Items Tagged ‘kidney disease’

November 11th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

WRVO Public Radio NY
The whole story on whole grains

The current diet trends to eat low-carb or go gluten-free have resulted in many people giving up a food group long believed to be part oWRVO NY NPRf a healthy diet — whole grains. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and editor of the bestseller, The Mayo Clinic Diet. Hensrud discusses the benefits of eating whole grains. More of this interview can be heard on "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show Saturday at 6:30 a.m. and Sunday at 6:30 p.m.

Reach: WRVO-FM is a non-commercial station owned by State University of New York and an affiliate member station of NPR.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

KJZZ
Mayo Clinic Opening Medical School Campus In Valley
by Naomi Gingold

The Mayo Clinic medical school is opening a satellite campus here in the Valley. They are having their official ribbon-cutting ceremony this week KJZZ NPR -AZ Logoand reviewing applications for their first class of students. Dr. Michele Halyard is a radiation oncologist at Mayo and has become the dean of the medical school here. KJZZ asked her about the new school and its progress.

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Context: Mayo Clinic School of Medicine has a four-year campus in Minnesota and a four-year campus opening in Arizona in 2017. Mayo Clinic School of Medicine students acquire experiences across a spectrum of patient populations in multiple practice settings. Michele Halyard, M.D., a Mayo Clinic radiation oncologist, is dean of the medical school.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

NY Times
After a Suicide Attempt, the Risk of Another Try
by Jane Brody

My family is no stranger to suicide and suicide attempts, and we are not alone. To recount just two instances:The New York Times newspaper logo A 20-year-old nephew, after receiving a very caring letter from his sister-in-law explaining why she could not be his lover, went to his room, shot himself in the head and died … Now a new study reveals just how lethal suicide attempts, as a risk factor for completed suicide, are. The study, led by Dr. J. Michael Bostwick, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic, tracked all first suicide attempts in one county in Minnesota that occurred between January 1986 and December 2007 and recorded all the deaths by suicide for up to 25 years thereafter. Eighty-one of the 1,490 people who attempted suicide, or 5.4 percent, died by suicide, 48 of them in their first attempt. The findings were reported in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: While a prior history of suicide attempt is one of the strongest predictors of completed suicide, a Mayo Clinic study finds it is more lethal than previously known. Researchers find that suicide risk was nearly 60 percent higher than previously reported when based on a population-based cohort focusing on individuals making first lifetime attempts and including those whose first attempts were fatal. This risk was dramatically higher for attempts using firearms. The population sample was identified through the Rochester Epidemiology Project. “We hoped to address the shortcomings of earlier studies by including two groups previously overlooked by other studies,” says J. Michael Bostwick, M.D., a psychiatrist on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus and the lead author of the study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry. “Our study enrolled individuals whose first-ever suicide attempt presented to medical attention. Not only did we include those who survived this initial attempt, but we also included those who died on their first attempt rather than ending up in the emergency room. These are large groups that have been routinely ignored in calculation of risk.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

WCCO
‘Cancer Avatars’ Giving Hope To Patients
by Rachel Slavik

What if doctors could know the exact therapy needed to treat ovarian cancer? — It could save precious time and also help patients avoid the side CBS Minnesotaeffects of ineffective chemotherapy drugs. Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Rochester are testing that theory on reoccurring ovarian cancer…Dr. John Weroha, a clinical oncologist at the Mayo Clinic, is the lead researcher on a clinical trial for recurring ovarian cancer treatment. “The clinical trial we’re running is an attempt to help patients once they develop a platinum-resistant reoccurring cancer,” Dr. Weroha said.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Context: Saravut "John" Weroha, M.D., Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist. Oncologists provide care for people with cancer. Mayo Clinic oncologists collaborate with experts in all other departments to provide coordinated and integrated, multidisciplinary care to people with cancer. Mayo Clinic oncologists actively contribute to care and research in the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, designated by the National Cancer Institute as a comprehensive cancer center.

Contact: Joe Dangor

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November 4th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik


Advisory Board
Mayo Clinic got 'five stars'—but its CEO still doesn't like how CMS rates hospitals

CMS' five-star rating system for overall hospital quality—and similar systems that purport to measure health care quality—are too reductionist and need to be changed, Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy argues in a Modern Healthcare op-ed. You might think, given that CMS awardedAdvisory Board Mayo Clinic five stars, that Noseworthy would praise the ratings system. But Noseworthy argues that "many measurement programs currently in use ... do not differentiate complexity of patient conditions nor account for their settings of care, which results in inaccurate reports on value."

