Items Tagged ‘high blood pressure’

September 4th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

TIME
Sitting is Killing You

by Alice Park

You’ve already heard that sitting is the new smoking. Now, scientists reveal exactly how it hurts the body—and novel ways to undo the damage (without clocTime magazine logoking hours at the gym). You might want to stand up for this…All of which has doctors and health experts calling for a paradigm shift. “In the same way that standing up is an oddity now, sitting down should be,” says Dr. James Levine, director of the Mayo Clinic-Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative and probably best known as the inventor of the first treadmill desk.

Reach: Time magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time Online receives mores than 4.6 million unique visitors to its website each month and its monthy page views are more than 32.8 million.

Additional Coverage:

Arizona Republic
Workplace treadmill desks beginning to make strides
by Ken Alltucker

Arizona Republic newspaper logo…Now entrepreneurs and exercise companies have pounced on the idea that sitting can be hazardous to your health. "It is a hidden killer if you like," said James Levine, a Mayo Clinic doctor who examined the topic in his book "Get Up! Why Your Chair is Killing You and What You Can Do About It."

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

 

KARE11
Measles shot helps eliminate woman's cancer
by Adrienne Broaddus

Stacy Erholtz battled cancer for 10 years. But now, she says her cancer is in remission after a massive dose of the measles vaccine. While her journey has been tough, her faith hasn't wavered. After returningKARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul from a taping a segment in Los Angeles with "The Doctors," Erholtz stopped by KARE 11 to chat about her journey. She said the show will highlight her treatment…Erholtz, 49, of Pequot Lakes, was one of two patients in a Mayo Clinic clinical trial last year using virotherapy. As she sips on a diet Pepsi, she can't stop smiling as she talks about her medical miracle.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Additional coverage: BringMeTheNews, WTVM Ga., WFSB, KCTV Kansas CityKCBD

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

MPR
Mayo doctor's tips for stress-free living and better health

MPR News logoDr. Amit Sood, author of the "Mayo Clinic's Guide to Stress-Free Living," speaks at a Minnesota Public Radio "Healthy States" event about the ways to improve your health by alleviating stress. Gratitude, compassion, acceptance, forgiveness and focusing on the meaning of life are key.Book cover Mayo Clinic's Guide to Stress-Free Living, with female doing cartwheel

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living, Mayo Clinic stress management and resiliency expert Amit Sood, M.D., draws on decades of groundbreaking research to offer readers a scientifically proven, structured and practical approach to reducing stress. He explains the brain’s two modes — focused mode and default mode — and how an imbalance between the two produces unwanted stress, and he shares new insights about how the mind works, including its natural tendency to wander. In this easy-to-follow guide, Dr. Sood provides actionable steps to cultivate emotional and mental strength, find greater fulfillment and nurture a kind disposition. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Sood, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Ginger Plumbo, Brian Kilen

 

Chicago Defender
Black Women Move Past ‘Tuskegee Experiment’ Mistrust
by Oretha Winston

If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated Chicago Defender newspaper logoresearchers teamed up to survey members of the international women’s organization, and found that a majority of African American women surveyed are willing to or have taken part in medical research…“Our findings are highly encouraging,” says Sharonne Hayes, M.D., Mayo Clinic cardiologist, co-author of the study, and director of Mayo’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Reach: The Chicago Defender covers local and national news of interest to its black readership, residing in the Chicago metropolitan area. The publication has a weekly circulation of more than 7,400 readers. The online version attracts more than 13,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Elev8

Context: If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated researchers teamed up to survey members of the international women’s organization, and found that a majority of African American women surveyed are willing to or have taken part in medical research. The results appear in the Journal of Women’s Health. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: 3D printing, ABC15 Arizona, acute sinusitis, Adela Grando, ADHD in children, African-American, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's diseease, Arizona Pop Warner Football, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University


September 13th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

September 13, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

AP (Pioneer Press)
More Americans exercise while they work
by Sam Hananel

Glued to your desk at work? Cross that off the list of excuses for not having the time to exercise. A growing number of Americans are standing, walking and even cycling their way through the workday at treadmill desks, standup desks or other moving workstations…It’s been a decade since scientific studies began to show that too much sitting can lead to obesity and increase the risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. Even going to the gym three times a week doesn’t offset the harm of being sedentary for hours at a time, said Dr. James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

