Items Tagged ‘stem cells’

February 24th, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Associated Press
AP Exclusive: Twin tragedies give survivor a new face
by Sharon Cohen

He'd been waiting for this day, and when his doctor handed him the mirror, Andy Sandness stared at his image and absorbed the enormity of the moment: He had a new face, one that had belonged to another man. His father and his brother, joined by several doctors and nurses at MayoAssociated Press Wire Service Logo Clinic, watched as he studied his swollen features. He was just starting to heal from one of the rarest surgeries in the world — a face transplant, the first at the medical center. He had the nose, cheeks, mouth, lips, jaw, chin, even the teeth of his donor. Resting in his hospital bed, he still couldn't speak clearly, but he had something to say. He scrawled four words in a spiral notebook: "Far exceeded my expectations," he wrote, handing it to Dr. Samir Mardini, who read the message to the group.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional coverage: New York Times, STAT, Washington Post, USA TODAY, CBS Minnesota, KSTP, Louis Post-Dispatch, ABC News, MSN, NWF Daily News, AP Big Story, Stamford Advocate, Medical Xpress, CTV News, WTOP, Evening Standard, DailyMail.com, Olean Times Herald, Evening Standard, TribLivePeople, News-medical.net, Morning Ticker, KARE 11, WCCO, The West Australian, KAAL, Star Tribune, Mirror UK, BBC,CBC, US Magazine, GoMN, Chicago Tribune, KGWN, FOX News, Arizona Republic, Pioneer Press, Latinos Health, Science Alert, iTech Post, The Columbian, Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, Knoxville News Sentinel, BABW News, Canada Journal, Jackson Hole News & Guide, Counsel & HealBecker’s Hospital Review, New York Post, Herald-Whig, Sky News, Business Insider, com.au, Metro UK, UPI.com, Yahoo! Australia, The Inquisitr, WDEF, Deccan Herald, Aurora Sentinel, KRNV, Rapid City Journal, WNYT, Cortez Journal, Daily Star, Metro UK, Tri-City Herald, Tech Times, India.com, WQOW, Gephardt Daily, Hindustan Times, Pulse Headlines, KBMT, Sumter Item, ABC13 Houston, FuturismStar TribuneNew York Times, RedOrbit, Catholic Online, NBC 6 South Florida, The HitavadaBecker’s Hospital Review, NBC ChicagoTCT magazine

Context:  A multidisciplinary team of surgeons, physicians and other health professionals recently completed a near-total face transplant on a Wyoming man on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. The extensive, life-changing surgery will improve the patient’s ability to chew, swallow, speak, breathe and smell. The recipient, Andrew Sandness, is a 32-year-old man from eastern Wyoming whose face was devastated by a gunshot wound at the age of 21. He is doing well. “I am absolutely amazed at the outcome so far,” says Sandness. “I am now able to chew and eat normal food, and the nerve sensation is slowly improving, too. My confidence has improved, and I’m feeling great ― and grateful. I am so thankful to my donor and the donor’s family, and to all of the people who have supported me throughout this process.” For more information on the face transplant, the following segments are available on Mayo Clinic News Network:

Mayo Clinic announces successful face transplant on Wyoming man

Mayo Clinic Radio: Face transplant — how the surgical team prepared

Transforming a life: Mayo Clinic announces its first face transplant

Contact:  Ginger Plumbo

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo researcher Abba Zubai is sending stem cells for study on the International Space Station
by Charlie Patton

As a boy growing up in Nigeria, Abba Zubair dreamed of becoming an astronaut. But as he prepared to apply to college, an advisor told him to Florida Times-Union newspaper logofind a different path. “He said it may be a long time before Nigeria sends rockets and astronauts into space, so I should consider something more practical,” Zubair saud. He decided to become a physician, and is currently the medical and scientific director of the Cell Therapy Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. And while he’ll almost certainly never get to make a journey outside the Earth’s atmosphere himself, if the weather stays good Saturday he’ll be sending a payload into space.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Action News Jax, Augustine Record, KTIV, Spaceflight Now, KTTCTechnology Networks

Context: Consider it one physician’s giant leap for mankind. Today, the latest rocket launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, included a payload of several samples of donated adult stem cells from a research laboratory at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. The launch by SpaceX, an American aerospace manufacturer and space transport services company, is part of NASA’s commercial resupply missions to the International Space Station. The biological cells come from the laboratory of Abba Zubair, M.D., Ph.D., who says he has eagerly awaited the launch following several delays over the past couple of years. Dr. Zubair, who specializes in cellular treatments for disease and regenerative medicine, hopes to find out how the stem cells hold up in space. He says he’s eager to know whether these special cells, which are derived from the body’s bone marrow, can be more quickly mass-produced in microgravity and used to treat strokes. Microgravity is the condition in which people or objects appear to be weightless. The effects of microgravity can be seen when astronauts and objects float in space. Microgravity refers to the condition where gravity seems to be very small. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact:  Kevin Punsky

 

USA Today
Can't sleep? When is it time to seek professional help
by Mary Bowerman

It’s no secret that Americans aren’t getting enough sleep. For those who are self-medicating or tossing and turning, it may be time to look at your sleeping habits once and for all, according to Timothy Morgenthaler, co-director of Mayo’s Center for Sleep Medicine in Rochester. "I think it'sUSA Today newspaper logo becoming increasingly clear that sleep is a vital component of health; for many years we've been aware of nutrition and exercise, and I think we now realize that sleep is very closely entwined with overall health," Morgenthaler said.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine physician who also practices in Mayo Clinic's Center for Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KARE 11
Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup
by Pat Evans

New findings about America’s heart health awareness, opinions, and behaviors have been uncovered as part of the Mayo Clinic National Health KARE-11 LogoCheckup, which first launched in January 2016 and provides a quick pulse on consumer health opinions and behaviors at multiple times throughout the year. “The Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup helps us to better understand the health knowledge and practices of all Americans, beyond the patients that walk through our doors,” says John Wald, M.D., Medical Director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic.

Reach: KARE-TV is the NBC affiliate serving the Minneapolis-Saint Paul market.

Additional coverage: KGUN TucsonCNBCKAALKXLY Spokane

Context: A new survey by Mayo Clinic revealed that more than two-thirds of African-Americans are concerned about their heart health (71 percent), which is significantly more than Caucasian (41 percent) or Hispanic (37 percent) respondents. Respondents from the South (51 percent) were also significantly more likely to express concern than those in the Northeast (39 percent) or West (35 percent). These findings were uncovered as part of the Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, which first launched in January 2016 and provides a quick pulse on consumer health opinions and behaviors at multiple times throughout the year. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

FOX 13 Tampa Bay
Vaccine could prevent breast, ovarian, lung cancer
by Dr. Joette Giovinco

It's a dream many parents would welcome for their children: a vaccine that could prevent breast, ovarian and some lung cancers. It'Fox 13 Tampa Bay Logos also the dream of immunology professor Dr. Keith Knutson. "The hope is we can develop vaccines before the development of cancer much in the way that we use a polio vaccine or a flu vaccine," Dr. Knutson tells us in in his Mayo Clinic Jacksonville laboratory.

