Items Tagged ‘Ovarian Cancer’

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on May 24th, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

 

 

May 24, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Star Tribune
Rochester, Mayo Clinic celebrate $585 million windfall from the state
By Jennifer Brooks

Minnesota came up with the money — more than half a billion dollars — and now Mayo Clinic is keeping its part of the bargain. It won’t be going anywhere anytime soon. “It’s a great day to be a Minnesotan, a great day to call Rochester our home,” Mayo CEO John Noseworthy told a cheering crowd Wednesday in Rochester. He was flanked by Gov. Mark Dayton and legislative leaders, all celebrating the herculean effort that went into ramming the $585 million Mayo legislation through the Legislature in a matter of months.

MPR
Mayo Clinic celebrates state funding approval, but questions remain on expansion details
by Elizabeth Baier

Mayo Clinic's proposed 20-year, $5 billion investment plan to make its flagship campus a "destination medical center" is closer to becoming reality.  The tax bill awaits Gov. Mark Dayton's signature to become law, but Mayo Clinic, local and state officials are celebrating the legislative victory, which commits $327 million in state aid for Rochester, Minn.  Amid the celebration, questions remain about how exactly the clinic plans to expand and how local taxpayers will contribute to the growth in Rochester.  Hundreds of Mayo employees, local and state officials, even former Vice President Walter Mondale filled the lobby of the Mayo Clinic building in Rochester Wednesday, to celebrate what Mayo and government officials say is the largest economic development initiative in Minnesota's history.

Additional DMC Celebration Coverage:
Star Tribune, KIMT, KAAL, KTTC, KARE 11, Post-Bulletin, MinnPost, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal,

Other Prominent DMC Coverage This Past Week:
Post-Bulletin
Our View: Norton defied odds, Senjem defied party for DMC

MPR
Dayton hails results of session

Pioneer Press
Lawmakers sign off on Mayo vision

Pioneer Press
Mayo Clinic expansion plan calls for $400 million in state infrastructure support

Additional DMC Coverage:
Sioux Falls Argus Leader, Post-Bulletin, The Republic Ind., Post-Bulletin, Pioneer Press, MPR, KAAL, Star Tribune, Finance & Commerce, Post-Bulletin, Star Tribune

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich

WYMT
Pikeville Medical Center joins Mayo Clinic Care Network

A major announcement for healthcare in the mountains on Thursday. Pikeville Medical Center and Mayo Clinic officials announced a collaboration to connect doctors with Mayo Clinic specialists. The announcement made at a news conference is one that hospital President/CEO Walter E. May calls the most important announcement in the hospital's history… Dr. Stephen Lange with the Mayo Clinic Care Network explains, "Breakthrough research will be available right here in this community and less people will have to travel to get answers to their complex questions."

Reach: WYMT is a CBS affiliate in Lexington, KY. The station serves the east-central part of Kentucky. WKYT leads in total-day and late-night news ratings.

Additional Coverage: Kingsport Times News, Huntington Herald-Dispatch, Lexington Herald Leader, Lane Report, WSAZ, Kentucky.com, Appalachian News-Express

Post-Bulletin
'Humble anchorman' speaks at Mayo Clinic commencement
by Brett Boese

In some ways, Tom Brokaw's life came full circle Saturday morning in Rochester. In 1957, the self-described "whiz kid" visited the Med City to purchase the first suit of his life at Hanny's. He then left for New York to participate on a game show opposite South Dakota Gov. Joe Foss, a renowned fighter pilot during World War II. Brokaw returned to Rochester on Saturday, nattily dressed, as one of the most recognized figures across the globe. During a commencement ceremony at Mayo Civic Center, he became the first recipient of an honorary degree from the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage on Tom Brokaw's Commencement Speech: NBC Nightly News (fast forward about 1.5 minutes), KARE 11, Post-Bulletin, KAAL, KTTC, San Francisco Chronicle, WCCO, Yankton Daily Press S.D., WXOW Eau Claire, The Republic Ind., Tampa Bay Tribune, Duluth News Tribune, FOX 47

Context: Tom Brokaw, internationally known special correspondent for NBC News, received the first-ever Mayo Clinic honorary degree — the Doctor of Letters (Hon.D.Litt.) — in recognition of his career as a distinguished journalist and best-selling author, his significant contributions to the preservation of history through the arts, and his dedication to public service and exemplary service to Mayo Clinic. The first conferment of an honorary degree (honoris causa) by Mayo Clinic and the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine occured during a joint commencement ceremony for the graduating classes of Mayo Graduate School and Mayo Medical School on Saturday, May 18. During the commencement ceremony, 67 physicians and scientists will receive degrees from Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. (In all, 84 physicians and scientists will receive degrees, including those who are not attending the ceremony.)

