Items Tagged ‘multiple myeloma’

January 15th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly News Summary

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in tMayo Clinic in the News Logohe News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic spending $92.7 million on buildings, equipment
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic announced Tuesday a plan for spending $92.7 million on facilities and equipment that includes more private rooms in Rochester, better roads near its hospital in Florida and a new airplane for transporting patients. The spending plan was approved in November by the boardStar Tribune newspaper logo of directors at Mayo, which routinely makes large infrastructure investments across its six-state network of hospitals and clinics.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Bloomberg News online, KTTC.com, KXLT.com, Post-Bulletin

Context:  An investment of $92.7 million in facilities and equipment across Mayo Clinic through 2017 will ensure that patients from across the globe find the world-class accommodations and whole-person care they have come to expect. These efforts reinforce Mayo Clinic’s level of commitment to the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative by enhancing the patient experience and positioning Mayo Clinic as the premiere global destination for health and wellness. “Our hospital projects will help us meet Mayo Clinic’s responsibility to combine safe and comprehensive care with a seamless, high-quality experience for our patients and their families,” says Amy Williams, M.D., medical director of hospital operations. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

TIME
Here’s What 10 Experts Think of the Government’s New Diet Advice
by Alexandra Sifferlin

“The 2015 Dietary Guidelines build upon the 2010 Dietary Guidelines to provide information to shape policy, design food and nutrition programs, and to help Americans make healthy dietary choices. However, although the Guidelines are required and purported to be “based on Time magazine logothe preponderance of current scientific and medical knowledge”, they did not include some of the recommendations of the Scientific Advisory Committee and therefore do not describe an optimal dietary pattern. Despite some of these shortcomings, it is important to recognize that for most people, following the Dietary Guidelines will improve their nutritional status and health. — Dr. Donald Hensrud, a physician at Mayo Clinic and editor of the Mayo Clinic Diet.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet Book.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

The Wall Street Journal
Can Echinacea Melt Winter’s Colds and Flu?
by Laura Johannes

“If you are getting plenty of fluids and plenty of rest and you want to take echinacea, it seems like a reasonable thing to do and unlikely to harm you,” says Pritish K. Tosh, associate professor at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But people at risk for flu complications, such as pneumonia or bronchitis, should instead take an antiviral medication such as Tamiflu, he adds.WSJ Banner

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert. His research is focused in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Florida Times-Union
$10 million gift from grateful patient will underwrite Mayo Clinic's neurosurgery residency program
by Charlie Patton

As he waited to undergo spinal surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville on Feb. 17, 2012, John Sonnentag promised himself that if everything Florida Times-Union newspaper logowent well, he would make significant gift to the hospital. Additional coverage: Post Bulletin, Bloomberg News Online

Reach: 
The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: A $10 million gift from a grateful patient and his wife will provide funding for a neurosurgery residency program on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus to help address the nationwide shortage of specialists in head and spine procedures. “There’s a tremendous need for training neurosurgeons in this country,” says Robert Wharen, Jr., M.D., chair of Neurosurgery at Mayo Clinic in Florida. “There is now a shortage of neurosurgeons, and that shortage is actually going to get worse, because there are more neurosurgeons retiring over the next 10 years than we are able to train.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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Tags: ABCnews.com, ALS Stem Cell Trial, asthma, asthma and shingles, Austin Herald, BBC News, Becker’s Hospital Review, birth control pills, Bloomberg, breast cancer screening, BringMeTheNews, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)


January 8th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in tMayo Clinic in the News Logohe News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to

Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

FOX Los Angeles
Dr. David Dodick of the Mayo Clinic talks concussions in sports

… So what are the truths about concussions and sports? The Mayo Clinic, hoping to get some answers out there have made soGood Day LAme of their experts available this morning. Joining us from their facility in Phoenix was Dr. David Dodick - Medical Director of the Headache Program and the Sports Neurology and Concussion Program.

Reach: Good Day-L.A. is an Emmy award-winning morning show which serves the greater Los Angeles area.

Additional coverage: Fox 11 Los Angeles   David Dodick of the Mayo Clinic talks concussions in sports

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an expert in concussion care and director of the Mayo Clinic Concussion Program.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Wall Street Journal
New Weapons in the Fight Against Multiple Myeloma
by Ron Winslow

Few types of cancer research have witnessed more progress in the past decade than the fight against the blood cancer known as multiple WSJ Bannermyeloma… “Of all the cancers, in terms of progress in the last 10 years, multiple myeloma is at the top of the list,” says S. Vincent Rajkumar, professor of medicine and a hematologist/oncologist at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context:  S. Vincent Rajkumar, M.D. is a hematologist with  Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

MPR
The loneliness of the Alzheimer’s care giver
by Bob Collins

When I fill in for Kerri Miller on Wednesday, I’m doing a segment on Alzheimer’s. If there’s a more despicable disease, I’m unaware of it. Perhaps MPR2that’s why you don’t hear a lot of politicians criticizing a huge increase in Alzheimer’s research. “It’s perhaps some of the most encouraging news we’ve had on Alzheimer’s disease in several years,” Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center, told the Washington Post. “This is truly very, very exciting in the field.”

