Items Tagged ‘multiple myeloma’

October 30th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

USA TODAY
Could a robot do your job?

... And doctors, long thought immune to being automated, now face competition, including a machine that replaces an anesthesiologist in lowUSA Today Newspaper Logo -risk colonoscopy procedures.... Starting next year, The Mayo Clinic in Minnesota will use Watson to sort through 8,000 Mayo studies and approximately 170,000 ongoing studies worldwide to match patients to clinical trials.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 4.1 million, which includes print, various digital editions and other  papers that use their branded content.

Previous Coverage in Sept. 11, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic and IBM  are using  Watson, the IBM cognitive computer, to match patients more quickly with appropriate clinical trials, beginning with research studies in cancer. A proof-of-concept phase is currently underway. “In an area like cancer —where time is of the essence — the speed and accuracy that Watson offers will allow us to develop an individualized treatment plan more efficiently so we can deliver exactly the care that the patient needs,” says Steven Alberts, M.D., chair of medical oncology at Mayo Clinic. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Star Tribune
Mayo scores major dementia grants
by Dan Browning

After more than a decade of work on what’s been called “the most common disease no one has ever heard of” — frontotemporal dementia — Mayo Clinic Star Tribune newspaper logohas been chosen to participate in a set of federal research projects that could help unlock a broad set of related brain disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease...“What is really striking is that four major grants have now been funded in [this] area, which is tens of millions of dollars [over five years],” said Dr. Brad Boeve of Mayo Clinic, one of the nation’s leading FTD researchers and principal investigator for one of the new grants.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:

Florida Times-Union
Mayo researchers getting funds for ALS, dementia research
by Steve Patterson

Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville are getting about $6 million in new grants to study a genetic breakdown tied to bothFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo Lou Gehrig’s disease and a form of dementia, clinic officials said Thursday. The work could lead to new testing and treatment approaches to the affliction based around a particular gene, called C9ORF72.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

KIMT, Mayo Clinic awarded grant for dementia research by DeeDee Stiepan…“We really want to eradicate these genes from the devastating effects that can occur in people who are already known to have these mutations, as well as those families who may, through obviously no fault of their own, pass it on to their children,” explains Dr. Bradley Boeve, a Professor of Neurology at Mayo Clinic.

Augustine Record, Mayo researchers getting funds for ALS, dementia research by Steve Patterson. Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville are getting about $6 million in new grants to study a genetic breakdown tied to both Lou Gehrig’s disease and a form of dementia, clinic officials said Thursday…The research will build on earlier work by another Mayo scientist, Leonard Petrucelli, who last year focused attention on buildups of proteins where the C9ORF72 mutation is found.

KTTC, WQOW Eau Claire, Post-BulletinKansas City Star, Miami Herald, The Telegraph Ga., Post-Bulletin, Daily Journal

Context: Mayo Clinic has been awarded two grants for large, five-year projects on frontotemporal dementia (FTD), characterized by degeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. While rare, it may strike people in their twenties, even in their teens. The projects are funded by the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS). The grants, allocated to the research teams at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota and Jacksonville, Florida, cover a wide spectrum of FTD research, to advance their studies aimed at improving the diagnosis and treatment of patients suffering from this disorder. More information on the grants can be found here and here on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic  (Minnesota) and Kevin Punsky (Florida)

 

Star Tribune
Schafer: Mayo Clinic surgeon, scientist team up as entrepreneurs
by Lee Schafer

Rakesh Suri and Jordan Miller are the kind of entrepreneurs who are easy to cheer for. Suri is a heart surgeon at the Mayo Clinic, and Miller is a Star Tribune Business section logoscientist who arrived in Rochester 5 ½ years ago to help with a research program into cardiac valve disease. Admittedly they are not typical business underdogs, not as top-of-the-profession staff at the renowned Mayo Clinic. What’s to like is how they want to take something out of the lab to help people live longer. And starting a company seems to be the only practical way to get that done.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Rakesh Suri, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiac surgeon and is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic Transplant Center.  Jordan Miller, PhD, is an in the Division cardiovascular surgery researcher with an academic appointment of Assistant Professor in the Departments of Surgery and Physiology. His research program focuses on three main areas: 1) understanding mechanisms contributing to aortic valve and atherosclerotic plaque calcification, 2) identification of reciprocal regulators of skeletal and cardiovascular calcification, and 3) understanding mechanisms contributing to vasomotor dysfunction in health and disease.

Public Affairs Contacts:  Sharon Theimer, Traci Klein

 

New Yorker
Breaking Away
by David Gendelman

…They also likely thought about the advantages gained by staying with the main pack, like protection from the wind provided by the runners in front. There’s also The New Yorker magazine logo“a psychic edge,” Michael Joyner, a physiologist at the Mayo Clinic, said. “People get in a rhythm. You’re feeding off other people. All of the signals that the average person would describe as painful, the élite is using as a red line. They’re running right on the edge. When you’re with somebody else, your perception of the effort you require, your perception of fatigue, might be less. You might be able to stay in the zone longer.”

Reach: The New Yorker is a weekly magazine with a circulation of more than one million readers. The magazine covers culture, art, fiction, business, politics, science and technology. It reports on current ideas and evolving issues, often with a touch of humor. Launched in 1925, it is published by Condé Nast Publications. Its mission is to report and reflect on the world at large with wit, sophistication and originality. The New Yorker's website has more than 722,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

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Tags: A.L.S., ABC News, Ahwatukee Foothills News, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's Disease and eye test, Angela Lunde, Angie’s Artisan Treat, Anna Stoehr, Argus Leader, Arizona Leadership Council, Arizona Republic


July 31st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
What Makes a Superfood?
By Heidi Mitchell

Salmon has at times been touted as a cancer preventive. Many nutritionists praise the health benefits of blueberries, kale and cinnamon bark. How does a food get elevated from the grocery aisle to superfoodThe Wall Street Journal Logo status? One expert, Phil Hagen, a preventive-medicine specialist at the Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., explains why there is more to food than a name.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Phillip Hagen, M.D. is a physician in Mayo Clinic's Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine department.

Public Affairs Contacts: Ginger Plumbo, Traci Klein

 

Florida Times-Union
Gift from Bacardi family will help Mayo Clinic researchers in Jacksonville close in on 'the future of medicine'
by Charlie Patton

The future of medicine is regenerative medicine. That’s a view shared by Thomas Gonwa, associate Florida Times-Union newspaper logodirector of the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine in Jacksonville, and by Jorge and Leslie Bacardi. “Regenerative medicine will be the cutting-edge medicine of the 21st century,” Gonwa says. “We think it is the most important thing happening in medicine,” Leslie Bacardi said. Now the Bacardis, who live in Nassau in the Bahamas, have given what Mayo Clinic officials call “a substantial gift” to fund ongoing research and clinical trials in regenerative medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional Coverage:

Phys.org, Bacardis make gift to significantly advance Mayo Clinic's regenerative medicine research

Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic Florida gets regenerative medicine boost

WEJZ Fla., Bio-Medicine, Mayport Mirror Fla.

