Items Tagged ‘probiotics’

May 22nd, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

 

 
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

TIME
Measles Vaccine Cures Woman Of Cancer
by Markham Heid

Mayo Clinic researchers have wiped out a 49-year-old Minnesota woman’s blood cTime magazine logoancer with a radical new virus-based treatment that involved injecting her with “the highest possible dose” of a measles vaccine, suggesting virotherapy could treat some cancers.

Reach: Time magazine has a weekly circulation of 3.3 million. Time Online receives mores than 4.6 million unique visitors to its website each month and its monthy page views are more than 32.8 million.

Additional coverage:  USA TODAY, Imperial Valley News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Chicago Tribune, SELF, LA Times, Boston Globe, Reuters, Telegraph UK, Hawaii Reporter, Design & Trend, Post-Bulletin, KSDK, Forbes, Leadership Newspapers, Le Figaro Sante, EveryJoeStar Tribune 

Previous coverage

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis


KARE11
Fort Hood shooting survivor faces challenges in MN
by Boyd Huppert

Patrick Zeigler sits quietly in a traveling museum celebrating 150 years of the Mayo Clinic. KARE-11 TV, Minneapolis-St. PaulPatrick is volunteering his time at the wounded warrior display. Visitors stop to read the text and view the pictures around him. Some notice Patrick's army cap and his service dog Ranger, then extend a hand to thank Patrick for his service.

Reach: KARE is a an NBC affiliate in the Minneapolis-St.Paul market.

Context: Army Staff Sgt. Patrick Zeigler was critically injured in the shooting at Fort Hood in November 2009 -- Zeigler was shot four times, including once in the head, during the attack. His first trip to Rochester came at a critical point in his recovery, and the soldier credits his Mayo Clinic team with saving his life.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Rebecca Eisenman

 

KSTPKAAL
Mayo Clinic Develops New, Less Invasive Weight Loss Procedure
by Naomi Pescovitz

A new study was underway for a weight loss procedure not meant for the morbidly obese. "This is radically different from the surgery because the surgery is radical," said Dr. KSTP-TV Eyewitness News LogChristopher Gostout, Consultant at Mayo Clinic and Director of the Developmental Endoscopy Unit. Gostout and Dr. Barham Abu Dayyeh, Assistant Professor of Medicine at Mayo, had developed a way to shrink a person's stomach, without the scarring or slicing through the skin.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.  KAAL, like KAAL TV logoKSTP,  is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional coverage: KTTC, WXOW La Crosse

Context: Christopher Gostout, M.D., and Barham Abu Dayyeh, M.D., are Mayo Clinic physicians in Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Public Affairs Contacts: Brian KilenRebecca Eisenman

 

Arizona Republic
Kidney donation leads to friendship between women
by Wendy Neri

At first glance, Nancy Shaver and Kati Walker could hardly be more different. Two decades apart in age, one is a longtime elementary-school principal with closely cropped Arizona Republic newspaper logowhite hair and an exuberant laugh; the other, a vibrant young mother, artist and fitness enthusiast with ombre hair and tattoos.…Soon after, Shaver, Walker, and both the transplant and donor teams at Mayo Clinic scheduled the transplant surgery for the following January. At that point, Shaver and Walker began meeting for coffee to get to know each other better.

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic doctors actively perform research in kidney transplantation, presenting their work at national and international meetings. The Mayo Clinic Transplant Center supports many studies for kidney transplant research.

Public Affairs Contact: Lynn Closway

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Tags: 12 Habits of Highly Healthy People, 2014 Recognition of Outstanding Contribution Award, 2018 Super Bowl, Advance for Occupational Therapy Practitioners, Advance Healthcare Network for Nurses, Alaska, All About Jazz, alzheimer's disease, Amy Purdy, antibiotics, antiviral medications, Arizona Republic



February 14th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

USA Today
A cat bite can turn into a hospital stay, study says
by Mary Bowerman

A cat bite on the hand can turn into a hospital stay, according to a new study. A recent Mayo Clinic study shows that one out of three people who sought treatment for a cat bite to the hand wereUSA Today NEW hospitalized. Published in February in the Journal of Hand Surgery the study looked at 193 patients who received treatment for a cat bite on the hand from January 2009 through 2011. Two thirds of those hospitalized during the study required surgery to flush out the infection in the wounds and middle-aged women were the most common bite victims.