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

MPR
The story of the year 2015
by Bob Collins

…I was impressed yesterday with the show we did on immunotherapy (you can find the podcast version here). It was sparked by President Carter’s recovery from cancer, thanks — it would seem — to a drug called Keytruda, which appears to be a “magic bullet” that allows the immune system to attack cancer, and then turns it off before it attacks something it shouldn’t be attacking. Here’s the thing: My guests were cancerMPR News logo researchers: Dr. Roxana Dronca of Mayo Clinic and Dr. Christopher Pennell of the University of Minnesota, who, like all cancer researchers, get up every day and go to work, hoping for success, but more often find failure. That’s the nature of success. “I’m not the most patient person in the real life, but I learned that I can be patient in research and in the clinic,” Dr. Dronca said.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Roxana Dronca, M.D. is an oncologist with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

CBS News
7 ways to recapture happiness at family holidays
by Mary Brophy Marcus

"Home for the holidays" may conjure lovely images of grandma baking cookies, piles of gifts, and long snowy walks with loved ones. But for many, the picture may not be as lovely: tight budgets, long work hours, CBS News Logoillness, stress, and long-running family tensions may dampen spirits. And long walks may be the last thing you want to take with certain curmudgeonly relatives. "Holidays are physical, emotional, and financial stress tests," Dr. Amit Sood of the Mayo Clinic told CBS News. "What should be enjoyable becomes a stressful event." Sood, a professor of medicine and the author of the books "The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living" and "The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness," said many people try too hard to overachieve during holiday time.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Star Tribune
The slow growth of a state biotech sector and the rise of a Destination Medical Center
by Matt McKinney

…In Rochester, city officials and others are hoping to turn that exodus into an influx of promising biotech researchers and companies. Central to that effort is Destination Medical Center, the ambitious, 20-year multibillion-dollar plan to remake the Mayo Clinic and the city itself into a global hub for health care and medical research…The Mayo Clinic will soon open its own clean-room facility for the production ofStar Tribune newspaper logo regenerative medicine products. Dr. Atta Behfar, director of the cardiac regeneration program and the Advanced Product Incubator, said it should begin manufacturing in the first quarter of next year.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: The Advanced Product Incubator (API) establishes cell-free platforms to develop regenerative therapies. Built according to Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMP) set forth by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the API adheres to rigorous standards of facility design, monitoring and process control. This multidisciplinary, first-of-its-kind facility bridges teams of researchers and physicians with scientific and industry experts to accelerate product development. Atta Behfar, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Behfar's lab uses state-of-the-art technologies developed at Mayo Clinic to understand heart disease at its most elemental level. With this understanding, Dr. Behfar and his colleagues are doing cardiovascular regeneration research with the aim of developing novel therapies to prevent and cure chronic heart conditions.

Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

 

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Tags: 3D Print, ABC News, Aden Munson, Adopt a Family, AK Antony, Alaska Dispatch News, Alaska Natives and colorectal cancer, Alaska News Dispatch, ALN Mag, Alzheimer’s care giver, Andrea Shaw, Angela Murad


December 18th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in tMayo Clinic in the News Logohe News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Note:  This edition of Mayo Clinic in the News will be the last issue of 2015. We will see you again in early 2016.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Is Lab Testing the ‘Wild West’ of Medicine?
by Thomas Burton

Descending in darkness, a FedEx cargo jet touched down on a runway at 5:44 a.m., filled with hundreds of identical, raspberry-colored boxes. A truWSJ Bannerck painted the same color soon sped the boxes, all human blood and cell samples, to more than 40 laboratories at the nearby Mayo Clinic, based here…Dr. Michael O’Sullivan, creator of Mayo Medical Laboratories, the operation that tests outside samples, also was its original delivery network. He drove around southern Minnesota to pick up vials and slides. Before long, the business grew large enough to support a fleet of vans. A sales force was added by 1986 and now has more than 100 employees.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage:

Wall Street Journal — Video: Inside the Mayo Clinic Diagnostic Testing Labs; Yahoo! Health Canada

Becker’s Hospital Review — FDA wants to crack down on lab-developed tests: 3 things to know by Emily Rappleye…2. Cost

Context: Mayo Medical Laboratories is a global reference laboratory operating within Mayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. Mayo Medical Laboratories staff collaborates with clinicians to provide knowledge of, and access to, the latest testing and treatment guidance. We provide clinical laboratory testing to support health care systems, hospitals, specialty clinics, and other clinical laboratories all working toward expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

USA Today
Study suggests link between flavor in e-cigarettes and lung disease
by Mary Bowerman

Researchers at the Harvard University T.H. Chan USA Today newspaper logoSchool of Public Health
tested 51 types of flavored e-cigarettes and flavor canisters for diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-pentanedione; three chemicals known to cause respiratory problems in factory workers…With around 7,000 e-cigarette flavors on the market, consumers are essentially at the mercy of the manufacturers, with little hope of knowing what chemicals are used in the products, according to Taylor Hays, director of Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center. “There are no FDA regulations on these products. It’s the Wild West of e-cigarettes,” Hays told USA TODAY Network.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Additional coverage:
USA TODAY — Survey: Teens still intrigued by e-cigarettes; KARE11Times of India

Context: Dr. Taylor Hays is director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center. The Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center (NDC) was one of the first centers in the country to focus exclusively on treatments for tobacco dependence. The NDC's model of care has now become the standard in many medical centers around the United States. The treatment team at the center offers you support and works with you to help develop the motivation and skills needed to stop using tobacco.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein


Wisconsin Public Radio
Physician Burnout Is Bad For Patients

A new study by the Mayo Clinic shows that burnout among physicians is bad, and getting worse. We find out how that affects patients, and what needs to change. Host:Wisconsin Public Radio  Veronica Rueckert Guest(s):  Tait Shanafelt Producer(s): Judith Siers-Poisson.

Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio consists of 34 radio stations programmed by seven regional studios and carrying programming on three content networks: the Ideas Network, the NPR News and Classical Network and the All Classical Network.