Mayo Clinic's College of Medicine educates medical and science professionals through five schools: Mayo Medical School, Mayo Graduate School, Mayo School of Health Sciences, Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education and Mayo School of Continuous Professional Development.

Mayo Medical School was established in 1972 and has more than 190 students currently enrolled in its four-year M.D. program. Mayo Graduate School was established in 1989 and grants Ph.D., M.D.-Ph.D., and master's degrees in 11 focus areas of biomedical research. The school has over 270 students.

News Release: Tom Brokaw to Receive Mayo Clinic's First-Ever Honorary Degree, Address Commencement

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic researchers seek tiny option against cancer
by Jeff Hansel

…But Mayo researchers say if they cut calcium uptake by the mitochondria, "sufficient cellular stress builds up, making the gold nanoparticles more effective in destroying cancer cells." "Everybody's dancing about with happiness about nanoparticles. But every nanoparticle isn't the same," said Dr. Y.S. Prakash, an anesthesiologist and physiologist at Mayo in Rochester. "Every kind of nanoparticle, whether it's made from gold, silver, titanium, carbon, each one behaves differently. Not only does each one behave differently, it behaves differently in different cell types."

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage Relating to Gold Nanoparticles: BreakThrough Digest, HealthCanal, Science Daily, Medical Daily, Science Newsline, Physorg Nanowerk

Context: Positively charged gold nanoparticles are usually toxic to cells, but cancer cells somehow manage to avoid nanoparticle toxicity. Mayo Clinic researchers found out why and determined how to make the nanoparticles effective against ovarian cancer cells. The discovery is detailed in the current online issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

News Release: Mayo Clinic: How Gold Nanoparticles Can Help Fight Ovarian Cancer

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

WCCO
Good Question: How Do You Keep Fear Of Storms From Becoming A Phobia?
By Jason DeRusha

The skies turn gray. The lightning cracks. Thunder booms. For most of us, a fleeting moment of fear is as bad as it gets. “I was petrified of tornadoes. Would almost pass out when the sirens went off,” said Kathy Lauer on my Facebook page. “Even when there’s not a storm, [kids are] checking the weather, they’re feeling nervous if it gets overcast. That’s different,” said Dr. Steven Whiteside, a Mayo Clinic child psychologist who specializes in anxiety.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

KMSP FOX Twin Cities
Tips for tackling 'thunderphobia' in children
by Lindsey LaBelle

Severe weather can trigger severe anxiety, especially in children, and the Mayo Clinic Children's Center is offering ways for parents to confront the subject for a stress-free storm season. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem in kids, and they often take their weather-related fears with them to school, hindering their concentration, Children's Center anxiety prevention expert and psychologist Dr. Stephen Whiteside says.

Reach: FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m. Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.  

Additional Coverage Relating to Storm Anxiety:
Health24, NBC News Pa., Hawaii News Now,  Doctors Lounge, News Medical, Newsday, HealthDay, KEYC Mankato, HealthNewsDigest

Context: Violent storms — often accompanied by lightning, thunder, heavy rain, powerful winds and even tornado warnings — can be stressful for anyone, but severe weather can trigger much more severe anxiety, especially among children. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem in kids and adults. Mayo Clinic Children's Center anxiety prevention expert and psychologist Stephen Whiteside, Ph.D., offers tips to help conquer weather-related fears.

News Release: Thunderphobia: Mayo Experts Offer Tips to Help Children Conquer Severe Weather Fears

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

HealthDay
Study Links Coffee to Lower Risk for Rare Liver Disease
by Mary Dallas

Just a few extra cups of coffee each month might help prevent the development of an autoimmune liver disease known as primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a new study suggests. Investigators from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., found that drinking coffee was associated with a reduced risk of developing the disease, which can lead to cirrhosis of the liver, liver failure and biliary cancer. This association, however, does not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. "While rare, PSC has extremely detrimental effects," Dr. Craig Lammert, an instructor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, said in a news release from the Digestive Disease Week annual meeting in Orlando.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day.