TIME
The Personalized Flu Shot
by Alice Park

Dr. Greg Poland is expecting a lot of questions--and confusion--from his patients this flu season. For the first time, U.S. health officials will distribute six influenza vaccines, up from four last year. "Instead of the one-size-fits-all approach, we are moving to vaccines ... for individual patients," says Poland, director of the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Related Coverage:
Waseca County News, The facts about vaccinations

Context: The next flu shot season will include several new vaccine options for consumers, Mayo Clinic vaccine expert Gregory Poland, M.D., says. Fearful of needles? There's now an influenza vaccination just for you. Allergic to eggs? It won't stop you from getting a flu shot. The new choices move influenza vaccinations closer to the personalized approach long sought by immunologists including Dr. Poland, but they may also prove bewildering to patients, he says.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Expert Explains New Vaccine Options for Next Influenza Season

Mayo Clinic News Network: Flu Vaccines - Changes & Choices for 2013

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

FOX9
Mayo Clinic hosts 'Transform' event to talk health care innovation
by Lindsey LaBelle

The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation hosted annual conference called Transform, and FOX 9 medical expert Dr. Archelle Georgiou both attended and spoke about her work. The conference focused on innovative health ideas happening in pockets around the country that have the potential to change healthcare for the greater good, and also, to highlight ideas that can be used so the health care system works better for patients and families.

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.  FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m.

Additional Coverage:

Hospitals & Health Networks
Maybe it's Time to Nix the Word 'Patient'

Hospitals & Health Networks
Come on, Health Care, Bust Out of Your Box

FOX47
Mayo Clinic hosts national leaders during 'Transform' healthcare summit

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic conference: Technology will transform health care

KAAL
Middle Schoolers Present at Mayo Clinic's Transform Symposium

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation held Transform 2013, its sixth multidisciplinary symposium focused on transforming the way health care is experienced and delivered, Sept. 8–10 in Rochester, Minn. Dozens of speakers from a wide array of backgrounds will look through different lenses to understand a larger picture of health care today. Topics include new models of care delivery, the uncertainty of change in the health care landscape, the intersection of business and health care innovation and how to scale programs to large populations.

News Release: Mayo Clinic to Hold Sixth Symposium on Transforming Health Care Delivery

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

KAAL
Mayo Clinic's Social Presence Among the Best
by Jenna Lohse
…An international bestselling author has ranked Mayo Clinic amongst the top companies in the nation for using social media. As Mayo Officials tell us, it's hard to be a leading organization without an online presence. "The history at Mayo Clinic has all been about our reputation being made by word of mouth,” said Lee Aase, Director of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Social Media…"We need to step out of our office and we need to find ways to reach families, to give them to messages to help them live healthy lives and this is a very efficient and effective way to do that,” said Brian Lynch, Mayo Clinic General Pediatrician.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: In 2010, Mayo Clinic announced the creation of a Center for Social Media to accelerate effective application of social media tools throughout Mayo Clinic and to spur broader and deeper engagement in social media by hospitals, medical professionals and patients to improve health globally.  "Mayo Clinic believes individuals have the right and responsibility to advocate for their own health, and that it is our responsibility to help them use social media tools to get the best information, connect with providers and with each other, and inspire healthy choices," explains Mayo Clinic president and CEO John Noseworthy, M.D. "Through this center we intend to lead the health care community in applying these revolutionary tools to spread knowledge and encourage collaboration among providers, improving health care quality everywhere."

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Nick Hanson

NBC Latino
What parents should know about children and food allergies

With children heading back to school, parents have to be ready for food allergies. A recent CDC study revealed that food allergies increased in children under 18 years from 1997 to 2011, affecting five percent of children under the age of 5 years old. NBC Latino’s Dr. Joe Sirven, Mayo Clinic Arizona, has some tips that every family should know about children and food allergies.

Reach: NBC Latino is an English-language wesbite aimed at Hispanics featuring news and general interest information.

Context: Joseph Sirven, M.D., is chair of neurology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Dr. Sirven’s research pertains to all facets of the diagnosis and management of seizures and epilepsy.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

MPR
Mayo Clinic extends waiting period between blood donations

by Elizabeth Baier

A new Mayo Clinic policy that requires blood donors to wait longer periods between donations could lead to a drop in the clinic's blood supply. In May, the Mayo Clinic extended the waiting period between blood donations from 8 to 12 weeks, aiming to avoid iron loss in frequent donors…To make up for the shortage, the clinic has started a campaign to convince people to donate one more time, said Blood Donor Center Medical Director Manish Gandhi said.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage: KSTP

Context: As few as 3 percent of Americans eligible to donate blood do, and fear and anxiety are common reasons why many decline to give. U.S. hospitals are always in need of new donors; at Mayo Clinic, that need is heightened by concern about iron deficiency in frequent givers. Mayo recently began requiring people to wait 12 weeks rather than eight between donations, a change that means an estimated 10 percent drop in its blood supply. To inspire more people to give blood, Manish Gandhi, M.D., medical director of the Mayo Clinic Blood Donor Center, addresses six common blood donation phobias.

