Items Tagged ‘Yahoo! News’

July 24th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich


Mayo Clinic in the News Logo
Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Advisory Board

Why Mayo Clinic's CEO wants to serve 200 million patients—and how he plans to do it

Question: I've read that before you joined the Mayo Clinic—and this was decades ago—one of your first encounters with the organization was when a physician was supposed to visit your hospital for a commemorative dinner…and he missed it. Can you talk Advisory Boarda little bit about that? John Noseworthy: It was one of the two or three most pivotal moments in my life. You're right, he missed his flight—and it was because he was with a patient. I was very young and I remember thinking, "who is this man who is so humble that he would put the needs of the patient ahead of his receiving  a distinguished recognition." And then I wondered what organization could retain and keep a person like that. It was Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The Advisory Board Company is a global research, technology, and consulting firm partnering with more than 165,000 leaders in more than 4,100 organizations across health care and higher education.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

 

Wall Street Journal
Why Seven Hours of Sleep Might Be Better Than Eight
by Sumathi Reddy

…Other experts caution against studies showing ill effects from too much sleep. Illness may cause someone to sleep or spend more The Wall Street Journal newspaper logotime in bed, these experts say. And studies based on people reporting their own sleep patterns may be inaccurate. "The problem with these studies is that they give you good information about association but not causation," said Timothy Morgenthaler, president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, which represents sleep doctors and researchers, and a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, is also affiliated with the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Alyson Gonzalez, Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo links abnormal protein in brain to Alzheimer's
by Mary Lynn Smith

…“Alzheimer’s disease symptoms have been typically thought to be produced by plaques and tangles,” said Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s disease Research Center. “Now these folks have documented that there’s a third elementStar Tribune newspaper logo that contributes to Alzheimer’s symptoms.” The protein, known as TDP-43, is normally found in the brain. But what Mayo researchers found is that when it becomes abnormal — chemically different and bunched up — a patient is more likely to show symptoms of Alzheimer’s, explained Dr. Keith Josephs, who headed the research team’s four-year study.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Mayo Clinic-led study on Alzheimer's grabs worldwide attention
MPR, Alzheimer's research at Mayo may open new possibilities to investigate
KTTC, Protein discovery may be key to Alzheimer's cure
WCCO, Albuquerque Journal, MinnPost

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

Context:  Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease. In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. “We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.” More information on the study, including a video interview with Dr. Josephs, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Mayo sees big future for personalized medicine
by Jim Spencer

Medical treatment will become more genetically specific to individuals as the 21st century progresses, the Mayo Clinic’s director of Star Tribune Business section logolaboratory medicine told a congressional subcommittee Wednesday. Dr. Frank Cockerill said that Mayo, one of the world’s leaders in specialized diagnostics, develops 150 tests per year in an attempt to become more precise in treating patients.  The Rochester-based clinic is moving toward tests that will let doctors tailor treatments that are unique to individuals, Cockerill told participants at a 21st Century Cures roundtable sponsored by the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s subcommittee on health. For instance, instead of using standard dosages, Cockerill said Mayo’s labs try to tranform scientific discoveries into “valid tests” that allow doctors to apply “specific genetic findings in a patient.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Frank Cockerill, M.D. is chair of the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and PathologyMayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (DLMP) in Rochester is one of the largest clinical laboratories in the world. It is composed of more than 3,200 people working in numerous specialty laboratories performing more than 20 million tests a year. Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML) is a reference laboratory specializing in esoteric laboratory testing for health care organizations throughout the United States and around the world. MML's mission is to support the local delivery of laboratory services through the provision of exceptional reference laboratory services and by providing support services that facilitate and augment community integration efforts.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Post-Bulletin

Our view: Community can help keep Mayo Clinic at top of rankings

Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperWhat's most impressive about Mayo Clinic's No. 1 ranking as the best hospital in the country by U.S. News & World Report magazine were the consistent high marks in several categories of evaluation. The report gave Mayo No. 1 or No. 2 rankings in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin, Pulse on Health: It's the personal care behind being No. 1 that counts
MedPage Today, Top-Ranked Hospitals Sing Own Praises
CSPAN, General Speeches: Rep. Erik Paulsen, R-Minnesota, 3rd District

