Items Tagged ‘Ovarian Cancer’

April 14th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

ABC News
What patients need to know about new recommendations for prostate cancer screening
by Allison Bond

The new recommendations may help patients get personalized care to address their health and specific concerns. The guidelines empower patients to talk with their doctor about personalized care tailored to their health and priorities, Dr. Jeff Karnes, a urologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who was not involved in the new recommendations, toldABC News logo ABC News. “A man should be allowed to discuss with his physician whether to have a PSA ordered or not,” Karnes said.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage: NBC NewsKTIC Nebraska

Context: R. Jeffrey Karnes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic urologist. Dr. Karnes and his urologist colleagues diagnose and treat problems involving the male and female urinary tract and the male reproductive organs.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Daily Mail
Paralysed man moves his legs and STANDS for the first time after a computer-controlled electrode is inserted into his abdomen and stimulates his spinal chord
by Claudia Tanner

A man paralysed from the waist down has moved his legs for the first time after doctors inserted an electrode sending an electrical current to the spinal cord… Mayo Clinic researchers, who tested the pioneering treatment, say these results offer further evidence that a combination of this technology and rehabilitation may help patients with spinal cord injuries regain control.

Context: the Daily Mail has a circulation of more than 1.4 million readers. Its website has more than 16.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: ReliaWire, Infobae.com

Previous coverage in April 7, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the April 7, 2017 News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers used electrical stimulation on the spinal cord and intense physical therapy to help a man intentionally move his paralyzed legs, stand and make steplike motions for the first time in three years. The case, the result of collaboration with UCLA researchers, appears today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers say these results offer further evidence that a combination of this technology and rehabilitation may help patients with spinal cord injuries regain control over previously paralyzed movements, such as steplike actions, balance control and standing. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Susan Barber LindquistRhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo Clinic Expanding Sports Medicine Facility In Minneapolis
by Sam Schaust

It was revealed last week when Chicago-based LaSalle Investment Management purchased Mayo Clinic Square that the building was 96 percent leased. Mayo spokeswoman Rhoda Madson told TCB that the medical institution’s expansion would be into the existing space on the second level connected to the skyway. “The cost of the project and our staffing needs are still beingTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo determined,” Madson said, noting that work on the new space is expected to wrap by the end of the year. Mayo said in a release on Friday that the expansion would include a number of additions and improvements to its current operation.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional coverage: Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, KTTCPost-Bulletin

Context: Mayo Clinic announced April 6 that it is expanding its services, space and other capabilities at its sports medicine facility in downtown Minneapolis to meet the growing demand for its expertise. Construction on the 16,000-square-foot project at Mayo Clinic Square is expected to begin in late April. “This project builds on our commitment to patients in the Twin Cities area by providing more convenient and accessible sports medicine services,” says Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine. “This expansion allows us to serve our patients better by tapping Mayo Clinic’s expertise, cutting-edge technology, research and educational capabilities." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Star Tribune
Mayo doctor performs 'life-changing' surgeries on kids all over the world
by Allie Shah

Born with a congenital heart defect, a 13-year-old girl in Mongolia was suffering from severe heart failure. Even worse, she had no place to go for the medical care she desperately needed. Star Tribune newspaper logoEnter Dr. Allison Cabalka, a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist. As part of a U.S. medical team, she traveled to Mongolia to treat children with heart defects in countries where heart surgical resources are limited or nonexistent. Cabalka also helped bring the girl to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, where she underwent surgery. “It was life-changing,” Cabalka said. “She graduated from high school and university training in Mongolia and moved to Istanbul this year to pursue further education.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Allison Cabala, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist. Dr. Cabalka's research interests in the areas of congenital and interventional cardiac catheterization and congenital echocardiography. Dr. Cabalka cares for patients of all ages with congenital heart disease and also participates in the care of adult patients with structural heart disease with Mayo Clinic's structural heart disease team.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Florida Times-Union
Guest column: Medical research plays an important role in meeting patient needs
by Gianrico Farrugia, M.D.