Context: Imagine a future in which a new lung is grown for a patient in need, using the patient’s own cellular material, or a day when an injection of replacement cells will enable a patient to self-heal damage in the brain, nerves or other tissues. Regenerative medicine is no longer science fiction, and a substantial gift from Jorge and Leslie Bacardi of the Bahamas will significantly accelerate the research of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine on the Florida campus. More information, including a video interview with Jorge Bacardi can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affair Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

AP
Injuries come frequently despite advances in safety, sports medicine and training

…August inevitably will be filled with more cringes and crutches, even though the NFL has tried to make the game safer in recent years. The league has placed limits on padded practices and implemented moreAssociated Press Wire Service Logo rules changes to protect players on both sides of the ball. "Despite all the advances in sports medicine, nutrition and training, we just can't prevent all injuries," said Dr. Ed Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. "What we can do is protect them as much as possible through training and technique."

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional Coverage:

New York Times (AP), N.F.L. Teams Chase the Dream of an Injury-Free Camp

ABC News, Star Tribune, USA Today, Fox News, Yahoo! Sports, CTV News

Context: Ed Laskowski, M.D., is co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

Arizona Republic
Coaches, Mayo team up on head injuries
by Nathan Brown

The 2014 Arizona Pop Warner Football Clinic, headlined by Dr. David Dodick, brought coaches from all Arizona Republic newspaper logolevels of Arizona Pop Warner together to discuss protocols being put in place with a partnership between the Mayo Clinic and Arizona Pop Warner for the upcoming season. Dodick, along with fellow Mayo Clinic doctors Amaal Starling and Bert Vargas, education coaches on the impact of concussions along with the new testing.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Additional Coverage: ABC 15

Context: In response to growing concerns about concussions and head injuries in youth sports,Arizona Pop Warner Football and Cheer and Mayo Clinic have announced a groundbreaking collaboration that will provide intensive medical research about the effects of sports-related injuries. As part of the program, all participants ages 10 years and older in Arizona Pop Warner’s flag and tackle football programs, as well as all participants in the organization’s cheerleading programs, will be required to complete a comprehensive evaluation prior to play that will provide a baseline for future testing in the event of an injury. This baseline evaluation will provide immediate data when testing young athletes after an injury, helping physicians determine the nature and extent of the injury and helping to assess a timeline for return to competition. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

FOX 9
Minn. musician bikes from Seattle to Boston to honor friend

He's collaborated with everyone from Eric Clapton the world-renowned Minnesota Orchestra, but a local musician is putting his career on hold to remember a lifelong friend who died of cancer.…Maurer said heMy Fox KMSP TC hopes to inspire people to see life at 10 mph instead of 60, like Held inspired him. He also hopes that those who are inspired will donate to the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, which is where Held went for treatment.

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.  FOX 9 News (WFTC) is the Twin Cities Fox affiliate.

Context: George Maurer is an accomplished musician and composer (recently won a McKnight Composer Fellowship) who is on day a 48-day bike ride from Seattle to Boston (covering 48 states) in memory of his friend Carolyn Held, who passed away in 2012 from cancer. The bike ride is a fundraiser for Mayo Clinic Cancer Center where Carolyn was a patient. Carolyn made the same bike rip in 1988 to raise funds for the Boys and Girls Club of Little Falls, Minnesota. More information cane be found on George's Blog, his Facebook page and by watching a video explaining the trip.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Cannon Falls Beacon
Facility design a team effort

From check-in to departure, patients at Mayo Clinic Health System will notice process improvements in Cannon Falls Beacon Newspaper logothe new medical center that incorporate functional design which will better provide seamless care. Clinic exam and hospital suites were designed with the help of staff.

Reach: The Cannon Falls Beacon is a weekly newspaper published in Cannon Falls, Minnesota.

Additional Coverage:

KTTC
Mayo Clinic Health System opens new location in Cannon Falls

KROC
Ribbon Cutting for Mayo’s New Cannon Falls Facility

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic plans ribbon cutting for new Cannon Falls clinic

Context: I’m in awe,” says Jerry Williams of Mayo Clinic Health System’s new clinic and hospital. Williams was one of approximately 2,000 who toured the new medical center during a public grand opening event on Friday, July 25. Located at 32021 County 24 Boulevard, the new clinic opens on Aug. 4 and the hospital and emergency department open on Aug. 7. More information on the new clinic and hospital can be found here.

Public Affairs Contact: Asia Christensen

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Tags: "sitting disease", Alan Greenway, Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology’s Statistics and Data Center, AP, Apple, Arizona Pop Warner Football, Arizona Republic, Associated Press, Association of Medical Illustrators annual meeting, ASU News, BC News, Becker’s Hospital Review


July 24th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Advisory Board

Why Mayo Clinic's CEO wants to serve 200 million patients—and how he plans to do it

Question: I've read that before you joined the Mayo Clinic—and this was decades ago—one of your first encounters with the organization was when a physician was supposed to visit your hospital for a commemorative dinner…and he missed it. Can you talk Advisory Boarda little bit about that? John Noseworthy: It was one of the two or three most pivotal moments in my life. You're right, he missed his flight—and it was because he was with a patient. I was very young and I remember thinking, "who is this man who is so humble that he would put the needs of the patient ahead of his receiving  a distinguished recognition." And then I wondered what organization could retain and keep a person like that. It was Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Advisory Board Company is a global research, technology, and consulting firm partnering with more than 165,000 leaders in more than 4,100 organizations across health care and higher education.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Wall Street Journal
Why Seven Hours of Sleep Might Be Better Than Eight
by Sumathi Reddy

…Other experts caution against studies showing ill effects from too much sleep. Illness may cause someone to sleep or spend more The Wall Street Journal newspaper logotime in bed, these experts say. And studies based on people reporting their own sleep patterns may be inaccurate. "The problem with these studies is that they give you good information about association but not causation," said Timothy Morgenthaler, president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, which represents sleep doctors and researchers, and a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, is also affiliated with the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Alyson Gonzalez, Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo links abnormal protein in brain to Alzheimer's
by Mary Lynn Smith

…“Alzheimer’s disease symptoms have been typically thought to be produced by plaques and tangles,” said Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s disease Research Center. “Now these folks have documented that there’s a third elementStar Tribune newspaper logo that contributes to Alzheimer’s symptoms.” The protein, known as TDP-43, is normally found in the brain. But what Mayo researchers found is that when it becomes abnormal — chemically different and bunched up — a patient is more likely to show symptoms of Alzheimer’s, explained Dr. Keith Josephs, who headed the research team’s four-year study.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic-led study on Alzheimer's grabs worldwide attention
MPR, Alzheimer's research at Mayo may open new possibilities to investigate
KTTC, Protein discovery may be key to Alzheimer's cure
WCCO, Albuquerque Journal, MinnPost

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

Context:  Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease. In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. “We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.” More information on the study, including a video interview with Dr. Josephs, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Mayo sees big future for personalized medicine
by Jim Spencer