Additional coverage: MedPage Today, Mirror UK, Business Standard, Philly.com, Big News Network, Science World Report, French Tribune, News-Medical, redOrbit, Healio, Health.com, Newsday, Winnipeg Free Press, Medical DailyRTT News, Voice of America, Wall Street Journal, CBS Atlanta, Utah Peoples Post, Pentagon Post, Science Recorder, Highlight Press, Headline and Global News, Barchester Health, UPI, KMSP FOX9, Health24

Context: Regular consumption of coffee is associated with a reduced risk of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), an autoimmune liver disease, Mayo Clinic research shows. The findings were being presented at the Digestive Disease Week 2013 conference in Orlando, Fla.

News Release: Consuming Coffee Linked to Lower Risk of Detrimental Liver Disease, Mayo Clinic Finds

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

WEAU Eau Claire
Camp Wabi

The Mayo Clinic Health System and YMCA are once again sponsoring Camp Wabi for kids struggling with weight issues. Dr. John Plewa, Mayo Clinic Health System pediatrician, and fifth-grader Lucas Winkler of Durand, talk about Camp Wabi.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Context: Summer camp means fun and friends. One camp sponsored by Mayo Clinic Health System and the YMCA helps kids who struggle with their weight make better health choices. John Plewa, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Health System pediatrician.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on March 29th, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

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March 29, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

P.S. Thanks to Alyson Fleming for serving as guest editor this week.

MPR
At Mayo, a bonanza of medical records is set to grow even larger
by Lorna Benson

Since 1966, the Mayo Clinic has collected as many medical records as possible in Minnesota's Olmsted County to generate powerful studies that help save lives. The Rochester Epidemiology Project has a treasure trove of close to 600,000 medical records…After nearly 50 years of success, the project is expanding to include patients from seven other southeastern Minnesota counties, which will help researchers broaden its database.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage:
KSTP, KEYC, BringMeTheNews, NECN, 10 TV (OH), Florida Times-Union, WVVA, ModernHealthcare, WQOW, La Crosse Tribune, WDAY

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

NBC Nightly News
Researchers discover genes linked to deadly cancers

Gene variations know to affect risk for some of the deadliest cancers may soon lead to new blood tests that determine how much a person is at risk, NBC's Robert Bazell reports. Dr. Sandhya Pruthi is interviewed.

Reach: NBC Nightly News, in addition to reaching a wide broadcast audience, is featured on NBCNews.com. NBC's web presence reaches an audience of more than 58 million unique visitors who generate more than 1.2 billion page views and 140 million online video streams each month.

Additional Coverage:
MPRScientists find new gene markers for breast, ovarian, prostate cancer

KMSPKARE 11Science CodexMy Fox PhoenixIvanhoeMSN Canada

Press Release: New DNA Sequences Hone In On Breast, Ovarian Cancer Risk: Mayo Clinic

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center have identified new DNA sequences associated with breast cancer— the most common cancer among women, with an average risk of developing the disease of 10 percent — and ovarian cancer, the most common cause of death from gynecological cancers in the U.S. The findings, which appear in three studies in the journals Plos Genetics and Nature Genetics, will help reveal the underlying causes of these diseases and help researchers build better risk models to support new prevention strategies.

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor 

Star Tribune
Shriners, Mayo join forces for pediatric care
by Jeremy Olson

Today, the Mayo Clinic announced that the Shriners Hospitals for Children -- Twin Cities would be the first pediatric hospital to join its national, collaborative Mayo Clinic Care Network…“Both Mayo Clinic and Shriners have a heart for kids, and we’re excited to know that this new collaborative step together will increasingly benefit our young patients,” said Dr. Christopher Moir, director of Mayo's Children's Center. “Combining the knowledge of Mayo Clinic and Shriners experts can only benefit outcomes for patients who are the most vulnerable among us."