Reach: USA TODAY  has the highest daily circulation of any U.S. newspaper with a daily average circulation of 2.9 million, which includes print and various digital editions.

Additional Cat Bite Study Coverage:

NY Times
Beware of a Cat’s Bite
by Nicholas Bakalar

…In a three-year retrospective study published in the February issue of The Journal of Hand Surgery, researchers reviewed records NYTof 193 people who came to Mayo Clinic Hospital with cat bites to the hand…“Redness, swelling, increasing pain, difficulty in moving the hand and drainage from the wound are all signs that there may be an infection and that treatment should be sought,” said the senior author of the study, Dr. Brian T. Carlsen, a hand surgeon at the Mayo Clinic. 

FOX NewsCat bites can lead to serious severe infections, hospitalization, Research published in the Journal of Hand Surgery, found that one out of three people who sought treatment for a cat bite on the hand were hospitalized, reported USA Today…"The bites lead toFox News dot com serious infections that can require multiple hospitalizations, antibiotics and sometimes surgery," study researcher Dr. Brian Carlsen, an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic, told USA Today.

KARE 11HealthDayU.S. News & World ReportDetroit Free PressWMAZHealthWFMY News 2Winona Daily NewsLa Crosse TribuneYahoo! HealthTech TimesMinnPostCare2CBS NewsKTTCKSAZ Ariz.ScienceNewsUniversity HeraldBakersfield CalifornianMedPage TodayYahoo! FranceANSA,(Italian wire agency)

Context: Dogs aren’t the only pets who sometimes bite the hands that feed them. Cats do too, and when they strike a hand, they can inject bacteria deep into joints and tissue, perfect breeding grounds for infection.Cat bites to the hand are so dangerous, 1 in 3 patients with such wounds had to be hospitalized, a Mayo Clinic study covering three years showed. Two-third of those hospitalized needed surgery. Middle-aged women were the most common bite victims, according to the research, published in the Journal of Hand Surgery. More information can be found here on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Star Tribune
UnitedHealth-Mayo venture Optum Labs adds partners
by Jackie Crosby

An ambitious health care research initiative launched last year between Optum and the Mayo Clinic has landed seven new partners with interests in public health, pharmaceuticals and the Star-Tribune-Logo-300x45biosciences. The addition of groups that include pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and the University of Minnesota Nursing School is a sign that newly formed Optum Labs, based in Cambridge, Mass., is working to swiftly assemble the pieces for what it describes as an open center for research and innovation.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Minneapolis / St. Paul Business JournalCalgary Herald

Context: Optum Labs, the collaborative research and innovation center founded by Optum and Mayo Clinic, announced this week the addition of seven new charter partners committed to improving the quality and value of patient care. The announcement follows the recent addition of AARP as Founding Consumer Advocate Organization of the collaborative. John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO, offers his perspective on the announcement in Mayo's the Future of Health Care blog.

Public Affairs Contact: Josh Derr

Star Tribune
Sports fuel orthopedics boom, provide Mayo entry downtown
by Jeremy Olson

…Minnesota has seen some $66 million in capital projects related to orthopedic care between 2008 and 2012. And it is why the Mayo Clinic – after years of flirting with a Star Tribune Logomedical presence in the Twin Cities – broke through last week with the announcement of a downtown Minneapolis sports medicine center in league with the Minnesota Timberwolves. “The growth is being driven by a more active population that happens to be in competitive sports or fitness activities,” said Dr. Michael Stuart, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center who is in Sochi now as a team doctor for USA Hockey. “I have a 65-year-old patient who plays 120 softball games a year.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related sports medicine coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Our View: Sports medicine clinic is a slam dunk for Mayo Clinic

Star Tribune, Block E ready for its renovation

NBA.comColumn: Love's Role In Practice Facility Important To Him, Timberwolves

Previous Coverage in Mayo Clinic in the News

Context: Mayo Clinic and the Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx announced in early February a partnership which extends the Mayo Model of Care for patients in sports medicine to the Twin Cities. The collaboration includes: 1) the opening of a Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center at 600 Hennepin, 2) designating Mayo as the preferred medical provider for the teams, and 3) utilizing the teams’ international reach to educate the public about numerous health and wellness topics.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic, Minnesota Timberwolves & Lynx Announce Collaboration

