Items Tagged ‘stem cells’

July 24th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Advisory Board

Why Mayo Clinic's CEO wants to serve 200 million patients—and how he plans to do it

Question: I've read that before you joined the Mayo Clinic—and this was decades ago—one of your first encounters with the organization was when a physician was supposed to visit your hospital for a commemorative dinner…and he missed it. Can you talk Advisory Boarda little bit about that? John Noseworthy: It was one of the two or three most pivotal moments in my life. You're right, he missed his flight—and it was because he was with a patient. I was very young and I remember thinking, "who is this man who is so humble that he would put the needs of the patient ahead of his receiving  a distinguished recognition." And then I wondered what organization could retain and keep a person like that. It was Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Advisory Board Company is a global research, technology, and consulting firm partnering with more than 165,000 leaders in more than 4,100 organizations across health care and higher education.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Wall Street Journal
Why Seven Hours of Sleep Might Be Better Than Eight
by Sumathi Reddy

…Other experts caution against studies showing ill effects from too much sleep. Illness may cause someone to sleep or spend more The Wall Street Journal newspaper logotime in bed, these experts say. And studies based on people reporting their own sleep patterns may be inaccurate. "The problem with these studies is that they give you good information about association but not causation," said Timothy Morgenthaler, president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, which represents sleep doctors and researchers, and a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, is also affiliated with the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Alyson Gonzalez, Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo links abnormal protein in brain to Alzheimer's
by Mary Lynn Smith

…“Alzheimer’s disease symptoms have been typically thought to be produced by plaques and tangles,” said Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s disease Research Center. “Now these folks have documented that there’s a third elementStar Tribune newspaper logo that contributes to Alzheimer’s symptoms.” The protein, known as TDP-43, is normally found in the brain. But what Mayo researchers found is that when it becomes abnormal — chemically different and bunched up — a patient is more likely to show symptoms of Alzheimer’s, explained Dr. Keith Josephs, who headed the research team’s four-year study.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic-led study on Alzheimer's grabs worldwide attention
MPR, Alzheimer's research at Mayo may open new possibilities to investigate
KTTC, Protein discovery may be key to Alzheimer's cure
WCCO, Albuquerque Journal, MinnPost

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

Context:  Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease. In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. “We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.” More information on the study, including a video interview with Dr. Josephs, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Mayo sees big future for personalized medicine
by Jim Spencer

Medical treatment will become more genetically specific to individuals as the 21st century progresses, the Mayo Clinic’s director of Star Tribune Business section logolaboratory medicine told a congressional subcommittee Wednesday. Dr. Frank Cockerill said that Mayo, one of the world’s leaders in specialized diagnostics, develops 150 tests per year in an attempt to become more precise in treating patients.  The Rochester-based clinic is moving toward tests that will let doctors tailor treatments that are unique to individuals, Cockerill told participants at a 21st Century Cures roundtable sponsored by the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s subcommittee on health. For instance, instead of using standard dosages, Cockerill said Mayo’s labs try to tranform scientific discoveries into “valid tests” that allow doctors to apply “specific genetic findings in a patient.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Frank Cockerill, M.D. is chair of the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and PathologyMayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (DLMP) in Rochester is one of the largest clinical laboratories in the world. It is composed of more than 3,200 people working in numerous specialty laboratories performing more than 20 million tests a year. Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML) is a reference laboratory specializing in esoteric laboratory testing for health care organizations throughout the United States and around the world. MML's mission is to support the local delivery of laboratory services through the provision of exceptional reference laboratory services and by providing support services that facilitate and augment community integration efforts.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Post-Bulletin

Our view: Community can help keep Mayo Clinic at top of rankings

Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperWhat's most impressive about Mayo Clinic's No. 1 ranking as the best hospital in the country by U.S. News & World Report magazine were the consistent high marks in several categories of evaluation. The report gave Mayo No. 1 or No. 2 rankings in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Pulse on Health: It's the personal care behind being No. 1 that counts
MedPage Today, Top-Ranked Hospitals Sing Own Praises
CSPAN, General Speeches: Rep. Erik Paulsen, R-Minnesota, 3rd District

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic has achieved the highest honor in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of top hospitalsMayo Clinic earned more number one rankings than any other provider, ranking number one or number two in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “We have a deep commitment to delivering high-value health care that best meets patients' needs. We owe our success to truly dedicated staff that provide a seamless patient experience and the care that each individual needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Noseworthy, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

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Tags: "sitting disease", A.L.S., ABC News, ABC15, advisory board, Ahwatukee Foothills News, Aitkin Age, Albuquerque Journal, alzheimer's disease, Am.com, AP, Apple


June 26th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Obesity Is Undercounted in Children, Study Finds
by Sumathi Reddy

…A new study finds that the commonly used body-mass-index measure may fail to identify as many as 25% of children, age 4 to 18 years, who have excess body fat. The meta-analysis, scheduled for publication online in the journal Pediatric Obesity on Tuesday, reviewed 37 separate studies involving a combined The Wall Street Journal newspaper logo53,521 participants. "BMI is not capturing everybody who needs to be labeled as obese," said Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, director of preventive cardiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who headed the study with Asma Javed, a pediatric endocrinology fellow.

Additional coverage:

KAAL, Mayo Study Finds Fault with Youth BMI Measurements
WJXT Fla., KTVZ Oreg., ANSA Italy


Wall Street Journal Lunch Break
Video: Obesity Undercounted in Children, Study Finds

A new study finds that the commonly used body mass index measure A new study finds that the Wall Street Journal Live Logocommonly used body mass index measure may leave out as many as 25% of children with excess body fat. Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, co-author of the study and director of preventive cardiology at the Mayo Clinic, joins Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez's research program has studied obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up.


Wall Street Journal
How to Keep Your Muscles Strong as You Age
by Laura Landrow

...For now, however, the best medicine available to maintain muscle mass and strength is less complicated and costly—namely, exercise and a healthy diet. Yet about 60% of people over 65 are insufficiently active or overtly inactive, and many have poor nutrition, says Nathan LeBrasseur, a researcher who directs the Muscle Performance and Physical Function Laboratory and the Healthy Aging and The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoIndependent Living Initiative at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Dr. LeBrasseur estimates that most people will lose approximately 30% of muscle mass over their lifetime, and as much as 50% by the time they reach their 80s or 90s.

Context: Nathan LeBrasseur, Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic researcher and is affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. More information about his work can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

 

Wall Street Journal
How Bad Sitting Posture at Work Leads to Bad Standing Posture All the Time
by Jeanne Whalen

Good posture means aligning ears over the shoulders, shoulders over hips, and Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logohips over the knees and ankles…Many deskbound office workers have started standing and walking in this position, too, says Andrea Cheville, a rehabilitation physician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. To counteract kyphosis, it is important to stretch the pectoral muscles and strengthen the trapezius muscles in the upper back, which hold the shoulder blades back, Dr. Cheville said. Remembering to keep the ears and head over the shoulders, and not jutting forward, is also important.

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is an expert on exercise in the elderly and also focuses on the delivery of supportive care services to optimize the functionality and quality-of-life for patients with cancer in all disease stages.

Wall Street Journal
Can Data From Your Fitbit Transform Medicine?
By Elizabeth Dwoskin

Many runners and fitness fanatics have been quick to embrace wearable wireless tracking devices for Wall Street Journal Tech Logomeasuring physical activity and calories burned. Now, a growing number of physicians are formally studying whether such "wearables" can improve patients' health by spurring people to get moving…David Cook, an anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, who, along with colleagues, used Fitbit Inc.'s namesake gadget to track activity levels of cardiac-surgery patients. The researchers found that patients who moved more the day after surgery were more likely to be discharged sooner. The findings prompted the hospital to dispatch physical therapists to study patients who weren't moving as much, said Dr. Cook.

Context: David J. Cook, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: 3D mammograms, ABC News Australia, ABC30, aging, Agnes Rapacz, Allevant Solutions, alzheimer's disease, American News Report, angina, ANSA, anti-obesity devic, AP


April 25th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Kingman Daily Miner
Mayo Clinic tour starts in Kingman
by Doug McMurdo

The Mayo Clinic chose Kingman to launch a 43-city, two-country mobile exhibit celebratinKingman Daily Minerg its 150-year history at Kingman Regional Medical Center on Monday. KRMC was the first hospital outside of the Midwest to become part of the Mayo Clinic Care Network.

Reach: The Kingman Daily Miner covers local and state news that is relevant to the Kingman region and Mohave County in Arizona. The publication has a daily circulation of 7,300 and a weekend circulation of more than 7,600. The Daily Miner website has more than 25,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

KPHO Ariz., Mobile Exhibit, Part of Phoenix and medical history is hitting the road, city and state leaders celebrating 150 years of the Mayo Clinic. They've unveiled the mobile exhibit showcasing Mayo’s past, present, and future. You listen to the story with some of the products divide developed by the Mayo Clinic. The mobile exhibit will be at the Scottsdale campus tomorrow.

Arizona Republic, Mayo Clinic's 150th draws Arizona governor, others, Arizona's governor is helping to celebrate the Mayo Clinic's 150th anniversary at its Phoenix hospital. Mayo officials say Gov. Jan Brewer will unveil a mobile exhibit Tuesday morning that highlights 150 years of the health care provider's history. Additional coverage:

Kansas City Star (AP), Mayo Clinic's 150th draws Arizona governor, others, Arizona's governor is helping to celebrate the Mayo Clinic's 150th anniversary at its Phoenix hospital.

La Crosse Tribune, Mobile exhibit marks Mayo's 150 years, A mobile exhibit commemorating the Mayo Clinic’s 150 years will stop for tours from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. May 1 at the south end of the parking lot near Mississippi Street at Mayo Clinic Health System-Franciscan Healthcare, 700 West Ave. S. in La Crosse.