Additional coverage: Healthcare Dive

Context: Burnout among U.S. physicians is getting worse. An update from a three-year study evaluating burnout and work-life balance shows that American physicians are worse off today than they were three years earlier. These dimensions remained largely unchanged among U.S. workers in general, resulting in a widening gap between physicians and U.S. workers in other fields. The study conducted by Mayo Clinic researchers in partnership with the American Medical Association compared data from 2014 to metrics they collected in 2011 and found that now more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing professional burnout. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Burnout manifests as emotional exhaustion, loss of meaning in work, and feelings of ineffectiveness,” says Tait Shanafelt, M.D., “What we found is that more physicians in almost every specialty are feeling this way and that’s not good for them, their families, the medical profession, or patients.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
Don’t forget about vaccinations, even if you think you’re too old for them
by Emily Sohn

R.D. Zimmerman had been to northern Africa and the Caribbean, spent lots of time in Russia, and visited Mexico multiple times.Washington Post newspaper logo But a couple of weeks after returning home to Minneapolis in April from a visit to Cabo, on the southern tip of Baja California, he developed a persistent cough that landed him in the emergency room with an unexpected diagnosis: hepatitis A…But anecdotal evidence suggests that Zimmerman’s experience is common, says Greg Poland, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group in Rochester, Minn. He sees patients every week who come home from trips with illnesses they could have avoided, including hep A, which often comes from consuming contaminated food or water.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. The Vaccine Research Group works to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
Proposed budget for Alzheimer’s research may rise by over 50 percent
by Tara Bahrampour

The spending deal Congress reached Tuesday night includes an unprecedented increase in funding for Alzheimer’s rWashington Post newspaper logoesearch: $350 million in fiscal 2016. If approved by the White House, it will increase government spending on the disease by over 50 percent… “It’s perhaps some of the most encouraging news we’ve had on Alzheimer’s disease in several years,” said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center. “This is truly very, very exciting in the field.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Under the federal spending bill, released this week, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) would receive $200 million for President Obama’s Precision Medicine initiative and a $350 million increase for Alzheimer’s research funding in 2016. “We applaud the agreement for the first increase in research funding for the NIH in over a decade. This significant act recognizes the importance of funding research and innovation in our nation,” says Gregory Gores, M.D., executive dean for Research at Mayo Clinic. “The increase in funding and commitment to research in areas such as precision medicine and Alzheimer’s disease would support discovery and translation to bring forward new treatments for our patients.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Sharon Theimer

 

News4Jax
Flu deaths reported; Doctors urge people get shot
by Ashley Mitchem

Doctors are encouraging people to get the flu shot as new details emerge about some of the first flu deaths of the season… Vandana Bhide with News Jax 4 LogoMayo Clinic believes the flu is just beginning to spread this season. “I think it's early in the season, so we're going to see more activity in January and February,” said Bhide.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Hospital Internal Medicine physician. More information on flu shots can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

ABC15 Arizona
Mayo Clinic Cardiologist talks about blood pressure

Todd Hurst, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of Sonoran Living Live to discuss the prevalence of high blood pressure is in theABC affiliate, channel 15 in Arizona U.S., simple life style changes that can help lower blood pressure and how you can easily monitor your blood pressure at home.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Additional coverage on ABC15:

ABC15 Arizona — Rally for Red: You've seen the commercials, but what is A-fib?

ABC15 Arizona  — Mayo Clinic News Network: Reduce your blood pressure with these 10 tips from the Mayo Clinic 

Context: R. Todd Hurst, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

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Tags: a-fib or atrial fibrillation, ABC15 Arizona, Alzheimer's and dementia care, Alzheimer's Research, Alzheimer's Trial, American Medical Association, Autism Treatment cost coverage, Baltimore Sun, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, Becker’s Hospital Review, Behavioral Neurology at Mayo Clinic, beta amyloid


November 6th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News iMayo Clinic in the News Logos a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

NY Times
For Statins, Cholesterol Care May Be Just the Start
by Jane Brody

…However, not everyone responds well to statins. About 5 percent of people have distressing muscle aches, and some experience an unhealthy rise in blood sugar.The New York Times newspaper logo Furthermore, Dr. Stephen L. Kopecky, a preventive cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said that about 15 percent to 20 percent of people were “hyporesponders” – their LDL level is only minimally reduced or actually goes up on a statin. They may be good candidates for one of three other newer drugs that lower cholesterol by different mechanisms.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Steven Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. His research interests include cardiovascular clinical trials primarily in coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
Health care consolidation: Which way is up, and why are we going there?
by Ronald Wirtz

Health care providers are Fed Gazette Logolooking to scale—in a variety of forms—to meet evolving market demands and regulatory pressures …Pointing to the likes of Mayo Clinic and Cleveland Clinic, highly reputable health care systems, “the common seed is that they employ physicians,” said Anderson. “This allows you to design a care model where the physician and hospital have the same stake in the outcome. They are bound together.”

 

Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
Beyond mergers and acquisitions: When providers marry but don't live together
by Ronald Wirtz

More than a thousand miles separate Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and Livingston HealthCare, in Livingston, Mont., and possibly as much virtual distance lies betweenFed Gazette Logo their organizational size, structure and complexity. The Mayo Clinic owns 70 hospitals in a handful of states, employs more than 50,000 people and has a worldwide reputation…Over the previous two decades, Mayo Clinic “had acquired a number of hospitals throughout the Midwest” and today has a presence in 70 communities in a multistate region, according to Jeff Bolton, Mayo chief administrative officer. But in the past five years or so, he said, “we’ve moved away from an active M&A strategy.”

Sidebars:

Beyond mergers and acquisitions: When providers marry but don't live together

Accountable care organizations: The shift from volume to value, Loss of independent physicians: Follow the money

Reach: Fedgazette is written for bankers, economists, legislators, educators and anyone interested in issues that affect the ninth Federal Reserve District economy. It is published to share economic information with the district, which includes Montana, North and South Dakota, Minnesota, northwestern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The magazine is published every other month.

Context: Mayo Clinic launched Mayo Clinic Care Network in 2011. The network consists of more than 30 member organizations across the United States, and in Mexico and Singapore. Network members remain independent, but share a common philosophy, commitment and mission to improve the quality and delivery of health care.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Florida Times-Union
How Mayo Clinic is ramping up medical tourism in Jacksonville
by Colleen Michele Jones

It’s been nearly a year since Dr. Gianrico Farrugia took over the helm of the Mayo Florida Times-Union newspaper logoClinic in Florida as CEO of the Jacksonville campus of the world-renowned institution based in Rochester, Minnesota. At a luncheon Tuesday hosted by the World Affairs Council of Jacksonville, Farrugia spoke about how under his leadership the center is ramping up ways to make Northeast Florida a destination for medical tourism.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. spoke at a luncheon hosted by the World Affairs Council of Jacksonville and  spoke about how under his leadership the center is ramping up ways to make Northeast Florida a destination for medical tourism. Dr. Farrugia is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

KJZZ Ariz.
Joseph Sirven: Are We Overprescribing Antibiotics?