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Duluth News Tribune
Director hopes to hit home run with documentary about Chisholm doctor
By John Lundy

Twenty-five years after the movie “Field of Dreams” gave birth to the ethereal character “Moonlight” Graham, another film is being made about the real Dr. Archibald Graham, a short-lived baseball player and longtime Chisholm doctor. This film, a documentary, will explore theDuluth News Tribune long relationship between Graham and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester.  We found out that he had come down here to the Mayo Clinic from Chisholm approximately 90 times,” said Mark Flaherty, a film producer and director who works for the clinic.

Reach: The Duluth News Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 26,800 and a Sunday circulation of more than 39,400. Its website receives more than 116,500 visitors each month.

Related Coverage:

Duluth News Tribune, Filmmaker seeks help, The Mayo Clinic is looking for help from Chisholm-area residents with its documentary on Doc Graham. Mark Flaherty, the film’s producer and director, is looking for photos, films, letters and other mementos associated with Graham. He will scan and immediately return photos and letters; films will be copied and returned.

Context: Most people are at least familiar with the name "Moonlight" Graham as a character in the book Shoeless Joe and the film “Field of Dreams," but fewer people know that "Moonlight” Graham was an actual person, not a fictional character. And long-time residents of the Chisholm, Minn., area who remember Dr. Archibald Graham as their beloved hometown doctor will have an opportunity to provide photos, film and other information as part of an upcoming documentary film on this remarkable man. Find out more information on Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Seeks Input For Film About 'Doc' Graham.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: 12News Arizona, African-American, Albany Herald, American Academy of Ophthalmology, ANSA, antiandrogen therapy, Antonita Slaughter, athletes and concussions, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, au Claire Leader-Telegram, babies, Bakersfield Californian


July 12th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

July 12 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Philadelphia Enquirer
Study seeks ways to treat Alzheimer's before symptoms start
By Stacey Burling

The day is coming when doctors will be able to diagnose and treat Alzheimer's disease before people have symptoms, and Ronald Petersen is among the doctors laying the groundwork for that future. Petersen is director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, which is using detailed tests to monitor cognitive changes in older adults from Olmsted County, Minn., as they age.

Circulation: The Philadelphia Inquirer has a daily circulation of more than 350,000 readers. Philadelphia Inquirer - Online has more than 1.7 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

NY Times (Blog)
Skin Cancer on the Rise in Young Women
by Emma Fitzsimmons

…But as I learned more about skin cancer, I discovered that it is becoming increasingly common, especially among young women. A recent study by the Mayo Clinic found that melanoma, the most serious type, had increased eightfold for women under 40 since 1970.  “There is this thought that, ‘It won’t happen to me because I’m young,’ but that’s not true anymore,” said Dr. Jerry Brewer, a dermatologist at the Mayo Clinic and an author of the study.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Related Coverage:
WZVN Fort Myers
Mayo Clinic: Monthly skin exam could save lives

NBC2 (FL)
Mayo Clinic: Monthly skin exam could save lives

Sarasota Tribune News (NY Times)
Skin cancer and young women

Previous Coverage:
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights, June 21, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights, May 31, 2013

Context: Jerry D. Brewer, M.D. is a dermatological surgeon and Svetomir Markovic, M.D. is a hematologist and oncologist at at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Alyson Gonzalez

ABC News Nightline (Online text with video)
REPORTER'S NOTEBOOK By ELY BROWN and

It was just more than a year ago when we touched down in Rochester, Minn. to do a story on the organ transplant unit at Mayo Clinic. Before we could even check our camera mics, we got word that another plane had just landed carrying a red cooler containing a liver for 60-year-old Gordon Karels.

ABC News (Colter Meinert's story with video)
Inside Mayo Clinic Organ Transplant Unit: Gift of Life

Colter Meinert, 9, was born with half a heart, but a donor heart may transform his life.

ABC News (Jessica Danielson's story with video)
Inside Mayo Clinic Organ Transplant Unit: Living for 2

Part 2: For Jessica Danielson, 30, not a day goes by without thinking of her "angel" organ donor.