KSAZ Ariz.Anchorage Daily News, Bellville News Democrat (lll.), Centre Daily Times Pa., Daily Journal Ind., Idaho Statesman, Modesto BeeKTAR Ariz., Washington Times, KNXV Ariz., MyFOXPhoenix

Context: Mayo Clinic's traveling mobile exhibit has begun its journey. In 2014, we honor 150 years of serving humanity. This is one way Mayo Clinic can give back – to thank the patients and friends who’ve been part of our story, and share our vision with the public. People from all walks of life turn to Mayo Clinic … so we’re reaching out, bringing Mayo Clinic to the people. This exhibit is sponsored by the Mayo Clinic Sesquicentennial Committee with generous support from many patients and friends. 

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

 

Star Tribune
Tevlin: For this man, checking off ‘organ donor’ is personal

Dave Costello had survived a cancer scare and was being kept alive by a mechanical heart, but he was so determined to Star Tribune newspaper logotake his wife, Audrey, to a church concert that he wrote “date night” on the calendar one February evening in 2013. Costello, who suffered from a rare heart disease, had been on the transplant waiting list at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester for more than four years. Complications from his condition had also damaged his kidney, so he knew his chance for a long life were getting slim.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Mayo Clinic, with transplant services in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, performs more transplants than any other medical center in the world. Research activities in the Transplant Center at Mayo Clinic have contributed significantly to the current successful outcomes of organ transplantation.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic researchers place ALS hope in stem cells
by Jeff Hansel

Seventy-five years after baseball player Lou Gehrig was diagnosed with ALS, Mayo Clinic researchers have begun a human study hoping to slow progression of the devastating ailment. ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaperosis, has become widely known as Lou Gehrig's disease…"Lifespan after diagnosis is roughly two to three years, but there's a huge range," said Mayo neurologist Dr. Nathan Staff. Affected individuals can survive more than a decade after diagnosis, or die within six months…"We don't know if it will work or not," said Dr. Anthony Windebank, deputy director for discovery in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo. "It may even do harm."

Related Coverage:

Post-Bulletin
Gehrig was gracious in Rochester visit
by Paul Christian

…On June 15, 1939, Lou Gehrig, baseball's "Iron Man," arrived in Rochester to see Mayo Clinic doctors about his mysterious decline. The rare form of paralysis from which he suffered could not be cured, and he died two years later.…As Gehrig's debilitation became steadily worse, his wife, Eleanor, called Mayo Clinic, and her call was transferred to Charles William Mayo.

Post-Bulletin
ALS legacy under revision at Mayo Clinic
by Jeff Hansel

Prestige sometimes springs from unfortunate circumstance. Such was the case for Mayo Clinic in 1939 when baseball player Lou Gehrig got his devastating diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, in Rochester. As a result, Lou Gehrig's disease and Mayo Clinic will forever be inseparably linked. Mayo researchers hope the clinic's next inextricable connection to Lou Gehrig's disease will be a patient-derived stem-cell treatment to slow — or even "arrest" — progression of the disease….It's important to manage public expectations, said Dr. Anthony Windebank, deputy director for discovery in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a rapidly progressive, uniformly fatal neurodegenerative disease. It is characterized by the loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and cerebral cortex, leading to a decline in muscular function. It eventually results in weakness, speech deficits and difficulty swallowing. ALS is almost always fatal within two to three years.

Public Affairs Contact: Jennifer Schutz

 

Los Angeles Times
2 new drugs aim to prevent migraines; early tests done
by Mary MacVean

Two drugs given to people who suffer migraines reduced the frequency of their headaches in early trials, scientists Logo for Los Angeles Times newspapersaid…Dr. David Dodick of the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, an author of both studies, said by telephone that rates for placebos are often high in studies of pain, and in this case those rates could be due in part to the high level of anticipation people had for the success of migraine treatment. They also could be affected, as they sometimes are, by the invasiveness of the treatments – injections rather than pills, he said.

Reach: The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million.

Additional coverage:

CNN
New migraine treatments show promise
by Saundra Young

There are few treatments available for the millions of people who suffer from migraines. New early-stage research offers new hope. Studies presented Tuesday at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting suggest that two new drugs may prevent migraines from happening… Goadsby and Dr. David Dodick, co-authors of both studies, say this treatment is exciting because it's entirely new and specific to migraines. Dodick, a professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic and Chairman of the American Migraine Foundation, said no drugs targeting the treatment of migraines have been developed in the past 50 years.

KTAR Ariz.
Mayo doctor says new migraine treatments appear promising
by Bob McClay

Two treatments are showing some promise in helping those who suffer from migraine headaches. For the last 20 years, doctors have known of a protein that plays an important role in the formation of migraines, but now, there may be some good news. "A couple of antibodies have been developed against that particular protein," said Dr. David Dodick, neurology professor at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale. "These antibodies are delivered, one intravenously and one subcutaneously, like an insulin injection."

Huffington Post UK, Yahoo! HealthMedicalXpress, ScienceCodex, WDSU La., C4K, DailyRx, ScienceNewsline Medicine, Daily Headache, Health Canal, bild der Wissenschaft, Express UK

Context:  David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist and director of Mayo Clinic in Arizona's Comprehensive Concussion Program.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh
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Tags: A.L.S., ABC News, ABC15, Albert Lea, Albert Lea Tribune, American Academy of Neurology, American Migraine Foundation, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Anatlitica, Anchorage Daily News, anti-aging practices, anti-inflammatory medicine


September 13th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

September 13, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

AP (Pioneer Press)
More Americans exercise while they work
by Sam Hananel

Glued to your desk at work? Cross that off the list of excuses for not having the time to exercise. A growing number of Americans are standing, walking and even cycling their way through the workday at treadmill desks, standup desks or other moving workstations…It’s been a decade since scientific studies began to show that too much sitting can lead to obesity and increase the risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. Even going to the gym three times a week doesn’t offset the harm of being sedentary for hours at a time, said Dr. James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

TIME
The Personalized Flu Shot
by Alice Park

Dr. Greg Poland is expecting a lot of questions--and confusion--from his patients this flu season. For the first time, U.S. health officials will distribute six influenza vaccines, up from four last year. "Instead of the one-size-fits-all approach, we are moving to vaccines ... for individual patients," says Poland, director of the Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Related Coverage:
Waseca County News, The facts about vaccinations

Context: The next flu shot season will include several new vaccine options for consumers, Mayo Clinic vaccine expert Gregory Poland, M.D., says. Fearful of needles? There's now an influenza vaccination just for you. Allergic to eggs? It won't stop you from getting a flu shot. The new choices move influenza vaccinations closer to the personalized approach long sought by immunologists including Dr. Poland, but they may also prove bewildering to patients, he says.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Expert Explains New Vaccine Options for Next Influenza Season

Mayo Clinic News Network: Flu Vaccines - Changes & Choices for 2013

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

FOX9
Mayo Clinic hosts 'Transform' event to talk health care innovation
by Lindsey LaBelle

The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation hosted annual conference called Transform, and FOX 9 medical expert Dr. Archelle Georgiou both attended and spoke about her work. The conference focused on innovative health ideas happening in pockets around the country that have the potential to change healthcare for the greater good, and also, to highlight ideas that can be used so the health care system works better for patients and families.

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.  FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m.

Additional Coverage:

Hospitals & Health Networks
Maybe it's Time to Nix the Word 'Patient'

Hospitals & Health Networks
Come on, Health Care, Bust Out of Your Box

FOX47
Mayo Clinic hosts national leaders during 'Transform' healthcare summit

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic conference: Technology will transform health care

KAAL
Middle Schoolers Present at Mayo Clinic's Transform Symposium

Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation held Transform 2013, its sixth multidisciplinary symposium focused on transforming the way health care is experienced and delivered, Sept. 8–10 in Rochester, Minn. Dozens of speakers from a wide array of backgrounds will look through different lenses to understand a larger picture of health care today. Topics include new models of care delivery, the uncertainty of change in the health care landscape, the intersection of business and health care innovation and how to scale programs to large populations.

News Release: Mayo Clinic to Hold Sixth Symposium on Transforming Health Care Delivery

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

KAAL
Mayo Clinic's Social Presence Among the Best
by Jenna Lohse
…An international bestselling author has ranked Mayo Clinic amongst the top companies in the nation for using social media. As Mayo Officials tell us, it's hard to be a leading organization without an online presence. "The history at Mayo Clinic has all been about our reputation being made by word of mouth,” said Lee Aase, Director of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Social Media…"We need to step out of our office and we need to find ways to reach families, to give them to messages to help them live healthy lives and this is a very efficient and effective way to do that,” said Brian Lynch, Mayo Clinic General Pediatrician.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: In 2010, Mayo Clinic announced the creation of a Center for Social Media to accelerate effective application of social media tools throughout Mayo Clinic and to spur broader and deeper engagement in social media by hospitals, medical professionals and patients to improve health globally.  "Mayo Clinic believes individuals have the right and responsibility to advocate for their own health, and that it is our responsibility to help them use social media tools to get the best information, connect with providers and with each other, and inspire healthy choices," explains Mayo Clinic president and CEO John Noseworthy, M.D. "Through this center we intend to lead the health care community in applying these revolutionary tools to spread knowledge and encourage collaboration among providers, improving health care quality everywhere."

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Nick Hanson

NBC Latino
What parents should know about children and food allergies

With children heading back to school, parents have to be ready for food allergies. A recent CDC study revealed that food allergies increased in children under 18 years from 1997 to 2011, affecting five percent of children under the age of 5 years old. NBC Latino’s Dr. Joe Sirven, Mayo Clinic Arizona, has some tips that every family should know about children and food allergies.

Reach: NBC Latino is an English-language wesbite aimed at Hispanics featuring news and general interest information.