Reach:  Fox 13 is the Fox affiliate in Tampa Bay, Florida.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: AAN, ABC News, ABC13 Houston, acupuncture, Alain Elkann, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimers, Ambient Clinical, Andy Sandness, anxiety, AP Big Story, Arizona Republic


December 16th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Chicago Tribune
Is bone broth the next hot health trend?
by Alison Bowen

Jason Ewoldt, a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., said patients often ask him about something new they've read about. People often think, he said, "if a little bit's good, maybe a lot is better." But far from assuming what's best is tripling your boneChicago Tribune Logo broth intake after reading about its benefits, he said, "that's not necessarily the case." He said some people consider bone broth a magic elixir, crediting it with improving joint function and gut health.

Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000.

Context: Jason Ewoldt is a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, which is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

HealthDay
Was football safer back in the day?

In a finding that suggests football used to be a less dangerous sport, a small study shows that men who played in high school in the 1950s and Health Day Logo1960s may not be at increased risk for dementia or memory problems…"What we can say is, for that era, football did not increase the risks of neurodegenerative disease compared with other sports," said senior researcher Dr. Rodolfo Savica, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: NWI Times, Healthline, KTTC, WebMD, KIMT, CBS News, Medical News TodayWTAJ Pennsylvania, MSN

Context: A Mayo Clinic study published online recently in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that varsity football players from 1956 to 1970 did not have an increased risk of degenerative brain diseases compared with athletes in other varsity sports. The researchers reviewed all the yearbooks and documented team rosters for Mayo High School and Rochester High School, now called John Marshall High School. The high school football players were compared with non-football playing athletes who were swimmers, basketball players and wrestlers. More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Reuters
Rural U.S. babies hardest hit by opiate addiction at birth
by Lisa Rapaport

These babies may have central nervous system issues like seizures and tremors, gastrointestinal problems and feeding difficulties, breathing challenges, as well as unstable body temperatures. “It is clear that neonatal abstinence syndrome is a growing problem across the country,” saidReuters Logo Dr. William Carey, a pediatric researcher at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota. “While some state-level data has suggested that neonatal abstinence syndrome disproportionately affected rural counties, this is the first study to show that rural communities throughout America are particularly affected by this epidemic,” Carey, who wasn’t involved in the study, added by email.

Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Sports

Context: William Carey, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pediatrician with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatric and adolescent medicine specialists provide comprehensive care for the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Tonic
The First Legit Study of Stem Cells and Arthritis Had Surprising Results
by Evy Pitt Stoller

According to a study led by the Mayo Clinic's Shane Shapiro, an orthopedic and sports medicine physician, the recent use of bone marrow stem Tonic cells in painful, arthritic joints has dramatically increased, while exactly how well the treatment works—or how safe it is—has yet to be made clear. "So many of these therapies are going on without the science to back it up," he says. "We weren't comfortable offering this treatment to patients until we or someone else had studied it in a rigorous fashion."

Reach: Tonic is a website hosted by Vice covering health and wellness, science, health issues, world health news and other topics.

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida have conducted the world’s first prospective, blinded and placebo-controlled clinical study to test the benefit of using bone marrow stem cells, a regenerative medicine therapy, to reduce arthritic pain and disability in knees. The researchers say such testing is needed because there are at least 600 stem cell clinics in the U.S. offering one form of stem cell therapy or another to an estimated 100,000-plus patients, who pay thousands of dollars, out of pocket, for the treatment, which has not undergone demanding clinical study.“Our findings can be interpreted in ways that we now need to test — one of which is that bone marrow stem cell injection in one ailing knee can relieve pain in both affected knees in a systemic or whole-body fashion,” says the study’s lead author, Shane Shapiro, M.D., a Mayo Clinic orthopedic physician. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo Researchers Land Patent For Non-Invasive Pancreatic Cancer Test
by Don Jacobson

The same Mayo Clinic research team that developed the Cologuard DNA-based stool test for colorectal cancer has also been working on similar technology for the early detection of pancreatic cancer. After encouraging early studies, they have now landed a patent for their methods. Dr.Twin Cities Business Magazine Logo David Ahlquist, a Mayo Clinic medical professor and consultant in its division of gastroenterology and hepatology, led the team that, late in the last decade, developed the genomic science behind the Cologuard test, which Mayo licensed in 2009 to Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) of Madison, Wisconsin. Now, in a patent dated November 29, Ahlquist and Mayo colleagues Dr. John Kisiel, William R. Taylor, Tracy Yab and Douglas Mahoney were also granted rights to their method of “Detecting Neoplasm,” through which bio-samples, such as those collected from stool, can be analyzed for pancreatic cancer-related DNA biomarkers.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context:  David Ahlquist M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and co-inventor of the Cologuard test.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

ActionNewsJax
Air Force veteran hopes to meet donor's family after lung transplant in Jacksonville — A Georgia Air Force veteran ActionNewsJaxgot a double lung transplant at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville hours after his wife was told he was going to die… An hour after doctors said he wasn’t going to make it, two healthy lungs became available. The 21-year-old woman’s lungs were a match for Terry Junn. Doctors flew them into Mayo Clinic from Mississippi and Terry Junn went into surgery.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Related coverage: 
ActionNewsJax, Veteran gets double lung transplant in Jacksonville hours after doctors said he was going to die

Context: A lung transplant is a surgical procedure to replace a diseased or failing lung with a healthy lung, usually from a deceased donor. A lung transplant is reserved for people who have tried other medications or treatments, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved. At Mayo Clinic, a team of doctors and staff work together to evaluate and treat people who may need lung transplants. Mayo Clinic's Transplant Center staff at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota works together to evaluate and treat people who may need a lung transplant. Mayo Clinic offers common recommendations, evaluation processes, treatment, post-surgical care and follow-up care for lung transplant candidates at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Mayo Clinic uses technology to help make patient information available as needed at all three locations.