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:
MedCity News, Post Bulletin, MPR, Pioneer Press

News Release: Shriners Hospital for Children - Twin Cities Joins Mayo Clinic Care Network

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Reuters
Upping vigorous exercise may improve fibromyalgia
by Kathryn Doyle

Previous studies have found short-term benefits of exercise for fibromyalgia, a poorly understood disorder that includes joint pain, tenderness, fatigue and depression and affects an estimated 5.8 million Americans, according to the Centers for Disease Control. But many fibromyalgia sufferers fail to keep up with exercise programs out of fear that it will worsen pain, Dr. Eric Matteson, a rheumatologist who was not involved in the study, told Reuters Health. "This study shows that if they're able to stay with the exercise program in the long term it actually is helpful to them," said Matteson, chair of the department of rheumatology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: Reuters supplies news - text, graphics, video and pictures - to media organizations across the globe and provides news to businesses outside the financial services sector as well as direct to consumers. Reuters is the news organization of Thomson Reuters, one of the world's largest international multimedia news agencies, providing information tailored for professionals in the financial services, media and corporate markets. Thomson Reuters is a global information company providing information tailored for professionals in the financial services, media and corporate markets. Reuters' newspaper clients include the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times and the Washington Post.

Additional Coverage:
Fox News

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

Overcoming Ovarian Cancer, Twice

Posted on October 12th, 2012 by Kelley Luckstein

Ovarian cancer is often called a silent killer because the early symptoms are vague and can be confused for signs of other conditions. Cindy Weiss received the dreaded diagnosis twice. Cindy Weiss of Jacksonville,  Fla., was in her thirties when her doctor told her something no woman wants to hear. She was diagnosed with stage 4 ovarian cancer and needed an immediate treatment: a hysterectomy, radiation, and chemotherapy…For two years after surgery, Weiss was cancer-free, but she knew not to ignore it when one day she just didn’t feel right. The cancer had returned. Six months of chemotherapy at Mayo Clinic left her, once again, cancer-free, and it's now been five years since her second diagnosis.

 

Everyday Health

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on September 28th, 2012 by Admin


September 28, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

USA Weekend
Step it Up!

How just 10 minutes of walking each day can change your life… And you don’t have to be a super-athlete to reap the benefits. Physician Michael Joyner, an anesthesiologist and specialist in exercise science with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., says some of the biggest health winners are couch potatoes who transition from being totally sedentary to moderately active. “If they only had one thing to do, the average person can get a whole lot of benefit out of walking,” Joyner says. “The first two miles of brisk walking are most critical.”

Circulation: USA TODAY has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. His research focuses on how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss. Dr. Joyner and his team study how the nervous system regulates blood pressure, heart rate and metabolism in response to these forms of stress. They are also interested in how blood flow to muscle and skin responds to these stressors. These responses are studied in young healthy subjects, healthy older subjects and people with conditions such as heart failure.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Brian Kilen

USA Today
Keep moving, and other advice to keep men healthy with age
by Janice Lloyd

… "Men are the king of the remote control but they're going to have to get up and do something instead of watching sports all weekend or late into the night," says Martha Grogan, a cardiologist and editor of the Mayo Clinic book Healthy Heart for Life!... "You don't have to get up and move around for long but you should move for 10 minutes every hour," she says. "You can even run in place in front of the TV or move around during the commercials. My brother always says he can do the Nordic Track quickly when watching a football game." If you don't like aerobic exercise, it's OK, says James Levine, also of the Mayo Clinic. He is the author of Move a Little, Lose a Lot and pioneered the concept of NEAT (non-exercise activity thermogenesis).

Circulation: See first post above.

Context: Martha Grogan, M.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, gave her expert perspective. She was not involved in the study. Dr. Grogan is medical editor of Mayo Clinic Healthy Heart for Life, a new book which became available earlier this year.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

USA Today
Lists, experts disagree on the 'best hospitals'
by Jayne O’Donnell

Nearly 40% of consumers surveyed last year said they use hospital ratings to choose a health care facility, but there's little agreement between the lists, raising questions about their value. Consumers pore over reviews and ratings of everything from cars to washing machines, but it's doctor and hospital rankings that may be the most confusing and controversial. 'Consumer Reports' rankings by safety…7. Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix…U.S. News' 'Honor Roll' of hospitals…3. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.

Circulation: See first post above.