“Dr. Sirven, would you mind writing a prescription for antibiotics?” asked a patient. “Oh, I don’t feel comfortable doing that unless I’m certain you really need them,” I KJZZ NPR -AZ Logosaid. The patient jokingly followed with, “Oh, come on, did you miss that day in med school? I have a runny nose and a cough, and an antibiotic would easily take care of it.”

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Context: Joseph Sirven, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Tags: "Authentic Connections", "liquid biopsies", ABC15 Phoenix, Alaska Star, anxiety disorders, appendicitis, asthmatics, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Augustine Herald, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, Becker’s Hospital Review CFO, bleach wipes


October 9th, 2015

In the News Mayo Clinic Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo CliniMayo Clinic in the News Logoc in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Forbes
How To Start Up Without Breaking Down
by Sarah Hedgecock

…Dr. Amit Sood, a Mayo Clinic physician and stress expert, gave some advice to Tran and any other entrepreneurs iForbes magazine logon
the room who may feel like their own companies are being taken out of their control: Don’t lose sight of why you’re doing what you’re doing. “You’re here helping the physicians experience low burnout and thereby delivering better care,” Sood told Tran. “If you can keep that meaningful to you, you’ll have much more resilience.”

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment. Dr. Sood talked to three 30 Under 30 alums at Forbes 30 Under 30 Summit about learning how to build a company while remaining emotionally healthy.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Fast Company
Mayo Clinic Launches Ambitious Study On How Being Indoors All The Time Affects Us
by Elizabeth Segran

…So who would subject themselves to this level of scrutiny for the good of science? The Mayo Clinic is tapping local communities that would be Fast Companywilling to be guinea pigs for different experiments. "Many people involved with Mayo see their mission as contributing to the furthering of medical science," Dr. Brent Bauer, medical director of the lab, tells Fast Company. "We've found that med students and Mayo employees are generally happy to participate in experiments like this."

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Additional coverage from Transform 2015:

Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal New Mayo Clinic lab is what the 'Big Brother' house wishes it could be 

KAAL — Medical Innovators Meet In Rochester For Major Conference 

MedCity News — Why I should have brought a box of tissues to Mayo Transform

MedCity News  If we don’t go outdoors enough, let’s optimize the indoors: Mayo Clinic and Delos debut Well Living Lab at Transform 

MedCity News — Common Practice’s conversational game ‘My Gift of Grace’ in action at Mayo Transform

Wired — Why the Mayo Clinic Modeled Its New Lab on a Stuffy Office 

Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal — Mayo Clinic names Big Challenge winners; Post-Bulletin, Modern Healthcare

Context: Exposure to indoor environments is at an all-time high. In fact, Americans spend more than 90 percent of their time indoors, whether at home, work, school, retail stores, fitness centers, health care facilities and more. But what many people don’t realize is that buildings, and everything in them, can affect human health and well-being. The Well Living Lab is a new research facility dedicated to studying these environments and creating healthier indoor spaces in which to live, work and play. More information about the Well Living Lab,Mayo Clinic Think Big Challenge and Transform 2015 can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Brian Kilen, Duska Anastasijevic

 

Florida Times-Union
Telemedicine evolving, impacting health care of state's over 65s
by Charlie Patton

The Federal Communication Commission brought its Connect2HealthFCC task force to the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville on WedneFlorida Times-Union newspaper logosday for a Broadband Health Summit… Telemedicine — the delivery of health care using telecommunications technologies such as video-conferencing — is something the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville has been doing since the 1990s, said Sarvam P. TerKonda, the clinic’s medical director for connected care in Florida.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: News4Jax, WJCT

Context: Sarvam TerKonda, M.D., is Mayo Clinic's medical director for Connected Care at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Connected Care integrates new care and service delivery models into traditional outpatient and inpatient care.

Contact: Cindy Weiss

 

Pioneer Press
Are heart problems more prevalent in runners?
by Richard Chin

…Some of these studies suggest a J- or U-shaped curve of the effects of exercise, in which mortality rates or heart problems are lowest for people Pioneer Press Sportswho engage in moderate levels of exercise, but they seem to rise at the ends of the spectrum in physical activity, among those who were sedentary or who are high-volume or high-intensity athletes. The studies "raise intriguing possibilities," but it's not time to hang up your running shoes, according to Todd Miller, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and medical director of Mayo's Sports Cardiology Clinic.

Reach: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has readers of more than 308,000 and has more than 511,111 Sunday newspaper readers. Its TwinCities.com website has more than 2.7 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Todd Miller, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and director of Mayo Clinic's Sports Cardiology Clinic.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

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September 17th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor: Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

News4Jax
Is it time to redefine high blood pressure?
by Crystal Moyer

Results of a study by the National Institutes of Health show a change in the treatment of high blood pressure may save lives…."The findings were surprising. I think theyNews Jax 4 Logo were even surprising to the folks that put this trial together,” said Dr. William Haley, principal investigator for Mayo Clinic. "Compared to the usual goal blood pressure that's been traditional, that a goal blood pressure of 120 was found to be associated with much lower risk of cardiovascular diseases and stroke and significant lowered risk of death."