Medical treatment will become more genetically specific to individuals as the 21st century progresses, the Mayo Clinic’s director of Star Tribune Business section logolaboratory medicine told a congressional subcommittee Wednesday. Dr. Frank Cockerill said that Mayo, one of the world’s leaders in specialized diagnostics, develops 150 tests per year in an attempt to become more precise in treating patients.  The Rochester-based clinic is moving toward tests that will let doctors tailor treatments that are unique to individuals, Cockerill told participants at a 21st Century Cures roundtable sponsored by the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s subcommittee on health. For instance, instead of using standard dosages, Cockerill said Mayo’s labs try to tranform scientific discoveries into “valid tests” that allow doctors to apply “specific genetic findings in a patient.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Frank Cockerill, M.D. is chair of the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and PathologyMayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (DLMP) in Rochester is one of the largest clinical laboratories in the world. It is composed of more than 3,200 people working in numerous specialty laboratories performing more than 20 million tests a year. Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML) is a reference laboratory specializing in esoteric laboratory testing for health care organizations throughout the United States and around the world. MML's mission is to support the local delivery of laboratory services through the provision of exceptional reference laboratory services and by providing support services that facilitate and augment community integration efforts.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Post-Bulletin

Our view: Community can help keep Mayo Clinic at top of rankings

Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperWhat's most impressive about Mayo Clinic's No. 1 ranking as the best hospital in the country by U.S. News & World Report magazine were the consistent high marks in several categories of evaluation. The report gave Mayo No. 1 or No. 2 rankings in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Pulse on Health: It's the personal care behind being No. 1 that counts
MedPage Today, Top-Ranked Hospitals Sing Own Praises
CSPAN, General Speeches: Rep. Erik Paulsen, R-Minnesota, 3rd District

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic has achieved the highest honor in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of top hospitalsMayo Clinic earned more number one rankings than any other provider, ranking number one or number two in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “We have a deep commitment to delivering high-value health care that best meets patients' needs. We owe our success to truly dedicated staff that provide a seamless patient experience and the care that each individual needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Noseworthy, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

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Tags: "sitting disease", A.L.S., ABC News, ABC15, advisory board, Ahwatukee Foothills News, Aitkin Age, Albuquerque Journal, alzheimer's disease, Am.com, AP, Apple


May 15th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations


NY Times
AGING AMERICA: Exercise as the Fountain of Youth

…Exercise may be the closest thing we have to a fountain of youth, one of the best ways to age happy and well. "The mantra now is, exercise is a drug" — able, like some medications

The New York Times newspaper logo are, to prevent and treat a host of age-related ailments, said Dr. Andrea Cheville, a Mayo Clinic expert on exercise in the elderly.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Star Tribune (AP), KAAL, ABC News, Huffington Post Canada, Monterey Herald, Ottawa Citizen

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is an expert on exercise in the elderly.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KSTP
On the Road with Jason Davis: Mayo Clinic Celebrates 150 Years

KSTP's Jason Davis goes on the road to Arizona, Florida and Minnesota fKSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logor his feature on Mayo Clinic. This was Davis's last report for his On the Road series before retiring at the end of May 2014 after nearly four decades with KSTP.  This year, one of Minnesota's best known institutions celebrates its 150th anniversary. It was in 1864 that Dr. William Worral Mayo started his small clinic in Rochester, and just how that small practice grew into a world-renowned facility is a fascinating story. Jason Davis went on the road to learn about the past, present and future of Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Additional Mayo Clinic 150th Anniversary and history of Mayo coverage:

KTTC, Mayo Clinic celebrates 150 years by Courtney Sturgeon

KARE11, Recovering Brokaw hosts Mayo's 150th anniversary 

KTTC, The early beginnings of the Mayo Clinic Mid-century advancements, Recent history

KTTC, Dr. John Noseworthy reflects on 150 years of Mayo Clinic success 

MPR, Mayo's mark: 5 innovations that changed health care 

Post-Bulletin, Jordanian king touched many in Rochester 

Post-Bulletin, Descendants of Dr. W.W. Mayo visit family home 

Post-Bulletin, Massive medical team focused 'millimeter by millimeter' to separate twins 

Post-Bulletin, 150th anniversary: Mayo Clinic helped U.S., allies win World War II 

Post-BulletinOddchester: 150 years in less than three hours

Greenhouse Grower, Mayo Clinic Will Promote Coreopsis ‘Electric Avenue’ As Its Flower Of Hope

Perishable NewsMayo Clinic Chooses Yellow Coreopsis As Its 'Flower Of Hope'

WCCO, Star Tribune, Big News Network, WCCO AM, Coon Rapids Herald, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin, Post-Bulletin

Context: On July 1, 1907, Dr. Henry Plummer and Mabel Root, Dr. Plummer's assistant, inaugurated Mayo's system of patient registration and medical record keeping. The single-unit record was central to the new system. It brought together all of a patient's records -- clinical visits, hospital stays, laboratory tests and notes -- in a single file that traveled with the patient and was stored in a central repository. This simple system quickly became the standard for medical record keeping around the world. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care. Dr. Mayo’s sons, Drs. William and Charles Mayo, joined the practice in the late 1880’s and, with their father, created Mayo Clinic’s medical hallmark: The integrated care model that focuses a team of experts on one patient at a time and puts patients’ needs first. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Rebecca Eisenman, Kelley Luckstein

 

FOX47
Mayo Clinic announces campaign to raise $3 billion
by Mary McGuire

Mayo Clinic is looking to the future in a big way as it launches a camFox 47 TV station logopaign to raise $3 billion. It's all part of the "You are ... the campaign for Mayo Clinic" being announced Thursday. The goal of the campaign is to raise $3 billion by the end of 2017 to strengthen patient care, research and education at Mayo.

Additional coverage: KTTC, Becker’s Hospital Review, KROC-AM

Previous coverage

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care, Mayo Clinic today announced a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on the Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic trial: Massive blast of measles vaccine wipes out cancer
by Dan Browning

Stacy Erholtz was out of conventional treatment options for blood cancer last June when she underwent an exStar Tribune Health newspaper logoperimental trial at the Mayo Clinic that injected her with enough measles vaccine to inoculate 10 million people. The 50-year-old Pequot Lakes mother is now part of medical history…But the experiment provides the “proof of concept” that a single, massive dose of intravenous viral therapy can kill cancer by overwhelming its natural defenses, according to Dr. Stephen Russell, a professor of molecular medicine who spearheaded the research at Mayo.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
KARE11Minn. woman's cancer in remission thanks to measles 

Washington Post, Woman’s cancer killed by measles virus in unprecedented trial

MPR, How the Mayo Clinic handles potential patients in clinical trials

USA TODAY, Massive dose of measles vaccine clears woman's cancer

WGN-TV, Mayo Clinic: Woman’s cancer cured with huge dose of measles vaccine

International Business Times UK, Mayo Clinic Landmark Trial: Measles Vaccine Wipes out Cancer in Patient