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic has achieved the highest honor in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of top hospitalsMayo Clinic earned more number one rankings than any other provider, ranking number one or number two in 11 of the 12 specialties based on reputation, services and volumes, safety and clinical outcomes. “We have a deep commitment to delivering high-value health care that best meets patients' needs. We owe our success to truly dedicated staff that provide a seamless patient experience and the care that each individual needs,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Noseworthy, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Rebecca Eisenman

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Tags: "sitting disease", A.L.S., ABC News, ABC15, advisory board, Ahwatukee Foothills News, Aitkin Age, Albuquerque Journal, alzheimer's disease, Am.com, AP, Apple


July 3rd, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

New York Times

Medical Boards Draft Plan to Ease Path to Out-of-State and Online Treatment
by Robert Pear

Officials representing state medical boards across the country have drafted a model law that would make it much easier for doctors licensed in one state to treat patients in other states, whether in person, by videoconference or online…The Mayo Clinic, in Minnesota, for example, has established links with more than two dozen hospitals The New York Times newspaper logoand health systems…“Cross-border licensure is a strategic imperative as we move forward in this brave new world,” said Kathleen M. Harrington, who is in charge of government relations at Mayo.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: In stroke telemedicine, also called telestroke, doctors who have advanced training in the nervous system (neurologists) remotely evaluate people who've had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations to emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Doctors communicate using digital video cameras, Internet telecommunications, robotic telepresence, smartphones and other technology.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Fortune
Test-driving the Mayo Clinic's new plan for healthy living
by Larry Armour

The famed clinic has a fresh approach to helping patients stick with a fitness program. I went to check it out. I’m sharing a gym in Rochester, Minn., with 16 men and women. We are part of a pilot program for a new venture called the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Plan. We were told to wear comfortable clothes and athletic shoes, butFortune magazine logo the hardcore workout we all expected never shows up. Instead, we are introduced to a concept called NEAT, which stands for Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis.

Reach: FORTUNE has a circulation of more than 845,000 readers.  It's website receives more than 4.5 million unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is designed to help people break down barriers, dispel myths and give participants a comprehensive wellness experience tailored to their individual goals. What makes this program unique is that it doesn’t end once the person leaves the campus; it offers ongoing support long after the person returns home. “Mayo has been dedicated to the health and wellness of individuals for 150 years, and this program continues that tradition by offering life-changing experiences to people seeking whole-person wellness who want to maximize their health,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical director, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. “We’re committed to partnering with each participant to design an individualized wellness plan to help them reach their wellness goals so that their success continues once they return home and are immersed back into the reality of their busy lives.” More information on Mayo's Healthy Living Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

MPR
Researchers, advocates see better ALS therapies on the horizon

This weekend marks the anniversary of one of pro sports' most poignant moments: Baseball great Lou Gehrig, standing before microphones near home plate at Yankee Stadium on July 4, 1939 as a standing-room only crowd honored him as one of the most famous players of his time...There are two stem cell therapy trials going on atMPR-News-300x45 Mayo Clinic. Both involve using stem cells grown from a participant's stomach fat. One is looking at the safety of injecting ALS patients with varying doses of their stem cells. The other trial uses a patient's stem cells, modified with growth factors, and reintroduced into the patient's spinal fluid. Researchers hope those tweaked stem cells will protect cells that control movement from further damage and death from ALS. Dr. Anthony Windebank, with the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo, calls the fledgling therapy a "radically new kind of treatment." 

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage:

Men’s HealthGehrig's Final, Finest At-Bat

Post-Bulletin, Gehrig honored, 75 years after speech 


Context:
 Seventy-five years ago, on July 4th 1939, baseball legend Lou Gehrig delivered the famous speech bidding farewell to the ballpark and his fans. Two weeks before Gehrig had been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Accompanied by his wife, Eleanor, Lou left Mayo Clinic with the devastating diagnosis on June 20th 1939, a day after his 36th birthday. He died in June two years later, not quite 38 years old, of the rare neurological disease that would come to bear his name.