News Release: Not a Blood Donor? Mayo Clinic Expert Addresses 6 Fears That Stop People from Giving

Mayo Clinic News Network: Manish Gandhi, M.D., medical director of the Mayo Clinic Blood Donor Center, addresses several common blood donation phobias, including fear of needles, fear of the sight of blood and fear of fainting.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic moves ahead in heart stem-cell research
by Jeff Hansel

Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Rochester are looking for new ways to repair a heart that doesn't beat properly in the days following a heart attack. Traditionally, a person with an irregular heartbeat — a problem known medically as dyssynchrony — gets treated with a pacemaker to coach the heart back into normal rhythm. But that's ineffective for about a third of patients, said Dr. Andre Terzic, director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage: MedCity News

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers have found a way to resynchronize cardiac motion following a heart attack using stem cells. Scientists implanted engineered stem cells, also known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, into damaged regions of mouse hearts following a heart attack. This regenerative approach successfully targeted the origin of abnormal cardiac motion, preventing heart failure. The findings appear in the September issue of the Journal of Physiology. "The discovery introduces — for the first time — stem cell-based 'biological resynchronization' as a novel means to treat cardiac dyssynchrony," says Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D., senior author of the study. Dr. Terzic is the Michael S. and Mary Sue Shannon Family Director, Center for Regenerative Medicine, and the Marriott Family Professor of Cardiovascular Diseases Research.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Restores Disrupted Heartbeat with Regenerative Intervention

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Restores Disrupted Heartbeat with Regenerative Intervention

Public Affairs Contact: Jennifer Schutz

Huffington Post Live
Obese Teens & Eating Disorders

A new report by the Mayo Clinic says overweight and obese children and teens who lose weight are at significant risk for developing eating disorders, but their symptoms are often overlooked. Dr. Leslie Sim joins us to discuss her findings.

Reach: HuffPost Live is an online streaming video network produced by the Huffington Post. It features videos relating to current events, entertainment, politics, technology and other topics of interest. The network streams original content Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. ET. The site receive more than 550,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:

USA Today
Teens who beat obesity at risk for eating disorders

LA Times, Business Standard, CBS News, WebMD, Yahoo! Shine Canada, Design&Trend, WDTV W.V., WBAY Wis., Health.com, Science World Report, Headlines & Global News, WXYC Mich., WRAL N.C., WSMV Tenn., KSAZ, Huffington Post, Tucson Citizen, HealthCanal, HealthDay, Science2.0, MPR, Newsday

Context: Obese teenagers who lose weight are at risk of developing eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, Mayo Clinic researchers imply in a recent Pediatrics article. Eating disorders among these patients are also not being adequately detected because the weight loss is seen as positive by providers and family members. In the article, Mayo Clinic researchers argue that formerly overweight adolescents tend to have more medical complications from eating disorders and it takes longer to diagnose them than kids who are in a normal weight range. This is problematic because early intervention is the key to a good prognosis, says Leslie Sim, Ph.D., an eating disorders expert in the Mayo Clinic Children's Center and lead author of the study.

News Release: Obese Teenagers Who Lose Weight at Risk for Developing Eating Disorders

Mayo Clinic News Network: Lead author of the study Leslie Sim, Ph.D., L.P., talks about the research

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Wisconsin Public Radio
Hospitals Try Adding Round-The-Clock Remote Patient Monitoring
by Maureen McCollum

Mayo Clinic Health System in La Crosse and Eau Claire are the latest hospitals that will introduce technology to monitor critical care patients remotely…Carrie Apuan is the director of patient care in Mayo’s La Crosse critical care unit. She says if a patient has pneumonia, their vital signs can trend downward slowly and may not be noticed immediately by staff in La Crosse.

Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio serves approximately 300,000 listeners each week throughout Wisconsin and adjoining states on two networks. 