Context: Joseph Sirven, M.D., is chair of neurology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Dr. Sirven’s research pertains to all facets of the diagnosis and management of seizures and epilepsy.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

MPR
Mayo Clinic extends waiting period between blood donations

by Elizabeth Baier

A new Mayo Clinic policy that requires blood donors to wait longer periods between donations could lead to a drop in the clinic's blood supply. In May, the Mayo Clinic extended the waiting period between blood donations from 8 to 12 weeks, aiming to avoid iron loss in frequent donors…To make up for the shortage, the clinic has started a campaign to convince people to donate one more time, said Blood Donor Center Medical Director Manish Gandhi said.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage: KSTP

Context: As few as 3 percent of Americans eligible to donate blood do, and fear and anxiety are common reasons why many decline to give. U.S. hospitals are always in need of new donors; at Mayo Clinic, that need is heightened by concern about iron deficiency in frequent givers. Mayo recently began requiring people to wait 12 weeks rather than eight between donations, a change that means an estimated 10 percent drop in its blood supply. To inspire more people to give blood, Manish Gandhi, M.D., medical director of the Mayo Clinic Blood Donor Center, addresses six common blood donation phobias.

News Release: Not a Blood Donor? Mayo Clinic Expert Addresses 6 Fears That Stop People from Giving

Mayo Clinic News Network: Manish Gandhi, M.D., medical director of the Mayo Clinic Blood Donor Center, addresses several common blood donation phobias, including fear of needles, fear of the sight of blood and fear of fainting.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic moves ahead in heart stem-cell research
by Jeff Hansel

Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Rochester are looking for new ways to repair a heart that doesn't beat properly in the days following a heart attack. Traditionally, a person with an irregular heartbeat — a problem known medically as dyssynchrony — gets treated with a pacemaker to coach the heart back into normal rhythm. But that's ineffective for about a third of patients, said Dr. Andre Terzic, director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage: MedCity News

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers have found a way to resynchronize cardiac motion following a heart attack using stem cells. Scientists implanted engineered stem cells, also known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, into damaged regions of mouse hearts following a heart attack. This regenerative approach successfully targeted the origin of abnormal cardiac motion, preventing heart failure. The findings appear in the September issue of the Journal of Physiology. "The discovery introduces — for the first time — stem cell-based 'biological resynchronization' as a novel means to treat cardiac dyssynchrony," says Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D., senior author of the study. Dr. Terzic is the Michael S. and Mary Sue Shannon Family Director, Center for Regenerative Medicine, and the Marriott Family Professor of Cardiovascular Diseases Research.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Restores Disrupted Heartbeat with Regenerative Intervention

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Restores Disrupted Heartbeat with Regenerative Intervention

Public Affairs Contact: Jennifer Schutz

Huffington Post Live
Obese Teens & Eating Disorders

A new report by the Mayo Clinic says overweight and obese children and teens who lose weight are at significant risk for developing eating disorders, but their symptoms are often overlooked. Dr. Leslie Sim joins us to discuss her findings.

Reach: HuffPost Live is an online streaming video network produced by the Huffington Post. It features videos relating to current events, entertainment, politics, technology and other topics of interest. The network streams original content Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. ET. The site receive more than 550,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:

USA Today
Teens who beat obesity at risk for eating disorders

LA Times, Business Standard, CBS News, WebMD, Yahoo! Shine Canada, Design&Trend, WDTV W.V., WBAY Wis., Health.com, Science World Report, Headlines & Global News, WXYC Mich., WRAL N.C., WSMV Tenn., KSAZ, Huffington Post, Tucson Citizen, HealthCanal, HealthDay, Science2.0, MPR, Newsday

Context: Obese teenagers who lose weight are at risk of developing eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, Mayo Clinic researchers imply in a recent Pediatrics article. Eating disorders among these patients are also not being adequately detected because the weight loss is seen as positive by providers and family members. In the article, Mayo Clinic researchers argue that formerly overweight adolescents tend to have more medical complications from eating disorders and it takes longer to diagnose them than kids who are in a normal weight range. This is problematic because early intervention is the key to a good prognosis, says Leslie Sim, Ph.D., an eating disorders expert in the Mayo Clinic Children's Center and lead author of the study.

News Release: Obese Teenagers Who Lose Weight at Risk for Developing Eating Disorders

Mayo Clinic News Network: Lead author of the study Leslie Sim, Ph.D., L.P., talks about the research

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Wisconsin Public Radio
Hospitals Try Adding Round-The-Clock Remote Patient Monitoring
by Maureen McCollum

Mayo Clinic Health System in La Crosse and Eau Claire are the latest hospitals that will introduce technology to monitor critical care patients remotely…Carrie Apuan is the director of patient care in Mayo’s La Crosse critical care unit. She says if a patient has pneumonia, their vital signs can trend downward slowly and may not be noticed immediately by staff in La Crosse.

Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio serves approximately 300,000 listeners each week throughout Wisconsin and adjoining states on two networks. 

Additional Coverage:

KEYC Mankato
Enhanced Care in Intensive Care Unit 

KSTP
Critically Ill Patients Benefit from New Mayo Clinic Program
 
Austin Herald,  Clinical Innovation + Technology, FierceHealthIT

Context: Critically ill patients are benefiting from a new program designed to improve care and shorten hospital stays. Mayo Clinic's Enhanced Critical Care program offers 24/7 remote monitoring of the sickest patients at six Mayo Clinic Health System hospitals. "It's like having an extra set of eyes on every patient," says Dany Abou Abdallah, M.D., a pulmonologist and director of the critical care unit in Eau Claire. "With this program, operations center nurses and physicians continuously review patients' vital signs and other data. The minute they notice a potential problem, they can alert the local care team."

News Release: Critically Ill Patients at Mayo Clinic Health System Receive Additional Level of Care

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Paul Meznarich

Arizona Republic
The Power Of Bioscience Research
by Greg Stanton, Michael Crow and Wyatt Decker

When state leaders launched an ambitious plan to invest in the biosciences a decade ago, they did so for a simple reason: to break free from our economic handcuffs to only a few industries…Our state couldn’t ask for a better anchor: Mayo Clinic’s 200-acre campus in the north Valley. In less than two years, Mayo will open a massive 380,000-square foot, $130 million cancer center, as well as a $180 million proton-beam therapy center — one of only a few in the West. The cancer center will create more than 800 permanent jobs over the next decade, 1,000 construction jobs, and make Mayo’s unique model of patient-centered medical care even more accessible to those who live here. 

Circulation: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Greg Stanton is mayor of Phoenix. Michael Crow is president of Arizona State University. Wyatt Decker is vice president and chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Mayo Clinic in Arizona celebrated 25 years in the southwest in 2012. Mayo Clinic in Arizona now spans two campuses, comprising more than 400 acres of land, and has added two research buildings on the Scottsdale campus, while the Phoenix campus includes a 244-bed hospital, specialty clinic, housing for transplant and cancer patients and leased space for a child care center as well as hospice and a hotel. Offsite family medicine practices were also added in Scottsdale and Glendale, Ariz.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Celebrates 25 Years in Arizona

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: Angie Stransky, anorexia nervosa, AP, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University, Associated Press, Austin, Austin Herald, Barb Spurrier, bioscience, blood, blood donation phobias


August 29th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

August 30, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

NPR
Patients Love A Gentler Approach To Surgery, But Surgeons Balk
by Nancy Shute

Surgery can be a necessary misery, endured in hope of health. But what if you took away the misery, and kept the benefits? When hospitals quit subjecting patients to prolonged fasting, nasogastric tubes, abdominal drains, and other commonplaces of surgical care, a study finds, patients feel less pain and recover faster… "The early feeding makes a big difference" in how people feel, says Dr. Sean Dowdy, a professor in obstetrics and gynecology at Mayo who led the study. But he told Shots it's not just that. "Whether it's the early feeding or the lack of bowel preps or the change in anesthesia delivery, regardless, patients are happier."

Reach: The NPR Shots Blog covers news about health and medicine. It is written and reported by NPR’s Science Desk.

Additional Coverage: MPR, KNAU Ariz., HealthLeaders Media, News Medical, Boise State Public Radio, Contemporary OB/GYN

Context: Patients who had complex gynecologic surgery managed by an enhanced recovery pathway (ERP) resulted in decreased narcotic use, earlier discharge, stable readmission rates, excellent patient satisfaction and cost savings, according to a Mayo Clinic study. The findings are published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.

"Patients are much happier when we are able to eliminate the use of unproven and unpleasant interventions such as bowel preparations, caloric restriction, sedating medications and the use of surgical drains," says Sean Dowdy, M.D., a Mayo Clinic gynecologic surgeon and lead study author. "We show that patients undergoing the most complex and invasive operations have the most to gain from this recovery pathway."

News Release: Mayo Clinic Study: Enhanced Recovery Pathway for Gynecologic Surgery Gets Patients Back To Health Faster

Interview with Mayo Clinic gynecologic surgeon and lead study author Sean Dowdy, M.D on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

USA Today
Experts: Mom has biggest impact on girls' body image

Women urged to avoid talk of diet, weight with young daughters…"Moms are probably the most important influence on a daughter's body image," said Dr. Leslie Sim, clinical director of Mayo Clinic's eating disorders program and a child psychologist. "Even if a mom says to the daughter, 'You look so beautiful, but I'm so fat,' it can be detrimental."

Reach: USA TODAY has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

Context: In the U.S., 10 million women and 1 million men suffer from eating disorders. Millions more suffer from binge eating disorders. The peak onset of eating disorders occurs during puberty and the late teen/early adult years, but symptoms can occur as young as kindergarten. Leslie Sim, Ph.D., L.P. is a Mayo Clinic eating disorders expert with appointments in Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine and Psychiatry and Psychology.

Tips to prevent teen eating disorders can be found here.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

MPR
Medical researchers study ways to make hot temps less dangerous
by Lorna Benson

…Dr. Michael Joyner, a Mayo Clinic physiologist and anesthesiologist who studies how people respond to heat by warming and cooling his subjects with a water-filled suit adapted from the U.S. space program, is trying to figure out if sensors in the body that drive breathing also detect temperature changes. And if so, he's trying to determine whether these sensors are faulty in people with heart failure, hypertension and diabetes - the three conditions that cause the most problems for people during periods of high heat.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Star Tribune
Rise in thyroid cancer diagnoses is challenged by Mayo researchers
by Jeremy Olson

The findings, published Tuesday by doctors at the Mayo Clinic, have prompted the researchers to recommend a new diagnostic term that could spare people with small throat tumors from surgery, medication and radiation that they might not need… “This is exposing patients to unnecessary and harmful treatments that are inconsistent with their prognosis,” said Dr. Juan P. Brito, a Mayo endocrinologist in Rochester.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: An increasing gap between the incidence of thyroid cancer and deaths from the disease suggests that low-risk cancers are being overdiagnosed and overtreated, a study from the Mayo Clinic Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery finds. The study appears in the current issue of BMJ.