Reach: “Nightline” ranks No. 1 in late night among Total Viewers, Adults 25-54 and Adults 18-49, ahead of both NBC’s “The Tonight Show” and CBS’ “The Late Show.” Total Viewers (3.899 million), Adults 25-54 (1.504 million) and Adults 18-49 (1.197 million), for the week of April 23, 2012, according to Nielsen Media Research. ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News.

Additional Coverage:
KSTP
'Nightline' Features Duluth Woman for 2nd Time

WDIO Duluth, KSTP, Fiji News, Australian News

Previous Coverage of Jessica Danielson's Transplant:
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly News Highlights, June 21, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights, May 4, 2012

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Arizona Republic
Mayo Clinic takes us closer to the cutting edge
Our View: Biomedical campus a win from the recession
By Editorial Board

Years ago, when the Mayo Clinic built a hospital in north Phoenix, it had no neighbors. It still sits mostly by itself, surrounded by acres upon acres of empty land. That may be one of the few positives to come from the real-estate bust. When the market imploded, no developer wanted to buy the trust land along Loop 101 near the hospital.

Circulation: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona celebrated 25 years in the southwest in 2012. Mayo Clinic in Arizona now spans two campuses, comprising more than 400 acres of land, and has added two research buildings on the Scottsdale campus, while the Phoenix campus includes a 244-bed hospital, specialty clinic, housing for transplant and cancer patients and leased space for a child care center as well as hospice and a hotel. Offsite family medicine practices were also added in Scottsdale and Glendale, Ariz.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Celebrates 25 Years in Arizona

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic researchers study how body can repair itself
by Dan Browning

At Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine, physicians and researchers have a dazzling array of tools at their fingertips: transplants, genomics, computerized data analysis and biomedical engineering. But the core idea is simple: stimulating or restoring the human body’s innate ability to heal itself. Recent discoveries in cellular biology and genomics have led scientists to the threshold of what transplant cardiologist Dr. Brooks Edwards called the “single most-exciting advance” in his 35 years at Mayo.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: In the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic, interdisciplinary teams of physicians and scientists are carrying out innovative basic, translational and clinical research to develop definitive regenerative treatments aimed at fully healing damaged tissues and organs, offering solutions and hope for people who have conditions that today are beyond repair.

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Jennifer Schutz, Kelley Luckstein

MyFOX9
CLIFF DIVING: The dangers of taking the plunge

For many thrill seekers, cliff-diving is a popular past-time during the hot Minnesota summers, but medical professionals who spoke with FOX 9 News say it's an adrenalin rush with serious risks. Dr. Donald Jenkins, trauma expert, Mayo Clinic, is interviewed.

Reach: FOX 9 News (WFTC) serves the Minneapolis-St. Paul market.  

Related Coverage on Summer Safety:
CBS News
Treat Fireworks With Caution On The Fourth of July 

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, WIBW Kansas

Context:  In Cannon Falls, Minn. cliff diving at Lake Byllesby has led to several injuries seen in the emergency department at Mayo Clinic Health System, Cannon Falls. Besides facing the legal consequences, cliff divers put themselves in serious danger.

Related News Release: Mayo Clinic: Five Tips to Keep Your Summer Safe and Injury Free

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Kristy Jacobson

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Opens Center to Reduce C. diff Exposure
by Cassie Hart

The Mayo Clinic is opening a new treatment center aimed at reducing the cases of something called Clostridium difficile (C.diff), which is the most common infectious cause of diarrhea in hospitals

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Previous C. diff Coverage
Mayo Clinic in the News Weeklyy Highlights, Dec. 21, 2012

Context: Fecal transplants are quick, inexpensive and offer a 90 percent cure rate for patients. About one-fourth of people with C. difficile get sick again, either because the initial infection never went away or because they’re reinfected with a different strain of the bacteria. Treatment for recurrent disease may include antibiotics, which may involve one or more courses of a medication, a longer course of treatment or an antibiotic given once every two days; probiotics, such as S. boulardii, given along with the antibiotic medication or a “stool transplant” to restore healthy intestinal bacteria by placing donor stool in your colon, using a colonoscope or nasogastric tube. Although this is rarely done in practice, research has shown stool transplant to be helpful.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Opens C. difficile Clinic

