brott, M.D., a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida, aims to find out. “It’s a critical question. The quality medicines we have today may mean that it is not necessary to perform invasive procedures on patients who do not have warning signs of stroke,” Dr. Brott says. “More than 100,000 carotid surgeries and carotid artery stentings are performed each year in the United States on such patients at risk — and that may not be necessary.” More information, including a video interview with Dr. Brott, about the international study to test best approach to stroke prevention can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

USA TODAY
Apathy could signal brain shrinkage in old age
by Mary Bowerman

A new study suggests that as people age, they should be aware of symptoms of apathy, which may indicate a decrease in brain volume and possible brain disease...Apathy, which has similar symptoms to depression, is hard to measureUSA Today newspaper logo because the symptoms are more subtle and complex, according to Ronald Petersen, the director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who is not associated with the study.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Additional coverage: KARE11

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic


Post-Bulletin
Back and Forth: The early home of Dr. Henry Plummer
by Harley Flathers

Dr. Henry Stanley Plummer, the famed Mayo Clinic physician, was born March 3, 1874 to Dr. Albert and Isabelle Plummer in the little community of Hamilton. This Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperlittle village lies a mile and a half east and a mile south of Racine on the Mower-Fillmore County road. Sonja Hoag, a retired Mayo Clinic nurse, and her retired husband, many years a preacher, live in the home where Plummer was born.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Related coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic mobile exhibit kicks off Monday

Mayo Clinic kicks off a free, mobile 150th-anniversary tour Monday in Kingman, Ariz., at Kingman Regional Medical Center, a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The exhibit is scheduled to visit more than 40 communities in Minnesota, Missouri, Colorado, California, North Dakota, Washington, Illinois, Nebraska, Maryland, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky and Michigan, along with Washington, D.C., Winnipeg and Toronto, Canada.

Context: On July 1, 1907, Dr. Henry Plummer and Mabel Root, Dr. Plummer's assistant, inaugurated Mayo's system of patient registration and medical record keeping. The single-unit record was central to the new system. It brought together all of a patient's records -- clinical visits, hospital stays, laboratory tests and notes -- in a single file that traveled with the patient and was stored in a central repository. This simple system quickly became the standard for medical record keeping around the world. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. 

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein


ABC15 Ariz.
Mayo Clinic's Simulation Center helps with team approach to medicine, reenacts real-life scenarios

ABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizona

Mayo Clinic cardiologist, David Fortuin, M.D., joined the cast of Sonoran Living Live to talk about Mayo Clinic's Multidisciplinary Simulation Center and how it's used to perfect Mayo's team approach to patient care.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: F. David Fortuin, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Public Affairs Contact: Carol Benson

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April 4th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Fox Business
Part 1 -- Mayo Clinic CEO: We need to modernize the delivery system, Medicare  

Fox Business
Part 2 -- Top institutions squeezed by rising health-care costs 

Fox Business
Part 3 -- Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, American Action Forum president Douglas Holtz-Eakin discuss health-care spending    

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's
Fox Businessstudios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy recently joined Maria Bartiromo on Fox Business’s “Opening Bell” to discuss the Affordable Care Act, the need to modernize the health care delivery system and Medicare and Mayo Clinic's role in health care innovation.

Dr. Noseworthy explained that the health care delivery system must be modernized. He highlighted three ways Mayo Clinic is doing this:

  1. Mayo Clinic’s focus on providing the highest quality and safest care
  2. Expanding Mayo’s reach through the Mayo Clinic Care Network
  3. Identifying and investing in what patients need in the future through research activities and work in the science of health care delivery, including Mayo’s strategic research alliance with Optum Labs

Public Affairs Contacts:  Chris Gade, Bryan Anderson

 

KMUW Wichita Public Radio
Topeka Hospital to Collaborate with Mayo Clinic

Topeka's Stormont-Vail HealthCare has become the first health system in Kansas to partner with the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The deal will give local patients access to the expertiseKMUW Wichita Public Radio of the medical staff at the Mayo Clinic.