"High tech imaging technologies such as ultrasound, CT and MRI can detect very small thyroid nodules many of which are slow growing papillary thyroid cancers, says the study's lead author Juan Pablo Brito, M.B.B.S. an endocrine fellow and health care delivery scholar at Mayo Clinic. "This is exposing patients to unnecessary and harmful treatments that are inconsistent with their prognosis."

Additional Coverage: WCCO-830, Chicago Tribune, Post-Bulletin, FOX47, CTV News, MinnPost, MedCity News, Yahoo! Noticias

News Release: Mayo Clinic: High-Tech Imaging Contributing To Overdiagnosis Of Low-Risk Thyroid Cancers

Public Affairs Contact: Shelly Plutowski

La Crosse Tribune
Monday profile: Dr. Margaret Grenisen makes her mark as women’s health advocate
by Mike Tighe

Colleagues describe Dr. Margaret Grenisen as a champion for women and a hero, while she deflects much of the credit to co-workers. Grenisen was one of the architects of the Center for Women’s Health at Mayo Clinic Health System-Franciscan Healthcare in La Crosse, which was the first of its kind and marked its 20th anniversary this month.

Circulation: The La Crosse Tribune covers local and state news that is relevant to the Western Wisconsin area and has a daily circulation of more than 24,000. La Crosse Tribune - Online has more than 182,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: The La Crosse Campus serves as the hub for the Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare medical practice and is home to most medical specialties and services. The Center for Women's Health at Franciscan Healthcare is a comprehensive women's health center established to meet the diverse and dynamic needs of adolescent and adult women. With a multidisciplinary, all-women staff, The Center for Women's Health offers a variety of services designed to address the physical, psychological, and spiritual needs. Our services include screening, diagnosis and management of conditions which are unique to women, more common in women, more serious to women, or manifest differently in women.

Public Affairs Contact: Rick Thiesse

WJXT Fla./News4Jax
Drug May Stop Invasive Breast Cancer

New research from the Mayo Clinic here in Jacksonville, could give twice as many cancer-fighting patients, more options. Researchers say a drug used to treat blood cancers, may also stop the spread of invasive breast cancers.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Additional Coverage: Big News Network, Health Canal, National Cancer Institute, Nature World News, Science Daily, Sify, Zee News, Globedia, KTTC

Context: A drug used to treat blood cancers may also stop the spread of invasive breast cancer, researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida have discovered. Their study, published online in Breast Cancer Research, found that in the lab and in animals, the drug decitabine turns on a gene coding for protein kinase D1 (PRKD1) that halts the ability of cancer cells to separate from a tumor and spread to distant organs.

"Treatment with low doses of decitabine in an animal model of breast cancer restored PRKD1 expression, reduced tumor size, and blocked metastasis to the lung," says the study's senior investigator, Peter Storz, Ph.D., a biochemist and molecular biologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

News Release: Drug Used for Blood Cancers May Stop Spread of Breast Cancer Cells, Mayo Clinic Finds

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

CBS5 Ariz.
Mayo Clinic to open stem cell lab in Phoenix 

Mayo Clinic will open its own stem cell laboratory next summer. It will store and process stem cells that are used for bone marrow transplants. The clinic has one of the most active bone marrow transplant programs in the U.S., with more than 200 procedures done each year.

Reach: KPHO-5 is the CBS affiliate in Phoenix and is owned by Meredith Corporation.

Additional Coverage:  KPNX, Stem Cell Daily

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona, with one of the most active bone marrow transplant programs in United States, will open its own stem cell laboratory in summer 2014. The laboratory will be initially dedicated to storing and processing stem cells used for bone marrow transplants at Mayo Clinic Hospital and Phoenix Children's Hospital.

Mayo Clinic is a regional referral center and performs more than 200 adult stem cell transplants each year and approximately 30 pediatric transplants with Phoenix Children's. The program is accredited by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy and the National Bone Marrow Donor Program.

News Release: Mayo Clinic to Open Stem Cell Laboratory in Phoenix

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Chicago Tribune
Breast-feeding may lessen stuttering
by Janise Neuiviann

Dr. Esther Krych, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic, said she found the results "really interesting" and commended the authors for uncovering another potential benefit to breast-feeding.  "They highlight nicely that breast-feeding isn't a cure-all, but at the same time that there may be benefits to breast-feeding we still have not discovered," said Krych, explaining there are many factors that go into language development. "Because of that, moms who can't breastfeed don't need to feel guilty." Krych, who is also chief medical editor of the Mayo Clinic Guide to Your Baby's First Year, said the mere act of caressing a baby while either breast-feeding or bottle-feeding with formula offered babies intimacy and a sense of security.

Reach: The Tribune’s average weekday circulation is about 425,000. Average Sunday circulation is more than 781,000. According to the Tribune, its newspaper reaches more than five million consumers while covering 76% of the market.

Context: Esther Krych, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pediatrician with appointments in Community Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine and Mayo Clinic Children's Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Courier-News Ill.
Elgin man set to undergo fourth kidney transplant at Mayo Clinic Wednesday
by Mike Danahey

Peter Giannaris of Elgin is looking forward to being able to do something he hasn’t done in 12 years that most of us see as a chore and take for granted… Giannaris, 38, has polycystic kidney disease. The Mayo Clinic website explains the condition “is an inherited disorder in which clusters of noncancerous, fluid-filled sacs (cysts) develop within the kidneys ... (and) can cause cysts to develop elsewhere in the body, too. The disease causes a variety of serious complications.”

Reach: The Courier-News serves the Elgin, Ill. area and Kane County in Northeastern Illinois.

Additional Coverage: WBBM Chicago

Context: Mayo Clinic Transplant Center is one of the largest and most experienced surgical practices in the world. Mayo has more than 300 surgeons and 122 operating rooms among its three locations in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Mayo Clinic surgeons perform hundreds of transplant surgeries each year.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

Modern Healthcare
100 Most Influential People in Healthcare – 2013

This year's ranking of the 100 Most Influential People in Healthcare includes 15 newcomers as well as seven leaders who have been on every list since it started in 2002…15. Dr. John Noseworthy, president and CEO, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.

Reach: Modern Healthcare, published by Crain Communications, is a healthcare news weekly that provides hospital executives with healthcare business news. The magazine specifically covers healthcare policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and healthcare from a business perspective. It also publishes a daily e-newsletter titled Modern Healthcare’s Daily Dose. The weekly publication has a circulation of more than 70,000 and its on-line site receives more than 29,700 unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

CBS Harrisburg
New law changes focus on keeping truckers healthy
by Ewa Roman

…And people in the medical field are gearing up for the changes as well. Dr. Clayton Cowl made a pit stop in Dauphin County Friday, teaching doctors, nurses and chiropractors about the new federal medical examinations and requirements. "What we're trying to do is actually close the loophole, so when a driver goes and sees an examiner there will be a specific number and registry for when that examiner does an exam and they'll be reported to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration on at least a monthly basis if not sooner," said Cowl, Mayo Clinic physician. 

Reach: CBS-21 serves Harrisburgh, Penn.

Additional Coverage: WITF

Previous Coverage in Nov. 12, 2012 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Big changes are coming to the medical evaluations required for many commercial driver’s license holders, including truckers and bus drivers. Under new federal requirements, the medical examinations will only count if they are performed by a health care provider specially trained and certified to do so. The goal is preventing medical emergency-related truck and bus crashes through what likely will be more intense health exams, says Clayton Cowl, M.D., of Mayo Clinic.

News Release: Mayo Expert Explains New Medical Exam Rule

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: 100 Most Influential People in Healthcare, anesthesiologist, Big News Network, biochemist, blood loss, BMJ, Boise State Public Radio, bone marrow transplant, Breast Cancer, breast cancer research, breast feeding, British Medical Journal


July 26th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich


 
July 26, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Wall Street Journal
Advances That Regrow Babies' Hearts
by Ron Winslow

Pediatric surgeons are developing a new strategy to tackle one of cardiology's most challenging congenital defects: babies born with only one heart ventricle. The doctors are enlisting the body's own regenerative powers in an effort to grow the missing ventricle or strengthen the remaining one…In the Mayo Clinic study, the focus isn't on salvaging the left ventricle, but on helping the right one serve as the main pumping chamber. Umbilical-cord blood cells are harvested at birth and processed to separate out stem cells, which are then frozen…The theory is that this "would stimulate more heart cells to grow or regenerate and make the existing cells stronger," says Harold Burkhart, a pediatric heart surgeon at the clinic. "The hope is it would delay the need for a transplant or the onset of a decrease in function of the single ventricle."

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Related Coverage:

Wall Street Journal
New Treatments Give Hope to Babies With Heart Defects

Pediatric surgeons at two of the country's top hospitals are developing new treatments that could dramatically improve the survival rates of babies born with congenital heart defects. WSJ's Ron Winslow and Mayo Clinic physician Tim Nelson explain on Lunch Break.

Context: Mayo Clinic announced the first U.S. stem cell clinical trial in June 2013 for pediatric congenital heart disease. The trial aims to determine how stem cells from autologous umbilical cord blood can help children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a rare defect in which the left side of the heart is critically underdeveloped. The trial will test the safety and feasibility of delivering a personalized cell-based therapy into the heart of 10 infants affected by HLHS.  Harold Burkhart, M.D. is a pediatric cardiovascular surgeon with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Timothy Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for HLHS in Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine.