Treatments and drugs

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

News4Jax
Study: Bracelet-like device controls acid reflux

A bracelet-like device with magnetic beads can control the chronic digestive disorder gastroesophageal reflux disease, according to a study published online Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine…The advance is significant, says study co-author C. Daniel Smith, M.D., chair of the surgery department at Mayo Clinic in Florida and a specialist in treating reflux disease. Mayo Clinic is the only medical center in Florida and one of two in the Southeast to help study the device.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Florida will be one of the first health care institutions in the United States to offer a newly approved device to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The condition, also known as acid reflux disease, can lead to serious health problems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the device and treatment procedure in March 2012 for patients with GERD who continue to have chronic reflux symptoms despite taking medication. C. Daniel Smith, M.D. is chair of the General Surgery Department and is also affiliated with the Bariatric Center at at Mayo Clinic in Florida, and an internationally recognized expert on the treatment of GERD.

News Release: Bracelet-Like Device Controls Chronic Acid Reflux, Study Finds

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Arizona Republic
New cancer center at Mayo Clinic may mean 1,000 new jobs
by Rachael Levy

When Mayo Clinic opens its cancer center in 2015, health-care leaders say, people will come from all over the world to receive treatment at the northeast Phoenix facility. The center will offer innovative treatment that’s not available in the Southwest. But beyond the care, officials say, the center also signals progress for economic development in the area. Officials expect the center, an expansion of Mayo’s Phoenix campus, to provide more than 1,000 medical-related jobs, including more than 100 physician positions. And developers envision the 380,000-square-foot cancer center as one piece of a vast biomedical corridor surrounding the facility.

Circulation: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Previous Coverage:
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights, July 3, 2012

Context: On June 27, the last piece of steel went into place onto the newest building on Mayo Clinic’s Phoenix campus — a building that will be the future Arizona home to Mayo Clinic’s Cancer Center and the first proton beam therapy facility of its kind in the Southwest. The new Cancer Center will begin to be occupied in early 2015, with proton beam therapy expected to begin by 2016. Mayo Clinic’s proton beam therapy program will be the first of its kind in the Southwest.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Cancer Center Topping off Ceremony

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

Star Tribune
Rochester, Minn.: Big city, small-town charm
by Christine Bernier Lienke

It’s true that Rochester has become synonymous with the Mayo Clinic. But the city has much more to offer beyond world-renowned health care. The rapidly growing city exudes small-town charm with architectural history and lively arts, dining and shopping scenes…Rochester, Minnesota’s third-largest city, spans nearly 55 square miles and is home to nearly 108,000 residents.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC), an economic development initiative designed to secure Mayo Clinic and Minnesota’s future as a global medical destination, passed on May 20 as part of the Minnesota Legislature’s tax bill. It will help fund the public infrastructure required to keep pace with an estimated $5 billion private investment by Mayo Clinic and other private entities over the next 20 years.

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich

The Onion
70% Of Americans Take Prescription Drugs

A report from the Mayo Clinic found that nearly 7 in 10 Americans take at least one prescription medication, and noted that antibiotics, antidepressants, and painkillers were the most frequently prescribed drugs in the U.S. What do you think?

Circulation: The Onion is widely considered to be the top humor periodical in the United States and is published weekly. The Onion contains scathingly funny commentary on world events, human behavior, and journalistic convention. The Onion is distributed to readerships in New York City, Chicago, Milwaukee, Madison, the Twin Cities, Denver/Boulder, Austin, Toronto and to thousands of subscribers. The Onion's online version receives nearly 750,000 unique visitors each month.

Previous Coverage:
Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights, July 3, 2012

Context: Nearly 70 percent of Americans are on at least one prescription drug, and more than half take two, Mayo Clinic and Olmsted Medical Center researchers say. Antibiotics, antidepressants and painkilling opioids are most commonly prescribed, their study found. Twenty percent of patients are on five or more prescription medications, according to the findings published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

News Release: Nearly 7 in 10 Americans Take Prescription Drugs, Mayo Clinic, Olmsted Medical Center Find

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Sharon Theimer

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: ABC News, ABC News Nightline, ABCnews.com, acid reflux, alzheimer's disease, and Blood Institute, antibiotics, antidepressants, Arizona Republic, Australian News, bio-plotter, biomedical corridor


December 21st, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

December 21, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. This week's report covers two weeks of highlights because we were unable to publish last week due to technical difficulties. This will be the last news summary of 2012. Our first report of 2013 will be published January 4. Enjoy the holiday season!