Reach: The Advisory Board Company is a global research, technology, and consulting firm partnering with more than 165,000 leaders in more than 4,100 organizations across health care and higher education.

Previous coverage in October 28, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Hospitals & Health Networks
Experts Take on the Big Picture of Value-Based Payment
by Brian Frankie

Value-based payment is coming to health care. And its complications are something we have to understand. That was the message of panelists Hospitals and Health NetworksWednesday during a session at the H&HN Executive Forum in Chicago on value-based payment and purchasing and what can make it successful…Much of the discussion, led by moderator Robert Nesse, M.D., senior medical adviser for payment reform to the Mayo Clinic Board of Governors and former Mayo Clinic Health System CEO, focused on leveraging data to track value.

Reach: Hospitals & Health Networks is a monthly magazine with a circulation of more than 77,000 that reports on and analyzes the social, political and economic forces that shape healthcare delivery. Its website has more than 21, 000 unique visitors each month. The publication targets health care executives and clinical leaders in hospitals and health systems.

Context: Robert Nesse, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Health System family medicine physician in Lake City, Minn. and he also serves as senior medical director, Payment Reform at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Nesse is also former CEO of Mayo Clinic Health System, a network of clinics and hospitals serving more than 70 communities in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

TIME
You Asked: Should I Go Gluten Free?
by Markham Heid

Gluten is a type of elastic grain protein that helps wheat, rye and barley hold their shape. Because of its glue-like properties, gluten is often added to other food products—pasta, sauces, crackers, baked goods—to thicken or bind those products together. “These kinds of junk foods and refinedTime magazine logo carbohydrates promote weight gain and diabetes and disease,” says Dr. Joseph Murray, a professor of medicine and a gluten researcher at Mayo Clinic. So if you’re eating a lot of cookies, crackers and other grain-based snack foods, any diet that limits your intakes of them is bound to do your health some good. “But for those who don’t suffer from celiac disease, gluten isn’t inherently bad, and gluten-free foods aren’t inherently healthy,” he says.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and hepatologist with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and enteropathy; and esophageal disorders, particularly esophageal functional disorders, particularly reflux, and the detection of atypical reflux.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
Health Notes: Mayo Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s now open
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s has opened. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare Florida Times-Union newspaper logobrings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the St. Vincent’s Medical Center Riverside campus. Mayo Clinic is staffing the facility with physicians from its Department of Hematology/Oncology. St. Vincent’s is assuming the remaining clinical and administrative responsibilities. The cancer services include medical oncology, an infusion center for chemotherapy, and multidisciplinary disease specialized care for various types of cancer. An official blessing and dedication ceremony will be held Monday.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Previous coverage in October 21, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To deliver Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked comprehensive cancer care to more people in Northeast Florida, the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center located at St. Vincent’s Riverside will open to patients on Oct. 17. The collaboration between Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a part ofAscension, the nation’s largest Catholic and non-profit health system, brings Mayo Clinic’s cancer services to patients in a newly built 11,500-square-foot medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. “We are excited to launch this community collaboration and we look forward to further meeting the needs of cancer patients, right here in their own community,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida.  “This community collaboration will enable patients to receive cancer care at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s and come to Mayo’s San Pablo Road campus when they need highly complex care, such as bone marrow transplants.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Wall Street Journal
Boy’s Cardiac Death Led to Misuse of Genetic Test, Study Says
by Ron Winslow

A 13-year-old boy’s sudden cardiac death led doctors to wrongly diagnose more than 20 of his relatives with a potentially lethal heart disorder in a case that illustrates the potential for genetic testing to go wrong… The search for a genetic cause of the teenager’s death was done with “goodWSJ Banner intentions,” said Michael Ackerman, a cardiologist and director of the Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But “the entire clinical evaluation was a train wreck, where wrong conclusions led to wrong turns and resulted in wrong therapies.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: The sudden death of a 13-year-old boy resulted in more than 20 relatives to be incorrectly diagnosed as having a potentially lethal heart rhythm condition. This erroneous diagnosis occurred as a result of inappropriate use of genetic testing and incorrect interpretation of genetic test results, according to Mayo Clinic research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. This case highlights the potential danger of genetic testing when it is used incorrectly and the great need to not only use this powerful tool carefully and wisely but to scrutinize the results with great caution, says senior author Michael J. Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D., genetic cardiologist and director of Mayo Clinic’s Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory. “While the technological advances in genetic sequencing have been exponential, our ability to interpret the results has not kept pace,” he says. More information cane be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Additional coverage: STAT, CNN, Immortal NewsKIMT, Raw Story, Science Daily, Cardiovascular Business, Healthcare Business News, GenomeWeb, FOX News, Motherboard, News4JaxBecker’s Health IT & CIO Review, The Scientist