Daily BeastMeasles Vaccine Killed Patient's Cancer

MashableMeasles Vaccine Wipes Out Cancer in Groundbreaking Test

UPI.com, Massive dose of measles vaccine knocks out woman's cancer

azcentral.comMeasles vaccine cures woman's cancer in study

Reuters, CNN, International Business Times, La Parisienne (France), Le Monde (France), Telegraph (UK), Globe and Mail, Fox 19 (OH), Examiner, Detroit Free Press, Green Bay Press Gazette, ABC 15 Arizona, Fox News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, News 4 Jax, L’Economiste, 11 Alive Atlanta, Le Figaro (France), Yahoo! France, Le Huffington Post, ABC.es (Spain), Access Atlanta, Honolulu Star-Advertiser, Yahoo! Health, Business Standard India, France 24, Yahoo! News UK & Ireland (AFP), Yahoo! MexicoKTTCNational PostDaily MailThe BlazeThe Daily BeastRefinery 29

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: 11 Alive Atlanta, 3-D printing, 3D printers, Abbigail Carlsen, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC.es (Spain), ABC15, Access Atlanta, Advanced Primary Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic in Florida, aerobic activity, aging, American Academy of Neurology


May 8th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Prevention
The Hidden Type of Alzheimer's Doctors Miss
by Markham Heid

…The study team examined the brains of more than 1,800 confirmed Alzheimer's patients. They found the types of protein blockages and tangles associated with the hippocampal sparing form of Alzheimer's in 11% of those brain specimens. InPrevention logo this subtype, one type of protein called tau forms "tangles" in the parts of brain that control behavior, motor awareness, speech, and vision, explains Melissa Murray, PhD, who led the Mayo Clinic research team.

Reach: Prevention is published monthly with a circulation of 2.8 million.  Prevention - Online has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month and has 9.3 million average page views each month.

Additional coverage: HealthDay, Alzheimer's Variation May Often Go Unrecognized: Study; Canada Journal, Health.com, Aetna InteliHealth, Bayoubuzz Health, BioPortfolio, DoctorsLounge, Hawaii News Now, Counsel & Heal, Innovations Report, KAIT Ark., FOX19 Ohio

Context: Neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida have defined a subtype of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that they say is neither well recognized nor treated appropriately. The variant, called hippocampal sparing AD, made up 11 percent of the 1,821 AD-confirmed brains examined by Mayo Clinic researchers — suggesting this subtype is relatively widespread in the general population. The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that 5.2 million Americans are living with AD. And with nearly half of hippocampal sparing AD patients being misdiagnosed, this could mean that well over 600,000 Americans make up this AD variant, researchers say. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

TIME
11 Reasons Why You’re Not Losing Belly Fat

…You’re getting older, As you get older, your body changes how it gains and loses weight. Both men and women experience a declining metabolic rate, or the number of calories theTime banner body needs to function normally. On top of that, women have to deal with menopause. “If women gain weight after menopause, it’s more likely to be in their bellies,” says Michael Jensen, MD, professor of medicine in the Mayo Clinic’s endocrinology division.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Jensen, MD. is an endocrinologist and diabetes expert.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Rolls Out Mobile Exhibit to Celebrate 150 Years
by Hannah Tran

150 years of service. Mayo Clinic is celebrating 15 decades of care and it wants to share its KAAL TV logogsuccess across the nation. For the past 18 months, Mayo staff have worked on a mobile exhibit to encapsulate its accomplishments and development in core values. "This exhibit is showing the story of Mayo Clinic to the people," said CEO John Noseworthy, who addressed an audience outside of the exhibit before preliminary tours commenced.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic's big-rig exhibit arrives Tuesday
KTTC, Mayo Celebrates 150 Years of Medicine
La Crosse Tribune, 500 tour Mayo's 150th anniversary exhibit
KTTC, Mayo Clinic celebrates 150 years of service with traveling exhibit
Post-Bulletin, 150 years: Franciscan sisters integral to Mayo Clinic's development
Post-Bulletin, Mayo at 150: Brothers' values continue to guide clinic
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic didn't profit from major discovery
KIMT Online (video), In-Forum, N.D.

Context: Mayo Clinic's traveling mobile exhibit has begun its journey. In 2014, we honor 150 years of serving humanity. This is one way Mayo Clinic can give back – to thank the patients and friends who’ve been part of our story, and share our vision with the public. People from all walks of life turn to Mayo Clinic … so we’re reaching out, bringing Mayo Clinic to the people. This exhibit is sponsored by the Mayo Clinic Sesquicentennial Committee with generous support from many patients and friends. 

Public Affairs ContactsRebecca EisenmanRick Thiesse, Kelley Luckstein

 

MSNBC Morning Joe
How diet impacts brain function in seniors

Dr. John Noseworthy and Dr. Rosebud Roberts, both of the Mayo Clinic, join Morning Morning JoeJoe to discuss 150 years of the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Roberts also discusses how a poor diet in old age can impact the brain.

Reach: MSNBC provides in-depth analysis of daily headlines, political commentary and informed perspectives. MSNBC’s home on the Internet is tv.msnbc.com. Joe Scarborough hosts “Morning Joe,” with co-hosts Mika Brzezinski and Willie Geist, featuring interviews with top politicians and newsmakers, as well as in-depth analysis of the day’s biggest stories. Morning Joe has about 375,000 viewers daily.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic President and CEO, and Rosebud Roberts, M.B., Ch.B.. appeared on Morning Joe May 8. Dr. Roberts' research  focuses on identifying risk factors for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia, both diseases of aging that affect memory and thinking skills. People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss and other damage to the brain, as well as problems with memory and thinking skills, than people who never have diabetes or high blood pressure or who develop it in old age, according to a new study published in the March 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology. Middle age was defined as age 40 to 64 and old age as age 65 and older. More information about the research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Duska Anastasijevic

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic announces it is more than halfway to its goal of raising $3 billion from private benefactors by the end of 2017
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic, which has campuses in Rochester, Minn., Scottsdale, Ariz., and Jacksonville, is in the midst of a $3 billion fundraising campaign that will be formallyFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo announced Friday in Rochester. The campaign, which began with a “quiet phase” in 2010 and has already achieved 58.5 percent of its goal, “addresses reliable funding as the biggest barrier to medical breakthroughs,” said Cheryl Hadaway, chief development officer for Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic asks grateful patients to help endow its top treatment
By Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic today announced a $3 billion philanthropic fundraising campaign to help pay Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperfor research, as federal funding has become less reliable because of budget cuts. Mayo has raised more than half the money, or $1.7 billion, as the quiet phase of the campaign began in 2010. The campaign will continue untilDec. 31, 2017.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: To accelerate the pace of research, solve unmet needs of patients and improve the quality of health care,Mayo Clinic today announced a philanthropic campaign to raise $3 billion by Dec. 31, 2017, strengthening Mayo’s strategic priorities in patient care, research and education. “Reliable funding is the biggest barrier to advance medical breakthroughs that can benefit patients suffering from diseases,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “Traditional funding sources, such as federal grants, cannot cover the cost of discovering cutting-edge science and implementing those solutions in clinical practice.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Newtwork and campaign website.