Contact: Paul Scotti

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 3D labs, ABC15 Arizona, ActionNewsJax, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Becker's ASC Review, Becker’s Hospital Review, blood donation, bone broth, Boston Globe, breast cancer screening


July 29th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
Complex jobs and social ties appear to help ward off Alzheimer’s, new research shows
by Tara Bahrampour

The studies support previous findings that more stimulating lifestyles are associated with better cognitive outcomes later in life, and bolster the importance of intellectual engagement, said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center. “Physical activity has been reasonably well-documented, but with intellectual activity the data get pretty soft…these two studies speakWashington Post newspaper logo to that,” he said. “What it may mean is the development of Alzheimer’s Disease or cognitive change with aging need not be a passive process; you can do something about it…staying intellectually active whether it be your job or other kinds of activities may actually be beneficial.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: NBC News

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

CBS News
Memory loss is not necessarily the first sign of dementia
by Ruslan Guzov

Memory loss may not always be the first warning sign that dementia is brewing -- changes in behavior or personality might be an early clue…"It's important for us to recognize that not everything's forgetfulness," CBS News Logosaid Dr. Ron Petersen, the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research chief. He wasn't involved in developing the behavior checklist but said it could raise awareness of the neuropsychiatric link with dementia.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Additional coverage: Associated Press

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

Washington Post
Men may get Alzheimer’s as much as women; we just haven’t known how to spot it
by Tara Bahrampour

Looking at the State of Florida’s brain bank, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found Alzheimer’s in 1,625 of 2,809 people who had donated their brains for autopsies. The donors were almost equally divided: 51 percent men and 49 percent women. But contrary to what has been seen in the general population, the Alzheimer’s cases in the brain bank were much more evenly divided: 54 percent of cases were women and 46Washington Post newspaper logo percent were men… It is hard to diagnose the disease in people under 70, according to Melissa Murray, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic’s department of neuroscience, who presented the study. “If you don’t know what the disease is then you can’t give even the modicum of treatment that we have available,” Murray said, noting that symptoms in men are often mistaken for cortico-basal syndrome, frontotemporal dementia, or other conditions.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

CBS News, 1 in 5 Alzheimer's cases may be misdiagnosed

Florida Times-Union, Mayo clinic study finds mens Alzheimer' misdiagnosed more often than women

ABC News, HealthDay, Neurology Today, Telegraph UK, Express UK, Daily MailActionNewsJax

Context: Mayo neuroscientist Melissa E. Murray, Ph.D., led the study, which suggests a high number of men are not accurately diagnosed during their lifetime. The Alzheimer’s Association issued a news release today about the research findings, which Dr. Murray is presenting at the 2016 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. “While it is well accepted that age is the strongest risk factor for Alzheimer’s, there is an enormous need to understand interacting factors that contribute to the development of the disease,” says Dr. Murray, assistant professor of Neuroscience on Mayo’s Jacksonville campus. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Star Tribune (Associated Press)
Behavior changes offer clues that dementia could be brewing
by Lauran Neergaard

If validated, the checklist could help doctors better identify people at risk of brewing Alzheimer's and study changes over time. "It's important for us to recognize that not everything's forgetfulness," said Dr. Ron Star Tribune LogoPetersen, the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research chief. He wasn't involved in developing the behavior checklist but said it could raise awareness of the neuropsychiatric link with dementia.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Chicago Daily Herald, Post-Bulletin, Kansas City Star

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber LindquistDuska Anastasijevic

 

STAT
Promising Alzheimer’s treatment flops in new trial, crushing hopes
by Damian Garde

A closely watched treatment for Alzheimer’s disease came up short in a late-stage trial, marking the latest setback in a field wracked by years of failure. The drug, from biotech company TauRx, did no better than a sugar pill at improving patients’ scores on tests of cognitive and physical function, according to data presented early Wednesday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. The studySTAT Logo of Boston Globe looked at roughly 900 patients with mild to moderate forms of Alzheimer’s. “I must say I’m disappointed by the results,” said Dr. David Knopman, a Mayo Clinic neurologist not involved with the study.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage:

CNN, Does it pass the 'smell test'? Seeking ways to diagnose Alzheimer's early

Reuters, TauRx Alzheimer's drug fails in large study; some benefit seen

New York Times, USA Today, MedPage TodayFOX News, Huffington Post, NBC News

Contacts: Susan Barber LindquistDuska Anastasijevic

 

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic researcher wins international award
by Brett Boese

A Mayo Clinic scientist received a prestigious international award Monday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference that's being hosted in Canada. Dr. Guojun Bu, a neuroscientist at Mayo's Florida Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapercampus, received the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer's Disease, which is given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. Bu and his research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles on Alzheimer's over the past 20 years that have been cited more than 10,000 times. That work is widely recognized as being some of the most significant in the field.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context:  Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a neuroscientist onMayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease ─ one of the most prestigious awards given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. The award was presented to Dr. Bu today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. Over the past 20 years, Dr. Bu and his medical research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles that have been cited more than 10,000 times. Colleagues and other Alzheimer’s researchers say his team’s contributions to Alzheimer’s research rank among the most significant in the field. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: "liquid biopsies", 9&10 News (Michigan), Abby Bartz, ABC News, ActionNewsJax, Adult coloring, Allie Wergin, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Amber Kohnhorst, Andra Palmer, Anesthesiology News


July 8th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Wall Street Journal
Can Adults Grow Taller?
By Heidi Mitchell

Nearly everyone shrinks with age. But some people insist, often after an annual visit to their doctor, that they’ve added a half-inch or so. If they aren’t children or teens, they’re probably mistaken, says Todd Milbrandt, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.,WSJ Banner who explains the significance of physes and what makes 20 a special number. “There may be a 21-year-old patient that is young, in terms of his bone age, which is why he may still be growing in college, whereas others may have stopped when they are 13 or 14,” says Dr. Milbrandt, who does research on growth plates.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Todd Milbrandt, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon who is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Children's Center.  Dr. Milbrandt investigates pediatric muscle, tendon and bone dysfunction. Specifically, he is interested in re-creating naturally found tissue when that tissue is damaged. By using tissue-engineering techniques, Dr. Milbrandt looks to reform cartilage in growth arrest from childhood trauma, to prevent hip collapse in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease and to eradicate bone infections.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Twin Cities Business
Signature Mayo Heart Cell Regeneration Technique Passes Key European Trial
by Don Jacobson

A signature research project of the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine – using stem cells to treat ischemic heart failure – has proven effective on enough patients in a European clinical trial to prompt its corporate backer to accelerate commercialization efforts. The results, Twin Cities Business Magazine Logoannounced last week, heralded the first time heart cell regeneration has been shown effective in a large-scale trial and could represent a major win for the Mayo center, which began work on the concept a decade ago. The product, C-Cure, is being developed by the Belgian company Celyad S.A. under an exclusive license from Mayo. Touted as a potential paradigm-shifter in treating the dire condition, the technique was co-developed by Dr. Andre Terzic, director of the Rochester clinic’s regenerative medicine center, as one of its first big projects.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D.  is director of Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine and a Mayo cardiologist. Mayo Clinic and center leaders believe that regenerative medicine, which makes it possible to actually repair diseased, injured or congenitally defective tissues and organs, will be a vital component of medical and surgical practice in the coming years. By harnessing the potential of regenerative medicine, Mayo Clinic is poised to create new models of health care and transform medicine and surgery.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Business Insider
USA Swimming director gave an astonishing quote about how Katie Ledecky is going to dominate and change the sport

Sheinin also spoke to Michael J. Joyner, a researcher for the Mayo Clinic, who fueled the notion that we haven’t seen an athlete like Ledecky before. Joyner illustrated what Ledecky’s dominance would look like for athletes in other sports. “She’s dominating by the widest margin inBusiness Insider international sport, winning by 1 or 2 percent,” Joyner said. “If [a runner] won the 10,000 meters by that wide a margin, they’d win by 100 meters. One or 2 percent in the Tour de France, over about 80 hours of racing, would be 30 or 40 minutes. It’s just absolutely remarkable.”