Contact: Traci Klein

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January 15th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly News Summary

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in tMayo Clinic in the News Logohe News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic spending $92.7 million on buildings, equipment
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic announced Tuesday a plan for spending $92.7 million on facilities and equipment that includes more private rooms in Rochester, better roads near its hospital in Florida and a new airplane for transporting patients. The spending plan was approved in November by the boardStar Tribune newspaper logo of directors at Mayo, which routinely makes large infrastructure investments across its six-state network of hospitals and clinics.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Bloomberg News online, KTTC.com, KXLT.com, Post-Bulletin

Context:  An investment of $92.7 million in facilities and equipment across Mayo Clinic through 2017 will ensure that patients from across the globe find the world-class accommodations and whole-person care they have come to expect. These efforts reinforce Mayo Clinic’s level of commitment to the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative by enhancing the patient experience and positioning Mayo Clinic as the premiere global destination for health and wellness. “Our hospital projects will help us meet Mayo Clinic’s responsibility to combine safe and comprehensive care with a seamless, high-quality experience for our patients and their families,” says Amy Williams, M.D., medical director of hospital operations. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

TIME
Here’s What 10 Experts Think of the Government’s New Diet Advice
by Alexandra Sifferlin

“The 2015 Dietary Guidelines build upon the 2010 Dietary Guidelines to provide information to shape policy, design food and nutrition programs, and to help Americans make healthy dietary choices. However, although the Guidelines are required and purported to be “based on Time magazine logothe preponderance of current scientific and medical knowledge”, they did not include some of the recommendations of the Scientific Advisory Committee and therefore do not describe an optimal dietary pattern. Despite some of these shortcomings, it is important to recognize that for most people, following the Dietary Guidelines will improve their nutritional status and health. — Dr. Donald Hensrud, a physician at Mayo Clinic and editor of the Mayo Clinic Diet.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet Book.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

The Wall Street Journal
Can Echinacea Melt Winter’s Colds and Flu?
by Laura Johannes

“If you are getting plenty of fluids and plenty of rest and you want to take echinacea, it seems like a reasonable thing to do and unlikely to harm you,” says Pritish K. Tosh, associate professor at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But people at risk for flu complications, such as pneumonia or bronchitis, should instead take an antiviral medication such as Tamiflu, he adds.WSJ Banner

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert. His research is focused in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Florida Times-Union
$10 million gift from grateful patient will underwrite Mayo Clinic's neurosurgery residency program
by Charlie Patton

As he waited to undergo spinal surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville on Feb. 17, 2012, John Sonnentag promised himself that if everything Florida Times-Union newspaper logowent well, he would make significant gift to the hospital. Additional coverage: Post Bulletin, Bloomberg News Online

Reach: 
The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: A $10 million gift from a grateful patient and his wife will provide funding for a neurosurgery residency program on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus to help address the nationwide shortage of specialists in head and spine procedures. “There’s a tremendous need for training neurosurgeons in this country,” says Robert Wharen, Jr., M.D., chair of Neurosurgery at Mayo Clinic in Florida. “There is now a shortage of neurosurgeons, and that shortage is actually going to get worse, because there are more neurosurgeons retiring over the next 10 years than we are able to train.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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September 25th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor: Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

MPR
Ceiling cracks: Women step into Mayo Clinic's top academic posts
by Elizabeth Baier

Heidi Nelson still remembers the doubters after she became Mayo Clinic's first female surgeon a quarter century ago. She haMPR2d to win credibility with colleagues — and find ways to convince patients she was the surgeon. "I had to develop a strategy where I'd walk into a room with my card, and I would engage them with eye contact and with verbal presence ... I'm Dr. Heidi Nelson, I'm a colorectal surgeon on staff. I'm here to answer questions and care for you. Here's my card,'" she recalled recently.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Sharonne Hayes, M.D., Mayo Clinic Director of Diversity and Inclusion, says encouraging and including contributions from diverse individuals is critical to Mayo's future. Mayo will be better positioned to reach its full potential and to better serve its patients when we actively bring together individuals with diverse thoughts, ideas and backgrounds; and put them to work to help create better solutions. Heidi Nelson, M.D., is chair of Mayo Clinic's Department of Surgery. Claudia Lucchinetti, M.D., is chair of Mayo Clinic's Department of Neurology.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

News4Jax
'Success Kid' helps save his father's life
by Vic Micolucci

…Besides the money, Justin says more than 500 strangers contacted Mayo Clinic to be News Jax 4 Logopotential donors. And in August, the Griner family got the call they had been waiting for: the kidney was available. It came from a matching organ donor who recently passed away. Hours later, Justin arrived at Jacksonville's Mayo Clinic and got the transplant he so desperately needed. "He's had a very good result at this point in time," said Kris Croome, MD, transplant surgeon with Mayo Clinic Jacksonville. "His kidneys started working right away."