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Tags: 150 Great Places to Work in Healthcare, 5K training, Aaron Taylor, acute myeloid leukemia, adult-onset diabetes, Aetna InteliHealth, affordable housing, Alabama.com, alzheimer's disease, Arkansas, arthritis, ASCO


April 4th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Fox Business
Part 1 -- Mayo Clinic CEO: We need to modernize the delivery system, Medicare  

Fox Business
Part 2 -- Top institutions squeezed by rising health-care costs 

Fox Business
Part 3 -- Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, American Action Forum president Douglas Holtz-Eakin discuss health-care spending    

Reach: FoxNews.com has more than 13 million unique visitors each month. Fox Business Network is headquartered in News Corporation's
Fox Businessstudios in midtown Manhattan with bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco (Silicon Valley), Washington, D.C. and London.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy recently joined Maria Bartiromo on Fox Business’s “Opening Bell” to discuss the Affordable Care Act, the need to modernize the health care delivery system and Medicare and Mayo Clinic's role in health care innovation.

Dr. Noseworthy explained that the health care delivery system must be modernized. He highlighted three ways Mayo Clinic is doing this:

  1. Mayo Clinic’s focus on providing the highest quality and safest care
  2. Expanding Mayo’s reach through the Mayo Clinic Care Network
  3. Identifying and investing in what patients need in the future through research activities and work in the science of health care delivery, including Mayo’s strategic research alliance with Optum Labs

Public Affairs Contacts:  Chris Gade, Bryan Anderson

 

KMUW Wichita Public Radio
Topeka Hospital to Collaborate with Mayo Clinic

Topeka's Stormont-Vail HealthCare has become the first health system in Kansas to partner with the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The deal will give local patients access to the expertiseKMUW Wichita Public Radio of the medical staff at the Mayo Clinic.

 

Reach: KMUW-FM 89.1 is a non-commercial NPR News/Talk and Variety music public radio station out of Wichita State University in the Wichita, Kan. area.

Additional Coverage:
Topeka Capital-Journal
Editorial: Local health care community takes another big step

The health of the local health care community just keeps improving. The latest advancement on that front was revealed Tuesday when officials of Stormont-Vail HealthCare and the world-renown Mayo Clinic, based in Rochester, Minn., announced they had entered a partnership that will give local physicians access to the clinic’s physicians for consultations.

Post-BulletinMayo Clinic Care Network now in 14 states, Mexico; WIBW Kan.Wichita EagleTopeka Capital-JournalNews Medical

Context:  Stormont-Vail HealthCare and Mayo Clinic officials announced April 1 that the Topeka-based health system has become a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and families. Stormont-Vail HealthCare is the first health system in Kansas to join the network. The Mayo Clinic Care Network is a network of like-minded organizations which share a common commitment to improving the delivery of health care in their communities through high-quality, data-driven, evidence-based medical care. More information about the announcement can be found here on Mayo Clinic Care Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

KARE
Mayo Clinic patient celebrates junior prom bedside

KARE 11A heart transplant didn't stop Bree Hanson from celebrating her junior prom.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Context: At Mayo Clinic Transplant Center a team of doctors trained in heart and blood vessel disease (cardiologists), transplant surgery, infectious diseases, mental health conditions (psychiatrists) and other areas evaluate patients to determine if they are eligible for a heart transplant.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

KPHO Ariz.
Looking inside Mayo Clinic's Proton Therapy Cancer Center by Greg Argos, Though it's not going to accept patients until 2016, CBS 5 News took an exclusive look inside the Mayo Clinic's $400 million dollar proton therapy center. "There are only about 12 sites in the country that will have proton beam therapy now, and this will be the only site in ArizonaCBS5AZ-KPHO that has proton therapy," explained Dr. Steve Schild, an Oncologist and the Department Chair for the Mayo Clinic's new center.

Reach: KPHO-5 is the CBS affiliate in Phoenix and is owned by Meredith Corporation.

Context: Mayo Clinic is launching a Proton Beam Therapy Program to provide the latest cancer treatment for Mayo patients. New treatment facilities will be built on the Minnesota and Arizona campuses. Treatment for patients will be available beginning in 2015 in Minnesota and 2016 in Arizona. Proton beam therapy will be used to treat many kinds of cancers located deep within the body and close to critical organs and body structures, especially in children and young adults.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Post BulletinDr. John Noseworthy: Rochester, Mayo Clinic have grown up together
by Dr. John Noseworthy

For 150 years, the city of Rochester and Mayo Clinic have had a partnership like none other. We've grown up together. We could not have asked for a better place to call home throughout our history or a better place to invest in our future to benefit Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperour patients, employees and the community. During the last legislative session, Gov. Mark Dayton and the legislature determined there was a compelling public interest to authorize public investments in Rochester to help support the significant investments by Mayo Clinic to strengthen and secure Minnesota as a global destination medical center.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Additional Coverage:

Post Bulletin
, DMC special report: Road map to the future by Jay Furst, Twenty years from now, Rochester will have about 35,000 more people, the Rochester area will have 35,000 to 45,000 more jobs, and Mayo Clinic will remain a world-class destination for health care, according to Destination Medical Center promoters. How will this happen, and who's drawing up the plan? Today, in a 24-page special report called "DMC: Road Map to the Future," the Post-Bulletin lays out the plan envisioned by Mayo, city and county officials, and business leaders.

Post BulletinWhat is DMC: The facts, The concept of Destination Medical Center is simple — to transform Mayo Clinic and Rochester into a more attractive destination for medical patients and providers. But the structure of the $6 billion, 20-year public-private investment is not simple at all…The eight-member Destination Medical Center Corp. board will guide the use of all public funding, andwill oversee the operation of the nonprofit Destination Medical Center Corp. It's also responsible for approving the overall DMC Development Plan. Four members of the DMCC were chosen by the governor, three are representatives of local government and one is a Mayo Clinic representative.

Post BulletinA DMC magic wand by Jeff Hansel, Richard Dooley and his wife, Karol, have been staying at the Hope Lodge in Rochester while he undergoes prostate cancer therapy at Mayo Clinic. Dooley said he loves "everything" about Mayo Clinic and Rochester. "We both love the town. It's nice and clean and neat and everybody's respectful and nice," Dooley said…If Solis had a magic wand, he said, he would have Mayo introduce a "Louder than a Bomb" poetry program to both Mayo Clinic patients and to Rochester community members. That program has helped young people close to dropping out of school get energized, Solis said. He'd like to see local poets read to Mayo patients, and Mayo patients encouraged to write and read poetry.

Post BulletinMayo Clinic expansion already underway, more likely by Jeff Hansel, With the Destination Medical Center plan in the books, Mayo Clinic has already shifted into growth mode. The nonprofit has several projects underway, or planned in the near future. "There are current projects taking place at Mayo Clinic that will continue to enhance the patient experience and increase the quality of care delivered to patients for generations to come," said Mayo spokeswoman Kelley Luckstein. The latest is at Mayo Medical Laboratories which plans a 66,000-square-foot, two-story addition to the Superior Drive Support Center.

Post BulletinMayo reaching out in other areas by Jeff Hansel, Even as it is making plans to expand in Rochester, Mayo Clinic is reaching out elsewhere in an effort to connect with more patients. Among those efforts are a sports medicine and athletic training center called Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis, the continued growth of the Mayo Clinic Care Network and even the recent purchase of 187 acres in Onalaska, Wis., for a possible new facility.