Reach: Business Insider has more than 11 million unique visitors each month. The on-line publication focuses on business news. The site provides and analyzes business news and acts as an aggregator of top news stories from around the web. Its content is sometimes cited by other, larger, publications such as The New York Times and domestic news outlets like National Public Radio.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. His laboratory is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss. Dr. Joyner and his team study how the nervous system regulates blood pressure, heart rate and metabolism in response to these forms of stress. They are also interested in how blood flow to muscle and skin responds to these stressors. These responses are studied in young healthy subjects, healthy older subjects and people with conditions such as heart failure.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

KIMT-TV
11-year-old heart transplant patient going home after 2 years
by DeeDee Stiepan

A young patient from Panama who has been receiving treatment following a heart transplant at Mayo Clinic will finally get to go home after living KIMTin Rochester for more than two years. But before he left, Mayo Clinic staff threw him and his family a surprise going away party on Thursday. “He’s done so much better than we could have ever imagined,” explains Jonathan Johnson, M.D., Joseph’s heart transplant surgeon. “He’s really done great and he keeps up with other kids his age and does everything we could have ever hoped — we’re really, really pleased.”

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Context: Jonathan Johnson, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist and hear transplant surgeon. Dr. Johnson's research encompasses several different areas of pediatric cardiology. Dr. Johnson's primary focus is researching clinical outcomes in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease, as well as those with cardiomyopathy or heart failure, or those who have required heart transplantation or ventricular assist device (VAD) placement. Dr. Johnson is also interested in cardiac imaging, including fetal, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and studies how these imaging modalities can be used to improve patient outcomes.

Contact: Kelly Reller

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 24/7 Wall St., age-related shrinking, air ambulance, Aries Merritt, Arizona Republic, Aromatherapy, ASU Now, Becker’s Hospital Review, Billings Gazette, birth control, brain waves, brain-wave patterns


July 1st, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

NBC News
Google Partners With Harvard, Mayo Clinic for Symptom Search Feature

Google is rolling out a new health feature called symptom search, which is designed to pinpoint a potential problem when you search symptoms — from your mobile device.nbcnews.com

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KAAL-TV

Previous coverage in June 24, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: When people seek information on health-related symptoms, many turn to the internet, and Google in particular, as the first stop. Now, when consumers access Google’s mobile search for information about certain symptoms, they will get facts on relevant related medical conditions up front on their smartphone or other mobile device. For example, a symptom search — even one using common language free of medical terminology like “my tummy hurts” or “nose blocked” — will show a list of related conditions. For individual symptoms like “headache,” searchers will see overview information as well as have the ability to view self-treatment options and suggestions of when to seek help from a healthcare professional.  To ensure quality and accuracy, teams of doctors, including expert clinicians at Mayo Clinic, have written or reviewed individual symptom information and evaluated related conditions. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelly Reller

 

WCCO-TV
Doctors At Mayo Clinic Using Viruses To Fight Cancer

Doctors at Mayo Clinic are using deadly viruses to fight a deadly disease. Just last month, the Food and Drug Administration gave breakthrough status to a cancer therapy that uses the polio virus to combat brain WCCO-TV 4tumors. “We do have one of the oldest programs, not just in this country, but in the world,” Dr. Eva Galanis said. Galanis leads the Mayo’s virus therapy program, which started in 1994. It uses a number of viruses to attack cancer cells.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Additional coverage: MSN.com

Context: Evanthia "Eva" Galanis, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic is an orthopedic oncologist with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Dr. Galanis has a long-standing interest in developing novel therapeutic approaches for cancer treatment. The focus of her laboratory is to develop and optimize novel virotherapy approaches with special emphasis on paramyxoviruses. A number of different strategies are tested, including use of therapeutic transgenes; trackable markers; combinations with small molecules, cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy; re-targeting of viral strains against tumor-specific antigens; development of novel viral delivery approaches; and exploration of immunomodulatory methods to modify humoral and innate immunity as a means of optimizing virotherapy efficacy.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
'Giving my kidney a send-off:' Jacksonville woman starts a kidney donation chain stretching to 9 people
by Matt Soergel

Jennifer Tamol was plenty nervous the evening before she went to the hospital to donate one of her kidneys to a complete stranger, someone in Minnesota who was awaiting his or her chance for a new, better life…She decided four years ago to donate a kidney, and reached out to Mayo Clinic. She took a week’s worth of vacation then to go through a battery of tests, and was tested periodically after that. There were a couple of Florida Times-Union newspaper logofalse alarms where she thought there was a suitable recipient, though something went awry each time.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Martin Mai, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic nephrologist and also chair of the division of transplant medicine at Mayo Clinic in Florida.  Mayo Clinic's kidney transplant doctors and surgeons use proven innovations to successfully treat people with kidney failure and complications of diabetes and other diseases. Their experience in using minimally invasive surgery, new medicines to prevent organ rejection and specialized procedures makes Mayo Clinic a leader in transplant outcomes. Mayo Clinic surgeons perform more than 600 kidney transplants a year, including for people with very challenging kidney conditions who need special solutions and surgeries. And Mayo Clinic kidney transplant teams in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are leaders in living-donor kidney transplants. People who receive a kidney from a living donor usually have fewer complications than those who receive a kidney from a deceased donor.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

TIME
Electronic health records and digital clerical work are strongly linked to burnout
by Mandy Oaklander

Of all professionals in the U.S., doctors experience some of the highest rates of burnout: the feeling of being so emotionally exhausted from work that you start to feel indifferent about those you’re serving. Time magazine logoResearchers at the Mayo Clinic looked at several months of 2014 survey data from 6,560 U.S. physicians measuring features of work life, including burnout and electronic use. Even after controlling for factors like age, sex, specialty and the number of hours doctors work per week, the researchers found a strong link between burnout and time spent doing digital work.

Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:
ReutersBecker’s Orthopedic & Spine, HealthLeaders Media, KAAL-TV, KIMT-TVKTTC-TV, HealthDay, Health Data Management, Deccan Chronicle, Science Daily, Headlines & Global NewsFOX News, Tech Times, Doctors Lounge

Context: The growth and evolution of the electronic environment in health care is taking a toll on U.S. physicians. That’s according to a national study of physicians led by Mayo Clinic which shows the use of electronic health records and computerized physician order entry leads to lower physician satisfaction and higher rates of professional burnout. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Electronic health records hold great promise for enhancing coordination of care and improving quality of care,” says Tait Shanafelt, M.D., Mayo Clinic physician and lead author of the study. “In their current form and implementation, however, they have had a number of unintended negative consequences including reducing efficiency, increasing clerical burden and increasing the risk of burnout for physicians.” In collaboration with investigators from the American Medical Association (AMA), researchers from Mayo Clinic assembled a national sample of U.S. physicians using the AMA Physician Masterfile, a near complete record of alMl U.S. physicians. The survey included validated instruments to assess burnout, as well as items developed specifically for the study to evaluate the electronic practice environment of the participating physicians. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Wall Street Journal
How Telemedicine Is Transforming Health Care
by Melinda Beck

At the Mayo Clinic, doctors who treat out-of-state patients can follow up with them via phone, email or web chats when they return home, but they can only discuss the conditions they treated in person. “If the patient wants to talk about a new problem, the doctor has to be licensed in that state to discuss it. If not, the patient should talk to his primary-care physician about it,” says Steve Ommen, a cardiologist whoWSJ Banner runs Mayo’s Connected Care program.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Steve Ommen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and is also medical director of Connected Care. Telehealth is simply using digital information and communication technologies, such as computers and mobile devices, to manage your health and well-being. Telehealth, also called e-health or m-health (mobile health), includes a variety of health care services, including but not limited to:

  • Online support groups
  • Online health information and self-management tools
  • Email and online communication with health care providers
  • Electronic health records
  • Remote monitoring of vital signs, such as blood pressure, or symptoms
  • Video or online doctor visits

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Huffington Post
This Is What A Poop Transplant Actually Looks Like
by Anna Almendrala

The procedure might sound disgusting and messy, but as the video clip from VICE shows, the procedure typically takes place in an extremely well-controlled and sterile hospital environment, and takes less than 10 minutes to complete. In the clip, doctors from the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota inject a mix of healthy poop and saline into a patient suffering from C-diff, and you won’t feel like gagging even once.Huffington Post Logo

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Stephanie Bennett chronicle's her story in an In the Loop feature and her physician Sahil Khanna, M.B.B.S., a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, discusses fecal transplant treatment of C. difficile at Mayo.

Contact: Joe Dangor

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: ABC13 Houston, African American women, aging, alzheimer's disease, Austin Herald, autoimmune neurological disorders, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, brain waves, Brain-eating amoeba, Bring Me the News, bronchopleural fistulas, C. diff


August 27th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Daily Mail UK
Scientists discover how to 'switch off' cancer: Remarkable breakthrough means diseased cells can be made healthy again
by Fiona Macrae

Scientists have found a code for turning off cancer, it was announced today. In exciting experiments, they made cancerous breast and bladder cells benignDaily Mail UK again...The research, from the Mayo Clinic in Florida, showed it to be missing or faulty in a range of cancers. When this happens, key genetic instructions to the cells are scrambled and they turn cancerous. A research team, led by Panos Anastasiadis, was able to reset the instructions – turning off the cancer. Experiments in a dish showed that human cells from highly dangerous bladder cancers can be made normal again.

Reach: The Daily Mail has a circulation of more than 1.4 million.

Additional coverage: Florida Times-Union, Telegraph UK, BBC, RT America, Cape Times, Independent UK, Yahoo! Italia, New Zealand Herald, Middle East Post, 9News Australia, Talk Radio News, La Verdad, The Australian Business Review, Sydney Morning Herald, KTTCBBC NewsThe National Post, Quartz, Press TV, Consumer Affairs, Engadget, UPI, WiredNature World Report, First Coast NewsRochester Post-Bulletin.

Context:  Cancer researchers dream of the day they can force tumor cells to morph back to the normal cells they once were. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a way to potentially reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy. The finding, published in Nature Cell Biology, represents “an unexpected new biology that provides the code, the software for turning off cancer,” says the study’s senior investigator,Panos Anastasiadis, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Cancer Biology on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Anastasiadis, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

NY Times
Jet Lag ‘Cures’ Aplenty, but None That Work for All
by Joan Raymond

…Doctors do know that heading west is generally easier on the body than traveling The New York Times newspaper logoeast, because it requires a person’s internal clock to “set later, not earlier,” said Dr. R. Robert Auger, a sleep specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But the more time zones crossed, the tougher the jet lag. The rule of thumb to get your body clocks back in sync is about one day per time zone change, making it “very difficult for real road warriors to get acclimated,” Dr. Auger said.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: R. Robert Auger, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic sleep specialist. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic doctor has your prescription for happiness
By Allie Shah

A doctor at Rochester’s Mayo Clinic believes that he has the prescription for happiness. He isn’t arguing that we can buy happiness, but that we can achieve it. WeStar Tribune newspaper logo can train our brains to feel less stressed and increase our inner bliss, overriding even genetic tendencies toward unhappiness, said Dr. Amit Sood, author of the new book “The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Atlanta Journal-Constitution — Melanoma a highly treatable cancer, doctors say by Virginia Anderson – Doctors who treat cancer said that some of the most Atlanta Journal-Consitution myAJC logo
important advances in their field in the past five years have come in the treatment of melanoma, which is a cancer of the skin. “When we look at the big cancer meetings we have every year, the most exciting news recently has been about melanoma,” said Dr. Alan Bryce, a medical oncologist at Mayo Clinic Arizona who treats melanoma.

Reach: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has a daily circulation of more than 168,000. Its website has more than one million unique visitors each month.

Context: Alan Bryce, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist. Dr. Bryce studies cancer genetics and novel therapeutics with a focus on personalized medicine. His clinical practice centers on genitourinary malignancies (prostate, kidney, bladder, and testicular cancers) and melanoma.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 'switch off' cancer, 2-minute test for concussion, 9News Australia, ActionNewsJax, adhesion molecules, Alzheimer’s walk, appendectomy, Arizona State University News, arthritis in the cervical spine, Ask Men, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Austin Daily Herald


November 6th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Boston Globe
Yes, sitting at work is bad, but is standing actually better?
By Deborah Kotz

…In a June study, 28 office workers who were given a sit/stand desk for a month reduced their time spent in a sedentary position by 38 Boston Globe Logominutes a day compared to when they used a traditional desk. They also reported a mood boost, increased energy, and reduced fatigue. “I think it’s correct to say we’re in the middle of a ‘stand up movement,’ but the emphasis needs to be on movement,” said the study author Dr. James Levine, director of the Mayo Clinic/Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative. “I don’t want people to think that they should stand up like still soldiers. That is not a good idea.”