Additional Coverage:

KEYC Mankato
Enhanced Care in Intensive Care Unit 

KSTP
Critically Ill Patients Benefit from New Mayo Clinic Program
 
Austin Herald,  Clinical Innovation + Technology, FierceHealthIT

Context: Critically ill patients are benefiting from a new program designed to improve care and shorten hospital stays. Mayo Clinic's Enhanced Critical Care program offers 24/7 remote monitoring of the sickest patients at six Mayo Clinic Health System hospitals. "It's like having an extra set of eyes on every patient," says Dany Abou Abdallah, M.D., a pulmonologist and director of the critical care unit in Eau Claire. "With this program, operations center nurses and physicians continuously review patients' vital signs and other data. The minute they notice a potential problem, they can alert the local care team."

News Release: Critically Ill Patients at Mayo Clinic Health System Receive Additional Level of Care

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Paul Meznarich

Arizona Republic
The Power Of Bioscience Research
by Greg Stanton, Michael Crow and Wyatt Decker

When state leaders launched an ambitious plan to invest in the biosciences a decade ago, they did so for a simple reason: to break free from our economic handcuffs to only a few industries…Our state couldn’t ask for a better anchor: Mayo Clinic’s 200-acre campus in the north Valley. In less than two years, Mayo will open a massive 380,000-square foot, $130 million cancer center, as well as a $180 million proton-beam therapy center — one of only a few in the West. The cancer center will create more than 800 permanent jobs over the next decade, 1,000 construction jobs, and make Mayo’s unique model of patient-centered medical care even more accessible to those who live here. 

Circulation: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Greg Stanton is mayor of Phoenix. Michael Crow is president of Arizona State University. Wyatt Decker is vice president and chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Mayo Clinic in Arizona celebrated 25 years in the southwest in 2012. Mayo Clinic in Arizona now spans two campuses, comprising more than 400 acres of land, and has added two research buildings on the Scottsdale campus, while the Phoenix campus includes a 244-bed hospital, specialty clinic, housing for transplant and cancer patients and leased space for a child care center as well as hospice and a hotel. Offsite family medicine practices were also added in Scottsdale and Glendale, Ariz.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Celebrates 25 Years in Arizona

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: Angie Stransky, anorexia nervosa, AP, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University, Associated Press, Austin, Austin Herald, Barb Spurrier, bioscience, blood, blood donation phobias


November 9th, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

Nov. 2, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

NY Times
Smoke-Free Workplace Leads to Fewer Heart Attacks
by Anahad O’Connor

A new study has found the strongest evidence yet that smoke-free workplace laws that reduce secondhand smoke inhalation can lead to reductions in heart attacks. The research, carried out by scientists at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., found a 33 percent drop in heart attack rates in one Minnesota county after public smoking bans were enacted. “I think the bottom line is this should turn the page on the chapter discussing whether or not secondhand smoke is a risk factor for heart attacks,” said Dr. Richard D. Hurt, an author of the study and a professor of medicine at Mayo.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Additional coverage:  NPR, Reuters, Washington Post, MedPage Today, Senior Journal, KOSU Okla.US News & World Report, TIME, Newsday, NBC News, LA Times , USA Today , MarketWatchWYSO Miami, The Bunsen Burner, Healthline, Clinical Endocrinology News, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Indianapolis Star, KNAU Ariz. , FOX News, Daily Titan Calif., Science News, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, Tiroler Tageszeitung (Austria), Focus (Germany), Winnipeg Free Press Canada, Yahoo! News Canada, MSNBC.com, HealthDay, Chicago Tribune

Context: A decline in the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI, heart attack) in one Minnesota county appears to be associated with the implementation of smoke-free workplace laws, according to a report published Online First by Archives of Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication.

Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) is associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) in nonsmokers, and research suggests that the cardiovascular effects of SHS are nearly as large as those with active smoking, according to the study background. Elimination of smoking in public places, such as by smoke-free laws and policies, has the potential for reducing smoking and perhaps cardiovascular events.

Richard D. Hurt, M.D., and colleagues at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., evaluated the incidence of MI and sudden cardiac (SCD) death in Olmsted County, Minn., during the 18-month period before and after implementation of smoke-free ordinances. In 2002, a smoke-free restaurant ordinance was implemented and, in 2007, all workplaces, including bars, became smoke free.