Ingenuity, innovation and hard work have been the key drivers of our state’s economic destiny. The support of state and federal governments, the private sector and philanthropy must continue to advance research, promote discovery and develop the next generation of scientists and innovators. This is vital to solve the threats to public health while maximizing theFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo tremendous economic benefit of innovation for Florida’s communities…Mayo Clinic is a committed partner in accelerating Florida’s economy. While the NIH budget over the past decade has remained flat with the exception of some targeted funding from the 21st Century Cures Act, Mayo Clinic has doubled our investment in research. Right now we are testing a vaccine that could become a gold standard therapy and prevent recurrence of breast cancer, and testing drugs that starve cancers. We also are developing mechanisms for the body’s immune system to protect itself from cancer. Physician Gianrico Farrugia is CEO of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: ABC News, aging, birth control, Bitacora Medica, brain tumor, Breast Cancer, Cancer, Cardiology Advisor, cellulitis, Chatelaine, Clinical Advisor, CNBC


March 17th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

KTTC
Mayo Clinic researchers pinpoint experimental drug that may shrink tumors in multiple myeloma patients
by Jason Pope

The Mayo Clinic says this experimental drug is leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is a cancer that affects the blood cells that fight infection. Rather than fighting infection, the cancer causes kidney problems and infections. AccordingKTTC TV logo to Dr. Marta Chesi, the drug was developed to support tumor death but instead of killing the tumor cells, it made them more visible. This visibility helps the immune system spot the tumor cells and eliminate them.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Life Science Daily

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers have found that an experimental drug, LCL161, stimulates the immune system, leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. The findings are published in Nature Medicine. Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that affects plasma cells – white blood cells that normally produce antibodies to fight infection. Rather than produce helpful antibodies, the cancer cells, as they grow, secrete large amounts of a single antibody that accumulate in the body, causing kidney problems and infections. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Huffington Post
Finding treatments to fight fibroids

Fibroid embolization and focused ultrasound are minimally invasive options that reproductive endocrinologist Dr. Ebbie Stewart says warrant Huffington Post Logomore research to help guide women and health care providers on a treatment plan. She co-authored a recent study that looked at the two treatments, compared recovery time, and noted adverse events in the first six weeks after treatment, Dr. Stewart says.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers.

Context:  Elizabeth "Ebbie Stewart, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic ObGyn. Dr. Stewart studies uterine fibroids, also called uterine leiomyomas or myomas. Fibroids are noncancerous tumors of the uterus that commonly cause heavy menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain and pressure, bowel and bladder problems, and sometimes infertility and miscarriage. Fibroids are also the leading cause of hysterectomy.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Men’s Health
This Exact Workout Routine May Actually Reverse Aging
by Elizabeth Millard

Research has shown physical activity can reduce inflammation in your body and improve heart health—both important for staying young beyond your years. But not all exercise is the same in keeping age-related decline at bay, researchers from the Mayo Clinic say…“Decline is mitochondria isMens Health Logo the key factor responsible for age-related physical declines,” says the study’s senior author, Sreekumaran Nair, M.D., Ph.D. That includes osteoporosis, arthritis, gastrointestinal issues, decreased flexibility, hypertension, and cardiovascular issues. “Higher intensity of exercise seems to elicit a rejuvenation of mitochondrial [processes] in everybody, including older people.”

Reach: Men's Health has an audience of more than 13.5 million readers.

Additional coverage: Healthline, The Hans India, Canindia.com, AARP

Context: Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell MetabolismMayo researchers compared high-intensity interval training, resistance training and combined training. All training types improved lean body mass and insulin sensitivity, but only high-intensity and combined training improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle. Decline in mitochondrial content and function are common in older adults. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Bob Nellis

 

Washington Post
It’s not just being stuck inside; cold weather sets us up for getting sick
by Emily Sohn

It's not clear why winter brings so many health woes, says Pritish Tosh, an infectious-disease physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Washington Post newspaper logoRochester, Minnesota. "The reason one virus is a wintertime virus may not be the same reason another virus is a wintertime virus," Tosh says. "We're finding more and more that it's not one size fits all."

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
Chicago TribuneWhy do we get sick in winter?
Health, How to Get Rid of the Flu Faster

Context: Pritish Tosh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. Dr. Tosh is interested in emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them, ranging from collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development to hospital systems research related to pandemic preparedness. Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting.

Contact: Bob Nellis

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Tags: AARP, ABC News, Analitica, Anesthesiology News, Associated Press, Becker’s Hospital Review, bone health, Brandix, bullying, BuzzFeed, Canindia.com, Cardiovascular Business


November 18th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
The one thing missing from the debate over Obamacare, according to a top doctor
by Carolyn Y. Johnson

President-elect Donald Trump’s promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act while preserving some key elements has triggered rampant speculation about the future of American health care — and plunged millions of patients who benefit from the law into deep uncertainty aboutWashington Post newspaper logo the future of their coverage. Little is known about the replacement plan that will ultimately emerge. But one voice angling to shape future policy is the leader of the Mayo Clinic, neurologist John Noseworthy. “Patients are getting frustrated and fearful and anxious that they can’t have access to the care that’s best suited for them,” Noseworthy said. “How can you have a great country if our citizens can’t get access to world class health care? It’s actually not a bad time to reassess.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Albuquerque Journal, The Journal