Context: Mayo Clinic ranked near the top of the 23rd U.S. News & World Report annual America's Best Hospital list, earning the No. 3 overall spot on its "Best Hospitals" list. Mayo Clinic in Rochester also was rated best in the nation in three clinical areas — gynecology, diabetes and endocrinology, and gastroenterology. A news release highlighting the ranking is here.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

NY Times
Avoiding Sugared Drinks Limits Weight Gain in Two Studies
by Roni Rabin

…Two-thirds of all American adults and one-third of children in the United States are overweight or obese. The contribution of sugary sodas and fruit drinks to this epidemic has been hotly disputed. But two new randomized clinical trials published on Friday in The New England Journal of Medicine lend credence to the idea that limiting access to these beverages may help reduce obesity…Both clinical trials have limitations, but they are unusual in that they demonstrate the effect of a single behavioral change on weight gain, said Dr. Seema Kumar, a pediatric endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic Children’s Center. “Typically when you do a weight loss intervention, we talk about multiple aspects, changing food choices, portion sizes, frequency of snacks, types of snacks,” she said.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Context: Seema Kumar, M.D. is a  a Mayo Clinic pediatric endocrinologist with joint appointments in Endocrinology and Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. Her research primarily relates to molecular mechanisms of development of childhood obesity.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Kelley Luckstein

NY Times
Study Divides Breast Cancer Into Four Distinct Types
by Gina Kolata

In findings that are fundamentally reshaping the scientific understanding of breast cancer, researchers have identified four genetically distinct types of the cancer. And within those types, they found hallmark genetic changes that are driving many cancers… But researchers found that this cancer was entirely different from the other types of breast cancer and much more resembles ovarian cancer and a type of lung cancer.  “It’s incredible,” said Dr. James Ingle of the Mayo Clinic, one of the study’s 348 authors, of the ovarian cancer connection. “It raises the possibility that there may be a common cause.”

Circulation: See post immediately above this one.

Context: James Ingle, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic medical onvcologist and the principal investigator for the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer SPORE Grant. The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is one of 11 cancer research centers to receive a National Cancer Institute (NCI) Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) grant for breast cancer research.

Public Affairs Contacts: Joe Dangor, Traci Klein

NY Times
Seeking Cures, Patients Enlist Mice Stand-Ins
by Andrew Pollack

Megan Sykes, a medical researcher, has a mouse with a human immune system — her own. She calls it “Mini-Me.”… In what could be the ultimate in personalized medicine, animals bearing your disease, or part of your anatomy, can serve as your personal guinea pig, so to speak. Some researchers call them avatars, like the virtual characters in movies and online games. “The mice allow you the opportunity to test drugs to find out which ones will be efficacious without exposing the patient to toxicity,” said Colin Collins, a professor at the University of British Columbia…At the Mayo Clinic, avatars are being used to “immortalize” tumors from patients in a clinical trial. The Jackson Laboratory in Sacramento is building a big collection of personalized animal models representing various cancer types to use in studies. Companies like Oncotest, based in Germany, and StemMed in Houston are helping pharmaceutical companies do clinical trials on the mouse surrogates of patients.

Circulation: See post above.

Context: The Breast Cancer Genome Guided Therapy Study (BEAUTY Project) will help physicians tailor chemotherapy to breast cancer patients based on their individual genomes and the genomes of their tumors. Mayo Clinic researchers will obtain three whole genome sequences: one from the patients’ healthy cells before treatment, and two tumor genomes – one before chemotherapy and one after. Patients will be paired with mouse “avatars” that will help physicians identify the best treatment for each person.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Bob Nellis

Oprah Magazine
A Reason to Be Hopeful: 5 New Breast Cancer Breakthroughs
by Rachel Bertsche

As October's pink ribbons remind us, the fight against breast cancer is far from over. But after a host of recent breakthroughs, doctors are optimistic. "There's a tremendous amount of work being done," says Deborah Rhodes, MD, a specialist in breast cancer risk at the Mayo Clinic. "With such a multifaceted approach, we're gradually winning the war." Here, some of the most inspiring discoveries of 2011.

Reach: Oprah, the magazine, has a total circulation of 2.3 million.

Context:  Deborah Rhodes, M.D. is a preventive medicine specialist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Her research focus is the evaluation and management of women at increased risk for breast cancer.

Public Affairs Contacts: Dana Sparks, Alyson Fleming, Joe Dangor

Prevention
Lose 35+ Pounds without Working Out
by Carol Krucoff

…James Levine, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, has spent a decade studying the role that everyday movement, or NEAT (nonexercise activity thermogenesis), plays in metabolism. His discovery: People who tap their feet, prefer standing to sitting, and generally move a lot burn up to 350 more calories a day than those who sit still. That adds up to nearly 37 pounds a year!