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 215,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: Boston Globe10 ways companies can encourage workers to move

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

 

MPR
Glen Campbell's public decline with Alzheimer's documented in new film

…MPR's Cathy Wurzer spoke with Kim Campbell and Dr. Ronald Petersen, Director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. He was one of MPR News logoGlen Campbell's doctors.  A new documentary about the life and career of music icon Glen Campbell opens in theaters  nationwide. "I'll Be Me" is not an ordinary music biopic because Campbell was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 2011 and decided to deal with it publicly. The film documents his emotional "Goodbye Tour" and how his wife Kim became his caregiver.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Glen Campbell film called touching

KTTC, Country star Glen Campbell's family and doctor talk about Mayo's role in fight with Alzheimer's

Pioneer Press'Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me' is moving, funny portrait of country star's struggle with Alzheimer's

Context: This film will increase awareness of Alzheimer’s impact on patients and their caregivers and is a call to action for our nation to find a cure for this disease.  Our future depends on us pushing the boundaries of knowledge and discovery of cures for this and other devastating diseases,” says John Noseworthy, MD, president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. Dr. Ronald Petersen is director of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. The Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Center is part of a network of 28 centers around the country sponsored by the National Institute on Aging.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Prevention
8 Things Your Sleep Habits Say About You

by Jordan Davidson…The symptom: You slept your way through 3 ham sandwiches and an entire pound cPrevention logoake. What it might mean: Parasomnia and REM Behavior Disorder (RBD). Erik St. Louis, a Mayo Clinic sleep physician, recently ended up with a patient who spread jelly on his Nook and left it in the fridge. Sleepwalkers may make a snack, take a walk, and then return to bed with no idea they ever left. The really scary ones drive.

Reach: Prevention is published monthly with a circulation of 2.8 million.  Prevention - Online has more than 1.1 million unique visitors each month and has 9.3 million average page views each month.

Context: Erik St. Louis, M.D. is a physician with the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treat about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Public Affairs Contact: Alyson Gonzalez

 

Wall Street Journal
Just How Fast a Marathoner Could Wozniacki Be?
By Matthew Futterman

Tennis star Caroline Wozniacki stunned the endurance world Sunday when she finished the New York City Marathon in 3 hours 26 minutes 33 The Wall Street Journal Logoseconds. It was her first marathon. She never did a training run longer than 13 miles, and she played in the WTA Tour Finals in Singapore the previous weekend. How fast would Woz be if she tried? Pretty darn fast. Michael Joyner, a physician at the Mayo Clinic aWSJ Daily Fixnd veteran marathoner who specializes in time extrapolations, posited that at 5 feet 10, Wozniacki would most likely be better suited to swimming or rowing. Still, Joyner added, Wozniacki could get 10% better from training and another 10% better by getting super-skinny. Or, “if she was a closet aerobic animal you might get 25%,” he wrote in an email.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: A.L.S., ABC15 Phoenix, Affordable care act, alzheimer's disease, American Society of Anesthesiologists, American Thyroid Association, apple cider vinegar and Lowering blood glucoses, Arab News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, bariatric surgery, Bernie Miller, Bloomberg


September 18th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Reuters
Experimental Virus Being Tested as Cancer Treatment

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic are starting a second round of human clinical trials to test if an engineered strain of measles virus is an effective cancer treatment. The trial follows a successful first round of testsReuters logo where a woman went into complete remission after a massive dose of the virus eradicated cancer in her body. Ben Gruber reports.

Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Additional coverage:

NBC News (KTTC), IBM Takes On Cancer, A new collaboration between the Mayo Clinic and IBM brings the Watson supercomputer to best match cancer patients with the estimated 178,000 ongoing medical trials, suited to their needs. KTTC's Devin Bartolotta reports.

ABC News, Cancer Survivor Saved by Measles Virus Raises Funds for Expanded Trial, After battling blood cancer for 10 years, Stacy Erholtz has no signs of the disease, thanks to an experimental treatment that used an engineered version of the measles virus. Now, a year after finishing her treatment, the 50-year-old mother of three is transitioning from patient to advocate, working with the Rochester, Minnesota-based Mayo Clinic to expand the tiny trial that saved her life.

AOL News, WPXI, Thanhnien News, The Northwestern, WTSP, Post Crescent, WSB Radio, Statesman, Courier-Journal, MSN UK, Bing, Yahoo! News, Yahoo! Finance, Yahoo! Canada

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in Sept. 4, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Jacksonville Business Journal
Jacksonville health care facilities collaborate to save bone marrow patients' lives
by Colleen Jones

Nearly every day in Jacksonville, there is a patient going through some part of the bone marrow transplant process: diagnosis, match-making or implantation. Three health care providers recently teamed up for a Jacksonville Business Journal newspaper logocommunitywide bone marrow donor drive to benefit the Bone Marrow Transplant program of Mayo Clinic in Florida, Wolfson Children’s Hospital and Nemours Children’s Clinic…“Moments usually aren’t critical, but days are,” said Dr. Vivek Roy, medical director for Mayo’s adult bone marrow transplant program. “If we pool our resources, we find it works for us all.”

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Context: The Blood and Marrow Transplantation Program of Mayo Clinic, Nemours Children's Clinic, Jacksonville, and Wolfson Children's Hospital has been awarded a three-year accreditation renewal by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT). The foundation awarded the accreditation renewal after thorough site visits at all collection, transplantation and laboratory facilities at the three locations. More information about the program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Paul Scotti

 

Huffington Post
The Shrinking Middle Class of Physical Activity
by Brad Stulberg

…In other words, the vast majority of the country's economic growth is going to those who are already wealthy, the middle class is shrinking, and the gap between rich and poor is widening. There is evidenceHuffington Post Healthy Living that people who are of a higher socioeconomic status have a greater likelihood of adhering to health guidelines than those who are not. Note: This article was co-authored by Dr. Michael Joyner, who is an anesthesiologist and physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Alyson Gonzalez

 

Washington Post
Treadmill desk to counteract the sedentary lifestyle of sitting all day
by Christie Aschwanden

As an avid runner, cyclist and skier, I get plenty of exercise, but the research shows that a five-mile run at Washington Post newspaper logothe end of the day won’t erase the health risks — such as an increased risk of diabetes, hypertension and obesity — wrought by eight hours of sedentary time, says Mayo Clinic physician and researcher James Levine, popularizer of the treadmill desk.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Previous Coverage in Sept. 4, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob NellisJim McVeigh

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: ABC News, ABC-15, ABC15 Arizona, Advocate Health Care, Al Jazeera America, alternative medicine, alzheimer's disease, American Medical Association, AOL News, Argus Leader, Arizona Republic, Arizona State University


August 21st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Public Radio International
Science Friday: Measles becomes a 'biological weapon' against cancer
by Adam Wernick

A patient with supposedly incurable cancer is now in complete remission thanks to a new experimental treatment she received at the Mayo Clinic: Killing cancer cells with massive doses of the measles virus.Public Radio International logo

Reach: Public Radio International (PRI) is an independent non-profit multi-media organization that creates and distributes news and cultural content that builds awareness and understanding of the world's people, conditions, issues and events. PRI is heard on almost 900 radio stations across the U.S. and on digital platforms that reach millions around the globe.