Post BulletinDEED, DMC job projections similar by Brent Pearson, he Mayo Clinic has a major effect on the economy of southeastern Minnesota, with a proposed $5 billion expansion of the world-renowned medical center likely to stimulate further growth. Destination Medical Center is a plan to expand the Mayo Clinic's Rochester campus and further enhance the region's position as a global destination for health-care services. Mayo officials estimate the expansion will create between 25,000 and 30,000 direct jobs, another 10,000 to 15,000 indirect jobs, and 1,800 to 2,200 construction jobs over the next 20 years.

BringMeTheNews, Construction jobs aplenty in southeast Minnesota by Jessica Mador, There are new signs of growth in Rochester this spring, partly spurred by the Mayo Clinic’s plans for a new $5 billion flagship campus makeover. The Mayo project calls for doubling the size of its existing Minnesota campus. According to Mayo, the clinic already employs 40,600 Minnesotans, 33,400 of whom work in Rochester. And as MPR News reports, the clinic’s makeover plan includes $327 million in state aid, largely to fund improvements to public facilities in the city.

Post Bulletin, DMC to bring thousands of jobs by Bryan Lund, The Destination Medical Center could have a significant impact on Rochester's employment landscape, if the estimates of Mayo Clinic officials come to fruition. The DMC initiative's website says the project will create thousands of permanent, well-paying jobs in the area over the next couple decades. Some of those are directly related to DMC, such as additional physicians and medical support staff, while others are predicted to come as a result of growth in the area's economy indirectly associated with DMC.

Post-Bulletin, Letter: DMC planners must consider needs of disabled, I hope the Destination Medical Center planners consider the needs of people with disabilities. The Mayo Clinic has restroom facilities for people with special needs. A few other places have them as well. Fortunately, the new senior center is planning to have companion restroom facilities for people who need assistance in a rest room.

MPR, More construction workers needed in Rochester as housing market recovers by Elizabeth Baier, It's a good time to be a construction worker in southeastern Minnesota. With home construction on the rise, the job forecast is good in the construction and trade industries. Over the next two decades, more workers will be needed to help Rochester keep pace with the expected growth. During that time, the city is expected to grow by 32,000 residents, in part because of Mayo Clinic's $5 billion plan to remake its flagship campus. The plan includes $327 million in state aid, largely to fund improvements to public facilities in the city. Additional coverage: St. Cloud Times

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Tags: 3-D printing, ABC 15 Phoenix, ABC News, ABC15, Abigail Van Buren, ACA, Affordable care act, allergy season, allergy shots, allergy shots versus pill, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's disease and walking pace


February 14th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

USA Today
A cat bite can turn into a hospital stay, study says
by Mary Bowerman

A cat bite on the hand can turn into a hospital stay, according to a new study. A recent Mayo Clinic study shows that one out of three people who sought treatment for a cat bite to the hand wereUSA Today NEW hospitalized. Published in February in the Journal of Hand Surgery the study looked at 193 patients who received treatment for a cat bite on the hand from January 2009 through 2011. Two thirds of those hospitalized during the study required surgery to flush out the infection in the wounds and middle-aged women were the most common bite victims.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Additional Cat Bite Study Coverage:

NY Times
Beware of a Cat’s Bite
by Nicholas Bakalar

…In a three-year retrospective study published in the February issue of The Journal of Hand Surgery, researchers reviewed records NYTof 193 people who came to Mayo Clinic Hospital with cat bites to the hand…“Redness, swelling, increasing pain, difficulty in moving the hand and drainage from the wound are all signs that there may be an infection and that treatment should be sought,” said the senior author of the study, Dr. Brian T. Carlsen, a hand surgeon at the Mayo Clinic. 

FOX NewsCat bites can lead to serious severe infections, hospitalization, Research published in the Journal of Hand Surgery, found that one out of three people who sought treatment for a cat bite on the hand were hospitalized, reported USA Today…"The bites lead toFox News dot com serious infections that can require multiple hospitalizations, antibiotics and sometimes surgery," study researcher Dr. Brian Carlsen, an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic, told USA Today.

KARE 11HealthDayU.S. News & World ReportDetroit Free PressWMAZHealthWFMY News 2Winona Daily NewsLa Crosse TribuneYahoo! HealthTech TimesMinnPostCare2CBS NewsKTTCKSAZ Ariz.ScienceNewsUniversity HeraldBakersfield CalifornianMedPage TodayYahoo! FranceANSA,(Italian wire agency)

Context: Dogs aren’t the only pets who sometimes bite the hands that feed them. Cats do too, and when they strike a hand, they can inject bacteria deep into joints and tissue, perfect breeding grounds for infection.Cat bites to the hand are so dangerous, 1 in 3 patients with such wounds had to be hospitalized, a Mayo Clinic study covering three years showed. Two-third of those hospitalized needed surgery. Middle-aged women were the most common bite victims, according to the research, published in the Journal of Hand Surgery. More information can be found here on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Star Tribune
UnitedHealth-Mayo venture Optum Labs adds partners
by Jackie Crosby

An ambitious health care research initiative launched last year between Optum and the Mayo Clinic has landed seven new partners with interests in public health, pharmaceuticals and the Star-Tribune-Logo-300x45biosciences. The addition of groups that include pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and the University of Minnesota Nursing School is a sign that newly formed Optum Labs, based in Cambridge, Mass., is working to swiftly assemble the pieces for what it describes as an open center for research and innovation.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Minneapolis / St. Paul Business JournalCalgary Herald

Context: Optum Labs, the collaborative research and innovation center founded by Optum and Mayo Clinic, announced this week the addition of seven new charter partners committed to improving the quality and value of patient care. The announcement follows the recent addition of AARP as Founding Consumer Advocate Organization of the collaborative. John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO, offers his perspective on the announcement in Mayo's the Future of Health Care blog.

Public Affairs Contact: Josh Derr

Star Tribune
Sports fuel orthopedics boom, provide Mayo entry downtown
by Jeremy Olson

…Minnesota has seen some $66 million in capital projects related to orthopedic care between 2008 and 2012. And it is why the Mayo Clinic – after years of flirting with a Star Tribune Logomedical presence in the Twin Cities – broke through last week with the announcement of a downtown Minneapolis sports medicine center in league with the Minnesota Timberwolves. “The growth is being driven by a more active population that happens to be in competitive sports or fitness activities,” said Dr. Michael Stuart, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center who is in Sochi now as a team doctor for USA Hockey. “I have a 65-year-old patient who plays 120 softball games a year.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related sports medicine coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Our View: Sports medicine clinic is a slam dunk for Mayo Clinic

Star Tribune, Block E ready for its renovation

NBA.comColumn: Love's Role In Practice Facility Important To Him, Timberwolves

Previous Coverage in Mayo Clinic in the News

Context: Mayo Clinic and the Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx announced in early February a partnership which extends the Mayo Model of Care for patients in sports medicine to the Twin Cities. The collaboration includes: 1) the opening of a Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at 600 Hennepin, 2) designating Mayo as the preferred medical provider for the teams, and 3) utilizing the teams’ international reach to educate the public about numerous health and wellness topics.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic, Minnesota Timberwolves & Lynx Announce Collaboration

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Duluth News Tribune
Director hopes to hit home run with documentary about Chisholm doctor
By John Lundy

Twenty-five years after the movie “Field of Dreams” gave birth to the ethereal character “Moonlight” Graham, another film is being made about the real Dr. Archibald Graham, a short-lived baseball player and longtime Chisholm doctor. This film, a documentary, will explore theDuluth News Tribune long relationship between Graham and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester.  We found out that he had come down here to the Mayo Clinic from Chisholm approximately 90 times,” said Mark Flaherty, a film producer and director who works for the clinic.

