Items Tagged ‘kidney disease’

June 5th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

The Guardian (UK)
Apple previews new mobile software iOS 8 at WWDC 2014
By Alex Hern

Apple demonstrated iOS 8, its newest version of its operating system for iPhones and iPads, at its worldwide developers conference in San Francisco. The new OS introduced a new Health app to offer "a single comprehensive overview of your fitness," as well asThe Guardian newspaper logo
updates to features including Mail and Notification Centre. The Health app integrates with apps such as Nike+, or even apps made by healthcare providers, to let users manage their health through their iOS devices. "We believe Apple's healthkit will revolutionise how the healthcare industry interacts with people," said John Noseworthy, CEO of the prestigious Mayo Clinic hospital.

Reach: The Guardian is the world's 3rd largest newspaper website. US traffic topped 12.7 million monthly unique users in June 2013.

Additional Coverage:

Pioneer Press, Apple, Mayo partner on iOS health monitor
MPR, The doctor will see your phone now
Forbes, Apple Gives Epic And Mayo Bear Hug With HealthKit
CNBC, The OpenTable for doctors hits the office
KAAL,  Mayo Teaming with Apple on Breakthrough Technology
Post-Bulletin,  Apple, Mayo Clinic team up

Financial Post, ReadWrite, Florida Times-Union, Star Tribune, Modern Healthcare, FOX News, Huffington Post, WCCO, Washington Post, SELF magazine, Reuters, NY Times, NBC News, FOX10 Phoenix, CNBC, Chicago Tribune, CBS News, Bloomberg, ABC News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution (AP), BringMeTheNews, Forbes, Times of India, Mashable, MedCity News, Daily Mail UK, Trust.org, Trust.orgHeartScore, MediaPostPost-Bulletin, International Business Times UK, InformationWeek, Star Tribune, KIMT, Wall Street Journal

Context: During this week's  keynote address at the Worldwide Developers Conference 2014Apple, Inc., unveiled HealthKit, a digital repository for various types of health-fitness related data. Apple highlighted HealthKit through a new Mayo Clinic app under development that would offer users a more personalized experience and make their health data more actionable in supporting healthier lifestyles. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic targets $3 billion for research funding
by Coleen Michele Jones

Mayo Clinic is publically kicking off a capital campaign to raise $3 billion by 2017 for biomedical research and education across its three campuses, including Jacksonville…“We’re partnering Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logowith benefactors to bring medical breakthroughs which will enhance patient care,” said Dr. Michael Camilleri, executive dean for the department of development at Mayo’s headquarters in Minnesota. “As we have seen, reliable funding is the best way to ensure better outcomes.”

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Previous Coverage in May 15 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in May 8 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care, Mayo Clinic announced on May 8 a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on the Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Arizona Republic (HealthDay)
Flying after surgery may be safe, experts say

If you're returning home after having chest surgery at an out-of-town hospital, flying is as safe as driving, an expert says.  It's widely believed that ground travel is safer than air travel after chest surgery, but a Arizona Republic newspaper logorecent study by Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon Stephen Cassivi found that isn't true. He also concluded there is no reason to wait for weeks after chest surgery to fly home.

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Previous Coverage in May 29 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Summer travel isn’t for vacation alone. For some people, it may include a trip to an out-of-town hospital for surgery. If you are traveling for chest surgery, you may wonder whether it is safer to return home by car or plane. A new Mayo Clinic study found that, contrary to conventional wisdom, air travel is just as safe as ground travel after chest surgery, and there is often no reason to wait for weeks after an operation to fly home. Lead study author Stephen Cassivi, M.D., a Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon, offers these five tips for safer, more comfortable travel home after surgery on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Delta Sky Magazine
Wiping out Cancer
by Karen Springen

Leading doctors take stock of the current state of cancer care and the exciting developments on the Delta Sky magazine logohorizon…Dr. Sameer Keole, a radiation oncologist specializing in pediatric cancer at the Mayo Clinic, has used proton therapy to treat kids with cancer and estimates that 3,000 to 3,500 U.S. kids could be treated with proton beam therapy each year.