Previous Coverage in May 15, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Sharon Theimer

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville is designated as a Comprehensive Stroke Center by The Joint Commission
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville has been certified as a Comprehensive Stroke Center by The Joint Florida Times-Union newspaper logoCommission, the oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care. Mayo is the first hospital in Florida to receive the designation, which was created by The Joint Commission in 2012. It was previously designated a Joint Commission Primary Stroke Center. Baptist Medical Center Jacksonville, Baptist Medical Center South and UF Health Jacksonville remain Joint Commission Primary Stroke Centers.

Reach:
The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Mayo Clinic’s stroke center in Jacksonville is the first center in Florida to receive national Comprehensive Stroke Center certification, joining an elite group of centers throughout the United States that are focused on providing advanced and complex stroke care. Centers that achieve this distinction — awarded by The Joint Commission working with the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association — are recognized as leaders that help set the national agenda in highly specialized stroke care. The Joint Commission is the nation's oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care. More information, including video interviews, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Cindy Weiss

 

MPR
Over and over, Bruce Kramer takes a test he'll never beat
by Cathy Wurzer

Nobody likes taking tests, whether in school or a doctor's office. But not everyone has experienced tests the way Bruce Kramer has. "I didn't like being measured like this," Kramer said the other day, "but youMPR News logo have to get over that."…Dr. Lyell Jones is Kramer's Mayo physician. He explained that a patient's score is "a useful tool, but it's not a perfect predictor of how long a patient will live with ALS. And to be honest, we really don't have a really ideal tool to measure or predict how long a patient will live with ALS."

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Previous coverage of Bruce Kramer's story in January 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Bruce Kramer of Minneapolis received a medical diagnosis that changed his life in an instant. Kramer, who was 54 at the time, had noticed his left foot feeling heavy and a little floppy. His ordinarily muscular thighs would tremble noticeably, and he had taken a couple of falls and found it tough to get back up…Jeffrey Strommen, M.D., the Mayo Clinic physician overseeing Kramer's use of the DPS, says, "he's more energetic. He feels stronger and we do have some evidence, albeit, limited that this may actually prolong survival." Dr. Strommen is a Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation specialist.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

KTSP
Minnesota Orchestra Violinist Fiddles During His own Brain Surgery
by Jennie Olson

A violinist with the Minnesota Orchestra deserves a standing ovation for a performance where he played KSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logthe violin during brain surgery. Violinist Roger Frisch has performed around the world, but a tremor in his hand started preventing him from playing. Doctors at Mayo Clinic used a technique called deep brain stimulation, where they inserted an electrode to stop the tremors.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Additional coverage:

BuzzFeed, A World-Class Musician Was Asked To Play Violin During His Own Brain Surgery

Bustle, WATCH INSPIRING VIOLINIST ROGER FRISCH PLAY DURING BRAIN SURGERY, WITH AMAZING RESULTS 

KAAL, WAWS Jacksonville, CNET

Previous Coverage in August 14, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: You may remember the story, a few years ago, about the professional musician who played the violin during his brain surgery? That journey began at Mayo Clinic when a surgical team implanted electrodes in his brain to stop a tremor that could have ended his career. Today, more than five years after his deep brain stimulation surgery, Roger Frisch continues to be one of the world's foremost violinists. More information, including a video of the deep brain stimulation surgery, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contacts: Dana SparksDuska Anastasijevic

 

KTTC
Trial to use stem cells to repair heart
by Stephen Rydberg

Medical officials are talking about a breakthrough clinical trial that could help the heart repair itself. On Tuesday afternoon, Mayo Clinic and Cardio3 Biosciences officials outlined an FDA-approved clinical trialKTTC TV logo to be carried out here in the United States. A similar trial has already been underway in Europe. Cardio3 CEO Christian Homsy says stem cells are a major part of this heart-healing process. "What we do is take cells from a patient and we reprogram those cells to become cardiac reparative cells. Those cells have the ability to come and repair the heart." Those stem cells would come from the bone marrow of patients who suffer from heart failure.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KAAL, KIMT

Context: Earlier this year, Cardio3 BioSciences, an international Mayo Clinic collaborator, received FDA approval for a phase III pivotal clinical trial of its stem cell therapy. The trial will test the Mayo Clinic discovery of cardiopoietic (cardiogenically-instructed) stem cells designed to improve heart health in people suffering from heart failure. The multisite U.S. trial, called CHART-2, will aim to recruit 240 patients with chronic advanced symptomatic heart failure. Cardio3 BioSciences is a bioscience company in Mont-Saint-Guibert, Belgium. "Regenerative medicine is poised to transform the way we treat patients," says Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine. Watch the video below to see how stem cells are being used to treat people with heart failure. More information about the collaboration can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network and in Discovery's Edge, Mayo Clinic's online research magazine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Jennifer Schutz

 

ActionNewsJax
Researchers from the Mayo Clinic are ahead of the game with ALS
by Erica Bennett

It's an act thousands of people are taking part in. Oprah, Britney Spears. Even LeBron James. Although the ice bucket challenge is fun to watch, it has a purpose. Action News Jacksonville logoThe goal is to raise money for ALS, a neurological disorder also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. "Will definitely add to the level of support. The financial support needed to make these breakthrough discoveries,” Dr. Leonard Petrucelli said.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Additional Coverage: 

Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic researchers report ALS find

Palm Beach PostTC Palm Fla.

Related ALS Coverage:

KAAL, Mayo ALS Doctors Take Ice Bucket Challenge, By now you've probably seen the videos of the ice bucket challenge. Friday it was Mayo Clinic doctors getting wet. Doctors Eric Sorenson and Nathan Staff work at the ALS center at Mayo. The challenge is a way to raise money and awareness for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's Disease, which is a deadly degenerative nerve disorder.

Context: A team of researchers at Mayo Clinic and The Scripps Research Institute in Florida have developed a new therapeutic strategy to combat the most common genetic risk factor for the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). In the Aug. 14 issue of Neuron, they also report discovery of a potential biomarker to track disease progression and the efficacy of therapies. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

AP
AP Photos: spa show is a feast for the senses
by Beth Harpaz

Smells good, tastes good, feels good: The International Spa Association's annual industry show was a feast for the senses. Spas showed products and treatments that seemed good enough to eat — and a few demonstrations actually did involve edibles...The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, demonstrated vegetarianAssociated Press Wire Service Logo stir-fry cooking to promote its Healthy Living Program. The program offers a class trip to a restaurant to teach participants how to order healthy menu items.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Additional coverage:

Skin Inc., Spas Mold Menus On Cultural Traditions…Food is a simple way to bring people together to share in a culture. At this year’s Media Event, many spas used food as a means of tying a native tradition to a classic treatment…Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program discussed the link between diet and overall health and showed that healthy cooking is easy with a healthy food prep demonstration.