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union, South Florida Reporter

Context: Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus was the nation’s second largest recruiting site, and largest in the Southeast, to participate in a landmark study that has found maintaining systolic blood pressure at a target of 120 greatly reduced the risk of cardiovascular complications and death in older adults with high blood pressure. “It’s been widely assumed that if you’re older, it’s OK to have a higher blood pressure, and this study challenges that notion,” said William E. Haley, M.D., principal investigator for Mayo Clinic of the SPRINT study and a nephrologist at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

First Coast News
Mayo Clinic awarded $13.3 million grant to test cancer vaccine
by Keitha Nelson

The Mayo Clinic has received a $13.3 million dollar grant from the U.S. Department of
First Coast News LogoDefense's Breast Cancer Research Program to fund a clinical trial. Researchers believe they now have a vaccine that could bring new found hope to those who have been told in the past that there are no targeted therapies for the disease they're fighting… "What we want to do is intervene during that period between conventional therapy and when they relapse and see if we can boost the body's immune defenses to fight off that relapse," said Dr. Keith Knutson in the Department of Immunology at Mayo Clinic's Florida campus.

Reach: First Coast News refers to three television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate; WTLV, the NBC affiliate; and WCWJ, the CW affiliate.

Additional coverage:

Florida Times-Union — Jacksonville's Mayo Clinic gets $13.2 million grant for new breast cancer study

KAAL — Mayo Receives Grant to Start Clinical Trials for Breast Cancer Vaccine

Jacksonville Daily Record, BioFlorida, Jacksonville Metro Bugle, KSTP

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The clinical trial, which will enroll 280 patients at multiple clinical sites, is expected to begin early in 2016. More information, including an interview with the principal investigator, Keith Knutson, Ph.D., can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

KIMT
School-based flu shot clinics

For the seventh year, Mayo Clinic is teaming up with the Olmsted Medical Center, Olmsted County Public Health and schools in the county for the school-basedKIMT LOGO clinics…“It can spread easily and then they bring it home to their family members and the community that are susceptible like the elderly and so vaccinating school aged children has helped dramatically decrease illness in the older population without them even being vaccinated,” says Jennifer Brickley, the Program Coordinator.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage: KTTC, FOX47

Context: “Everyone needs to get the flu vaccine every year, and, this year, the school-based immunization program of Olmsted County is bigger than ever, making it easier for more families to get their school children vaccinated on time,” says Robert Jacobson, M.D., pediatrician and medical director of the Employee and Community Health Immunization Program at Mayo Clinic. “This year, for the first time, we will bring the flu vaccine program to every middle school in the county and four of the seven high schools. That’s great news for parents.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

ABC News
Infant Twins Share Heartbreaking Cancer Diagnosis
by Nicole Pelletiere

After nine months in the womb together, a set of 3-month-old twin girls, Kenedi and ABC News logoKendal, are now sharing something else -- the same heartbreaking cancer diagnosis…On Aug. 17, following a bone marrow biopsy, Breyfogle received confirmation that her twins both had acute myeloid leukemia…On Aug. 19, Kenedi and Kendal were admitted into the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Two days later, the girls received their first rounds of chemotherapy. "This one is very rare and to have both identical twins have it at the same time, at least at the Mayo Clinic, in our group we have never seen it," said Dr. Shakila Khan, division chair of pediatric hematology-oncology at the clinic.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News. Its website receives more than 16.9 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Growing your baby,WJBF Ga., FOX News, FOX29 Philadelphia

Context: Experts from Mayo Clinic's Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology in Minnesota work as part of a multispecialty team to provide customized care for children and adolescents who have blood disorders or cancer. Shakila Khan, M.D., chairs the division and is a pediatric hematologist and oncologist.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

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August 7th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

WBUR Boston
Doctors Say High Cancer Costs Can't Continue

Guests: Andrew Pollack, biotechnology reporter for the New York Times.From The Reading List Mayo Clinic Proceedings: In Support of a Patient-Driven Initiative and Petition to Lower the High Price of Cancer Drugs— “The high prices of cancer drugs high prices of cancer drugs are affecting the care ofOn Point WBUR Boston patients with cancer and our health care system. In the United States, the average price of new cancer drugs increased 5- to 10-fold over 15 years, to more than $100,000 per year in 2012. A study by Howard et al documented the escalation in cancer drug prices by an average of $8500 a year over the past 15 years. The cost of drugs for each additional year lived (after adjusting for inflation) has increased from $54,000 in 1995 to $207,000 in 2013.”

Reach: NPR’s On Point is carried by 290 stations nationwide, with a weekly audience of 1.76 million. Each month, more than 320,000 visitors stop by this website and more than 2 million shows are downloaded from its iTunes podcast. WBUR-FM is Boston's NPR news station.

Additional coverage:

Huffington Post — Doctors Say Cancer Drug Prices Unaffordable

Previous coverage in July 30, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in July 24, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: A group of 118 of the nation's leading cancer experts have drafted a prescription for reducing the high cost of cancer drugs and voiced support for a patient-based grassroots movement demanding action on the issue. Their recommendations and support are outlined in a commentary, co-authored by the group, in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.  "High cancer drug prices are affecting the care of patients with cancer and our health care system," says lead author Ayalew Tefferi, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic. "The average gross household income in the U.S. is about $52,000 per year. For an insured patient with cancer who needs a drug that costs $120,000 per year, the out-of-pocket expenses could be as much as $25,000 to $30,000 – more than half their average household income." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Post-Bulletin
Singapore group joins Mayo Clinic Care Network
by Elizabeth Hurley

The Mayo Clinic Care Network recently announced that Singapore-based Raffles Medical Group will join the network. This marks the third Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperinternational member, and the first Asian member to join. The purpose of the network is to create a 'domestic and international footprint', said Dr. David Hayes, the network's medical director. "It gives Mayo the ability to know the other organization really well over the years; it extends Mayo's brand, hopefully; and it helps to create a complex care provider."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Mayo Clinic and Raffles Medical Group announced today that Singapore-based Raffles has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a growing network of organizations committed to better serving patients and their families through collaboration. Raffles Medical Group, the largest private group practice in Singapore, is the first health care organization in Asia to join the network. The formal agreement gives Raffles Medical Group access to the latest Mayo Clinic knowledge and promotes physician collaboration that complements local expertise. Through shared resources, more patients can get answers to complex medical questions while staying close to home. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Madson