If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

The New York Times
Where Have All the Primary Care Doctors Gone?

More and more, my family and friends are asking for my help in finding a primary care doctor. That they would be having trouble finding one doesn’t surprise me. We’ve all been reading warnings about an impending doctor shortage for several years now. . . The environment is such that even the primary care track training programs don’t have a fighting chance,” said lead author Dr. Colin P. West, an associate professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and associate program director of the internal medicine residency training program.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Previous Coverage

Context: This study appeared in the Dec. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Colin West., M.D., Ph.D., the lead author, is a General Internal Medicine physician at Mayo Clinic. His research focuses primarily on physician well-being, evidence-based medicine and biostatistics, and medical education.

News Release

Public Affairs Contact: Alyson Fleming

Wall Street Journal
Why That Banana or Onion Might Feel Like Three Martinis
by Sumathi Reddy

Woke up with a hangover? It isn't just heavy alcohol consumption that can bring on a massive headache the next day; some researchers say a range of unexpected foods, from cheese to pickles to citrus fruit, can do the same…David Dodick, a neurology professor at the Mayo Clinic and chairman of the American Migraine Foundation, cited a randomized, controlled study published in 2010 that tested 30 migraine patients on diets that either included or excluded foods associated with high levels of antibodies for each person. After six weeks, the diets were reversed. The study, published in Cephalalgia, the journal of the International Headache Society which Dr. Dodick edits, found that participants had significantly fewer migraines when they avoided certain foods. Food isn't the primary cause of migraines, but it can induce or aggravate attacks, the study said.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Related Coverage:
Sports Illustrated
Helmets alone won't save football from concussions
by Jeremy Repanich

Many of us don't want football to change. We want the game to remain the hard-hitting spectacle that has caused it to grow into America's most popular sport. However, in the face of the concussion crisis, change is needed to make the game safer...which leaves us with an uncomfortable question -- can we not rely on helmets? The chief medical officer for USA Hockey doesn't know if we can. "There is no scientific evidence to prove that the hockey helmet reduces the risk of concussion," the Mayo Clinic's Dr. Michael Stuart, Vice-Chair of Orthopedic Surgery and the co-director of its Sports Medicine Center told SI's Stu Hackel earlier this year. "Now maybe it does, but we don't have sound scientific evidence."

Context: David Dodick, M.D., is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona who is frequently sought out for his expertise related to testing of novel compounds for the acute and preventive treatment of migraine and cluster headaches. Michael Stuart, M.D., with an appointment in orthopedic surgery at Mayo Clinic, is a sports medicine expert. He serves as Chief Medical Officer for USA Hockey, a consultant to the National Hockey League Players Association and is a member of the education committee of the International Ice Hockey Association. Dr. Stuart is routinely sought out by reporters for his expertise.

Related News Release: Mayo Clinic, USA Hockey to Youth Hockey Players: 'Heads Up, Don't Duck'

Public Affairs Contacts: Jim McVeigh, Traci Klein, Bryan Anderson

ESPN
NFL reports remain inconsistent

Three years after Congress pressured the NFL to overhaul its concussion program, the league effort remains marked by inconsistencies in how it tracks, manages and even describes serious head injuries, making it difficult to assess the league's progress on the issue, an analysis by ESPN's "Outside the Lines" and PBS "Frontline" shows . . . "I'm gonna be blunt here: We're so primitive," said Dr. David Dodick, a neurologist who examines some NFL players as director of the concussion program at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz. "Twenty years from now, we'll look back at ourselves and laugh."

Reach: The weekly ESPN Outside the Lines explores the most significant sports story of the week . It is an investigative sports-news program. ESPN's website has more than 40 million unique visitors each month.

Context: In response to the growing awareness of the dangers of concussions to athletes at all levels, Mayo Clinic provides concussion testing for athletes at Mayo locations in Arizona and Minnesota.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Reuters
Knee replacement linked to weight gain: study

by Kerry Grens

Being overweight is known to increase the risk of needing a knee replacement, but a new study finds that knee replacement surgery may also raise a person's risk of gaining weight, according to a U.S. study… "Patients who undergo knee arthroplasty are at increased risk of clinically important weight gain following surgery," wrote study leader Daniel Riddle, a professor at Virginia Commonwealth University… Riddle's group used a patient registry from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, which collected information on 917 knee replacement patients before and after their procedures.