ALS is a type of progressive motor neuron disease that typically strikes at middle to later life and causes nerve cells in spinal cord, brain stem and brain to gradually break down and die. These nerve cells are responsible for muscle function so eventually, ALS can affect the ability to control the muscles needed to move, speak, eat and breathe.

While ALS still evades cure and effective treatment, researchers at Mayo Clinic are conducting a Phase I clinical trial in the hope that they can guide newly grown stem cells to become protective of neuromuscular function.

“We use fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells from the patient's own body. These cells are modified in the laboratory and delivered through a spinal tap into the fluid around the patient's nervous system to promote neuron survival,” explains neurologist Anthony Windebank, M.D, deputy director for discovery in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “We hope that the growth factors that they are producing will help protect and promote the survival of nerve cells and therefore slow down or arrest the progression of ALS. If we can halt an ALS patient's loss of cells at 20 to 30 percent, that person’s function would be well-preserved," says Dr. Windebank. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Post Bulletin
Hockey players get cognitive training from Mayo Clinic staff
by Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic's new Rochester training center for elite athletes has taken a cue from the Israeli military. The facility, in the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center, this year Logo for Post-Bulletin newspaperbegan cognitive training designed to increase hockey players' "hockey sense" — their awareness of where the puck and other players are on the ice. It uses "applied cognitive engineering" developed with USA Hockey…Dr. Michael Stuart, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, said athletes can actually improve their ability to anticipate what's going to happen on the ice based on the location of the puck or other players, including "both teammates and opponents."

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

 

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Tags: 3D mammography, A.L.S., AftenPosten, Albert Lea Tribune, alzheimer's disease, Apple, Arthritis Today, Augie Nieto, autism spectrum disorder, birth control, Bloomberg Businessweek, BMI


June 26th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Obesity Is Undercounted in Children, Study Finds
by Sumathi Reddy

…A new study finds that the commonly used body-mass-index measure may fail to identify as many as 25% of children, age 4 to 18 years, who have excess body fat. The meta-analysis, scheduled for publication online in the journal Pediatric Obesity on Tuesday, reviewed 37 separate studies involving a combined The Wall Street Journal newspaper logo53,521 participants. "BMI is not capturing everybody who needs to be labeled as obese," said Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, director of preventive cardiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who headed the study with Asma Javed, a pediatric endocrinology fellow.

Additional coverage:

KAAL, Mayo Study Finds Fault with Youth BMI Measurements
WJXT Fla., KTVZ Oreg., ANSA Italy


Wall Street Journal Lunch Break
Video: Obesity Undercounted in Children, Study Finds

A new study finds that the commonly used body mass index measure A new study finds that the Wall Street Journal Live Logocommonly used body mass index measure may leave out as many as 25% of children with excess body fat. Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, co-author of the study and director of preventive cardiology at the Mayo Clinic, joins Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez's research program has studied obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up.


Wall Street Journal
How to Keep Your Muscles Strong as You Age
by Laura Landrow

...For now, however, the best medicine available to maintain muscle mass and strength is less complicated and costly—namely, exercise and a healthy diet. Yet about 60% of people over 65 are insufficiently active or overtly inactive, and many have poor nutrition, says Nathan LeBrasseur, a researcher who directs the Muscle Performance and Physical Function Laboratory and the Healthy Aging and The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoIndependent Living Initiative at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Dr. LeBrasseur estimates that most people will lose approximately 30% of muscle mass over their lifetime, and as much as 50% by the time they reach their 80s or 90s.

Context: Nathan LeBrasseur, Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic researcher and is affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. More information about his work can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

 

Wall Street Journal
How Bad Sitting Posture at Work Leads to Bad Standing Posture All the Time
by Jeanne Whalen

Good posture means aligning ears over the shoulders, shoulders over hips, and Wall Street Journal Life and Culture logohips over the knees and ankles…Many deskbound office workers have started standing and walking in this position, too, says Andrea Cheville, a rehabilitation physician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. To counteract kyphosis, it is important to stretch the pectoral muscles and strengthen the trapezius muscles in the upper back, which hold the shoulder blades back, Dr. Cheville said. Remembering to keep the ears and head over the shoulders, and not jutting forward, is also important.