 

KAAL
First Proton Therapy Patient Finishes Treatment at New Mayo Facility
by Katherine Johnson

The first Mayo Clinic patient to receive proton beam therapy in Minnesota finished her treatments Monday morning. Twenty-three-year-oldKAAL-TV-6 logo Jessica Brenholt was the first person to receive the treatments for her brain tumor at Mayo's new Proton Center.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage: KSTP

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota this past June and in Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic to offer more procedures through centers-of-excellence program
by Chris Snowbeck

Patients nationwide will be encouraged to seek treatment at “centers of excellence.” UnitedHealth Group is expanding a program with Mayo Star Tribune newspaper logoClinic that encourages patients across the country to travel to the Rochester-based health system for certain specialized procedures…“Our feeling is that the major cost savings, and the major benefit to the patient, is having an experienced team that arrives at the right diagnosis,” said Dr. Charles Rosen, the medical director for contracting and payer relations at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Optum and Mayo Clinic announced that health plans and employers participating in Optum’s leading Centers of Excellence (COE) program now have access to high-quality, cost-effective care from Mayo Clinic care providers who are experts in treating complex and rare conditions. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Joe Dangor, Karl Oestreich

 

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July 24th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

 

The Wall Street Journal
Doctors Object to High Cancer-Drug Prices

by Jeanne Whalen —More than 100 oncologists from top cancer hospitals around the U.S. have issued a harsh rebuke over soaring cancer-drug prices and called for new regulations to control them.…In an editorial published in the Mayo Clinic’s WSJ Bannermedical journal, the doctors focus attention on the financial burden to patients, saying the out-of-pocket costs are bankrupting many just as they’re fighting a deadly illness.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional coverage:

Reuters, Experts support call for lower cancer drug prices

NPR, Doctors Press For Action To Lower 'Unsustainable' Prices For Cancer Drugs

New Hampshire Public Radio, Doctors Speak Out Against 'Unsustainable' Rise In Cancer Drug Prices,

The New York Times, Drug Prices Soar, Prompting Calls for Justification

Kansas City Star (The New York Times), As drug prices soar, calls for justification intensify

Forbes, 155 Doctors Say This Is The Solution To Terrifying Drug Prices

Fortune, Doctors say cancer drug costs are out of control

Newsweek — The High Cost of Cancer Care: Your Money or Your Life? 

The Washington Post — Cancer experts call for curbs on rising drug prices

POLITICO Pro, Top cancer docs want patients to join pushback on drug costs 

NBC News, Can Cancer Drugs Be Made Affordable? More Than 100 Experts Weigh In

Time, Top Cancer Doctors Call for Lower Drug Costs

CBS News, Rising cancer costs pit doctors against drugmakers

FOX News (Reuters), Experts support call for lower cancer drug prices

Yahoo! (Reuters) Over 100 Doctors Call for Lower Cancer Drug Prices

HealthDay, U.S. Oncologists Decry High Cost of Cancer Drugs,

OncLive, Cancer Care Leaders Demand Drug Pricing Reforms

CNBC, Eli Lilly CEO: Obamacare out-of-pocket costs high

UPI.com, Experts: Cancer drug costs 'not sustainable'

ThinkProgress, More Than 100 Doctors Tell Big Pharma To Stop Making Cancer Drugs So Expensive

Times Gazette, Doctors Agree That Cancer Drug Prices Must be Decreased

American Pharmacists Association, More than 100 doctors object to high cancer drug prices

Tech Times, 118 Experts Support Calls To Lower Prices Of Cancer Meds

Youth Health Magazine, Are Cancer Drugs Getting Too Expensive? A Group of Oncologists Says So

Valley News (AP), Cancer Experts Say Curb Drug Costs

fox4kc.com, Doctors urge action on cancer drug costs

The Fiscal Times, As Drug Prices Soar, Doctors Voice Outrage

 

Context: A group of 118 of the nation's leading cancer experts have drafted a prescription for reducing the high cost of cancer drugs and voiced support for a patient-based grassroots movement demanding action on the issue. Their recommendations and support are outlined in a commentary, co-authored by the group, in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.  "High cancer drug prices are affecting the care of patients with cancer and our health care system," says lead author Ayalew Tefferi, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic. "The average gross household income in the U.S. is about $52,000 per year. For an insured patient with cancer who needs a drug that costs $120,000 per year, the out-of-pocket expenses could be as much as $25,000 to $30,000 – more than half their average household income." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

The Florida Times-Union
Money from Ice Bucket Challenge helps pay for ongoing research into ALS at Jacksonville's Clinic
by Charlie Patton

Last summer, according to the ALS Association, the Ice Bucket Challenge raised $115 million to help find treatments and a cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the disease that killed Hall of Fame baseball player Lou Gehrig. Of thatFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo money, $77 million was allocated for research. The ALS Association announced last week 58 new research grants totaling $11,621,638. About $1 million of that is going to the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville in three grants.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

Augustine Record — Money from Ice Bucket Challenge helps pay for ongoing research into ALS at Jacksonville's Clinic 

Context: Leonard Petrucelli, Ph.D.'s research team research is investigating the cellular mechanisms that cause neurodegeneration in diseases characterized by abnormal protein aggregation, such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In expanding upon his commitment to understanding the causes of such diseases, Dr. Petrucelli is now emphasizing translational research geared toward identifying and developing therapies for treatment and prevention.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

 

Washington Post
Alzheimer’s scientists to meet in D.C. amid signs of progress for treatment
by Fredrick Kunkle

…Dean Hartley, director of science initiatives at the Alzheimer’s Association, said Congress is debating the possibility of increasing the annual Washington Post newspaper logoresearch budget of about $600 million by an additional $300 million to $350 million a year, beginning in fiscal 2016. But he said that’s still less than what is currently spent on cancer, heart disease or HIV research, and well below the estimated $2 billion that the scientific community has said would be necessary to try to find a cure or effective treatments by 2025. “We’ve got to ramp up now,” said Ronald C. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and chairman of the national Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Sharon Theimer