Reach: Delta Sky is the inflight magazine for Delta Airlines. The magazine has a circulation of more than 600,000. Delta Sky online serves as the online companion to its parent magazine.

Context: Mayo Clinic Cancer Center combines personalized cancer treatment with leading-edge research to provide patients with unparalleled cancer care.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

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Tags: "Mayo's Pain Reliever" pills, ABC News, ADHD, ALTTO, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Amy Donohue, AP, Apple, Arizona Republic, Arthritis Research UK, ASCO, Associated Press


May 15th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


NY Times
AGING AMERICA: Exercise as the Fountain of Youth

…Exercise may be the closest thing we have to a fountain of youth, one of the best ways to age happy and well. "The mantra now is, exercise is a drug" — able, like some medications

The New York Times newspaper logo are, to prevent and treat a host of age-related ailments, said Dr. Andrea Cheville, a Mayo Clinic expert on exercise in the elderly.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Star Tribune (AP), KAAL, ABC News, Huffington Post Canada, Monterey Herald, Ottawa Citizen

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is an expert on exercise in the elderly.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KSTP
On the Road with Jason Davis: Mayo Clinic Celebrates 150 Years

KSTP's Jason Davis goes on the road to Arizona, Florida and Minnesota fKSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logor his feature on Mayo Clinic. This was Davis's last report for his On the Road series before retiring at the end of May 2014 after nearly four decades with KSTP.  This year, one of Minnesota's best known institutions celebrates its 150th anniversary. It was in 1864 that Dr. William Worral Mayo started his small clinic in Rochester, and just how that small practice grew into a world-renowned facility is a fascinating story. Jason Davis went on the road to learn about the past, present and future of Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Additional Mayo Clinic 150th Anniversary and history of Mayo coverage:

KTTC, Mayo Clinic celebrates 150 years by Courtney Sturgeon

KARE11, Recovering Brokaw hosts Mayo's 150th anniversary 

KTTC, The early beginnings of the Mayo Clinic Mid-century advancements, Recent history

KTTC, Dr. John Noseworthy reflects on 150 years of Mayo Clinic success 

MPR, Mayo's mark: 5 innovations that changed health care 

Post-Bulletin, Jordanian king touched many in Rochester 

Post-Bulletin, Descendants of Dr. W.W. Mayo visit family home 

Post-Bulletin, Massive medical team focused 'millimeter by millimeter' to separate twins 

Post-Bulletin, 150th anniversary: Mayo Clinic helped U.S., allies win World War II 

Post-BulletinOddchester: 150 years in less than three hours

Greenhouse Grower, Mayo Clinic Will Promote Coreopsis ‘Electric Avenue’ As Its Flower Of Hope

Perishable NewsMayo Clinic Chooses Yellow Coreopsis As Its 'Flower Of Hope'

WCCO, Star Tribune, Big News Network, WCCO AM, Coon Rapids Herald, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin

Context: On July 1, 1907, Dr. Henry Plummer and Mabel Root, Dr. Plummer's assistant, inaugurated Mayo's system of patient registration and medical record keeping. The single-unit record was central to the new system. It brought together all of a patient's records -- clinical visits, hospital stays, laboratory tests and notes -- in a single file that traveled with the patient and was stored in a central repository. This simple system quickly became the standard for medical record keeping around the world. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Rebecca Eisenman, Kelley Luckstein

 

FOX47
Mayo Clinic announces campaign to raise $3 billion
by Mary McGuire

Mayo Clinic is looking to the future in a big way as it launches a camFox 47 TV station logopaign to raise $3 billion. It's all part of the "You are ... the campaign for Mayo Clinic" being announced Thursday. The goal of the campaign is to raise $3 billion by the end of 2017 to strengthen patient care, research and education at Mayo.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Becker’s Hospital Review, KROC-AM