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Success Kid was first chronicled in an ABCNews.com story (via “Good Morning America”) about raising money via GoFundMe for a kidney transplant for his dad and recently having that transplant at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. Mayo Clinic doctors and surgeons have experience diagnosing and treating people who have kidney disease. Each year doctors and surgeons care for more than 30,000 people who have kidney disease.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

MedCity News
Mayo Clinic’s Farrugia on the future of precision medicine: Patients are ready to engage
by Meghana Keshavan

Gianrico Farrugia, CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida, laid out his vision of the immediate future of precision medicine at this week’s Individualizing Medicine Conference inMedCity News Minnesota. He discussed the issues around patient engagement, reimbursement, data security and salience of President Barack Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative. In terms of immediate potential, Farrugia said there are five fields worth watching: Pharmacogenomics, Liquid biopsy, Non-invasive prenatal testing, Whole genome sequencing, Microbiome.

Reach: MedCity News focuses on business, innovation and influence in healthcare. Its websites has more than 72,000 unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:

KTTC — Health specialists talk 'Precision Medicine' at conference held at Mayo Civic Center 

Medical Daily — From Preventing Side Effects To Sequencing Babies, 5 Ways Precision Medicine Will Change How Doctors Treat Patients 

MedCity News — Illumina launching ‘PopArray’ consortium to develop population health genomics test

Context: Mayo Clinic Vice President Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. addressed participants in his keynote address at the 4th annual Individualizing Medicine Conference. The core of his talk highlighted five areas in which the knowledge and know-how from the human genome will be most impactful in patient care, not just at Mayo Clinic, but anywhere in the nation and globally. “What’s in it for you?” he asked the crowd of health providers at the Mayo Civic Center in Rochester, Minn. “Individualized or precision medicine offers help for your medical practice today. You can take advantage of these advances to help your patients, to better diagnose, treat or prevent illness right now.” More information, including a video interview with Dr. Farrugia, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Action News Jax
Doctors hope new breast cancer vaccine will save lives
by Brittany Jones

Part of a nearly $13.3 million Department of Defense grant will used  in our area to develop a vaccine for breast cancer. Currently, 280 patients are participating in the trial. Dr. ActionNewsJaxKeith Knutson has been working with breast cancer patients for about ten years. "In addition to me being touched, the burden breast cancer has on society keeps me going," said Knutson.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The clinical trial, which will enroll 280 patients at multiple clinical sites, is expected to begin early in 2016. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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September 4th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

New York Times
New Alternatives to Statins Add to a Quandary on Cholesterol
By Gina Kolata

Doctors have long faced a conundrum in prescribing statins to lower cholesterol and heart attack risk: The drugs are cheap and effective for most people, and large, rigorous clinical trials have found minimal side effects. But as many as 25 percent of those who try them complain of muscle The New York Times newspaper logopain. Others stop taking the drugs because, they say, they cause a hazy memory or sleep problems, among other side effects not documented in studies...At the Mayo Clinic here, Dr. Stephen L. Kopecky, who directs a program for statin-intolerant patients, says he is well aware that middle-age and older adults who typically need statins may blame the drugs for aches, pains and memory losses that have other causes. He also knows his patients peruse the Internet, which is replete with horror stories about the dangers of statins.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage:
Star Tribune  — Pricey new cholesterol drugs pose new dilemma in treatment; Houston Chronicle, Massachusetts TelegramNewsmax Health 

Related coverage:
The Science Times — New Drug To Lower Bad Cholesterol Levels; Healthcare Business Daily News

Context: Doctors in the Statin Intolerance Service within the Cardiovascular Health Clinic at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota treat people who have statin side effects or a family history of statin intolerance. Steven Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. His research interests include cardiovascular clinical trials primarily in coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Reuters
New guidelines for cancer doctors aim to make sense of gene tests
by Julie Steenhuysen