Circulation: Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Context: Registries are important for examining the effectiveness of orthopedic implants that have limited pre-market performance information. Mayo Clinic's extensive total joint registry resources are being well leveraged to collect patient-reported outcome data. Mayo uses the data at the point of care to help understand the level of disability caused by the patient's condition and to monitor responses to treatment objectively. The data can also be used to assess the value — including cost-effectiveness — of various interventions in populations of patients.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Reuters
Chest compression-only CPR shows long-term benefit
by Katherine Hobson, People who suffer cardiac arrest - in which the heart stops beating - were less likely to die in subsequent years when bystanders performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation using chest compressions only, a new study found. That builds on previous research that found no short-term survival differences in adult victims given compression-only CPR instead of the standard kind, which includes mouth-to-mouth resuscitation…This study shows "we were on the right track in 2008," said Dr. Roger White of the Mayo Clinic, who was on the advisory group that wrote the AHA's statement.

Circulation: See entry immediately above.

Context: Roger White, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist who has saved countless lives through groundbreaking work in cardiac resuscitation at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. His discoveries helped pave the way for the placement of defibrillators in airports and other public places, better CPR practices and education, and faster emergency response times. Mayo Clinic made headlines when Dr. White directed a helicopter flight crew that successfully performed CPR on a man with no pulse for 96 minutes. The patient, 54-year-old Howard Snitzer, recovered completely.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

KMSP FOX News Twin Cities
Whooping Cough Outbreak

Minnesota is experiencing a major outbreak of whooping cough this year. Hennepin County alone has 1,033 cases of whooping cough making it the most affected county in the entire state of Minnesota. Joining us now from the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Gregory Poland, infectious disease expert and adviser to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.  FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m. newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m.

Context: Whooping cough, or pertussis, is making headlines, nearly all of them bad news. At least 18 children have died in recent months in what the U.S. government calls the highest infection rate in 70 years. And the problem is global, with similarly increasing rates reported overseas. While preventing the disease is in part up to medical experts, everyone can take some basic steps, such as getting vaccinated and staying home when ill, says Gregory Poland, M.D., Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine and an infectious diseases expert and advisor to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Media Expert Alert

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic prepares for health care evolution
by Jeff Hansel

Facing health-care reform changes, a slow economy and other challenges, Mayo Clinic is slowing its hiring pace even as it remains committed to long-term expansion plans. "We're making changes internally to be financially responsible," said Mayo CEO John Noseworthy in a Thursday interview with the Post-Bulletin. "With the downturn in the economy, we have to be certain that we are working on adequately resourcing the highest priorities of the organization." It's not a hiring freeze; rather, the clinic is reviewing every job opening and project and is continuing to hire, Mayo Chief Administrative Officer Shirley Weis said.

Post-Bulletin
Change is coming to health care, Mayo Clinic
by Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic plans to slow capital investment and construction in the near-term as it deals with the slow economy and the rapidly changing health care industry. "We are literally going through a process of reviewing all" projects planned or under way, Mayo CEO Dr. John Noseworthy said during an interview Thursday with the Post-Bulletin. If a hole already has been dug, such as for the proton-beam treatment center in Rochester, it will proceed, Mayo officials said during the session with top leadership. They also emphasized that there's no hiring freeze at the clinic, but that every new job opening is being reviewed.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic President and CEO; Mike Harper, M.D., Executive Dean for Practice; Patricia Simmons, M.D., Chair, Government Relations Committee and Shirley Weis, Chief Administrative Officer met with Post-Bulletin editors and reporters to highlight Mayo Clinic’s recognition of industry-wide challenges and Mayo's long-term strategy to sustain our mission and thrive in the future.