Reach: The Duluth News Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 26,800 and a Sunday circulation of more than 39,400. Its website receives more than 116,500 visitors each month.

Related Coverage:

Duluth News Tribune, Filmmaker seeks help, The Mayo Clinic is looking for help from Chisholm-area residents with its documentary on Doc Graham. Mark Flaherty, the film’s producer and director, is looking for photos, films, letters and other mementos associated with Graham. He will scan and immediately return photos and letters; films will be copied and returned.

Context: Most people are at least familiar with the name "Moonlight" Graham as a character in the book Shoeless Joe and the film “Field of Dreams," but fewer people know that "Moonlight” Graham was an actual person, not a fictional character. And long-time residents of the Chisholm, Minn., area who remember Dr. Archibald Graham as their beloved hometown doctor will have an opportunity to provide photos, film and other information as part of an upcoming documentary film on this remarkable man. Find out more information on Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Seeks Input For Film About 'Doc' Graham.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

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Tags: 12News Arizona, African-American, Albany Herald, American Academy of Ophthalmology, ANSA, antiandrogen therapy, Antonita Slaughter, athletes and concussions, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, au Claire Leader-Telegram, babies, Bakersfield Californian


December 13th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

December 13, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

BBC
Dementia: Five priorities for research
by James Gallagher

Dementia is described as a "global disaster waiting to happen" and the biggest health and care problem of a generation. Someone is diagnosed with the disease every four seconds and cases are expected to soar from 44 million now to 135 million by 2050…Dr. Ronald Petersen, the director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Centre at the Mayo Clinic, US, told the BBC: "That's horrific when you think about the billions invested in the disease. "There are 44 million people with Alzheimer's and we have to treat them as well [as find a cure]".

Reach: The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is a British public service broadcasting company. Its main responsibility is to provide impartial public service broadcasting in the United Kingdom, the Channel Islands, and the Isle of Man. The BBC is headquartered in London.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Additional Coverage:
Bloomberg (AP), UK says cure or drug for dementia possible by 2025; The Times UK, G8 leadership promise to end the tragedy of dementia; Star Tribune, KSAZ Phoenix, KAAL, Huffington Post, Times Colonist

Modern Healthcare
Mayo using big data, digitized know-how to improve care and extend its reach
by Merrill Goozner

Dr. John Noseworthy has been president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic since 2009. Along with its flagship facilities in Rochester, Minn., Mayo has other hospitals in Minnesota as well as Arizona, Florida and Georgia. In an interview with Merrill Goozner, editor of Modern Healthcare, Noseworthy talks about the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on the system, Mayo's partnership arrangements with other provider organizations, and how it hopes to employ “big data” to improve healthcare outcomes. The following is an edited excerpt.

Modern Healthcare
Video News: Mayo Clinic's Dr. John Noseworthy (6:28)

Mayo Clinic President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy explains why the system chose a subscription model to strike clinical affiliations with providers around the country, its big-data deal with Optum Health, and the role the institution plays in its Minnesota home.

Reach:  Modern Healthcare, published by Crain Communications, is a healthcare news weekly that provides hospital executives with healthcare business news. The magazine specifically covers healthcare policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and healthcare from a business perspective. It also publishes a daily e-newsletter titled Modern Healthcare’s Daily Dose. The weekly publication has a circulation of more than 70,000 and its online site receives more than 29,700 unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Chris Gade, Karl Oestreich

Wall Street Journal
A Restaurant Chairman Whittles His Waist
by Jen Murphy

Levy Restaurants Chairman Larry Levy Fitness Secrets…The Pros and Cons of a Beach Workout, Exercising on the sand offers challenges—and a few possible pitfalls. The benefit of a beach workout is that it is kinder on the joints because "sand is shock absorbing," says Ed Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minn. "If you do jumping jacks, you diffuse the force when you come down," he says, but you need to use more energy to jump up again from a soft surface. The uneven sand also offers a balance challenge, causing you to use more stabilizing muscles, he says.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Ed Laskowski, M.D., is co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Twin Cities Business
John Noseworthy, President and CEO, Mayo Clinic

Since becoming its president in 2009, Noseworthy has led the Mayo Clinic through the recession and implemented several growth initiatives, in part by engaging, energizing, and being transparent with employees. among other things, we examine the Destination Medical Center initiative, which could change the face of Rochester for good.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

Pioneer Press
Giving a very special gift to a stranger: new kidneys
by Christopher Snowbeck

Phil Fischer's wife likes to joke that at least her husband's kidney gets to go out dancing every once in a while. About two years ago, Fischer joined the small but growing number of people who've donated a kidney to a stranger in need. “I think it did something good for somebody else in the world,” said Fischer, 58, a pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Of his motivation, he simply said: “It was something I was supposed to do, so I did it.”

Reach: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of 208,280 and its Sunday newspaper circulation is 284,507. Its TwinCities.com website had approximately 20.4 million page views (March 2013). Mobile page views on smartphones and tablet computers totaled more than 11.4 million in March 2013.

Additional coverage: Morning Sun Mich., The Reporter Pa.

Context: Phil Fischer, M.D., is a pediatrician with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center.
Public Affairs Contacts: Ginger Plumbo, Kelley Luckstein

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:

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Tags: ABC News, AIDS, Altru Health System, American Society of Hematology, Anastrozole, AP, Arimidex, ASH, Asperger's, Associated Press, Austin Public Schools, BBC


July 26th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich


 
July 26, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Wall Street Journal
Advances That Regrow Babies' Hearts
by Ron Winslow

Pediatric surgeons are developing a new strategy to tackle one of cardiology's most challenging congenital defects: babies born with only one heart ventricle. The doctors are enlisting the body's own regenerative powers in an effort to grow the missing ventricle or strengthen the remaining one…In the Mayo Clinic study, the focus isn't on salvaging the left ventricle, but on helping the right one serve as the main pumping chamber. Umbilical-cord blood cells are harvested at birth and processed to separate out stem cells, which are then frozen…The theory is that this "would stimulate more heart cells to grow or regenerate and make the existing cells stronger," says Harold Burkhart, a pediatric heart surgeon at the clinic. "The hope is it would delay the need for a transplant or the onset of a decrease in function of the single ventricle."

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Related Coverage:

Wall Street Journal
New Treatments Give Hope to Babies With Heart Defects

Pediatric surgeons at two of the country's top hospitals are developing new treatments that could dramatically improve the survival rates of babies born with congenital heart defects. WSJ's Ron Winslow and Mayo Clinic physician Tim Nelson explain on Lunch Break.