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Forbes
Are Naproxen and Ibuprofen Sometimes Risky? A Controversial Study Of Celebrex Raises Concerns
by Matthew Herper

A study released today may mean that the painkiller celecoxib, once sold under the brand name Celebrex, is safer than prescription doses of Forbes Pharma and Healthcare logoibuprofen or naproxen. That is if the study, which is already controversial, means anything at all. … “It’s fascinating that Celebrex is not worse, and may have a small trend to being better,” says Rekha Mankad, director of the cardio-rheumatology clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “I as a cardiologist I would prefer that nobody take any of these drugs on a long-term basis ever.” Still she says, it’s better for patients to get non-steroidal drugs like these than opioids, which are often the next option.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: CBS News

Context: Rekha Mankad, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Mankad's interests include gender disparities that exist in regards to heart disease, the relationship between autoimmune diseases and coronary artery disease and gender differences in valvular heart disease.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CNN
Crawling has some fitness experts going gaga
by Jacqueline Howard

On any given morning, as the sun peeks over the horizon, Danielle Johnson can be found crawling down the hallways of her Rochester, CNN LogoMinnesota, home. It may sound bizarre, but Johnson crawls every day to strengthen her core muscle groups. "You can crawl in many ways. You can crawl on your hands and knees. You can also prop up on your toes and just hover, one or two inches above the ground, which is really going to pull in those core muscles and work those muscles effectively," said Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program.

Reach: Cable News Network (CNN) is a worldwide news and information network providing live, continuous coverage of news from around the globe, 24 hours a day. CNN online received more than 55 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Huffington Post
A Culture of Legacy
by Marcia McMullen

The recent passing of a cultural icon in health care revealed a rare glimpse into how a successful 150-year-old brand built on a clear mission and Huffington Post Logoexacting processes which ultimately became its culture. Dr. William J. Mayo’s clarity of mission, “The needs of the patient come first.” set into a motion a defining statement that would withstand not only time, but also cultural shifts and leadership changes. One of those change leaders, Sr. Generose Gervais, OSF, administrator and executive director emeritus, Saint Marys Campus-Mayo Clinic Hospital, recently passed away at the age of 97.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique visitors.

Previous coverage in the October 21, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Sister Generose Gervais, long-time administrator of Saint Marys Hospital and president of the Poverello Foundation, passed away peacefully recently in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97. Sister Generose will be remembered for her tireless work on behalf of patients and the staff of Saint Marys Hospital. Her hospital ministry focused on perpetuating the Franciscan legacy, specifically nurturing the values of respect, integrity, compassion, healing, teamwork, innovation, excellence and stewardship among all Mayo Clinic staff. “Sister Generose was known for her faith, her quiet leadership, her wise counsel, her dedication to patients and staff, her sense of humor and the example of service that she lived every day,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic was blessed by her presence for more than 60 years.” More information about Sister Generose can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and Mayo Clinic in the Loop.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

New York Times
Q&A: A look at the cancer some believe linked to Vietnam War

…Bile duct cancer is unusual because it can be prevented in some cases. Pills can wipe out liver flukes early on, but the medicine is not effective in later stages after the worms have died and scarring has occurred. Surgery is possible in some cases, but the survivalThe New York Times newspaper logo rate is only about 30 percent for five years, said Dr. Gregory Gores, a gastroenterologist and executive dean of research at Mayo Clinic. Affected countries, such as Vietnam and Laos, have not conducted extensive research to determine the extent of the problem. The world’s highest rate of cholangiocarcinoma — about 84 new cases per 100,000 people — is found in northeastern Thailand where many people eat a popular raw fish dish.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage: WTOP Washington, Star Tribune, Associated Press

Context: Gregory Gores, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.  Dr. Gores research is focused on mechanisms of liver cell death, especially apoptosis. He employs disease-relevant models to unravel the fundamental cellular processes contributing to liver injury during cholestasis and fatty liver diseases. In addition, Dr. Gores' lab is also interested in the mechanisms by which cancer cells escape from cell death in order to undergo malignant transformation and metastases.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

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Tags: ABC News, Affordable care act, aging, Albuquerque Journal, AliveCor, alzheimer's disease, Angela Lunde, Arizona Daily Sun, Associated Press, Attn:, AZ Big Media, Baltimore Sun


September 30th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

ABC News
9-Year-Old Twin Sisters Dance With Bone Marrow Donor Who Saved Them
by Nicole Pelletiere

A pair of identical twin sisters from Minnesota were able to thank the man whose life-saving donation gave them the ability to be kids again.  “They fell in love with him right away,” mom Michelle Girtler, 43, of Minnesota City told ABC News today. “They took to him like they knew him their entire life. It was emotional, all of us were emotional. Lots of tears, a lot of gratitude."… This year, Elizabeth and Kathryn's doctor,ABC News logo Dr. Shakila Khan of the Mayo Clinic, submitted their story to Be the Match in hopes of setting up a meeting between them and their then anonymous donor.  The man, Ingo Gruda of Munster, Germany, was flown to Minnesota to meet with the girls over four after their transplants, Be the Match confirmed to ABC News.