Study Article and Abstract

News Release

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Chicago Tribune
Exercise should be prescribed like other medicine, doctors say
by Janice Neumann

Doctors should prescribe exercise for patients who are physically inactive to help keep them disease-free, according to a recent commentary in the Journal of Physiology. Dr. Michael Joyner, a professor of anesthesiology at Mayo Clinic, argues that if doctors "medicalized" physical inactivity, exercise could be the prescription of choice for high blood pressure, heart disease, some cancers and other health ills.

Circulation:  The Chicago Tribune’s average weekday circulation is more about 425,000. Average Sunday circulation is more than 781,000. According to the Tribune, its newspaper reaches more than five million consumers while covering 76% of the market.

Context: A sedentary lifestyle is a common cause of obesity, and excessive body weight and fat in turn are considered catalysts for diabetes, high blood pressure, joint damage and other serious health problems. But what if lack of exercise itself were treated as a medical condition? Mayo Clinic physiologist Michael Joyner, M.D., argues that it should be. His commentary is published in the August issue of The Journal of Physiology.

News Release

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Better Homes & Garden
Health Ask our Expert: Lynne Shuster, M.D., director of the Office of Women’s Health at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Q. I recently saw a sign for free diabetes screenings at my local drugstore. Are these tests trustworthy? A. If you’ve never been tested for type 2 diabetes, and if you’re over 45 or have risk factors…a free pharmacy screening is a great place to start.

KAAL
Teen Girl Uses Disease to Help Others
by Brittany Lewis

For many 13-year-olds, the biggest worry they have is homework or what their friends are doing. But for one young girl, her worries are much bigger than that. Ballet, jazz, tap. 13-year-old Katie Rhoten does it all. "I love to dance. I've been doing that since I was two years old and it's one thing that I really love," she said. But last year, she was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis and could only dance for 30 minutes a week…A disease thought to be reserved for the older, striking someone so young. "Well roughly 1 in 1,000 kids will get arthritis and most of them are younger than 13 probably 50 percent of the ones are actually before age seven is. The good thing is the long term outlook is generally pretty good," said Dr. Tom Mason, a Pediatric Rheumatologist at Mayo Clinic Children's Center.

Florida Times-Union
Neptune Beach breast cancer survivor embraces journey
by Janay Cook

Debbie Cooper was 110 feet underwater and losing oxygen. Her scuba-diving tank had run out and she began to panic. Suddenly her husband, Robby, handed her his air valve. They began to buddy-breathe, an emergency rescue-breathing technique…Two years later on Jan. 10, the healthy 49-year-old with no family history of breast cancer was diagnosed with the disease’s Stage 3. Cooper said she would essentially have to buddy-breathe the next nine months, getting by with the support of her friends, family and co-workers…According to Kathleen Gargin of Mayo Clinic, Cooper had no major complications throughout the treatments and maintained a positive attitude.

 

For more coverage of Mayo Clinic in the News, please link to our news clip blog here.

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: Archives of Internal Medicine, Better Homes & Gardens, Breast Cancer, Cancer, Chicago Tribune, Clinical Endocrinology News, Daily Titan Calif., Debbie Cooper, diabetes, Dr. Lynne Shuster, Dr. Michael Joyner, Dr. Tom Mason


June 22nd, 2012

Blood Pressure Drug Olmesartan Linked to Celiac Disease Side Effects in a Handful of Patients

By Admin

A drug used for treating high blood pressure has been linked with a number of severe gastrointestinal side effects, according to a report from the Mayo Clinic…"We thought these cases were celiac diseases initially because their biopsies showed features very like celiac disease, such as inflammation," said Dr. Joseph Murray, the Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist treating the patients, in a news release. "What made them different was they didn't have the antibodies in their blood that are typical for celiac disease."

Additional Coverage: Forbes, Star Tribune, SeniorJournal.com,  Wopular, Medical Xpress, KABC, KBOI, Fox News

 

ABC News by Carrie Gann

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Tags: ABC News, celiac diseases, Dr. Joseph Murray, gastrointestinal side effects, high blood pressure


June 8th, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Admin

June 8, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Wall Street Journal
Controlling High Blood Pressure, Through the Kidney
by Christopher Weaver

For a decade, a daily regimen of eight drugs, abstinence from salty foods, exercise and meditation did nothing to stem Tracy Fritchley's dangerously high blood pressure. Doctors had little else to offer. But now, medical-device makers have rallied to a new experimental treatment for such stubborn hypertension: Singeing the walls of nerve-lined arteries leading to the kidneys, blocking the organs' ability to raise blood pressure… "Until now, there were no other options for such patients, other than adding more drugs," said Issam Moussa, a Mayo doctor who is participating in the trial, but not Ms. Fritchley's care.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Context: Issam Moussa, M.D, is chair of cardiovascular diseases at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kevin Punsky, Traci Klein