Context: Mayo Clinic announced the first U.S. stem cell clinical trial in June 2013 for pediatric congenital heart disease. The trial aims to determine how stem cells from autologous umbilical cord blood can help children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a rare defect in which the left side of the heart is critically underdeveloped. The trial will test the safety and feasibility of delivering a personalized cell-based therapy into the heart of 10 infants affected by HLHS.  Harold Burkhart, M.D. is a pediatric cardiovascular surgeon with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Timothy Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for HLHS in Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine.

News Release: Mayo Clinic First in U.S. to Test Stem Cells for Cardiac Regeneration in Pediatric Congenital Heart Patients

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

Minneapolis/ St. Paul Business Journal
Mayo Clinic adds health system in N.D.'s Bakken region to care network
by Katharine Grayson

The Mayo Clinic will add North Dakota-based Trinity Health to its Mayo Clinic Care Network, the health system announced Wednesday. Trinity operates hospitals in Minot, N.D., as well as skilled-nursing and long-term care facilities. It has more than 2,700 employers and about $617 million in annual revenue.

Circulation: The Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Additional Coverage: Charlotte Observer, KMOT ND, KQCD ND, Bradenton Herald, Star Tribune, Minot Daily News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Phys.org

Context: In a move designed to strengthen the delivery and quality of health care in northwest North Dakota, Mayo Clinic welcomed Trinity Health as the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network July 24, 2013. As a member of the network, Trinity Health's physicians and other providers will have direct access to Mayo Clinic experts and clinical resources.

News Release: Trinity Health Joins Mayo Clinic Care Network

Mayo Clinic Care Network Members

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Pioneer Press, (AP)
Big names populate Mayo expansion board
by Brian Bakst

Gov. Mark Dayton and the Mayo Clinic turned Tuesday to heavy hitters in business and politics to run a new governing authority that will oversee the medical facility's ambitious Destination Medical Center expansion in Rochester, which is billed as the state's largest-ever economic development project. Dayton made four picks to the eight-member board: his chief of staff Tina Smith, Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak, former Wells Fargo and Co. executive James Campbell and Rani Engineering president Susan Rani. Meanwhile, Mayo has designated ex-Medtronic chief executive Bill George as its representative on the panel.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional Coverage:

Star Tribune
Dayton to name 4 picks to new board overseeing Mayo's Destination Medical Center project

Star Tribune
Gov. appointment offers glimpse into Rybak's future

KNSI Radio St. Cloud, Prairie Business Magazine N.D., Duluth News Tribune, Grand Forks Herald, NBCNews, Star Tribune, Politics in Minnesota, MyFOX47, KARE11,  Pioneer Press, Post-Bulletin 

Context: Mayo Clinic announced July 23, 2013 that Bill George, a member of the Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees and former Chairman and CEO of Medtronic, has accepted the appointment to be Mayo Clinic's representative on the Destination Medical Center Corporation (DMCC) Board. Gov. Mark Dayton also named four appoiuntments to the board.

News Release: Bill George Named Mayo Clinic Representative to Destination Medical Center Corporation Board

News Release: Governor Dayton Makes Appointments to Destination Medical Center Board

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

MedPage Today
Docs Point to Others to Cut Health Costs
by David Pittman

Physicians feel that other major players in healthcare -- lawyers, insurance companies, hospitals, drug companies, and patients -- bear greater responsibility for reducing healthcare costs than doctors do, a survey found. Furthermore, doctors are hesitant to back substantial financing reforms such as eliminating fee-for-service, but they support reducing unnecessary treatments, Jon Tilburt, MD, MPH, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues found.

Reach: MedPageToday.com is a news service for physicians that provides a clinical perspective on the breaking medical news that their patients are reading. MedPage Today has more than 419,000 unique visitors and 1.2 million page views each month.

Additional Coverage: Pioneer Press, FOX News, Washington Post, Cardiology News, Kaiser Health News, LA Times, Columbus CEO, Toronto Telegraph, HealthDay, Fresno Bee, LiveScience, Medscape, ModernMedicine, HealthLeaders, PhysBizTech, DOTmed

Context: A new study of attitudes about health care costs reveals that an overwhelming majority of U.S. physicians feel a responsibility to address costs, but prioritize their obligations to patients' best interests over cost concerns. Results of the random survey of 2,500 U.S. physicians are published in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). "Physicians feel stuck in a difficult position," says lead author Jon Tilburt, M.D., Mayo Clinic's Biomedical Ethics Program and Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. "Despite their sense of responsibility to address health care costs, physicians consistently express a commitment to the best interests of patients even when it is expensive. Given this finding, we recommend that cost-containment strategies aimed at physician behavior should focus on innovations that not only promote savings but also preserve physicians' commitment to individual patients."

News Release: Mayo Clinic-led Study Finds that US Physicians Put Patients' Best Interests Above Concerns About Health Care Costs

Public Affairs Contact: Shelly Plutowski

MPR
The Daily Circuit: Government ponders move to stub out menthol cigarettes

"Menthol makes a deadly product more palatable" and should be banned from cigarettes, says a Mayo Clinic doctor who works on nicotine addiction.  Dr. Richard Hurt told The Daily Circuit on Tuesday that the addition of chemicals like menthol to cigarettes "makes it easier to start and harder to stop."  Hurt's comments followed the release of federal Food and Drug Administration survey that found menthol cigarettes are a bigger threat to public health than other cigarettes. The finding was contained in a review released this morning.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Related Coverage:

MedPage Today, FDA Eyes Menthol in Cigarettes

Context: Dr. Richard Hurt is director of Mayo Clinic’s Nicotine Dependence Center and a leading expert on tobacco-related issues. As a former smoker, he once smoked three packs a day. Dr. Hurt had his last cigarette on Nov. 22, 1975.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Phoenix Business Journal
Arizona bioscience leaders stress need for more collaboration, industry awareness
by Erin Roman

Arizona’s bioscience leaders said Wednesday there is a lack of understanding about their industry, but huge growth potential and value to investors in the Phoenix area…The panel consisted of Sayare, A. Keith Stewart, the dean for research at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona; Jack Jewett, president of the Flinn Foundation; and Joan Koerber-Walker, president and CEO of the Arizona BioIndustry Association.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B. is dean for research and conducts translational research in multiple myeloma at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: AP, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Bill George, Bradenton Herald, Cancer, Cardiology News, Charlotte Observer, cigarettes, Columbus CEO, congenital defects, destination medical center


June 4th, 2012

ASCO 2012 Multiple Myeloma Update – Day Three: New Myeloma Treatments

By Admin

One of the morning presentations was given by Dr. Melissa Alsina from the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida.  Dr. Alsina presented a Phase 2 study of panobinostat in combination with Velcade (bortezomib) and dexamethasone (Decadron)… The panobinostat trial results were reviewed by Dr. Asher Chanan-Khan of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, in a presentation that also took place during this morning’s session.

 

Myeloma Beacon

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Tags: Dr. Asher Chanan-Khan, Dr. Melissa Alsina, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, multiple myeloma, Myeloma Beacon