Reach: ABC News Online has more than 28.8 million unique visitors to its site each month. ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir averages about 9.2 million viewers each night.

Additional coverage: Inside Edition, KVNU-AM

Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Shakila Khan, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Dr. Khan's collaborative clinical research efforts include the Children's Oncology Group and Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium (PBMTC). She has also has served as the Mayo Clinic principal investigator for a large number of Children's Oncology Group and PBMTC protocols, and she's also the Mayo Clinic principal investigator for PBMTC.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

 

Wall Street Journal
Trying to Break Unhealthy Habits? There’s a Coach for That
by Barbara Sadick

Changing unhealthy habits is hard, doctors say. But with Americans suffering from chronic disease in epidemic proportions, a big push is under way to get more individuals to do just that. … A Mayo Clinic study of WSJ Banner100 participants who worked with a wellness coach found that a majority had lost weight, improved nutritional habits and increased their physical activity by the end of the 12-week program. While there was some slippage in healthy behaviors at a three-month follow-up, the participants were still in better shape than before the coaching started, the study found. “Many people can implement positive lifestyle changes, but maintaining change over time is extremely difficult,” says Matthew M. Clark, a clinical psychologist at Mayo Clinic and the lead author of the study.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Several national surveys have found that approximately 15 to 20 percent of adults in the U.S. will report high levels of stress. A new study by Mayo Clinic researchers identified stress and burnout as a major problem employees face within the medical industry, leading to negative health behaviors. With rising stress levels in the workplace for employees, many companies are looking to integrate, engage and enroll employees into wellness programs. “It’s important to teach individuals to monitor their stress levels over time and practice effective, ongoing stress-reduction strategies, such as getting involved in wellness programs, this will in-turn help health care employees live a happy and health life,” says Matthew Clark, Ph.D., lead author of the study and resiliency expert at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Wall Street Journal
The Revolution in EMS Care
by Laura Landro

Much of the best equipment—including a helicopter equipped as a mobile emergency room or intensive-care unit—can be found at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn. Regarded as a leader in sophisticated onboard equipment and communications, Mayo often consults with other medical transport systems to share best patient care strategies, and works with U.S. military physicians to share expertise on WSJ Bannerhow treatment of battlefield wounds might apply to civilian medicine. Mayo provides increasingly advanced pre-hospital treatment, says Scott Zietlow, a trauma surgeon and medical director of the Mayo One trauma helicopter program.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Emergency Medicine specialists work at all three Mayo Clinic locations to treat life-threatening illnesses. Teams of board-certified physicians, registered nurses, and other specially trained staff are available at all times to treat anyone seeking emergency medical care. Each year Mayo emergency care physicians see more than 80,000 patients in the emergency care setting.  Mayo Clinic Medical Transport provides ground and air medical transport services from its base in Rochester:

Contact: Glenn Lyden

 

Modern Healthcare
Q&A: ‘If Mayo was a high-cost provider, we would be cut out of many of these networks’
by Bob Herman

Mayo Clinic, which has a 150-year history as a medical practice, now operates 22 hospitals and draws patients with complex needs from all over the world to its 1,243-bed flagship facility in Rochester, Minn. The Modern Healthcareorganization has also garnered praise for insulating clinical decisions from financial incentives by paying physicians under a salary model with no productivity bonuses. … Bob Herman, Modern Healthcare's Midwest bureau chief, interviewed Mayo President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy while he was in Chicago as co-chair of a consortium of 12 health system CEOs convened with the American Medical Association to address physician burnout.

Reach: Modern Healthcare is the industry's leading source of healthcare business and policy news, research and information. The magazine covers health care policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and health care from a business perspective. Modern Healthcare magazine is ranked No. 1 in readership among healthcare executives and deemed a "must-read" by the who's who in healthcare. Modern Healthcare has more than 72,0000 paid magazine subscribers and its website receives more than 568,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Modern Healthcare (video)Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy on physician burnout and value-based care

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Mayo Clinic has taken a leadership role in identifying solutions to address the physician burnout issue. This research has been led by  Tait Shanaflet, M.D., a Mayo Clinic hematologist. He is the director of the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Program on Physician Well-being, a clinical laboratory evaluating personal and organizational factors that contribute to physician satisfaction. His research in this area has involved physicians at all stages of their career from medical school to practice had has include several multi-center and national studies. This research is intended to identify personal and organizational factors that can be modified in order to promote physician well-being and enhance the quality of care physicians deliver. More information on his physician burnout research can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: DuskaAnastasijevic, Karl Oestreich