 

Reach: KMUW-FM 89.1 is a non-commercial NPR News/Talk and Variety music public radio station out of Wichita State University in the Wichita, Kan. area.

Additional Coverage:
Topeka Capital-Journal
Editorial: Local health care community takes another big step

The health of the local health care community just keeps improving. The latest advancement on that front was revealed Tuesday when officials of Stormont-Vail HealthCare and the world-renown Mayo Clinic, based in Rochester, Minn., announced they had entered a partnership that will give local physicians access to the clinic’s physicians for consultations.

Post-BulletinMayo Clinic Care Network now in 14 states, Mexico; WIBW Kan.Wichita EagleTopeka Capital-JournalNews Medical

Context:  Stormont-Vail HealthCare and Mayo Clinic officials announced April 1 that the Topeka-based health system has become a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and families. Stormont-Vail HealthCare is the first health system in Kansas to join the network. The Mayo Clinic Care Network is a network of like-minded organizations which share a common commitment to improving the delivery of health care in their communities through high-quality, data-driven, evidence-based medical care. More information about the announcement can be found here on Mayo Clinic Care Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

KARE
Mayo Clinic patient celebrates junior prom bedside

KARE 11A heart transplant didn't stop Bree Hanson from celebrating her junior prom.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Context: At Mayo Clinic Transplant Center a team of doctors trained in heart and blood vessel disease (cardiologists), transplant surgery, infectious diseases, mental health conditions (psychiatrists) and other areas evaluate patients to determine if they are eligible for a heart transplant.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

KPHO Ariz.
Looking inside Mayo Clinic's Proton Therapy Cancer Center by Greg Argos, Though it's not going to accept patients until 2016, CBS 5 News took an exclusive look inside the Mayo Clinic's $400 million dollar proton therapy center. "There are only about 12 sites in the country that will have proton beam therapy now, and this will be the only site in ArizonaCBS5AZ-KPHO that has proton therapy," explained Dr. Steve Schild, an Oncologist and the Department Chair for the Mayo Clinic's new center.

Reach: KPHO-5 is the CBS affiliate in Phoenix and is owned by Meredith Corporation.

Context: Mayo Clinic is launching a Proton Beam Therapy Program to provide the latest cancer treatment for Mayo patients. New treatment facilities will be built on the Minnesota and Arizona campuses. Treatment for patients will be available beginning in 2015 in Minnesota and 2016 in Arizona. Proton beam therapy will be used to treat many kinds of cancers located deep within the body and close to critical organs and body structures, especially in children and young adults.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Post BulletinDr. John Noseworthy: Rochester, Mayo Clinic have grown up together
by Dr. John Noseworthy

For 150 years, the city of Rochester and Mayo Clinic have had a partnership like none other. We've grown up together. We could not have asked for a better place to call home throughout our history or a better place to invest in our future to benefit Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperour patients, employees and the community. During the last legislative session, Gov. Mark Dayton and the legislature determined there was a compelling public interest to authorize public investments in Rochester to help support the significant investments by Mayo Clinic to strengthen and secure Minnesota as a global destination medical center.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Additional Coverage:

Post Bulletin
, DMC special report: Road map to the future by Jay Furst, Twenty years from now, Rochester will have about 35,000 more people, the Rochester area will have 35,000 to 45,000 more jobs, and Mayo Clinic will remain a world-class destination for health care, according to Destination Medical Center promoters. How will this happen, and who's drawing up the plan? Today, in a 24-page special report called "DMC: Road Map to the Future," the Post-Bulletin lays out the plan envisioned by Mayo, city and county officials, and business leaders.

Post BulletinWhat is DMC: The facts, The concept of Destination Medical Center is simple — to transform Mayo Clinic and Rochester into a more attractive destination for medical patients and providers. But the structure of the $6 billion, 20-year public-private investment is not simple at all…The eight-member Destination Medical Center Corp. board will guide the use of all public funding, andwill oversee the operation of the nonprofit Destination Medical Center Corp. It's also responsible for approving the overall DMC Development Plan. Four members of the DMCC were chosen by the governor, three are representatives of local government and one is a Mayo Clinic representative.