Circulation: For 60 years, Prevention has delivered information, breaking news and energizing lifestyle advice that women can use today for a happier, healthier, stronger life. Prevention's average newstand sales are more than 226,000 and is the 14th largest consumer managezine in the United States.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Alyson Fleming

Related Story:
Prevention
7 Ways to Work Out at the Office
by Jessica Cassity

You’ve heard that a desk job leads to weight gain, but this bad rap can be beat, says James Levine, MD, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic. In a recent study, more on-the-job standing and walking led workers to lose an average of 9 pounds and to lower triglyceride levels by nearly 40% in 6 months. Lose weight at the office with these 7 sneaky fat-burning tips.

Fast Company
Is The Maverick At Your Company A Genius Or A Jerk?
By Bob Vanourek

Mavericks Are Essential to Innovation…Look to a surprising example we discovered in our research and interviews for our new book, Triple Crown Leadership: Building Excellent, Ethical, and Enduring Organizations: Mayo Clinic, founded in 1889. The Mayo network serves more than a million patients annually. It is a global leader in health care delivery, research, and education, with a sterling brand in health care. Patients from all corners of the globe journey to Mayo for treatment. For over twenty straight years, Mayo hospitals have earned top U.S. News & World Report rankings. Mayo has compiled a stunning record of impacts, from to establish medical residency education to performing the first FDA-approved hip replacement opening their Center for Innovation in 2008.

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Context: Mayo Clinic was cited as an innovator in the article:  "Look to a surprising example we discovered in our research and interviews for our new book, Triple Crown Leadership: Building Excellent, Ethical, and Enduring Organizations: Mayo Clinic, founded in 1889. The Mayo network serves more than a million patients annually. It is a global leader in health care delivery, research, and education, with a sterling brand in health care. Patients from all corners of the globe journey to Mayo for treatment. For over 20 straight years, Mayo hospitals have earned top U.S. News & World Report rankings. Mayo has compiled a stunning record of impacts, from to establish medical residency education to performing the first FDA-approved hip replacement opening their Center for Innovation in 2008."

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Star Tribune
Health Check blog: Prostate cancer surgery brings on anxiety
by Coleen Stoxen

Men who have surgery for prostate cancer have excellent survival prospects – but nonetheless experience high levels of cancer anxiety that can lead to depression and reduced sexual satisfaction, Mayo Clinic researchers say… "The 10-year survival for a man undergoing surgery to remove localized prostate cancer is greater than 95 percent. Given that the majority of men who undergo prostatectomy for prostate cancer will not die from their disease, we are concerned about what life will be like for these patients decades after diagnosis and treatment," says the study's senior investigator, Alexander Parker, Ph.D., an associate professor of epidemiology and urology.

Additional coverage: Medical Xpress, Science Codex

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Health Check blog: Star Tribune blog which features the latest trends, research and news in medicine, health and science. A team of Star Tribune staffers aggregates updates from news wires, websites, magazines and medical journals.

Context: Men who undergo surgical removal of prostate cancer can experience significant levels of anxiety one year after surgery, and higher levels of anxiety appear to be linked to poor sexual satisfaction and depression, say researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. Their recent study, published in the online edition of Psycho-Oncology, suggests that men who experience high levels of "cancer-specific anxiety" following surgery for prostate cancer could likely benefit from counseling designed to address their worries and improve their quality of life. A news release highlighting the study results is here.

Additional Coverage:
Jacksonville Business Journal

Mayo Clinic prostate cancer research finds link to reduced quality of life
by Michael Clinton

Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has found prostate cancer diagnosis and surgery can lead to anxiety, depression and a reduced quality of life…“The 10-year survival for a man undergoing surgery to remove localized prostate cancer is greater than 95 percent. Given that the majority of men who undergo prostatectomy for prostate cancer will not die from their disease, we are concerned about what life will be like for these patients decades after diagnosis and treatment,” said Dr. Alexander Parker, the study’s senior investigator and an associate professor of epidemiology and urology, in the release.

Circulation: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Star Tribune
Editorial: Soda ban spotlights pop's health risk, (graphic on site is from Mayo Clinic)

For speaking a hard truth about pop and other sugar-drenched drinks -- there's no need to guzzle them by the near-bucketful -- New York City's feisty billionaire Mayor Michael Bloomberg has predictably been accused of turning "nanny-state" fears into reality. But it's a good bet that in years ahead, Bloomberg will not be remembered as the Big Gulp-Busybody-In-Chief, but instead as one of the first high-profile public officials to sound the alarm about these drinks' significant health risk.