 

Arizona Republic
Many people have expressed interest in wanting to learn what is their risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease
by Dr. Richard Caselli
— Question: What is Alzheimer’s disease and is it wise to get tested for risk? Answer: Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative disease; brain cells slowly dying. We don’t fully understand why. To some degree, degeneration is a natural process, but this accelerates that process to a pathological degree. Many people have expressed interest in wanting to learn what is their risk for developing Alzheimer’s, and that’s whereArizona Republic newspaper logo the idea of predictive testing comes in, somebody who isn’t ill today but who wants to know am I going to get this in the future.…Dr. Richard Caselli is a neurologist specializing in behavioral disorders and serves as associate director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Reach: The Arizona Republic has daily circulation of more than 180,000 and its website azcentral.com has more than 2.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Richard Caselli, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Caselli's research focuses on cognitive aging and the changes that can be detected before the symptomatic onset of memory loss and related symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Tags: ABC News, ABC2 News, Alzhheimer's, Angie Murad, Arnold Palmer, artificial sweetener, Athletic Business, Attn:, Austin Daily Herald, awake brain surgery, Be the Match, Becker's Hospital News


July 22nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

New York Times
Fecal Transplants Can Be Life-Saving, but How?
by Carl Zimmer

Now scientists are testing fecal transplants against such diseases as ulcerative colitis, and even obesity and diabetes…The bacteria in stool seem to be particularly important. Dr. Sahil Khanna of the Mayo Clinic and his colleagues isolated the spores of about 50 different species of bacteriaThe New York Times newspaper logo found in stool samples donated by healthy people. They put the spores in pills, which they gave to 30 patients with C. difficile infections. As they reported in the July 15 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 29 of the patients recovered.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Clostridium difficile (klos-TRID-e-um dif-uh-SEEL), often called C. difficile or C. diff, is a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. Mayo Clinic specializes in treating people with difficult cases of C. difficile who haven't responded to standard medical treatments or who have developed complications such as an inflamed colon. The Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, opened a C. difficile clinic that specializes in treating patients with C. difficile infection.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

New York Times
Pat Summitt’s Public Fight Spurs Research Support

Perhaps the most tangible evidence of the difference Summitt made is set to come in December with the opening of the Pat Summitt Alzheimer’s The New York Times newspaper logoClinic at the University of Tennessee Medical Center. “I think it’s going to become a real icon in the Southeastern part of the States for Alzheimer’s disease care and research,” said Ronald Petersen, the director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota…“People raved about her willingness to do this,” Petersen said. “She maintained a sense of humor as far into the disease as she could. She likened the battle to coaching basketball, and the way the players would react to a challenge on the court is the way she was reacting to dealing with this disease.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Post-Bulletin
Blue Cross honors Mayo's kidney donor program
by Brett Boese

An innovative Mayo Clinic program that pairs kidney donors with needy transplant patients was recognized Tuesday by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota's new Trailblazing Tour. It was one of 11 programs honored for its creative and forward-thinking methods, according to Blue Cross. Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperThe thought process behind Mayo's new donor program is simple, but it has drawn high praise while being hailed as revolutionary. "Mayo Clinic Living Donor Program's pioneering Paired Donation Program is evolving how patients receive transplants – in turn, proving how innovative trailblazers can accelerate the pace of improving health across Minnesota," said Garrett Black, senior vice president of health services at Blue Cross. "By recognizing the Mayo Clinic Living Donor Program, we hope to start a meaningful conversation and engage communities like Rochester throughout the state to reach their full potential and work together to transform health care."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The Paired Donation Program came out of the knowledge that the current system simply wasn’t working as well as it could. Mayo Clinic – ranked number one in the nation for nephrology by US News & World Report –realized that by matching up people willing to donate a kidney with those in need of a transplant, they may be able to help someone else, if not their immediate friend or family member. A kidney from a living donor leads to better outcomes for the patients, and those that have had a friend or family member go through a kidney transplant tend to be more willing to be on the list to donate if a match arises. More information can be found here.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Chicago Tribune
How to shop for sunscreen
by Alison Bowen

Spray, stick or lotion? The Mayo Clinic lays out pros and cons. A stick might be easy to apply around the eye, or a gel might help with a hairy Chicago Tribune Logochest. Lotions are easy for large applications. And if you use a spray, stay away from the wind — spraying your limbs in the wind might not result in full coverage.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context:  Mayo Clinic experts say the best sunscreen is one that you'll use generously and according to label directions. Here's help understanding sunscreen ingredients, types of sunscreen and more.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

ActionNewsJax
Expert weighs in possible Zika virus transmitted by mosquito in Miami
by Letisha Bereola

The first possible homegrown case of Zika transmitted by mosquito is being investigated in Miami. Action News Jax went to the Mayo Clinic to find out what health officials are zeroing in on. Dr. Vandana Bhide is an internist and pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic. She says a medical team will be examining the virus closely. “What are the DNA fingerprints of this particular infection? And we want to be sure it’s a recent infection ActionNewsJaxand not a similar infection like dengue fever,” she said.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic internist and pediatrician.