Post BulletinA DMC magic wand by Jeff Hansel, Richard Dooley and his wife, Karol, have been staying at the Hope Lodge in Rochester while he undergoes prostate cancer therapy at Mayo Clinic. Dooley said he loves "everything" about Mayo Clinic and Rochester. "We both love the town. It's nice and clean and neat and everybody's respectful and nice," Dooley said…If Solis had a magic wand, he said, he would have Mayo introduce a "Louder than a Bomb" poetry program to both Mayo Clinic patients and to Rochester community members. That program has helped young people close to dropping out of school get energized, Solis said. He'd like to see local poets read to Mayo patients, and Mayo patients encouraged to write and read poetry.

Post BulletinMayo Clinic expansion already underway, more likely by Jeff Hansel, With the Destination Medical Center plan in the books, Mayo Clinic has already shifted into growth mode. The nonprofit has several projects underway, or planned in the near future. "There are current projects taking place at Mayo Clinic that will continue to enhance the patient experience and increase the quality of care delivered to patients for generations to come," said Mayo spokeswoman Kelley Luckstein. The latest is at Mayo Medical Laboratories which plans a 66,000-square-foot, two-story addition to the Superior Drive Support Center.

Post BulletinMayo reaching out in other areas by Jeff Hansel, Even as it is making plans to expand in Rochester, Mayo Clinic is reaching out elsewhere in an effort to connect with more patients. Among those efforts are a sports medicine and athletic training center called Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis, the continued growth of the Mayo Clinic Care Network and even the recent purchase of 187 acres in Onalaska, Wis., for a possible new facility.

Post BulletinDEED, DMC job projections similar by Brent Pearson, he Mayo Clinic has a major effect on the economy of southeastern Minnesota, with a proposed $5 billion expansion of the world-renowned medical center likely to stimulate further growth. Destination Medical Center is a plan to expand the Mayo Clinic's Rochester campus and further enhance the region's position as a global destination for health-care services. Mayo officials estimate the expansion will create between 25,000 and 30,000 direct jobs, another 10,000 to 15,000 indirect jobs, and 1,800 to 2,200 construction jobs over the next 20 years.

BringMeTheNews, Construction jobs aplenty in southeast Minnesota by Jessica Mador, There are new signs of growth in Rochester this spring, partly spurred by the Mayo Clinic’s plans for a new $5 billion flagship campus makeover. The Mayo project calls for doubling the size of its existing Minnesota campus. According to Mayo, the clinic already employs 40,600 Minnesotans, 33,400 of whom work in Rochester. And as MPR News reports, the clinic’s makeover plan includes $327 million in state aid, largely to fund improvements to public facilities in the city.

Post Bulletin, DMC to bring thousands of jobs by Bryan Lund, The Destination Medical Center could have a significant impact on Rochester's employment landscape, if the estimates of Mayo Clinic officials come to fruition. The DMC initiative's website says the project will create thousands of permanent, well-paying jobs in the area over the next couple decades. Some of those are directly related to DMC, such as additional physicians and medical support staff, while others are predicted to come as a result of growth in the area's economy indirectly associated with DMC.

Post-Bulletin, Letter: DMC planners must consider needs of disabled, I hope the Destination Medical Center planners consider the needs of people with disabilities. The Mayo Clinic has restroom facilities for people with special needs. A few other places have them as well. Fortunately, the new senior center is planning to have companion restroom facilities for people who need assistance in a rest room.

MPR, More construction workers needed in Rochester as housing market recovers by Elizabeth Baier, It's a good time to be a construction worker in southeastern Minnesota. With home construction on the rise, the job forecast is good in the construction and trade industries. Over the next two decades, more workers will be needed to help Rochester keep pace with the expected growth. During that time, the city is expected to grow by 32,000 residents, in part because of Mayo Clinic's $5 billion plan to remake its flagship campus. The plan includes $327 million in state aid, largely to fund improvements to public facilities in the city. Additional coverage: St. Cloud Times

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