TIME
Immune System Glitch Linked to Four Times Higher Risk of Death
by Alexandra Sifferlin

People with an immune system flaw that causes the overproduction of an antibody molecule called a free light chain are four times more likely to die of diseases including cancer, diabetes and cardiac and respiratory disease than those with normal levels, according to researchers from the Mayo Clinic…Dr. Vincent Rajkumar, a Mayo Clinic hematologist and lead author of the new study, and his colleagues first noted the association between free light chains and death risk during earlier research of melanoma precursors. “It’s interesting that levels that are abnormal years prior to an event can be a predictor. A test that tells you something about a patient before anything adverse occurs is valuable,” says Rajkumar.

Circulation: Time magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time, Inc. engages more than 138 million U.S. consumers in print, online and via mobile devices each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers have identified an immune system deficiency whose presence shows someone is up to four times likelier to die than a person without it. The glitch involves an antibody molecule called a free light chain; people whose immune systems produce too much of the molecule are far more likely to die of a life-threatening illness such as cancer, diabetes and cardiac and respiratory disease than those whose bodies make normal levels. The study is published in the June issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Mayo Clinic issued a news release June 3.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

HealthDay
Immune System Glitch Linked to Greater Risk of Death

People with a certain flaw in their immune system are up to four times more likely to die than people who don’t have this “glitch,” a new study indicates. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic explained that people whose immune system produced too much of an antibody molecule known as a free light chain, are far more likely to die from a serious illness, such as cancer, diabetes or heart disease.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day.

Additional coverage: Health.com, Medical Daily, CNN Blog, Ozark First, Bioscience Technology, , DoctorsLounge, News Day

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Men’s Fitness
The Extreme Workout: How Much Exercise Is Too Much?

When you finally get off the couch and experience your first runner’s high, you may want to run forever, but is it possible to get too much exercise? The answer is yes, according to a recent review of research by a team led by cardiologist Dr. James O’Keefe. In some ways, exercise is like a medication that can be used to prevent and treat many chronic diseases. As with prescription drugs, though, it’s possible to “overdose” on exercise. The researchers, who published their work in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, looked at studies of people who competed in marathons, iron man triathlons, ultramarathons, and long distance bicycle races. Additional coverage: Dayton Daily news, Belfast Telegraph, Herald Scotland, KARE 11, WFMY, Middletown Journal, Springfield News-Sun,CNN Blog, TIME, CBC.ca, Telegraph UK, Kansas City Star, Scientific American Blog, Mail on Sunday UK, NBC San Diego, Star Tribune, US News & World Report, KHBS NW Ark, Huffington Post , Canoe.ca , Discovery News

Circulation: Men's Fitness is a lifestyle magazine for men. The magazine includes information on diet and nutrition, fashion, and sex, as well as training, fitness products and body building. Men's Fitness has a circulation of 65,135.

Context: This research, which was published in June 2012 issue of  Mayo Clinic Proceedings, looked at studies of people who competed in marathons, iron man triathlons, ultramarathons, and long distance bicycle races.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

HealthDay
Ginseng Capsules Seem to Ease Cancer-Related Fatigue

The herb ginseng appeared to significantly reduce cancer-related fatigue compared to an inactive placebo, although it took several weeks for the herb's effects to take effect in the patients, a new study reports… The patients took capsules of pure American ginseng instead of some over-the-counter ginseng products that can include ethanol. Ethanol may be potentially dangerous to breast cancer patients, study researcher Debra Barton of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center said in a news release from the clinic. Additional coverage: ABC News, Drugs.com, WLS AM NY, MSN Health, Times of India, MPR, ABC News Radio

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day.

Context: High doses of the herb American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) over two months reduced cancer-related fatigue in patients more effectively than a placebo, a Mayo Clinic-led study found. Sixty percent of patients studied had breast cancer. The findings are being presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual meeting. A news release was distributed by Mayo Clinic June 4.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

Chicago Sun-Times
Breast cancer drug that targets unhealthy cells shows promise
by Monifa Thomas

An eagerly awaited study presented Sunday in Chicago found that a new type of drug successfully delayed progression in certain breast cancer patients and had fewer side effects. The Phase III study of the T-DMI, sponsored by Roche’s Genentech, was released at the American Society of Clinical Oncology…Yet the four-drug, known as Cyclone, appears to be “as good, if not better” than the drugs used now to reduce tumors, said lead author Dr. Joseph Mikhael, a hematologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. A more detailed Phase III trial is being done now.