Contact: Kevin Punksy

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Tags: ABC15 Arizona, AccuWeather, ActionNewsJax, ALS News Today, alzheimer's disease, anesthesia, back surgery, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood donation, blood donors, Blue Cross, Business Standard




November 20th, 2015

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

WBNG 12 Action News
Local provider joins Mayo Clinic network
by Nick Papantonis

…“Joining the Mayo Clinic Care Network was a natural fit for Guthrie, and we feel it makes sense for both our organizations,” said Joeseph Scopelliti, M.D., president and CEO of Guthrie. For its part, the Mayo Clinic network will have access to the expertise from Guthrie’s fourWBNG CBS NY hospitals and 290 physicians. “This relationship gives us the opportunity to build on our uniquely similar cultures,” said David Hayes, M.D., medical director of the Mayo network.

Reach: WBNG-TV is the CBS-affiliated television station for the Eastern Twin Tiers of Southern Upstate New York and Northern Pennsylvania.

Additional coverage: My Twin Tiers, Elmira Star-Gazette, Corning Leader, My Twin Tiers, Steuben Courier Advocate, WENY NY, Morning Times, Time Warner Cable News, Press Connects

Context: Guthrie and Mayo Clinic announced this week that Guthrie has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of health care providers committed to better serving patients and their families through collaboration. Guthrie, the first health care organization based in Pennsylvania and New York to join the network, will be its 36th member. The formal agreement gives Guthrie access to the latest Mayo Clinic knowledge and promotes physician collaboration that complements local expertise. “Joining the Mayo Clinic Care Network was a natural fit for Guthrie, and we feel it makes sense for both our organizations,” says Joseph Scopelliti, M.D., president and CEO, of Guthrie. “We share a history with Mayo Clinic, as Guthrie was modeled after Mayo when Dr. Guthrie returned here from his residency training in Rochester, Minnesota, over 100 years ago.” More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukishima Madson

 

News4Jax
Positively Jax: Mother receives lifesaving heart transplant
by Francesca Amiker

Months after News4Jax first aired the story about a local mother in need of a heart transplant, she received the news that her life depended on it. Laquisha Mathis, a mother of five has been living with cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. In February she was told she had six News Jax 4 Logomonths to live, unless she received a lifesaving heart transplant. At the time under her health care policy she was unable to receive the transplant but thanks to her determined doctors and the stories on News4Jax, she says she is now receiving a second chance at life. Last week Mathis received the news she’s been praying for, a heart transplant.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: This young Jacksonville mother of five who was told she only had a few months to live back in February unless she received a heart transplant. The patient, who originally had several obstacles preventing her from being listed for a new heart, eventually was listed thanks to support from Mayo Clinic’s Florida transplant team and received her new heart on Nov. 4 after a more than two month wait. At Mayo Clinic, an integrated team of doctors trained in heart disease (cardiologists), heart and lung surgery (cardiac and thoracic surgeons), infectious disease management, and other specialties evaluates you and treats your condition. Mayo Clinic doctors work with doctors from many other areas to provide the most appropriate heart care.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Washington Post
Here’s what happens to your body after you down an energy drink. It’s kind of scary
by Ariana Cha

There's been a lot of controversy about caffeine-spiked energy drinks in recent years following a spate of deaths aWashington Post newspaper logond overdoses related to the beverages. In one of the most heartbreaking cases, 14-year-old Anais Fournier of Maryland died after consuming two 24-ounce cans of an energy drink. Food and Drug Administration has been studying such cases to try to determine if there's a causal link and, if so, what to do about it…In an effort to get more information about exactly happens in your body after you consume one of the drinks, Mayo Clinic researcher Anna Svatikova and her colleagues recruited 25 volunteers.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Additional coverage:

Star Tribune — To Your Health: Drinking even just one energy drink a day may boost heart disease risk, Yahoo!