Previous coverage

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care, Mayo Clinic today announced a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on the Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic trial: Massive blast of measles vaccine wipes out cancer
by Dan Browning

Stacy Erholtz was out of conventional treatment options for blood cancer last June when she underwent an exStar Tribune Health newspaper logoperimental trial at the Mayo Clinic that injected her with enough measles vaccine to inoculate 10 million people. The 50-year-old Pequot Lakes mother is now part of medical history…But the experiment provides the “proof of concept” that a single, massive dose of intravenous viral therapy can kill cancer by overwhelming its natural defenses, according to Dr. Stephen Russell, a professor of molecular medicine who spearheaded the research at Mayo.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
KARE11Minn. woman's cancer in remission thanks to measles 

Washington Post, Woman’s cancer killed by measles virus in unprecedented trial

MPR, How the Mayo Clinic handles potential patients in clinical trials

USA TODAY, Massive dose of measles vaccine clears woman's cancer

WGN-TV, Mayo Clinic: Woman’s cancer cured with huge dose of measles vaccine

International Business Times UK, Mayo Clinic Landmark Trial: Measles Vaccine Wipes out Cancer in Patient

Daily BeastMeasles Vaccine Killed Patient's Cancer

MashableMeasles Vaccine Wipes Out Cancer in Groundbreaking Test

UPI.com, Massive dose of measles vaccine knocks out woman's cancer

azcentral.comMeasles vaccine cures woman's cancer in study

Reuters, CNN, International Business Times, La Parisienne (France), Le Monde (France), Telegraph (UK), Globe and Mail, Fox 19 (OH), Examiner, Detroit Free Press, Green Bay Press Gazette, ABC 15 Arizona, Fox News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, News 4 Jax, L’Economiste, 11 Alive Atlanta, Le Figaro (France), Yahoo! France, Le Huffington Post, ABC.es (Spain), Access Atlanta, Honolulu Star-Advertiser, Yahoo! Health, Business Standard India, France 24, Yahoo! News UK & Ireland (AFP), Yahoo! MexicoKTTCNational PostDaily MailThe BlazeThe Daily BeastRefinery 29

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: 11 Alive Atlanta, 3-D printing, 3D printers, Abbigail Carlsen, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC.es (Spain), ABC15, Access Atlanta, Advanced Primary Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic in Florida, aerobic activity, aging, American Academy of Neurology


March 28th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

TPT Almanac
Mayo CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, capitol reporters, Rochester mayor, Syrian crisis, political scientist panel

TPT's public affairs program, Almanac, broadcast its first remote program on March 21 from Phillips Hall at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. More than 400 people were inTPT attendance for the live broadcast.

Context: Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock timeslot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running primetime TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of record that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program. Almanac has also earned six regional Emmys awards.

Related coverage: 
Post-BulletinPublic TV's 'Almanac' broadcasts live from Mayo Clinic

InsuranceNewsNet
Public TV's 'Almanac' broadcasts live from Mayo Clinic

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic aims for more Pentagon funding
by Corey Mitchell

The Mayo Clinic, with military ties that stretch back to the Civil War, is making a push to more aggressively pursue a larger share of the $900 million-plus spent annually by the Star-Tribune-Logo-300x45Pentagon on medical research. The medical giant has opened a Department of Defense Medical Research Office in Rochester and hired McAllister & Quinn, a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying firm, to help procure more federal funding. Dr. Peter Amadio, medical director of Mayo’s DOD Medical Research Office, said that while Mayo has some defense contracts, there’s “an opportunity for us to do better.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
Minneapolis /St. Paul Business Journal, Mayo goes to battle for military funds 

BringMeTheNews, Mayo Clinic angling for more Pentagon funds

Context: Mayo Clinic has opened the Mayo Clinic Department of Defense (DOD) Medical Research Office. The office, in Rochester, MN., is designed to be an easy to use single point of contact, linking the research needs of the DOD with Mayo Clinic investigators capable of addressing those needs, and to improve access to funding to serve DOD research and development priorities. The office oversees Mayo Clinic's portfolio of DOD-funded research, which has evolved over Mayo’s long and successful partnership with the U.S. government. Today, dozens of Mayo Clinic researchers receive funding for special projects that use new technologies and innovative solutions to support military readiness, functional restoration and rehabilitation after complex injuries, restore health and improve wellness of military populations.