Reach: Chicago Sun-Times reaches 4.5 million people through its print and online vehicles.

Context: A four-drug combination of chemotherapy drugs scored high marks as a highly effective treatment for patients newly diagnosed with the blood cancer multiple myeloma, according to results from a Mayo Clinic-led study. The multidrug regimen, called CYCLONE (comprised of Cyclophosphamide, Carfilzomib, Thalidomide and Dexamethasone), boasted strong results in the phase II trial, most notably for how quickly and effectively it worked and how well tolerated it was by the study recipients. The study was presented by at an American Society of Clinical Oncology conference in Chicago by Joseph Mikhael, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contacts: Julie Janovsky-Mason, Joe Dangor

Star Tribune
Minnesota seeks to limit psych drugs for kids
by Jeremy Olson

Concerned by a sharp rise in the use of powerful psychiatric drugs for adolescents, Minnesota will start requiring doctors in many cases to begin using a state-funded consulting service before prescribing such medications for children. The state Department of Human Services on Monday awarded a two-year contract to Mayo Clinic to run the service, which will advise pediatricians and family doctors on whether antipsychotic and stimulant medications are appropriate for their young patients…"We know there is overprescribing. We know there are some harmful drug combinations," said Dr. Peter Jensen, a Mayo psychiatrist.

Circulation:  The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: The Minnesota Department of Human Services has entered into a two-year contract with Mayo Clinic to provide expert guidance to pediatricians and other primary care providers who prescribe psychotropic medications for children. The new service is referred to as "collaborative psychiatric consultation" and is based on pilot projects that improved care and saved money. Mayo Clinic issued a news release June 4.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Pioneer Press
Minnesota, Mayo contract addresses psych medications for children

The Minnesota Department of Human Services has entered into a $1.7 million contract with the Mayo Clinic in which the Rochester, Minn.,-based health system will guide primary care doctors when they prescribe psychotropic medications for children.  The program will run for two years and is expected to pay for itself with reduced hospitalizations and medication use in the Medical Assistance program -- the state's version of the state-federal Medicaid public health insurance program.

Circulation: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of 226,108 and its Sunday newspaper circulation is 270,811. Its TwinCities.com website had approximately 18.6 million page views (March 2011) and the Pioneer Press and TwinCities.com reaches about 3.3 million people each month.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

MPR, Mayo-led group will focus on children's mental health
by Lorna Benson

The Mayo Clinic will lead a new partnership to provide mental health training to doctors. The collaboration is a response to Minnesota's severe shortage of child mental health experts. There are only 81 child psychiatrists in the state, which means that patients who may need psychotropic medications must often rely on family physicians or pediatricians for a prescription. Mayo psychiatrist Peter Jensen says these powerful drugs can help children, but they can also be harmful or unnecessary in many cases. "We've seen these many-fold increases in cocktails of medicines, if you will, without an adequate evidence base, with medicines that cause side effects, in an untrained population of physicians," Jensen says.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Mankato Free Press
Our View: Pediatric mental health idea solid

An effort by the Minnesota Department of Human Services and the Mayo Clinic to expand knowledge of pediatric mental health cases and offer support to doctors and practitioners seems very much needed and a worthwhile public health problem to tackle.

Circulation: The Free Press news staff covers six counties -- Blue Earth, Nicollet, Le Sueur, Brown, Waseca and Watonwan. The major cities of Mankato, North Mankato, Waseca, St. Peter and Le Sueur are also primary coverage areas. It also has wide coverage of local sports and Minnesota State University in Mankato. It also is the publisher of Mankato Magazine (circulation 10,000), the MN Valley Business magazine and The Land (circulation 35,000).

Additional coverage: MPR, MinnPost, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal , Star Tribune, PhysOrg, Bio-Medicine, a2z News

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram
Chief nursing officer to retire
by Christena O’Brien

Lynn Frank has had lots of nursing jobs with one employer - Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire. But after 42 years, Frank - vice president and chief nursing officer - is retiring. Her last day is Friday. "I've had a lot of opportunities and challenges here," said Frank, a Cadott native known for putting the patients' needs first.