Previous coverage

Context: New research shows that drinking one 16-ounce energy drink can increase blood pressure and stress hormone responses significantly. This raises the concern that these response changes could increase the risk of cardiovascular events, according to a study presented this week at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015. The findings also are published in the Journal of the American Medical Association“In previous research, we found that energy drink consumption increased blood pressure in healthy young adults,” says Anna Svatikova, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiology fellow and the first author. “We now show that the increases in blood pressure are accompanied by increases in norepinephrine, a stress hormone chemical, and this could predispose an increased risk of cardiac events – even in healthy people.” More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Economic development chief is the force driving Rochester's $6B rebirth
by Matt McKinney

A pair of tennis shoes tucked into her bag, a water bottle at the ready, Lisa Clarke steps into a meeting in a busy morning full of them and drops a
Star Tribune newspaper logowell-worn line. “It’s a good day to be in Rochester,” she says, flashing a broad smile at those in attendance. The extra shoes come in handy when she’s hurrying through the city’s skyways to her next thing. A packed schedule came with the job, as did a long title: executive director of the Destination Medical Center’s Economic Development Agency.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond.

Contact: Jamie Rothe

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Tags: ‘firm 40’ workweek, 24New Canada, 4-Traders, Albany Daily Star, Albert Lea Tribune, Almanac TPT, alternative medicine, alzheimer's disease, Arizona Big Media, Arizona Republic, AZ Republic, Becker’s Hospital Review


November 6th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News iMayo Clinic in the News Logos a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

NY Times
For Statins, Cholesterol Care May Be Just the Start
by Jane Brody

…However, not everyone responds well to statins. About 5 percent of people have distressing muscle aches, and some experience an unhealthy rise in blood sugar.The New York Times newspaper logo Furthermore, Dr. Stephen L. Kopecky, a preventive cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said that about 15 percent to 20 percent of people were “hyporesponders” – their LDL level is only minimally reduced or actually goes up on a statin. They may be good candidates for one of three other newer drugs that lower cholesterol by different mechanisms.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Steven Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. His research interests include cardiovascular clinical trials primarily in coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
Health care consolidation: Which way is up, and why are we going there?
by Ronald Wirtz

Health care providers are Fed Gazette Logolooking to scale—in a variety of forms—to meet evolving market demands and regulatory pressures …Pointing to the likes of Mayo Clinic and Cleveland Clinic, highly reputable health care systems, “the common seed is that they employ physicians,” said Anderson. “This allows you to design a care model where the physician and hospital have the same stake in the outcome. They are bound together.”

 

Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
Beyond mergers and acquisitions: When providers marry but don't live together
by Ronald Wirtz

More than a thousand miles separate Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and Livingston HealthCare, in Livingston, Mont., and possibly as much virtual distance lies betweenFed Gazette Logo their organizational size, structure and complexity. The Mayo Clinic owns 70 hospitals in a handful of states, employs more than 50,000 people and has a worldwide reputation…Over the previous two decades, Mayo Clinic “had acquired a number of hospitals throughout the Midwest” and today has a presence in 70 communities in a multistate region, according to Jeff Bolton, Mayo chief administrative officer. But in the past five years or so, he said, “we’ve moved away from an active M&A strategy.”

Sidebars:

Beyond mergers and acquisitions: When providers marry but don't live together

Accountable care organizations: The shift from volume to value, Loss of independent physicians: Follow the money

Reach: Fedgazette is written for bankers, economists, legislators, educators and anyone interested in issues that affect the ninth Federal Reserve District economy. It is published to share economic information with the district, which includes Montana, North and South Dakota, Minnesota, northwestern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The magazine is published every other month.

Context: Mayo Clinic launched Mayo Clinic Care Network in 2011. The network consists of more than 30 member organizations across the United States, and in Mexico and Singapore. Network members remain independent, but share a common philosophy, commitment and mission to improve the quality and delivery of health care.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Florida Times-Union
How Mayo Clinic is ramping up medical tourism in Jacksonville
by Colleen Michele Jones

It’s been nearly a year since Dr. Gianrico Farrugia took over the helm of the Mayo Florida Times-Union newspaper logoClinic in Florida as CEO of the Jacksonville campus of the world-renowned institution based in Rochester, Minnesota. At a luncheon Tuesday hosted by the World Affairs Council of Jacksonville, Farrugia spoke about how under his leadership the center is ramping up ways to make Northeast Florida a destination for medical tourism.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. spoke at a luncheon hosted by the World Affairs Council of Jacksonville and  spoke about how under his leadership the center is ramping up ways to make Northeast Florida a destination for medical tourism. Dr. Farrugia is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

KJZZ Ariz.
Joseph Sirven: Are We Overprescribing Antibiotics?