Public Affairs Contacts: Karl Oestreich, Chris Gade

MPR
Fecal transplant offers rare hope against deadly colon disease
by Lorna Benson

In an experimental treatment that may be the only way they can save some people who have contracted a dangerous colon infection, out of desperation some Minnesota doctors are transplanting donated human feces into their patients' colons… In the endoscopy suite, Dr. Mark Larson, the Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist who performed her fecal transplant, snaked a four-foot tube and flexible scope through Hanninen's large intestine. When he reached the end of her colon, he began filling his tube with a brown solution of saline mixed with filtered feces. "And there we go," Larson said. "Science at the cutting edge, right there."… Mayo Clinic's fecal transplant program in Rochester is in the very early stages. Dr. Sahil Khanna, a gastroenterology fellow at Mayo who leads the program, has arranged about a dozen transplants in the past few months.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Fecal transplants are quick,  inexpensive and offer a 90 percent cure rate for patients. About one-fourth of people with C. difficile get sick again, either because the initial infection never went away or because they're reinfected with a different strain of the bacteria. Treatment for recurrent disease may include antibiotics, which may involve one or more courses of a medication, a longer course of treatment or an antibiotic given once every two days; probiotics, such as S. boulardii, given along with the antibiotic medication or a "stool transplant" to restore healthy intestinal bacteria by placing donor stool in your colon, using a colonoscope or nasogastric tube. Although this is rarely done in practice, research has shown stool transplant to be helpful.

Treatments and drugs

News Release:  C. Diff Infections Becoming More Common, Severe

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

KAAL
Rochester Epidemiology Project

After almost fifty years the Mayo Clinic is grateful for the support of the community that helps them operate the Rochester Epidemiology Project. The one of a kind project creates a medical records pool that allows scientists to study an entire population. Records from more than 150,000 patients in Olmsted County make up the pool. Researchers have used the records to make findings concerning skin cancer, dementia, and exposures to anesthesia. The hope is to add records from seven more southeastern Minnesota counties to the mix."When the population gets bigger like a half a million then you can look at specific groups and you never know the more people the more numbers the better the study," Mayo Dr. Walter Rocca said.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: It's the medical resource behind discoveries that have affected patients around the globe, treasured by researchers and funded by the National Institutes of Health for nearly 50 years: the Rochester Epidemiology Project. This comprehensive medical records pool makes Olmsted County, Minn., one of the few places in the world where scientists can study virtually an entire geographic population to identify trends in disease, evaluate treatments and find factors that put people at risk for illness — or protect them. And, as it nears the half-century mark, the project is still growing. Health care providers in seven southeastern Minnesota counties are adding patients' records, including Dodge, Fillmore, Goodhue, Houston, Mower, Wabasha and Winona, more than doubling the number of area residents included.

News Release: The Greatest Medical Resource You've Never Heard Of: Rochester Epidemiology Project

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Phoenix Business Journal
Phoenix looks to hospitals to improve Mexico ties
by Mike Sunnucks

The city of Phoenix is enlisting the help of Mayo Clinic Arizona and other local hospitals and medical research groups to bolster its push for more international economic development and investments, especially from Mexico.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: Wyatt Decker, M.D., Mayo Clinic Vice President and Chief Executive Office at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, said the clinic already receives a steady stream of patients from Mexico, but it is interested in working with city officials to build an international destination that would attract not only patients, but scientists and doctors as well. Mayo is eyeing an estimated 1,200 acres of undeveloped land surround the hospital campus. The city and Arizona State Land Department, which controls parcels in that area, are examining ways to develop a bioscience corridor near Mayo. Arizona State University also is considering developing a presence there, Decker said.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

For more coverage of Mayo Clinic in the News, please link to our news clip blog here.

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Tags: AHA, american heart association, C. diff, chest compression-only CPR, chest compressions, cluster headache, concussion, concussion testing, CPR, doctor shortage, Dr. Colin West, Dr. David Dodick


May 10th, 2012

Probiotics May Prevent Diarrhea in Antibiotic-Takers, Study Suggests

By Admin

It's no secret to people who take antibiotics that the drugs can wreak havoc on a person's stomach. A new study says taking probiotics, which can be found in supplements or in certain brands of yogurt, may provide an effective way to prevent diarrhea during an antibiotic regimen… According to the Mayo Clinic, probiotics have also been tied to treatment benefits for yeast infections, irritable bowel syndrome, eczema in children, and reduces the severity of colds and flu.

 

CBS News by Ryan Jaslow

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Tags: antibiotics, CBS News, probiotics