News Release: Mayo Clinic First in U.S. to Test Stem Cells for Cardiac Regeneration in Pediatric Congenital Heart Patients

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

Minneapolis/ St. Paul Business Journal
Mayo Clinic adds health system in N.D.'s Bakken region to care network
by Katharine Grayson

The Mayo Clinic will add North Dakota-based Trinity Health to its Mayo Clinic Care Network, the health system announced Wednesday. Trinity operates hospitals in Minot, N.D., as well as skilled-nursing and long-term care facilities. It has more than 2,700 employers and about $617 million in annual revenue.

Circulation: The Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers.

Additional Coverage: Charlotte Observer, KMOT ND, KQCD ND, Bradenton Herald, Star Tribune, Minot Daily News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Phys.org

Context: In a move designed to strengthen the delivery and quality of health care in northwest North Dakota, Mayo Clinic welcomed Trinity Health as the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network July 24, 2013. As a member of the network, Trinity Health's physicians and other providers will have direct access to Mayo Clinic experts and clinical resources.

News Release: Trinity Health Joins Mayo Clinic Care Network

Mayo Clinic Care Network Members

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Pioneer Press, (AP)
Big names populate Mayo expansion board
by Brian Bakst

Gov. Mark Dayton and the Mayo Clinic turned Tuesday to heavy hitters in business and politics to run a new governing authority that will oversee the medical facility's ambitious Destination Medical Center expansion in Rochester, which is billed as the state's largest-ever economic development project. Dayton made four picks to the eight-member board: his chief of staff Tina Smith, Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak, former Wells Fargo and Co. executive James Campbell and Rani Engineering president Susan Rani. Meanwhile, Mayo has designated ex-Medtronic chief executive Bill George as its representative on the panel.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional Coverage:

Star Tribune
Dayton to name 4 picks to new board overseeing Mayo's Destination Medical Center project

Star Tribune
Gov. appointment offers glimpse into Rybak's future

KNSI Radio St. Cloud, Prairie Business Magazine N.D., Duluth News Tribune, Grand Forks Herald, NBCNews, Star Tribune, Politics in Minnesota, MyFOX47, KARE11,  Pioneer Press, Post-Bulletin 

Context: Mayo Clinic announced July 23, 2013 that Bill George, a member of the Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees and former Chairman and CEO of Medtronic, has accepted the appointment to be Mayo Clinic's representative on the Destination Medical Center Corporation (DMCC) Board. Gov. Mark Dayton also named four appoiuntments to the board.

News Release: Bill George Named Mayo Clinic Representative to Destination Medical Center Corporation Board

News Release: Governor Dayton Makes Appointments to Destination Medical Center Board

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

MedPage Today
Docs Point to Others to Cut Health Costs
by David Pittman

Physicians feel that other major players in healthcare -- lawyers, insurance companies, hospitals, drug companies, and patients -- bear greater responsibility for reducing healthcare costs than doctors do, a survey found. Furthermore, doctors are hesitant to back substantial financing reforms such as eliminating fee-for-service, but they support reducing unnecessary treatments, Jon Tilburt, MD, MPH, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues found.

Reach: MedPageToday.com is a news service for physicians that provides a clinical perspective on the breaking medical news that their patients are reading. MedPage Today has more than 419,000 unique visitors and 1.2 million page views each month.

Additional Coverage: Pioneer Press, FOX News, Washington Post, Cardiology News, Kaiser Health News, LA Times, Columbus CEO, Toronto Telegraph, HealthDay, Fresno Bee, LiveScience, Medscape, ModernMedicine, HealthLeaders, PhysBizTech, DOTmed

Context: A new study of attitudes about health care costs reveals that an overwhelming majority of U.S. physicians feel a responsibility to address costs, but prioritize their obligations to patients' best interests over cost concerns. Results of the random survey of 2,500 U.S. physicians are published in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). "Physicians feel stuck in a difficult position," says lead author Jon Tilburt, M.D., Mayo Clinic's Biomedical Ethics Program and Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. "Despite their sense of responsibility to address health care costs, physicians consistently express a commitment to the best interests of patients even when it is expensive. Given this finding, we recommend that cost-containment strategies aimed at physician behavior should focus on innovations that not only promote savings but also preserve physicians' commitment to individual patients."

News Release: Mayo Clinic-led Study Finds that US Physicians Put Patients' Best Interests Above Concerns About Health Care Costs

Public Affairs Contact: Shelly Plutowski

MPR
The Daily Circuit: Government ponders move to stub out menthol cigarettes

"Menthol makes a deadly product more palatable" and should be banned from cigarettes, says a Mayo Clinic doctor who works on nicotine addiction.  Dr. Richard Hurt told The Daily Circuit on Tuesday that the addition of chemicals like menthol to cigarettes "makes it easier to start and harder to stop."  Hurt's comments followed the release of federal Food and Drug Administration survey that found menthol cigarettes are a bigger threat to public health than other cigarettes. The finding was contained in a review released this morning.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Related Coverage:

MedPage Today, FDA Eyes Menthol in Cigarettes

Context: Dr. Richard Hurt is director of Mayo Clinic’s Nicotine Dependence Center and a leading expert on tobacco-related issues. As a former smoker, he once smoked three packs a day. Dr. Hurt had his last cigarette on Nov. 22, 1975.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Phoenix Business Journal
Arizona bioscience leaders stress need for more collaboration, industry awareness
by Erin Roman

Arizona’s bioscience leaders said Wednesday there is a lack of understanding about their industry, but huge growth potential and value to investors in the Phoenix area…The panel consisted of Sayare, A. Keith Stewart, the dean for research at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona; Jack Jewett, president of the Flinn Foundation; and Joan Koerber-Walker, president and CEO of the Arizona BioIndustry Association.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B. is dean for research and conducts translational research in multiple myeloma at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: AP, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Bill George, Bradenton Herald, Cancer, Cardiology News, Charlotte Observer, cigarettes, Columbus CEO, congenital defects, destination medical center


July 17th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

July 19, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations 

NBC News
Memory loss worries may indicate Alzheimer’s risk

Dr. Ronald Petersen is interviewed as well as a Mayo Clinic patient. Researchers at Brigham and Women’s hospital in Boston asked 200 healthy volunteers to report concerns about their own memory and then received a brain scan looking for build up of amyloid plaque, a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Those most anxious about their memory also had the highest levels of plaque. NBC’s Dr. Nancy Snyderman reports.

Reach:  NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams continues to be the top rated evening newscast with more than 7.9 million viewers each night.

Additional Coverage:

Reuters
Some, mild slips of memory may be very early Alzheimer's

AP, NECN, FOX News

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Nick Hanson

NY Times
Dementia’s Signs May Come Early
by Pam Belluck

…And, in a significant shift highlighted at the conference, leading Alzheimer’s researchers are identifying a new category called “subjective cognitive decline,” which is people’s own sense that their memory and thinking skills are slipping even before others have noticed.  “The whole field now is moving to this area, and saying ‘Hey, maybe there is something to this, and maybe we should pay attention to these people,’ ” said Dr. Ronald C. Petersen, chairman of the advisory panel to the federal government’s new National Alzheimer’s Project. Dr. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s center, said preliminary results of a Mayo study of healthy older adults in Minnesota suggested something similar.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services. Richard Caselli, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Dr. Caselli's research focuses on cognitive aging and the changes that can be detected before the symptomatic onset of memory loss and related symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Nick Hanson, Jim McVeigh, Lynn Closway

NPR
Patients Seek A Different Approach To Hip Replacement Surgery
by Pattie Neighmond

Every year more than a quarter of a million Americans have total hip replacement surgery. It's almost always a successful operation that frees patients from what's often described as disabling pain…Critics say the increased interest in anterior approach surgery may be more due to marketing from doctors, hospitals and companies that sell specialized operating tables and other gear rather than any benefits to patients. Clinical trials comparing the two methods are underway at the Mayo Clinic and at the Hospital for Special Surgery, but it may well be five years before that data is available. In the meantime, doctors says it's important to look at the big picture. Today "most healthy patients recover quickly, no matter which surgical technique is used," says orthopedic surgeon Mark Pagnano with the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The NPR Shots Blog covers news about health and medicine. It is written and reported by NPR’s Science Desk.

Context: Mark Pagnano, M.D. is an orthopedic surgeon who also has an appointment with Mayo Clinic's Young Hip Clinic. The Young Hip Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota evaluates and treats young people who have hip pain. The clinic focuses on alternatives to hip replacement or joint preservation surgery.

Public Affairs Contacts: Dana Sparks, Brian Kilen

NBCNews.com
Can Big Data solve the mystery of suicide?
By Helen Popkin

Everywhere on the Internet, we're trailed by bots that inspect our searches and social chatter, attempting to predict what we're going to buy, watch or who we might date next. But in the middle of all that commerce-friendly jibber jabber, some people are saying, in not so many words, "I am going to kill myself." What if a computer program could spot those cries for help as well?... Even outside the military population, doctors miss cues. A review of studies by the Mayo Clinic found approximately 44 percent of people who commit suicide visited their primary care physician, and 20 percent visited a mental health care worker in the month before their deaths.

Reach: NBC News Digital reaches an audience of more than 58 million unique visitors.

Context: Suicide is the 11th leading cause of death in the United States. Every year, millions of Americans think about taking their own lives. Sadly, each year tens of thousands die by suicide. While suicides can be a shock to family and friends, some warning signs exist. Often a simple question from a family doctor can be enough to start a person toward help and treatment. A review in the August issue 2011 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings by researchers at Mayo Clinic and the University of Washington, Seattle highlights the opportunity that primary care physicians have to establish a successful treatment plan for these patients. Dr. Timothy Lineberry is a Mayo Clinic suicide prevention expert.