"It's like having an all-you-can-eat buffet, and is that a good thing?" said Dr. Noralane Lindor, an oncologist and geneticist from Mayo Clinic Reuters LogoCenter for Individualized Medicine and an ASCO Prevention Committee member. Lindor was one of several authors of the guidelines issued on Monday by ASCO and published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Context: Noralane Lindor, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and genticist. Her research interests include cancer genetics, with an emphasis on hereditary predisposition to cancers, as well as the clinical translation of genetic findings to medical care.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

KIMT
Do you have good posture?
by DeeDee Stiepan

The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is offering posture screenings for people to see how good or bad their posture is and how poor posture can take its toll. “YouKIMT know, our body is kind of like a stack of Jenga blocks and as we lean forward we’re putting a lot of strain on our back and that creates chronic back pain. It actually creates compression into our organs as well and so we’re not breathing as effectively,” explains Jane Hein, a Wellness Physical Therapist at The Healthy Living Center.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage:  Arizona Daily Sun

Related coverage:
Fox 2 St. Louis — The Mayo Clinic’s “Healthy Living Program; KITV, NC8 Washington D.C., Fox 2 News Detroit

Context: Jane Hein is a wellness physical therapist with the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Arizona Republic’s Living Well
Proton Beam Therapy at Mayo Clinic
by Susan Lynne Fuchs

The first services – adult and pediatric radiation oncology – have been launched at the Valley’s newest cancer center, a $310 million, 400,000-Arizona Republic newspaper logosquare-foot facility rising on Mayo Clinic’s northeast Phoenix campus.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:
Arizona Republic — Arizona Cancer Center faces crowded cancer-care market by Ken Alltucker – The five-story, 220,000-square-foot center, which opened to patients Aug. 24, follows the path of other major cancer-care providers whose facilities have sprouted in metro Phoenix in recent years. Banner MD Anderson, Mayo Clinic and Cancer Treatment Centers of America all have poured tens of millions of dollars into openings or expansions.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota this past June and in Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Rochester Magazine
Mayo's "renegade" research team
by Paul Scott

Montori’s think-tank-within-a-clinic is known as the Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit, or KER Unit, for short. It’s the sort of official sounding name that nearly begs for a disco ball until you realize it’s actually pronounced “Care Unit,” and that it has been responsible for aRochester Magazine logo globally-contagious shift in thinking about what matters the most in medicine.

Reach: Rochester Magazine is a monthly publication that serves the residents and visitors of Rochester, Minnesota. The magazine averages more than 56,000 readers each month.

Context: Victor Montori, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Montori's research takes place in the Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Montori is interested in how knowledge is produced, disseminated and taken up in practice — and how this leads to optimal health care delivery and patient outcomes. Dr. Montori also serves as director of community engagement and of late stage translational research for the Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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June 5th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

The Guardian (UK)
Apple previews new mobile software iOS 8 at WWDC 2014
By Alex Hern

Apple demonstrated iOS 8, its newest version of its operating system for iPhones and iPads, at its worldwide developers conference in San Francisco. The new OS introduced a new Health app to offer "a single comprehensive overview of your fitness," as well asThe Guardian newspaper logo
updates to features including Mail and Notification Centre. The Health app integrates with apps such as Nike+, or even apps made by healthcare providers, to let users manage their health through their iOS devices. "We believe Apple's healthkit will revolutionise how the healthcare industry interacts with people," said John Noseworthy, CEO of the prestigious Mayo Clinic hospital.

Reach: The Guardian is the world's 3rd largest newspaper website. US traffic topped 12.7 million monthly unique users in June 2013.

Additional Coverage:

Pioneer Press, Apple, Mayo partner on iOS health monitor
MPR, The doctor will see your phone now
Forbes, Apple Gives Epic And Mayo Bear Hug With HealthKit
CNBC, The OpenTable for doctors hits the office
KAAL,  Mayo Teaming with Apple on Breakthrough Technology
Post-Bulletin,  Apple, Mayo Clinic team up

Financial Post, ReadWrite, Florida Times-Union, Star Tribune, Modern Healthcare, FOX News, Huffington Post, WCCO, Washington Post, SELF magazine, Reuters, NY Times, NBC News, FOX10 Phoenix, CNBC, Chicago Tribune, CBS News, Bloomberg, ABC News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution (AP), BringMeTheNews, Forbes, Times of India, Mashable, MedCity News, Daily Mail UK, Trust.org, Trust.orgHeartScore, MediaPostPost-Bulletin, International Business Times UK, InformationWeek, Star Tribune, KIMT, Wall Street Journal