Circulation: See entry immediately above.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D., a Mayo Clinic preventive medicine physician and endocrinologist, is often sought out for his expertise in obesity, nutrition and disease prevention, physical activity and health promotion, and clinical preventive medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Bob Nellis, Nick Hanson

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MTV Reality Star Diem Brown Chooses to Delay Cancer Treatment to Preserve Eggs

Posted on July 20th, 2012 by Admin

MTV reality star Diem Brown has decided to undergo another round of fertility treatments in order to harvest more eggs before she surgically removes her ovary as part of her cancer treatment, People.com reported… According to the Mayo Clinic, ovarian cancer can often go undetected for a long period of time… Risks for the disease can include: inherited gene mutations, increasing age, never having been pregnant or hormone replacement therapy for menopause, the Mayo Clinic said on its website.

 

FOX News

Bismarck Couple Facing Terminal Illnesses Together

Posted on March 25th, 2012 by Admin

For years, Don Hertz dreamed of sailing around the world in retirement. Then he fell in love. Her name was Kathy Glass…Shortly after they were married, Don was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. Eight years later, their lives were altered again…On a rainy day in Rochester, Minn., in 2010, Kathy was numb with disbelief as she sat behind the wheel of a minivan…Just minutes earlier, at the Mayo Clinic, an oncologist told her she had stage four ovarian cancer. Terminal. She had one to three years to live.

 

 

Bismarck Tribune by Mike McCleary   3/25/12

Recognizing and Treating Ovarian Cancer

Posted on March 2nd, 2012 by Admin

Ovarian cancer is the fifth-leading cause of cancer-related death among women and is the deadliest gynecologic cancer. The mortality rate associated with this disease is attributed in part to the fact that it is often not diagnosed until its later stages. Although no definitive screening test for this form of cancer yet exists, a recent consensus statement offers guidance to help physicians identify women who may have the disease. This article describes the importance of and means for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer, reviews treatments, and discusses the role of both the primary care physician and the gynecologic oncologist with regard to this disease.

Minnesota Medicine, by Dr. Bobbie Gostout, 03/01/2012

Mayo Clinic Scientists Find Effective Drug Combination Against Ovarian Cancer

Posted on December 8th, 2011 by Admin

Mayo clinic researchers have discovered a combination of drugs that seem to be effective at killing 70 percent of cancer cells that are resistant to chemotherapy. The drug was a combination of ixabepilone and sunitinib – two drug which had not previous been used together. This combination could be a good option for the treatment of late-stage ovarian cancer.

ThirdAge, by Emily Jacobson, 12/7/11

Additional coverage: Health Insurance News, Medical News Today, Xinhua, Medical Xpress

Mayo Clinic Receives Ovarian Cancer Grant

Posted on August 31st, 2009 by Kelley Luckstein

The Mayo Clinic has been awarded a multi-million dollar grant to fund ovarian cancer research. The National Cancer Institute award totals $11.5-million over 5 years.

 

Mayo says improved treatment options for women suffering from ovarian cancer over the past 30 years have extended the average survival time but the ultimate cure rate has not changed much.

 

Figures show 22,000 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with the disease every year and 16,000 die.

 

KAAL by Mary Tiang 08/28/05

Grant funds pursuit of cancer treatment

Posted on August 28th, 2009 by Kelley Luckstein

The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center has received a five-year grant for $11.5 million "to translate research into treatments for women with ovarian cancer."

 

Mayo's three campuses in Minnesota, Florida and Arizona together make up one of the country's 39 "comprehensive cancer centers" as designated by the National Cancer Institute, Mayo notes. It is the only center in the country with three sites nationwide.

 

The new ovarian cancer research money for Mayo is a "Specialized Programs of Research Excellence" grant from the National Cancer Institute.

 

"Our balance of basic, population science and clinical research programs within the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center enables us to pursue major issues in ovarian cancer, such as chemotherapy resistance, and quickly move new approaches into the clinic," Dr. Lynn Hartmann, grant lead investigator, is quoted by Mayo as saying.

 

Post-Bulletin by Jeff Hansel, 8/28/2009