 

Reuters
Ahead of Alzheimer’s meeting, researchers seize on signs of progress
by Bill Berkrot

After decades of Alzheimer’s research that led to dead ends, including 123 drugs that failed, top researchers in the field sayReuters Logo they are far more confident now of producing an effective treatment...Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, agrees with Sperling that a multi-prong approach will be required to keep the disease at bay.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Sharon Theimer

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic ranked nation's second best hospital
by John Scott

After a year at the top of the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals list, Mayo Clinic has traded places with last year's number two, Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperMassachusetts General Hospital. Rounding out the top five spots, Johns Hopkins Hospital tied with UCLA Medical Center for number three, and the Cleveland Clinic came in fourth..."We're extremely pleased to be honored by U.S. News & World Report because it is used by so many health consumers to help guide their care," said Dr. John Wald, medical director for public affairs and marketing for Mayo Clinic Enterprise. "To be ranked No. 1 in eight of those specialties, and to be ranked one, two and three in all data-driven specialties ... it really speaks to the breadth of our practice and not to one specialty. The reason we are Mayo Clinic is because patients come here to get seamless, integrated care. I think this ranking really defines that for us," Wald said.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage:

Healio — Mayo Clinic named best hospital for pulmonology care

Healio — US. News & World Report ranks Mayo Clinic best hospital for gastroenterology, GI surgery 

Healio — US. News & World Report ranks top hospitals for diabetes, endocrinology care 

Medscape — The Roanoke Times, Crain’s Detroit Business, KTTC,  The Boston Globe, Detroit Free Press, WXOW News 19 La Crosse, MinnPost, The Hub at Johns Hopkins, KROC AM 1340, KTIV 4 Sioux City, WQOW, WSJV, WDSI, Yahoo!, ABC15 Arizona, Medscape, boston.com, Minneapolis/ St. Paul Business Journal, ConsumerAffairs, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Newsmax, KXLT- FOX 47, KWWK, The Denver Post, Chicago Tribune

Context: Mayo Clinic has been named one of the best hospitals nationwide by U.S. News and World Report. Mayo Clinic earned more No. 1 rankings in individual specialties than any other provider based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “This ranking underscores our long-standing commitment to provide the highest-quality care that best meets our patients’ needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic is fortunate to be ranked No. 1 in more specialties than any other hospital in the nation. We owe our success to staff members who dedicate themselves daily to this shared mission.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Madson

 

Phoenix Business Journal
U.S. News & World Report' unveils Phoenix hospital rankings

U.S. News & World Report has released its 2015-16 list of the country's best hospitals, but none of Arizona's hospitals made the national Honor Roll. Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, which was No. 2 last year, claimed the No. 1 spot on the Honor Roll, which highlights hospitalsPhoenix Business Journal that are exceptional in numerous specialties. The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, ranked No. 2 on the Honor Roll, while Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles tied for third...Dr. Wyatt Decker, CEO at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and vice president of Mayo Clinic, said the Mayo staff takes great pride in developing the most innovative treatments and care delivery models in an effort to best service its patients. "Examples include the proton beam and new cancer center facility now under construction on our Phoenix campus, as well as our telemedicine programs, which are bringing much-needed specialty expertise to rural parts of our state," Decker said.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Context: Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix is ranked No. 1 in Arizona and the Phoenix metro area in the annual U.S. News & World ReportAmerica’s Best Hospital List released today. Hospitals included in the U.S. News Report such as the Mayo Clinic, are part of an elite group recognized for “breadth of excellence,” according to the magazine. Mayo Clinic in Arizona ranked nationally in 12 specialties including Cancer; Cardiology and Heart Surgery; Diabetes and Endocrinology; Ear, Nose and Throat; Gastroenterology and Gastroenterologic Surgery; Geriatrics; Gynecology; Nephrology; Neurology and Neurosurgery; Orthopedics; Pulmonology and Urology. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
These three Jacksonville facilities made U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Hospitals” list

U.S. News & World Report has named Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, UF Health Jacksonville and St. Vincent's Medical Center to its annual list of Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logo“America’s Best Hospitals” published online today. Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in the Jacksonville metro area, No. 4 in Florida and among the top 50 hospitals nationally in cancer, gastroenterology and GI surgery, geriatrics, and neurology and neurosurgery.

Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals

Context: U.S. News & World Report again has named Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus to its annual list of “America’s Best Hospitals” published online today. Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in the Jacksonville metro area, No. 4 in Florida and among the top 50 hospitals nationally in cancer,gastroenterology (GI) and GI surgery, geriatrics, and neurology and neurosurgery. The Florida campus also was recognized as high performing in diabetes and endocrinology, ear, nose and throat, gynecology, nephrology, orthopedicspulmonology and urology. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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July 3rd, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editors: Carmen Zwicker, Emily Blahnik

 

Boston Globe
Destination for reluctant but hopeful travelers
By Robert Weisman

They arrive in all seasons and from every corner of the earth: the chronically ill, the suddenly stricken, the worried well. They come seeking answers, guidance, and healing at this medical oasis in the Minnesota cornfields. Monica Robles, a copy center supervisorBoston Globe Logo from Arrada, Colo., was referred to Mayo Clinic to be treated by a top specialist in her rare heart condition. Vicky Wright, who organizes marriage workshops in Austin, Texas, flew in for a complicated biopsy. Kuwaiti aviation official Abdullah Al Obaid is spending four or five months in this small city south of Minneapolis so Mayo neurologists can adjust and monitor his multiple sclerosis treatments.