News Release: Mayo Clinic: Primary Physicians May Hold Key to Suicide Prevention

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Everyday Health
Need a New Hip? Press 'Print'
by Dr. Sanjay Gupta

Thousands of hip replacements are performed every year. These operations are life-changers for people with osteoarthritis and other conditions, ridding them of pain and returning them to an active life…Brooke was born with a misshapen pelvis. By the time she was in her 20’s, she was already severely debilitated by arthritis in her hips…Her doctors at Mayo Clinic were able to spare Brooke all those surgeries by turning to a new technology: 3-D printing…“You press print and a 3-D model is made,” says orthopedic surgeon Christopher Beauchamp, MD.

Reach: Everyday Health Media, LLC is a provider of online consumer health content across a broad portfolio of over 25 websites that span the health spectrum — from lifestyle offerings in pregnancy, diet and fitness to in-depth medical content for condition prevention and management.

Context: Joint replacements have been around for a long time. Most people with conditions such as osteoarthritis can expect good results if they have one. But what about those who have complicated cases or unusual deformities that a standard replacement can’t fix? In the past that’s meant few options, but now, doctors at Mayo Clinic in Arizona are using 3D printers to enable customized joint replacement surgeries. Many patients, who were previously out of luck, can now have a successful surgery and better quality of life.

Mayo Clinic News Network Package: 3D Printer Uses CT Scan to Print Out Model of Hip Joint Before Surgery (pkg)

Public Affairs Contact: Dana Sparks

Everyday Health
Stem Cells Heal a Damaged Heart
by Dr. Sanjay Gupta

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have made a breakthrough in doing that. They have trained stem cells harvested from a person’s bone marrow to become heart cells, by treating them with certain proteins that trigger heart development. They refer to these stem cells as “smart” stem cells. “This study helps us move beyond the science fiction notion of research,” said Andre Terzic, MD, PhD of Mayo Clinic, the study’s senior author.

Context: Physicians and researchers in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic say their work is developing completely new ways to treat and manage chronic diseases like diabetes, heart failure, or even degenerative nerve, bone and joint conditions. And in December, international experts will meet at the World Stem Cell Summit, to continue exploring and sharing ideas about the future of regenerative medicine. Here are some 101 basics of how this science benefits patients.

Mayo Clinic News Network Package: Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine 101 (Medical Edge TV)

Public Affairs Contact: Dana Sparks

US News & World Report
The Personalization of Medicine
by Katherine Hobson

…Just this past May, the Food and Drug Administration approved two drugs for advanced melanoma driven by certain mutations that join a crop of new therapies approved in the last few years. Also, in May, the Mayo Clinic launched an Individualized Medicine Clinic at its three locations in Minnesota, Arizona and Florida aimed at getting cutting-edge guidance to cancer patients who have failed standard treatments and to people with mysterious ailments that may have a genetic cause.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context:  Mayo Clinic has always been a destination for patients seeking answers. Now, Mayo is taking that concept to the next level with the public launch of its Individualized Medicine Clinic — at all three of its campuses, in Minnesota, Florida and Arizona.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Launches Individualized Medicine Consulting Clinic

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Pioneer Press (AP)
Mayo Clinic gets a silver in US News ranking

Johns Hopkins Hospital has regained its place atop U.S. News & World Report's annual rankings of the nation's best hospitals, one year after its 21-year stint at the top of the rakings was broken… The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., was ranked third, followed by the Cleveland Clinic and UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

KEYC Mankato
Mayo Clinic Health System Mankato Ranked High in State
Mayo Clinic Health System Mankato is ranked 14th among the state's hospitals according to a U.S. News and World Report released today. With nearly 160 hospitals in Minnesota, the report came as good news to the hospital staff.

Reach: KEYC-12, is a Fox affiliate whcih broadcasts from Mankato, Minn.

WEAU Eau Claire
Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire ranked among best in state

Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire is ranked No. 4 in Wisconsin and is recognized among the Best Hospitals in northwest Wisconsin in the newly released 24th U.S. News & World Report annual America’s Best Hospitals list… “This national recognition from U.S. News underscores the commitment our staff makes to care for patients,” says Randall Linton, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic Health System’s northwest Wisconsin region.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Phoenix Business Journal
13 Phoenix-area hospitals ranked as best by U.S. News & World Report
by Angela Gonzales

Of all 56 hospitals in the Phoenix metro area, 13 were named best regional hospitals by U.S. News & World Report. At the top of the list was Mayo Clinic, which touts 10 nationally ranked specialties and three high-performing specialties.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Jacksonville Business Journal
Baptist, Mayo Clinic among top 5 hospitals in Florida
by Michael Clinton

Several of Jacksonville’s hospital systems ranked among the best in Florida in an annual ranking of the best hospitals in the nation. Baptist Medical Center and Mayo Clinic tied as the No. 1 hospitals in Jacksonville and No. 4 in Florida on the U.S. News & World Report annual Best Hospitals study, released today.

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Nephrology News
Cleveland Clinic loses #1 ranking to Mayo for nephrology care

Medscape Today
Mayo Clinic Keeps Top Spot for Diabetes in US News Rankings

Additional US News Best Hospitals Coverage: MSNBC, Star Tribune, KARE 11, CNN, Chicago Tribune, Twin Cities Business, FierceHealthcare, Post-Bulletin, FOX47, KTTC, Action News Jax, Huffington Post, Health Leaders Media, Arizona Daily Star, CBS News, KTLA, WXOW, Action News Jax

Context: Mayo Clinic was highly rated in the 24th U.S. News & World Report annual America's Best Hospitals list released today. As in 2012, Mayo earned the No. 3 overall spot on the "Best Hospitals" list. Mayo ranked No. 1 in the nation in five clinical areas — gynecology, diabetes and endocrinology, gastroenterology, nephrology and pulmonology. In addition, Mayo is ranked No. 2 in five additional specialties — cardiology & heart surgery, ear, nose & throat, geriatrics, neurology & neurosurgery and orthopedics. Mayo Clinic earned the No. 1 spot in Minnesota, ranked No. 1 in Arizona and specifically in the Phoenix metro area, and earned the No. 1 rank as best hospital in the Jacksonville area.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Lauded in Quality Rankings, Most Recently by U.S. News & World Report

News Release: Mayo Clinic Ranked No. 1 in Arizona and Phoenix by U.S. News & World Report

News Release: U.S. News & World Report Ranks Mayo Clinic No. 1 in Jacksonville and a Leading Cancer Hospital Nationally

News Release: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Mankato rank among best in Wisconsin, Minnesota regions

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson (Mayo Clinic in Rochester), Jim McVeigh (Mayo Clinic in Arizona), Kevin Punsky (Mayo Clinic in Florida), Micah Dorfner (Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato, Minn.), Susan Barber-Lindquist (Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Clarie, Wisc.)

KSTP
Doctors, Deputies Warn Against Cliff Jumping
by Josh Rosenthal

…That's largely because the water below the cliff is a maximum of 14-feet deep, and it's only three-feet deep close to shore. Deputies have handed out more than 100 citations to people jumping off the cliff, which is on private property, in just the last month. "We had 18 just yesterday," Englund said. "This is a big problem for us out here." It's a big problem at the Mayo Clinic Health System in Cannon Falls, too. "This is very dangerous," Trauma Program Coordinator Angela Schrader said. "The impact can be lifetime on a lot of these patients."

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: Angela Schraeder is the Trauma Program coordinator at Mayo Clinic Health System in Cannon Falls, Minn.

Public Affairs Contact: Kristy Jacobson

Post-Bulletin
Destination Medical Center: Hold on to your hats
by Jeff Hansel

The Minnesota Legislature's passage of Destination Medical Center means the project no longer belongs to Mayo Clinic. In many ways, it belongs as much to Rochester residents themselves, who, through their votes, control the Rochester City Council. City Council members will measure, critique and approve expansion proposals submitted by Mayo and private developers over the next 20 years. 

Additional stories from Post-Bulletin Related to DMC Report:
A new model of health care — for the well, Pediatrics a key part of Mayo Clinic's Destination Medical Center The affluent will be big part of Destination Medical Center, Rochester seeks to become biotech destination  

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC), an economic development initiative designed to secure Mayo Clinic and Minnesota’s future as a global medical destination, passed on May 20 as part of the Minnesota Legislature’s tax bill. It will help fund the public infrastructure required to keep pace with an estimated $5 billion private investment by Mayo Clinic and other private entities over the next 20 years.

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich

Bloomberg
U.S. Blood Supply Threatened as Donors Face Iron Losses
by Michelle Cortez

…In the U.S., 70 percent of the blood supply comes from repeat donors. Limiting their giving may hamper a system that already suffers shortages. The Mayo Clinic predicts a 10 percent drop in its supply from its restrictions on donors after finding that one-third had iron deficiency. “We want to make sure we don’t have a group of people walking around being iron deficient,” said Manish Gandhi, the medical director of the Mayo Clinic’s blood donation center. “Blood donation in the U.S. is an altruistic thing. We need to focus on what we should be doing to protect these wonderful donors.”

Circulation: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Context: Manish Gandhi, M.D. is medical director of the Blood Donor Center at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Approximately 80,000 units of blood products are transfused at Mayo Clinic in Rochester annually. For more interesting facts about donating blood, click here.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Action News Jax
Mayo Clinic CEO talks about health care
by Catherine Varnum

The CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville talked one on one with Action News about the proposed health care reform plan. "We can't continue as we are," said Dr. William Rupp. He's the CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Florida. He's been watching the news closely over the last few months, trying to figure out how the Mayo Clinic will be affected by Obama's proposed health care plan. "I think there's still a lot of confusion about what actually is going to come out," said Dr. Rupp.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Fla.