“This is a continuation of Mayo Clinic’s 150-year legacy with the DOD,” says Peter Amadio, M.D., director of the office, and an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic. “The office and website are designed to strengthen this long-standing relationship and to not only match DOD research needs with the expertise of Mayo Clinic, but also accelerate the entire process from proposal development to funding to delivery of a completed project. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

WCCO
Boy With Melanoma Raises Thousands Making Bracelets To Battle Cancer
by Susan-Elizabeth Littlefield

There are certain statistics you want your kids to be a part of. This is not one of them. Less than 10 children in this country have a form of childhood melanoma, and one of them lives in the Twin Cities metro. Graham Fowler, of Fridley, Minn., is a 10-year-old with Spitzoid Melanoma. He’s being treated at the Mayo Clinic and has had eight surgeries.CBS Minnesota

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Context: Melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, develops in the cells (melanocytes) that produce melanin — the pigment that gives your skin its color. Melanoma can also form in your eyes and, rarely, in internal organs, such as your intestines. Specialists at Mayo Clinic work as a team to make a prompt melanoma diagnosis so you can begin treatment as soon as possible. Mayo Clinic's surgical pathologists and dermatopathologists are respected for their expertise in identifying melanoma stage, depth and severity, which is critical for selecting the most appropriate treatment combination.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

Florida Times-Union (Subscription required)
Medical tourism provides big economic boost to Jacksonville economy
by Charlie Patton

In the two weeks they’ve been here, they’ve done quite a bit of sightseeing, going to the St. Augustine Alligator Farm and making a day trip to Disney World….But the purpose of their Florida Times-Union newspaper logovisit isn’t fun. They came to Jacksonville because they were seeking cancer treatment for James at the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute…William C. Rupp, the chief executive officer of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, which has an economic impact in the Jacksonville area of about $1.6 billion, said that about 43,000 of the approximately 1000,000 patients treated at the clinic each year qualify as medical tourists.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
St. Augustine Record; Travel Weekly, Can medical tourism provide a shot in the arm for Fla.? 

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Phoenix Business Journal
Inside the Reporter’s Notebook
By Angela Gonzales

Phoenix Business JournalPhoenix Business Journal senior healthcare reporter Angela Gonzales interviews Dr. Wyatt Decker.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Context: Wyatt Decker, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Vice President and CEO at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh
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Tags: A.L.S., ABC News, Aby Bedtka, Aetna InteliHealth, Afghanistan, African-American men and cancer survival rates, allergies, Almanac, alzheimer's disease, american heart association, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Aerospace Medicine


June 22nd, 2012

Nick Cannon’s Autoimmune Disease: ‘America’s Got Talent’ Host Opens Up About His Health

By Admin

Nick Cannon is opening up about the series of health problems he's faced over the last couple of months.  The 31-year-old has revealed that the kidney disease he was hospitalized for earlier this year was a result of an autoimmune disease, People magazine reported…Lupus in particular is when the immune system attacks the body's tissues and organs, according to the Mayo Clinic, and is most known for the butterfly-wing-like rash that appears on the face. Symptoms of lupus are different from case to case, but common symptoms include fever, fatigue, joint pain, the facial rash, chest pain, headaches, dry eyes and skin lesions, the Mayo Clinic.

 

Huffington Post

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Tags: kidney disease, lupus, Nick Cannon