Context: During this week's  keynote address at the Worldwide Developers Conference 2014Apple, Inc., unveiled HealthKit, a digital repository for various types of health-fitness related data. Apple highlighted HealthKit through a new Mayo Clinic app under development that would offer users a more personalized experience and make their health data more actionable in supporting healthier lifestyles. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Mayo Clinic targets $3 billion for research funding
by Coleen Michele Jones

Mayo Clinic is publically kicking off a capital campaign to raise $3 billion by 2017 for biomedical research and education across its three campuses, including Jacksonville…“We’re partnering Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logowith benefactors to bring medical breakthroughs which will enhance patient care,” said Dr. Michael Camilleri, executive dean for the department of development at Mayo’s headquarters in Minnesota. “As we have seen, reliable funding is the best way to ensure better outcomes.”

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Previous Coverage in May 15 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in May 8 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care, Mayo Clinic announced on May 8 a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on the Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Arizona Republic (HealthDay)
Flying after surgery may be safe, experts say

If you're returning home after having chest surgery at an out-of-town hospital, flying is as safe as driving, an expert says.  It's widely believed that ground travel is safer than air travel after chest surgery, but a Arizona Republic newspaper logorecent study by Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon Stephen Cassivi found that isn't true. He also concluded there is no reason to wait for weeks after chest surgery to fly home.

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Previous Coverage in May 29 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Summer travel isn’t for vacation alone. For some people, it may include a trip to an out-of-town hospital for surgery. If you are traveling for chest surgery, you may wonder whether it is safer to return home by car or plane. A new Mayo Clinic study found that, contrary to conventional wisdom, air travel is just as safe as ground travel after chest surgery, and there is often no reason to wait for weeks after an operation to fly home. Lead study author Stephen Cassivi, M.D., a Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon, offers these five tips for safer, more comfortable travel home after surgery on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Delta Sky Magazine
Wiping out Cancer
by Karen Springen

Leading doctors take stock of the current state of cancer care and the exciting developments on the Delta Sky magazine logohorizon…Dr. Sameer Keole, a radiation oncologist specializing in pediatric cancer at the Mayo Clinic, has used proton therapy to treat kids with cancer and estimates that 3,000 to 3,500 U.S. kids could be treated with proton beam therapy each year.

Reach: Delta Sky is the inflight magazine for Delta Airlines. The magazine has a circulation of more than 600,000. Delta Sky online serves as the online companion to its parent magazine.

Context: Mayo Clinic Cancer Center combines personalized cancer treatment with leading-edge research to provide patients with unparalleled cancer care.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

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Tags: "Mayo's Pain Reliever" pills, ABC News, ADHD, ALTTO, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Amy Donohue, AP, Apple, Arizona Republic, Arthritis Research UK, ASCO, Associated Press


May 15th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


NY Times
AGING AMERICA: Exercise as the Fountain of Youth

…Exercise may be the closest thing we have to a fountain of youth, one of the best ways to age happy and well. "The mantra now is, exercise is a drug" — able, like some medications

The New York Times newspaper logo are, to prevent and treat a host of age-related ailments, said Dr. Andrea Cheville, a Mayo Clinic expert on exercise in the elderly.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Star Tribune (AP), KAAL, ABC News, Huffington Post Canada, Monterey Herald, Ottawa Citizen

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is an expert on exercise in the elderly.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KSTP
On the Road with Jason Davis: Mayo Clinic Celebrates 150 Years

KSTP's Jason Davis goes on the road to Arizona, Florida and Minnesota fKSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logor his feature on Mayo Clinic. This was Davis's last report for his On the Road series before retiring at the end of May 2014 after nearly four decades with KSTP.  This year, one of Minnesota's best known institutions celebrates its 150th anniversary. It was in 1864 that Dr. William Worral Mayo started his small clinic in Rochester, and just how that small practice grew into a world-renowned facility is a fascinating story. Jason Davis went on the road to learn about the past, present and future of Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Additional Mayo Clinic 150th Anniversary and history of Mayo coverage:

KTTC, Mayo Clinic celebrates 150 years by Courtney Sturgeon

KARE11, Recovering Brokaw hosts Mayo's 150th anniversary 

KTTC, The early beginnings of the Mayo Clinic Mid-century advancements, Recent history

KTTC, Dr. John Noseworthy reflects on 150 years of Mayo Clinic success 

MPR, Mayo's mark: 5 innovations that changed health care 

Post-Bulletin, Jordanian king touched many in Rochester 

Post-Bulletin, Descendants of Dr. W.W. Mayo visit family home 

Post-Bulletin, Massive medical team focused 'millimeter by millimeter' to separate twins 