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

WEAU
Mechanical heart gives local man a second chance
by Courtney Everett

In our Health Alert, according to the Centers for Disease Control, about 5.7 million people in the United States have heart failure. But, a mechanical device is giving people with heart failure a new chance at life…Many hospitals don't have the capability to do this surgery, but Mayo Clinic Health System is helping patients with the devices and plans to open a special center this fall. "We will be a share cared center and what that means is that we will care for the patient in conjunction with the center that put the device,” said Dr. Kincaid.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Context: Cardiologist Daniel Kincaid, M.D., discusses how the ventricular assist device --VAD -- works. Beginning this fall, patients will be able to receive follow-up VAD care at the Cardiac Center at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Wisc. For patient David Evans, this partial mechanical heart is a lifesaver until he hopefully receives a heart transplant someday.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber-Lindquist

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: 3-D printing, Action News Jacksonville, Action News Jax, Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, alzheimer's disease, American City Business Journals, Angela Schraeder, AP, Arizona Daily Star, Associated Press, Barb Spurrier, Best Hospitals


June 14th, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

June 14, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

USA TODAY
HPV causes a growing number of oral cancers
by Liz Szabo

Michael Douglas discussed his battle with throat cancer in an interview with The Guardian newspaper, in which doctors raised the point that some throat cancers can be caused by a sexually transmitted virus, HPV, related to cervical cancer. But Douglas' spokesperson has rebutted the newspaper's headline saying that oral sex caused his cancer. The spokesperson said that the article simply included discussion of oral sex as a suspected cause of certain oral cancers… Q. Does everyone who is infected get cancer? A. In an estimated 85% of cases, a person's immune system gets rid of the infection, just as it would eventually overcome a cold virus, says Eric Moore, an associate professor of otolaryngology at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The immune system knocks out most HPV infections on the cervix, as well, before they cause harm.

Circulation: USA TODAY has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

Additional Coverage:
WCCO 830 Dr. Eric Moore HPV June 4, 2013 (Audio)

NY Times
Oral Cancer Sneaks Up

LA Times, MedPage Today

Context: Eric Moore, M.D. is a physician in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology (ENT) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Human papillomavirus (also called HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI). There are more than 40 HPV types that can infect the genital areas of males and females. HPV can also infect the mouth and throat. Most people who become infected with HPV do not know they have it. HPV can sometimes cause cancer.

There are more than 40 HPV types that can infect the genital areas of males and females. HPV can also infect the mouth and throat. Most people who become infected with HPV do not know they have it. HPV can sometimes cause cancer.

Most of the time, HPV goes away by itself within two years and does not cause health problems. It is thought that the immune system fights off HPV naturally. It is only when certain types of HPV do not go away over years that it can cause cancers. It is not known why HPV goes away in most, but not all cases. There is no way to know which people will go on to develop cancer. The good news is that it can be prevented with a vaccine.

An HPV vaccine is recommended for 11- or 12-year-old boys and girls. HPV vaccines are safe and effective, and can protect males and females against some of the most common types of HPV that can lead to disease and cancer. HPV vaccines are given in three shots over six months; it is important to get all three doses to get the best protection. Boys and girls at ages 11 or 12 are most likely to have the best protection provided by HPV vaccines, and their immune response to vaccine is better than older women and men.

It’s important to put HPV-related cancers in context. While rates of HPV-related cancers are rising, which is a concern, HPV-related cancers are still relatively rare.

Additional Resources on HPV Vaccines
News Release:
More Parents Say They Won't Vaccinate Daughters Against HPV, Researchers Find

Medical Edge Newspaper Column: Age 9 an Appropriate Age for Girls to Receive HPV Vaccine

Medical Edge Newspaper Column: HPV Vaccine Now Recommended for Boys

Public Affairs Contacts: Joe Dangor, Bryan Anderson

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic puts stem cells to the test on infant heart defect
by Dan Browning

Every year, about 1,000 babies are born in the United States with half a heart — a rare defect that requires a series of risky surgeries and, even then, leaves the infants with a strong likelihood that their hearts will wear out prematurely. Now, the Mayo Clinic has received federal approval for a first-of-its kind clinical study to see if stem cells from the babies’ own umbilical cords can strengthen their underdeveloped hearts and extend their lives.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Mayo Clinic has announced the first U.S. stem cell clinical trial for pediatric congenital heart disease. The trial aims to determine how stem cells from autologous umbilical cord blood can help children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a rare defect in which the left side of the heart is critically underdeveloped. The trial will test the safety and feasibility of delivering a personalized cell-based therapy into the heart of 10 infants affected by HLHS.

"We want to see if these stem cells will increase the volume and strength of the heart muscle to give it greater durability and power to pump blood throughout the body," says Harold Burkhart, M.D., a pediatric cardiovascular surgeon with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center.

"The care of these children with HLHS has been continuously improving since the first surgical procedure became available three decades ago, yet cardiac transplantation continues to be the limiting factor for far too many individuals," says Timothy Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for HLHS in Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine. "Applying stem cell-based regeneration may offer a viable solution to help these children develop new tissues and grow stronger hearts."

News Release: Mayo Clinic First in US to Test Stem Cells in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease Patients

Additional Resources: Animation, lab b-roll and sound bites with Dr. Burkhart and Tim Nelson, M.D.,Ph.D

ABC News
7 Surprising Effects of Obesity
by Liz Neporent

…Dr. Donald Hensrud, a nutritionist and preventive medicine expert in the department of endocrinology, diabetes, metabolism and nutrition at the Mayo Clinic, said one of the most immediate health dangers for many obese people is sleep apnea, a condition in which a person gasps or stops breathing momentarily while asleep. "Sleep apnea can be caused by increased fat around the neck area that presses down and closes off the soft tissues of the airways while a person is lying down, especially on his back," Hensrud said in tip #5.

Circulation:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a preventive medicine expert at Mayo Clinic and medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet.

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Ginger Plumbo

Star Tribune
Cancer patients abandoning their beds and hitting the gym
by Allie Shah

…It’s something doctors are embracing, too. Dr. Andrea Cheville of the Mayo Clinic said exercise offers significant benefits for cancer patients. She cited in particular a 2005 study in the Journal of the American Medical Association which found that breast cancer patients who walked briskly for three hours a week had an almost 50-percent reduction in their risk of breast cancer recurrence. “That’s honestly as good as any drug we have,” she said.

Additional Coverage: Huffington Post Canada

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, interest in research includes exercise in the rehabilitation of cancer patients.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

ESPN
Dr Bernard Morrey, Mayo Clinic

Dr. Bernard Morrey of the Mayo Clinic talks about fascia and tendon surgeries, also Pau Gasol's plantar fascia condition on ESPN Radio's Weekend Warrior show.  

Reach: ESPN's Weekend Warrior show originates from ESPN-LA is hosted by Dr. Robert Klapper, Director of the Joint Replacement Program and Orthopaedic Surgeon at Cedars-Sinai Medical Group and Cedars-Sinai Health Associates. Dr. Klapper was the orthopaedic consultant to the TV show “ER.”

Context: Bernard Morrey, M.D., Mayo Clinic Orthopedic Surgery, is a Mayo Clinic Distinguished Alumni Award recipient. The contributions of Dr. Morrey as a distinguished clinician and scientist in orthopedic surgery place him as one of the most influential orthopedic surgeons of the last half-century. He is a prominent authority on elbow surgery and has made significant contributions to the anatomy, physiology, biomechanics and surgical reconstruction of the elbow.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

KIMT
Best Pediatric Hospital Rankings
by Amy Fleming

Mayo Clinic children’s center receives high marks for the third year in a row. Mayo Clinics ranked in all ten pediatric specialties in u-s news and world reports list of best children’s hospitals. t’s the only hospital in the Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Dakotas region to be named in all 10 areas. Some of the specialties include diabetes and endocrinology, cardiology and heart surgery, as well as neurology, and neonatal among others. University of Iowa Children’s hospitals ranked high in five specialty areas.

Reach: KIMT 3 serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional Coverage:
Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic Children's Center ranks high

Context: Mayo Clinic Children's Center has again been ranked in all 10 pediatric specialties in U.S. News & World Report's 2013-14 Best Children's Hospitals rankings. Each year, U.S. News & World Report, using an extensive survey and input from pediatric specialists from around the country, ranks nearly 200 of the nation's children's hospitals and identifies only the top 50 in each of 10 specialty areas. This is the third year in a row that the Mayo Clinic Children's Center has been the only Minnesota hospital to rank in all 10 specialties. In fact, the Mayo Clinic Children's Center is the only children's hospital not only in Minnesota but also the surrounding states of Wisconsin, Iowa and the Dakotas to rank in each of the specialties included in the survey: cancer, cardiology and heart surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, gastroenterology, neonatology, nephrology, neurology and neurosurgery, orthopedics, pulmonology and urology.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Children's Center Ranks in All 10 Specialties for Third Straight Year in Best Children's Hospital Rankings

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

KTTC
Proton beam build begins
by Peter Schuneman

What might it take to rid cancer cells in Mayo Clinic patients?  About 125 tons of equipment in the form of a new proton beam gantry.  The possibilities came to fruition on Thursday at the new Richard O. Jacobson cancer treatment facility as crews began install the first two pieces of the new beam. "Each piece is awkward, each piece is different amounts," said Josh Christensen, project manager with Boldt Construction. "And there are 18 pieces total, roughly 20,000 pounds each. "In the scheme of things the overall gantry itself is 125 tons of steel," Christensen said. "I've been working on it nearly full time since 2007," said Jon Kruse, physicist at Mayo Clinic. "So to see real big parts coming in a physical manifestation of this work is pretty exciting."

Reach: KTTC, an NBC affiliate, serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. KTTC-Online receives more than 73,000 unique vistors each month.