“Dr. Sirven, would you mind writing a prescription for antibiotics?” asked a patient. “Oh, I don’t feel comfortable doing that unless I’m certain you really need them,” I KJZZ NPR -AZ Logosaid. The patient jokingly followed with, “Oh, come on, did you miss that day in med school? I have a runny nose and a cough, and an antibiotic would easily take care of it.”

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Context: Joseph Sirven, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

Contact:  Jim McVeigh

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Tags: "Authentic Connections", "liquid biopsies", ABC15 Phoenix, Alaska Star, anxiety disorders, appendicitis, asthmatics, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Augustine Herald, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, Becker’s Hospital Review CFO, bleach wipes


September 4th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

New York Times
New Alternatives to Statins Add to a Quandary on Cholesterol
By Gina Kolata

Doctors have long faced a conundrum in prescribing statins to lower cholesterol and heart attack risk: The drugs are cheap and effective for most people, and large, rigorous clinical trials have found minimal side effects. But as many as 25 percent of those who try them complain of muscle The New York Times newspaper logopain. Others stop taking the drugs because, they say, they cause a hazy memory or sleep problems, among other side effects not documented in studies...At the Mayo Clinic here, Dr. Stephen L. Kopecky, who directs a program for statin-intolerant patients, says he is well aware that middle-age and older adults who typically need statins may blame the drugs for aches, pains and memory losses that have other causes. He also knows his patients peruse the Internet, which is replete with horror stories about the dangers of statins.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage:
Star Tribune  — Pricey new cholesterol drugs pose new dilemma in treatment; Houston Chronicle, Massachusetts TelegramNewsmax Health 

Related coverage:
The Science Times — New Drug To Lower Bad Cholesterol Levels; Healthcare Business Daily News

Context: Doctors in the Statin Intolerance Service within the Cardiovascular Health Clinic at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota treat people who have statin side effects or a family history of statin intolerance. Steven Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. His research interests include cardiovascular clinical trials primarily in coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Reuters
New guidelines for cancer doctors aim to make sense of gene tests
by Julie Steenhuysen

"It's like having an all-you-can-eat buffet, and is that a good thing?" said Dr. Noralane Lindor, an oncologist and geneticist from Mayo Clinic Reuters LogoCenter for Individualized Medicine and an ASCO Prevention Committee member. Lindor was one of several authors of the guidelines issued on Monday by ASCO and published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms.

Context: Noralane Lindor, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic oncologist and genticist. Her research interests include cancer genetics, with an emphasis on hereditary predisposition to cancers, as well as the clinical translation of genetic findings to medical care.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

KIMT
Do you have good posture?
by DeeDee Stiepan

The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is offering posture screenings for people to see how good or bad their posture is and how poor posture can take its toll. “YouKIMT know, our body is kind of like a stack of Jenga blocks and as we lean forward we’re putting a lot of strain on our back and that creates chronic back pain. It actually creates compression into our organs as well and so we’re not breathing as effectively,” explains Jane Hein, a Wellness Physical Therapist at The Healthy Living Center.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage:  Arizona Daily Sun

Related coverage:
Fox 2 St. Louis — The Mayo Clinic’s “Healthy Living Program; KITV, NC8 Washington D.C., Fox 2 News Detroit

Context: Jane Hein is a wellness physical therapist with the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Arizona Republic’s Living Well
Proton Beam Therapy at Mayo Clinic
by Susan Lynne Fuchs

The first services – adult and pediatric radiation oncology – have been launched at the Valley’s newest cancer center, a $310 million, 400,000-Arizona Republic newspaper logosquare-foot facility rising on Mayo Clinic’s northeast Phoenix campus.

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:
Arizona Republic — Arizona Cancer Center faces crowded cancer-care market by Ken Alltucker – The five-story, 220,000-square-foot center, which opened to patients Aug. 24, follows the path of other major cancer-care providers whose facilities have sprouted in metro Phoenix in recent years. Banner MD Anderson, Mayo Clinic and Cancer Treatment Centers of America all have poured tens of millions of dollars into openings or expansions.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota this past June and in Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Rochester Magazine
Mayo's "renegade" research team
by Paul Scott

Montori’s think-tank-within-a-clinic is known as the Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit, or KER Unit, for short. It’s the sort of official sounding name that nearly begs for a disco ball until you realize it’s actually pronounced “Care Unit,” and that it has been responsible for aRochester Magazine logo globally-contagious shift in thinking about what matters the most in medicine.

Reach: Rochester Magazine is a monthly publication that serves the residents and visitors of Rochester, Minnesota. The magazine averages more than 56,000 readers each month.

Context: Victor Montori, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Montori's research takes place in the Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Montori is interested in how knowledge is produced, disseminated and taken up in practice — and how this leads to optimal health care delivery and patient outcomes. Dr. Montori also serves as director of community engagement and of late stage translational research for the Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

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