Post-Bulletin, 150th anniversary: Mayo Clinic helped U.S., allies win World War II 

Post-BulletinOddchester: 150 years in less than three hours

Greenhouse Grower, Mayo Clinic Will Promote Coreopsis ‘Electric Avenue’ As Its Flower Of Hope

Perishable NewsMayo Clinic Chooses Yellow Coreopsis As Its 'Flower Of Hope'

WCCO, Star Tribune, Big News Network, WCCO AM, Coon Rapids Herald, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin

Context: On July 1, 1907, Dr. Henry Plummer and Mabel Root, Dr. Plummer's assistant, inaugurated Mayo's system of patient registration and medical record keeping. The single-unit record was central to the new system. It brought together all of a patient's records -- clinical visits, hospital stays, laboratory tests and notes -- in a single file that traveled with the patient and was stored in a central repository. This simple system quickly became the standard for medical record keeping around the world. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Rebecca Eisenman, Kelley Luckstein

 

FOX47
Mayo Clinic announces campaign to raise $3 billion
by Mary McGuire

Mayo Clinic is looking to the future in a big way as it launches a camFox 47 TV station logopaign to raise $3 billion. It's all part of the "You are ... the campaign for Mayo Clinic" being announced Thursday. The goal of the campaign is to raise $3 billion by the end of 2017 to strengthen patient care, research and education at Mayo.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Becker’s Hospital Review, KROC-AM

Previous coverage

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care, Mayo Clinic today announced a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on the Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic trial: Massive blast of measles vaccine wipes out cancer
by Dan Browning

Stacy Erholtz was out of conventional treatment options for blood cancer last June when she underwent an exStar Tribune Health newspaper logoperimental trial at the Mayo Clinic that injected her with enough measles vaccine to inoculate 10 million people. The 50-year-old Pequot Lakes mother is now part of medical history…But the experiment provides the “proof of concept” that a single, massive dose of intravenous viral therapy can kill cancer by overwhelming its natural defenses, according to Dr. Stephen Russell, a professor of molecular medicine who spearheaded the research at Mayo.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
KARE11Minn. woman's cancer in remission thanks to measles 

Washington Post, Woman’s cancer killed by measles virus in unprecedented trial

MPR, How the Mayo Clinic handles potential patients in clinical trials

USA TODAY, Massive dose of measles vaccine clears woman's cancer

WGN-TV, Mayo Clinic: Woman’s cancer cured with huge dose of measles vaccine

International Business Times UK, Mayo Clinic Landmark Trial: Measles Vaccine Wipes out Cancer in Patient

Daily BeastMeasles Vaccine Killed Patient's Cancer

MashableMeasles Vaccine Wipes Out Cancer in Groundbreaking Test

UPI.com, Massive dose of measles vaccine knocks out woman's cancer

azcentral.comMeasles vaccine cures woman's cancer in study

Reuters, CNN, International Business Times, La Parisienne (France), Le Monde (France), Telegraph (UK), Globe and Mail, Fox 19 (OH), Examiner, Detroit Free Press, Green Bay Press Gazette, ABC 15 Arizona, Fox News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, News 4 Jax, L’Economiste, 11 Alive Atlanta, Le Figaro (France), Yahoo! France, Le Huffington Post, ABC.es (Spain), Access Atlanta, Honolulu Star-Advertiser, Yahoo! Health, Business Standard India, France 24, Yahoo! News UK & Ireland (AFP), Yahoo! MexicoKTTCNational PostDaily MailThe BlazeThe Daily BeastRefinery 29

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: 11 Alive Atlanta, 3-D printing, 3D printers, Abbigail Carlsen, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC.es (Spain), ABC15, Access Atlanta, Advanced Primary Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic in Florida, aerobic activity, aging, American Academy of Neurology


March 28th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

TPT Almanac
Mayo CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, capitol reporters, Rochester mayor, Syrian crisis, political scientist panel

TPT's public affairs program, Almanac, broadcast its first remote program on March 21 from Phillips Hall at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. More than 400 people were inTPT attendance for the live broadcast.

Context: Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock timeslot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running primetime TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of record that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program. Almanac has also earned six regional Emmys awards.