Circulation: The Leader-Telegram is the largest daily newspaper in west-central Wisconsin. It covers 12 counties with circulations of 23,500 weekdays and 29,800 Sundays.

Context: A news release was distributed on June 4 by Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire.  After 42 years with Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire — the last 27 as vice president and chief nursing officer — Lynn Frank was retiring.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

ESPN The Magazine
Title Waves

More significantly, the splash they made in 1976 has had a rippling effect. Mary O'Connor, who went from being an Olympic rower to the head of orthopedic surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville (and the proud mother of a daughter who's a competitive rower), said, "Title IX has given women so much. What I'm most proud of is that we showed people the backbone of Title IX.”

Circulation: ESPN W aims to be the primary destination for women's sports.

Context: This feature story chronicles the pioneering roles that Mary O'Connor, M.D.,  head of orthopedic surgery at Mayo Clinic in Florida, and her rowing colleagues had when Title IX came into being in 1972.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punksy

Pioneer Press
Mayo picks up Fairview hospital in Red Wing

The Mayo Clinic and Fairview Health Services have signed a tentative agreement for the Minneapolis-based health system to transfer control of a hospital in Red Wing, Minn., to the Rochester-based clinic … The agreement marks the latest of example of growth in the Mayo Clinic's system of hospitals and clinics. Fairview, meanwhile, has faced recent financial struggles. Post-Bulletin, Biz Journals, Star Tribune, Republican Eagle, Modern HealthCare

Circulation: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of 226,108 and its Sunday newspaper circulation is 270,811. Its TwinCities.com website had approximately 18.6 million page views (March 2011) and the Pioneer Press and TwinCities.com reaches about 3.3 million people each month.

Context:  Mayo Clinic issued a news release June 7 announcing a tentative agreement today for Fairview Red Wing Health Services to become part of Mayo Clinic Health System. The parties will work to finalize the details of the agreement and acquisition during the next several weeks, targeting July 1 for Mayo Clinic Health System to assume operations.

Public Affairs Contacts: Joe O'Keefe, Nick Hanson

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Tags: American Society of Clinical Oncology, Chicago Sun-Times, Dr. Issam Moussa, Dr. James O'Keefe, Dr. Joseph Mikhael, Dr. Mary O'Connor, Dr. Vincent Rajkumar, Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, ESPN The Magazine, Genentech, ginseng, HealthDay


June 6th, 2012

Trial Offers New Choice for Blood-Pressure Patients

By Admin

A new medical device with the promise to relieve an otherwise untreatable form of high-blood pressure has made its first forays into the U.S. in recent weeks, as major medical centers begin testing the procedure, WSJ reported…The Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, which is also participating in the trial, has been getting enthusiastic calls from would-be participants. But screening out the folks that are eligible has proven difficult, says Karen Miller, a clinical trial coordinator there. “It’s much more complex than other studies we do,” she says.

 

Wall Street Journal by Christopher Weaver

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Tags: high blood pressure, Karen Miller, Wall Street Journal


May 23rd, 2012

Sleep Apnea Treatment May Prevent Hypertension

By Admin

Sleep apnea may prove to be a treatable cause of high blood pressure, according to research released today that suggests wearing a special breathing mask at night may protect apnea patients from the hypertension. Most people think of obstructive sleep apnea as a snoring disorder. Although many sufferers snore, apnea is characterized by short episodes in which the patient's upper airway narrows or closes, reducing the flow of oxygen to the body and brain. …Dr. Virend Somers, a sleep apnea and heart disease researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., cautioned that the results of the two studies are suggestive "but not definitive that CPAP is protective of the cardiovascular system."

 

ABC News

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Tags: ABC News, Dr. Virend Somers, high blood pressure, sleep apnea


January 30th, 2012

Mayo, Minn. communities targeting immigrant health

By Admin

In a first-of-its-kind collaboration, researchers at the Mayo Clinic are working with more than a dozen community organizations to keep immigrants and refugees from developing common diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity…Mayo Clinic Dr. Mark Wieland said he's trying to figure out what programs works best for each community. He'll monitor the progress of 40 patients, who will participate in a second round of physical fitness and nutrition classes starting in February.

MPR, by Elizabeth Baier, 01/27/2012

Additional coverage: St. Cloud Times, Winona Daily News

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Tags: diabetes, Dr. Mark Wieland, high blood pressure, immigrants, nutrition classes, Obesity, physical fitness classes, refugees