ABC News, FOX News, Sioux City Journal, Colorado Springs Gazette, Edge On the Net, Salt Lake Tribune, Star Tribune, Fairfield Citizen Conn

Previous Coverage in Mayo Clinic in the July 3, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is designed to help people break down barriers, dispel myths and give participants a comprehensive wellness experience tailored to their individual goals. What makes this program unique is that it doesn’t end once the person leaves the campus; it offers ongoing support long after the person returns home. “Mayo has been dedicated to the health and wellness of individuals for 150 years, and this program continues that tradition by offering life-changing experiences to people seeking whole-person wellness who want to maximize their health,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical director, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. “We’re committed to partnering with each participant to design an individualized wellness plan to help them reach their wellness goals so that their success continues once they return home and are immersed back into the reality of their busy lives.” More information on Mayo's Healthy Living Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein


Arizona Republic
CT Radiation doses dropping

Misconceptions a­bound about the risks associated with radiation dosages and CT (computed tomography) or x-rays. Dr. Amy Hara and a team of other Mayo Arizona Republic newspaper logoClinic radiologists have been implementing new procedures, new devices and new software to lower the dosages in more than 125 protocols since 2008. Hara said that overall doses have dropped up to 50 percent for some scans.

ReachThe Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday. The newspaper’s website Arizona Central, averages 83 million pages views each month.

Context: Many misconceptions exist about the risks associated with radiation doses and CT scans. Experts at Mayo Clinic want patients to have the right information about radiation dose, including when to have procedures with radiation, such as a CT scan, versus when to have magnetic resonance imaging or other non-radiation tests. Since 2001, a team of diagnostic radiologists and medical physicists at Mayo Clinic have been actively developing and implementing new techniques to lower radiation doses. They have installed new CT scanners and software and implemented new scanning instructions to lower the doses for more than 100 different CT protocols. Amy Hara, M.D., a diagnostic radiologist at Mayo Clinic Arizona says that doses have dropped more than 50 percent for several scan types. Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., a medical physicist at Mayo Clinic Rochester, emphasized that their goal is to reduce the radiation dose without compromising the image quality — and advances in technology are making that possible. More information, including a Q&A and video interview with Dr. Hara can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: A.L.S., AARP En Espanol, ABC News, ABC15 Phoenix, ActionNewsJax, Allevant Solutions, AP, Arizona Pop Warner Football and Cheer, Arizona Republic, audiology, Becker’s Hospital Review, Bloomberg


July 24th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Advisory Board

Why Mayo Clinic's CEO wants to serve 200 million patients—and how he plans to do it

Question: I've read that before you joined the Mayo Clinic—and this was decades ago—one of your first encounters with the organization was when a physician was supposed to visit your hospital for a commemorative dinner…and he missed it. Can you talk Advisory Boarda little bit about that? John Noseworthy: It was one of the two or three most pivotal moments in my life. You're right, he missed his flight—and it was because he was with a patient. I was very young and I remember thinking, "who is this man who is so humble that he would put the needs of the patient ahead of his receiving  a distinguished recognition." And then I wondered what organization could retain and keep a person like that. It was Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Advisory Board Company is a global research, technology, and consulting firm partnering with more than 165,000 leaders in more than 4,100 organizations across health care and higher education.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Wall Street Journal
Why Seven Hours of Sleep Might Be Better Than Eight
by Sumathi Reddy

…Other experts caution against studies showing ill effects from too much sleep. Illness may cause someone to sleep or spend more The Wall Street Journal newspaper logotime in bed, these experts say. And studies based on people reporting their own sleep patterns may be inaccurate. "The problem with these studies is that they give you good information about association but not causation," said Timothy Morgenthaler, president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, which represents sleep doctors and researchers, and a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, is also affiliated with the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Alyson Gonzalez, Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo links abnormal protein in brain to Alzheimer's
by Mary Lynn Smith

…“Alzheimer’s disease symptoms have been typically thought to be produced by plaques and tangles,” said Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s disease Research Center. “Now these folks have documented that there’s a third elementStar Tribune newspaper logo that contributes to Alzheimer’s symptoms.” The protein, known as TDP-43, is normally found in the brain. But what Mayo researchers found is that when it becomes abnormal — chemically different and bunched up — a patient is more likely to show symptoms of Alzheimer’s, explained Dr. Keith Josephs, who headed the research team’s four-year study.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic-led study on Alzheimer's grabs worldwide attention
MPR, Alzheimer's research at Mayo may open new possibilities to investigate
KTTC, Protein discovery may be key to Alzheimer's cure
WCCO, Albuquerque Journal, MinnPost

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

Context:  Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease. In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. “We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.” More information on the study, including a video interview with Dr. Josephs, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Mayo sees big future for personalized medicine
by Jim Spencer

Medical treatment will become more genetically specific to individuals as the 21st century progresses, the Mayo Clinic’s director of Star Tribune Business section logolaboratory medicine told a congressional subcommittee Wednesday. Dr. Frank Cockerill said that Mayo, one of the world’s leaders in specialized diagnostics, develops 150 tests per year in an attempt to become more precise in treating patients.  The Rochester-based clinic is moving toward tests that will let doctors tailor treatments that are unique to individuals, Cockerill told participants at a 21st Century Cures roundtable sponsored by the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s subcommittee on health. For instance, instead of using standard dosages, Cockerill said Mayo’s labs try to tranform scientific discoveries into “valid tests” that allow doctors to apply “specific genetic findings in a patient.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Frank Cockerill, M.D. is chair of the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and PathologyMayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (DLMP) in Rochester is one of the largest clinical laboratories in the world. It is composed of more than 3,200 people working in numerous specialty laboratories performing more than 20 million tests a year. Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML) is a reference laboratory specializing in esoteric laboratory testing for health care organizations throughout the United States and around the world. MML's mission is to support the local delivery of laboratory services through the provision of exceptional reference laboratory services and by providing support services that facilitate and augment community integration efforts.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Post-Bulletin

Our view: Community can help keep Mayo Clinic at top of rankings

Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperWhat's most impressive about Mayo Clinic's No. 1 ranking as the best hospital in the country by U.S. News & World Report magazine were the consistent high marks in several categories of evaluation. The report gave Mayo No. 1 or No. 2 rankings in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Pulse on Health: It's the personal care behind being No. 1 that counts
MedPage Today, Top-Ranked Hospitals Sing Own Praises
CSPAN, General Speeches: Rep. Erik Paulsen, R-Minnesota, 3rd District

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic has achieved the highest honor in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of top hospitalsMayo Clinic earned more number one rankings than any other provider, ranking number one or number two in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “We have a deep commitment to delivering high-value health care that best meets patients' needs. We owe our success to truly dedicated staff that provide a seamless patient experience and the care that each individual needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Noseworthy, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: "sitting disease", A.L.S., ABC News, ABC15, advisory board, Ahwatukee Foothills News, Aitkin Age, Albuquerque Journal, alzheimer's disease, Am.com, AP, Apple


Contact Us · Privacy Policy