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Context: For more than a century, people from all walks of life have found answers at Mayo Clinic.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Arizona Horizon (PBS)
Nationwide Melanoma Clinical Trials

A Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C) Melanoma Dream Team, led by TGen President Dr. Jeffrey Trent of Phoenix, is launching a set of nationwide Arizona PBSclinical trials on a form of melanoma skin cancer that affects about half of all people who get the disease. Mayo Clinic in Arizona is the only clinical trial location in our state. Dr. Trent and Dr. Alex Sekulic of Mayo Clinic will discuss the melanoma clinical trials.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent of the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Additional coverage: San Angelo Standard-Times, Frederick News-Post Online

Previous Coverage in June 26, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) are helping launch a national clinical trial that will apply the latest in precision medicine to treat advanced melanoma skin cancer. The study leverages advances in genomics, informatics, and health information technology, yielding more precise medical treatments for patients with this devastating disease. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic's first proton beam therapy patient receives treatment
by Kimberly Davis

The first patient to receive proton beam radiation therapy allowed KTTC to sit in on her session at Mayo Clinic Thursday morning. Thursday was Jessie Brentholt's fourth proton beam treatment of her six week process. Her mother tells News Center's Kimberly Davis she will come to theKTTC TV logo Jacobson building every day to receive treatment until August 3.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Previous Coverage in June 26, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in June 12, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in June 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduces its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota beginning this June and Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

WCCO-AM
MAYO CLINIC SQUARE-The WCCO Morning News with Dave Lee.

Dr. John Noseworthy is interviewed (see 6-17-15 segment)

WCCO-AM Dave LeeReach: WCCO radio, a CBS owned and operated affiliate in Minneapolis, boasts one of the largest coverage areas in the country as it reaches into portions of North and South Dakota during the day. At night, the station’s signal typically reaches across many U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

Previous Coverage in Jun 18, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Dignitaries from the worlds of medicine, sports, business and politics hit the court June 17 to dedicate Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis. The event was the first in a series of grand-opening events marking the strategic collaboration of Mayo Clinic, the Minnesota Timberwolves and Minnesota Lynx. "At Mayo Clinic we pride ourselves in teamwork," said John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. "We are proud to be part of the team that made this day possible." More information about Mayo Clinic Square can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

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May 28th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By KarlWOestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor, Carmen Zwicker

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Wall Street Journal
Big Bets on Proton Therapy Face Uncertain Future

Six new proton-beam centers are set to start delivering state-of-the-art radiation to cancer patients around the country by year’s end. Ten more are expected by 2018, bringing the U.S. total to 30—many the size of a football field and costing between $100 million and $200 million to build.The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoThe projects, long in the works, will enter an uncertain market. Proton-beam therapy, a highly precise form of radiation, has been dogged by a lack of evidence that it is better than traditional radiation despite costing significantly more… Some hospitals have turned to private donations, rather than private equity, to finance proton operations. Next month, the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., plans to start treating patients at its $180 million proton center, one of two built with the help of a $100 million gift.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic hosted a grand opening event for the Richard O. Jacobson Building, home to the Mayo Clinic proton beam therapy program on May 9. The new facility will begin treating patients in late June. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Joe Dangor, Jim McVeigh, Traci Klein

 

Health Leaders Media
Shriners Hospitals joins Mayo Clinic network to enhance physician collaboration

Mayo Clinic expertise will now be available to patients and providers at Shriners Hospitals for Children as part of a new network relationship HealthLeadersbetween the health care systems. Shriners Hospitals, with 22 locations throughout North America, announced Tuesday that it has joined the national Mayo Clinic Care Network.

Reach: HealthLeaders magazine focuses on the healthcare industry and has a monthly circulation of more than 40,000. HealthLeaders Online receives more than 43,000 unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Tampa Bay Business Journal, Shriners Hospitals joins Mayo Clinic network; Tampa Tribune, Tampa Bay Times, Benzinga

Context: Mayo Clinic and Shriners Hospitals for Children today announced Shriners Hospitals for Children as a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of organizations committed to better serving patients and their families through physician collaboration. The network will allow Shriners Hospitals for Children, a national health care system, to offer providers and patients convenient access to additional expertise from Mayo Clinic. The closer relationship will enhance the delivery of local care and promote peace of mind as providers and patients make health care decisions. “With Mayo Clinic’s similar mission of providing the best care to every patient through integrated clinical practice, education and research, a relationship will give Shriners Hospitals the opportunity to further transform children’s lives,” said Dale W. Stauss, Chairman of the Board of Directors for Shriners Hospitals for Children. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Fast Company
The $6.5 Billion, 20-Year Plan To Transform An American City
by Neal Ungerleider

The Mayo Clinic is located in the small city of Rochester (pop. 111,000), about a two-hour drive from Minneapolis, Minnesota. And it is, right this minute, competing fiercely for a small-but-extremely-lucrative slice of the global medical tourism industry. The wealthy American, European,Fast Company east Asian, and Gulf Arab patients who have been the clinic’s bread and butter have been instead choosing to get treatment abroad or at domestic rivals like Baltimore’s Johns Hopkins University or the Cleveland Clinic. But that may be changing—and the reason, if not the construction, is simple: the Destination Medical Center.

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Additional coverage:  Builder Magazine

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC) is an innovative economic development initiative to secure Minnesota's status as a global medical destination now and in the future. The latest updates on DMC can be found on the DMC blog.

Contact: Jamie Rothe

 

Star Tribune
Doctor burnout is a rising problem in Minnesota medicine
by Jeremy Olson

… Mayo Clinic researchers, however, found that doctors can shield patients for only so long, and that left undetected burnout can lead to Star Tribune newspaper logomedication errors and other mistakes. “By the time you start seeing effects on patients, physicians have gotten so rundown that they’re just not able to buffer patients from what they’re feeling anymore,” said Dr. Colin West, a Mayo internist who has co-written several burnout studies.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Burnout is a common problem among U.S. doctors and studies suggest it adversely impacts quality of care and patient satisfaction. Many factors impact how physicians perceive their career. A new study suggests there’s an interesting correlation between physician burnout and the effectiveness of their supervisors. That’s what researchers found at Mayo Clinic when they undertook a large internal study on the satisfaction of physicians and the leadership qualities of their supervisors. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

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