Related coverage: 
Post-BulletinPublic TV's 'Almanac' broadcasts live from Mayo Clinic

InsuranceNewsNet
Public TV's 'Almanac' broadcasts live from Mayo Clinic

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic aims for more Pentagon funding
by Corey Mitchell

The Mayo Clinic, with military ties that stretch back to the Civil War, is making a push to more aggressively pursue a larger share of the $900 million-plus spent annually by the Star-Tribune-Logo-300x45Pentagon on medical research. The medical giant has opened a Department of Defense Medical Research Office in Rochester and hired McAllister & Quinn, a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying firm, to help procure more federal funding. Dr. Peter Amadio, medical director of Mayo’s DOD Medical Research Office, said that while Mayo has some defense contracts, there’s “an opportunity for us to do better.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
Minneapolis /St. Paul Business Journal, Mayo goes to battle for military funds 

BringMeTheNews, Mayo Clinic angling for more Pentagon funds

Context: Mayo Clinic has opened the Mayo Clinic Department of Defense (DOD) Medical Research Office. The office, in Rochester, MN., is designed to be an easy to use single point of contact, linking the research needs of the DOD with Mayo Clinic investigators capable of addressing those needs, and to improve access to funding to serve DOD research and development priorities. The office oversees Mayo Clinic's portfolio of DOD-funded research, which has evolved over Mayo’s long and successful partnership with the U.S. government. Today, dozens of Mayo Clinic researchers receive funding for special projects that use new technologies and innovative solutions to support military readiness, functional restoration and rehabilitation after complex injuries, restore health and improve wellness of military populations.

“This is a continuation of Mayo Clinic’s 150-year legacy with the DOD,” says Peter Amadio, M.D., director of the office, and an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic. “The office and website are designed to strengthen this long-standing relationship and to not only match DOD research needs with the expertise of Mayo Clinic, but also accelerate the entire process from proposal development to funding to delivery of a completed project. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

WCCO
Boy With Melanoma Raises Thousands Making Bracelets To Battle Cancer
by Susan-Elizabeth Littlefield

There are certain statistics you want your kids to be a part of. This is not one of them. Less than 10 children in this country have a form of childhood melanoma, and one of them lives in the Twin Cities metro. Graham Fowler, of Fridley, Minn., is a 10-year-old with Spitzoid Melanoma. He’s being treated at the Mayo Clinic and has had eight surgeries.CBS Minnesota

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Context: Melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, develops in the cells (melanocytes) that produce melanin — the pigment that gives your skin its color. Melanoma can also form in your eyes and, rarely, in internal organs, such as your intestines. Specialists at Mayo Clinic work as a team to make a prompt melanoma diagnosis so you can begin treatment as soon as possible. Mayo Clinic's surgical pathologists and dermatopathologists are respected for their expertise in identifying melanoma stage, depth and severity, which is critical for selecting the most appropriate treatment combination.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

Florida Times-Union (Subscription required)
Medical tourism provides big economic boost to Jacksonville economy
by Charlie Patton

In the two weeks they’ve been here, they’ve done quite a bit of sightseeing, going to the St. Augustine Alligator Farm and making a day trip to Disney World….But the purpose of their Florida Times-Union newspaper logovisit isn’t fun. They came to Jacksonville because they were seeking cancer treatment for James at the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute…William C. Rupp, the chief executive officer of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, which has an economic impact in the Jacksonville area of about $1.6 billion, said that about 43,000 of the approximately 1000,000 patients treated at the clinic each year qualify as medical tourists.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
St. Augustine Record; Travel Weekly, Can medical tourism provide a shot in the arm for Fla.? 

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Phoenix Business Journal
Inside the Reporter’s Notebook
By Angela Gonzales

Phoenix Business JournalPhoenix Business Journal senior healthcare reporter Angela Gonzales interviews Dr. Wyatt Decker.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Context: Wyatt Decker, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Vice President and CEO at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh
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Tags: A.L.S., ABC News, Aby Bedtka, Aetna InteliHealth, Afghanistan, African-American men and cancer survival rates, allergies, Almanac, alzheimer's disease, american heart association, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Aerospace Medicine


June 22nd, 2012

Nick Cannon’s Autoimmune Disease: ‘America’s Got Talent’ Host Opens Up About His Health

By

Nick Cannon is opening up about the series of health problems he's faced over the last couple of months.  The 31-year-old has revealed that the kidney disease he was hospitalized for earlier this year was a result of an autoimmune disease, People magazine reported…Lupus in particular is when the immune system attacks the body's tissues and organs, according to the Mayo Clinic, and is most known for the butterfly-wing-like rash that appears on the face. Symptoms of lupus are different from case to case, but common symptoms include fever, fatigue, joint pain, the facial rash, chest pain, headaches, dry eyes and skin lesions, the Mayo Clinic.

 

Huffington Post

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Tags: kidney disease, lupus, Nick Cannon


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