Additional Coverage: FOX 47, KAAL, KIMT, Post-Bulletin

Context: When fully established, the Mayo Clinic Proton Beam Therapy Program will offer one of the most technologically advanced treatment options to people with cancer. Proton beam therapy precisely targets cancer cells through the use of charged particles. While not everyone with cancer requires proton beam therapy, it is a preferred treatment for selected patients, such as children and adults with anatomically complex tumors adjacent to critical or sensitive organs and regions such as the brain, eye, spinal cord, lung, heart, liver, bowel and kidneys. Proton beam therapy is sometimes used to treat benign tumors as well. Proton beam therapy facilities are being built at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Rochester, Minn., and Phoenix, Ariz. Groundbreaking in Rochester was in September 2011 and in Phoenix in December 2011. The first treatment rooms are expected to open by mid-2015 in Rochester and by March 2016 in Phoenix. Both facilities will be fully operational in 2017. Central to the development of this program was a gift of $100 million from longtime Mayo patient and philanthropist Richard O. Jacobson. A $10 million Gift from Lawrence W. and Marilyn W. Matteson also supports the proton beam therapy program.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Bryan Anderson

KAAL
Mayo Clinic, RPS Team Up
by Steph Crock

Starting in the fall, Rochester Public High School students will get a strength and conditioning coach from Mayo Clinic. Through the collaboration all three high schools, Century, John Marshall, and Mayo High School will have their own certified specialist on-hand…."They've (school coaches) done a great job, don't get me wrong, but it’s good to have a trained professional. They will be certified strength and conditioning specialists," said Chad Eickhoff with Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Additional Coverage:
KTTC
RPS, Mayo Clinic expanding partnership

Context: Mayo Clinic announced erecently an expansion to its sports medicine practice to meet the growing regional, national and international demand for its expertise. The expansion is part of the 100,000-square-foot Mayo Clinic Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center building project, and is scheduled to open in spring of 2014. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Planning Major Sports Medicine Center Expansion

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: ABC News, ABCnews.com, Boldt Construction, Cancer, Cardiology, Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center, diabetes, Director of the Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for HLHS, Dr. Andrea Cheville, Dr. Bernard Morrey, Dr. Eric Moore, Dr. Harold Burkhart


March 4th, 2013

Osseo native puts aside college hoop dreams for groundbreaking career as medical researcher

By loganlafferty

Less than two decades later, Dr. Timothy J. Nelson, 37, stands poised at the forefront of medical research, leading a team at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., that hopes to change the future of medicine through its quest for the Holy Grail of healing: regenerative medicine. The goal is to be able to bioengineer stem cells that could be directed into becoming whatever spare parts might be needed to fix an ailing human body.

 

Eau Claire Leader-Telegram by Eric Lindquist

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Tags: bioengineer, Dr. Timothy Nelson, Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Medical research, regenerative medicine, stem cells


November 16th, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

 

 

November 16, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Wall Street Journal
The Device That Saves Lives, But Can Be Hard to Find
by Ron Winslow

You needed an automated external defibrillator to help a victim of sudden cardiac arrest, chances are you would have trouble finding one, even if a device were located nearby. That's despite the fact that about one million AEDs—portable devices that can jump-start the heart and save lives when sudden cardiac arrest strikes—are installed in office buildings, malls, schools and sports stadiums around the U.S…The study also could be an early step to help fill in gaps in understanding about how to allocate public-health resources. "We know [AEDs] have lifesaving potential," says Roger White, an anesthesiologist at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., and an expert in sudden cardiac arrest. "Not a lot is known about how well they're performing, how frequently they are attached to patients" and what the outcomes are. "We need to know what's really happening with the devices," he says.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Context: Roger White, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist who has spent his lifetime researching outcomes of patients who have experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Just the idea of performing CPR can intimidate the average person, whether it's the thought of what's at stake or simply trying to remember all of the steps. Dr. White has moved to simplify cardiopulmonary resuscitation practices for the public and highlighted these important advances during CPR Awareness Month earlier this year.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Traci Klein

Post-Bulletin
Regenerative medicine raises hope
by Jeff Hansel

Even as regenerative medicine emerges as a new hope for many, doctors caution that it takes time to get a new discovery from the research lab to patient treatment. As an example, one type of regenerative medicine, treatment of blood cancer disorders, has taken about 50 years to develop, said Mayo Clinic heart specialist Dr. Andre Terzic, director of Mayo's regenerative medicine center. "We want to make sure that we are not creating a hype in the society but that we are really offering hope for patients, and ultimately definitive solutions," he said.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin
Regenerative medicine may transform transplants
by Jeff Hansel

Post-Bulletin
Regeneration is ‘next generation’ of treatment
by Jeff Hansel

Post-Bulletin
Regenerative medicine: Hope for the future
by Jeff Hansel

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic is at the forefront of regenerative medicine
by Jeff Hansel

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: In the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic, interdisciplinary teams of physicians and scientists are carrying out innovative basic, translational and clinical research to develop definitive regenerative treatments aimed at fully healing damaged tissues and organs, offering solutions and hope for people who have conditions that today are beyond repair.

Public Affairs Contact: Jennifer Schutz

Post-Bulletin
Opinions: Our view: Obama should accept Mayo's invitation

Minnesota isn't a swing state, although TV watchers in southeastern Minnesota certainly could be forgiven for thinking otherwise. We experienced more than our fair share of what we'll call "collateral damage" from political ads targeting voters in Wisconsin and Iowa during the past month…That's water under the bridge, of course, but now Mayo Clinic, with a short press release from CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, has made it clear that the clinic wants high-level involvement in reforming both delivery and payment models that are "unsustainable." The timing of this press release — the day after the election — speaks volumes. The clinic tends to steer clear of political involvement, but now that its leadership knows who will occupy the White House for the next four years, Mayo is wasting no time in seeking a well-deserved seat at the negotiating table.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Related Coverage:
Morning Joe
Sen. Amy Klobuchar from Minn. was on Morning Joe

Sen. Klobuchar's interview starts at about 2:18. At 3:55, she talks about ACA and that we’ve made some progress but we need more in the delivery system reform. At 4:06, she says: “Mayo Clinic is a great example of what you can get done.”

Context: Mayo Clinic issued a post-election response from President and CEO John Noseworthy, M.D., inviting the President and Congress to work with Mayo Clinic and others in the private sector to find a solution that is squarely focused on what is best for patients and is economically sustainable for our country.

Statement from John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic President and CEO

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Karl Oestreich

KIMT
Construction Paves the Way for Medical Advancement
by Raquel Hellman

…As dozens of onlookers cast their eyes to the sky, the last steel beam was installed in the Jacobson Building, the future home of Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy program, where cancer patients will receive the unique treatment. "They'll have a special type of radiation equipment that produces a proton beam, which is a more targeted form of treatment that causes less harm to the patient so they'll feel better during the treatment, and they'll have a better quality of life afterwards," said Dr. Robert Foote, Chairman of the Radiation Oncology Department at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KIMT 3 serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage: KAAL, KTTC, FOX 47, Post-Bulletin, Star Tribune

Context: When fully established, the Mayo Clinic Proton Beam Therapy Program will offer one of the most technologically advanced treatment options to people with cancer. Proton beam therapy precisely targets cancer cells through the use of charged particles. While not everyone with cancer requires proton beam therapy, it is a preferred treatment for selected patients, such as children and adults with anatomically complex tumors adjacent to critical or sensitive organs and regions such as the brain, eye, spinal cord, lung, heart, liver, bowel and kidneys. Proton beam therapy is sometimes used to treat benign tumors as well. Proton beam therapy facilities are being built at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Rochester, Minn., and Phoenix, Ariz. Groundbreaking in Rochester was in September 2011 and in Phoenix in December 2011. The first treatment rooms are expected to open by mid-2015 in Rochester and by March 2016 in Phoenix. Both facilities will be fully operational in 2017. Central to the development of this program was a gift of $100 million from longtime Mayo patient and philanthropist Richard O. Jacobson.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor

My Fox Phoenix
Kidney transplant saves American Idol finalist's life

"American Idol" finalist Scott MacIntyre was an inspiration as the only visually impaired contestant, but he says the real inspiration was the woman who saved him. McIntyre revealed that his sight wasn't the only hurdle he would come across -- he faced a life-threatening illness. He performed at a kidney transplant patient reunion at the Mayo Clinic on Saturday and talked to FOX 10 about the illness he kept hidden. "When I was 19, I found out that I had stage 4 kidney failure..never talked about it on American Idol,  never talked about it in the media, but that was one of the most difficult times in my life," he said.  "I eventually got so sick that I couldn't even play the piano or sing in my living room."

Additional coverage: Yuma News Now, Buddy TV

Reach: KSAZ-TV is the Fox owned-and-operated television station in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: Scott MacIntyre performed for patients at all three Mayo Clinic transplant reunion events over the past few weeks.  The kidney transplant event was a special homecoming for MacIntyre, a singer/songwriter/pianist.   He made history as the first blind contestant on American Idol, finishing in the top 10 finals in season eight in 2009.  But what he chose not to reveal during that season was that at 19 he was diagnosed with end-stage kidney disease, a life-threatening event that almost ended his career before it began. His medical journey led him to Mayo Clinic in Arizona, where, in 2007, he underwent a kidney transplant, thanks to a kidney donated by the wife of his former piano teacher. In celebration of that life-saving transplant, and “other gifts in his life,” according to MacIntyre, he performed his new song, “I Am Hope.”

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic researchers assist in finding gene variation that increases Alzheimer’s risk
by Charlie Patton

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville have been involved in a study that has found a gene variation so powerful it nearly triples the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The results of the study were published online Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Wall Street Journal, Jacksonville Business Journal, TruthDive, Alzheimer’s Reading Room, Britain News, Barcelona News, Yahoo! News India, Baltimore News, Amsterdam News, Medical News Today, e! Science News, First Coast News (WJXX Jax), First Coast News (WTLV Jax.)

Context: A gene so powerful it nearly triples the risk of Alzheimer's disease has been discovered by an international team including researchers from Mayo Clinic. It is the most potent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's identified in the past 20 years. The findings were reported this week in the online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. The researchers used new sequencing techniques to hone in on the TREM2 gene. Additional TREM2 sequencing was then performed, in part, by scientist Aleksandra Wojtas in the Mayo Clinic in Florida laboratory of Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D. These studies led to identification of a set of rare variants in TREM2 that occurred more often in 1,092 Alzheimer's disease patients than in a control group of 1,107 healthy people.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: adult stem cells, AEDs, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer’s Reading Room, American Idol, Amsterdam News, Baltimore News, Barcelona News, blood cancer disorders, bone marrow transplants, Britain News, CPR