Context: Andrea Cheville, M.D., Mayo Clinic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is an expert on exercise in the elderly and also focuses on the delivery of supportive care services to optimize the functionality and quality-of-life for patients with cancer in all disease stages.

Wall Street Journal
Can Data From Your Fitbit Transform Medicine?
By Elizabeth Dwoskin

Many runners and fitness fanatics have been quick to embrace wearable wireless tracking devices for Wall Street Journal Tech Logomeasuring physical activity and calories burned. Now, a growing number of physicians are formally studying whether such "wearables" can improve patients' health by spurring people to get moving…David Cook, an anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, who, along with colleagues, used Fitbit Inc.'s namesake gadget to track activity levels of cardiac-surgery patients. The researchers found that patients who moved more the day after surgery were more likely to be discharged sooner. The findings prompted the hospital to dispatch physical therapists to study patients who weren't moving as much, said Dr. Cook.

Context: David J. Cook, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: 3D mammograms, ABC News Australia, ABC30, aging, Agnes Rapacz, Allevant Solutions, alzheimer's disease, American News Report, angina, ANSA, anti-obesity devic, AP


June 19th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

 

Wall Street Journal
Effort Seeks to Reduce Ear-Tube Surgeries for Small Children
By Sumathi Reddy

Parents of young, otherwise healthy children fear them like the plague: ear infections…Contributing to a desire by doctors and parents to avoid surgery are concerns about the use of general anesthesia in young children. Researchers and doctors are exploring devices that would enable ear-tube procedures to be The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoperformed using alternatives. Preceptis Medical, a Plymouth, Minn., company, is testing a device, the Hummingbird, that uses nitrous oxide instead of general anesthesia in clinical trials at four sites, including the Mayo Clinic…Randall Flick, director of the Mayo Clinic Children's Center, said his and other studies show the risk seems to occur after multiple exposures.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Randall Flick, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic Children's Center. For 150 years, Mayo Clinic has provided trusted answers for children and their parents. Mayo Clinic Children's Center includes providers from over 40 medical and surgical specialties, all focused on children's health care needs.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Traci Klein

 

Science Friday
Pre-Surgery Routine Needs an Update

Says Doc, For years, patients preparing for colon surgery have been told to stick to a liquid diet and do a colon cleanse. The only problem? There's not much science to back up those suggestions, says Robert Science FridayCima of the Mayo Clinic. He and his Mayo colleagues subscribe instead to the “enhanced recovery” approach, which spares patients the fasting and heavy narcotics in favor of regular meals and over-the-counter painkillers. Surgery is like running a marathon, he says, and the body needs to be in a normal state to brace for the big event.

Reach: Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4pm Eastern time as part of NPR's 'Talk of the Nation' programming. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand.

Context: Robert Cima, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic surgeon and chair of Mayo’s surgical quality subcommittee.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

KSTP
Burnsville Father and Son Hope for Gift of Life
by Naomi Pescovitz

As Minnesota families celebrate dads this Father's Day, a Burnsville family is especially grateful for another year together. Last winter, David Costello's double organ transplant saved his life. This year, theKSTP-TV Eyewitness News Log Costellos are hoping for the gift of life once again. David Costello waited four and a half years to finally get the call. "My phone lit up, the ID said Mayo Clinic," Costello said.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: Mayo Clinic Transplant Center, with transplant services in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, performs more transplants than any other medical center in the world.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

Orlando Business Journal
Brevard County hospital first in C. Fla. to join Mayo Clinic network
by Matthew Richardson

Parrish Medical Center in Brevard County has formed a partnership with Mayo Clinic— the first hospital in the Central Florida area to do sOrlando Business Journal newspaper logoo, reports News 13. Parrish is now the 29th member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, under the umbrella of the original Mayo Clinic. The century-old, renowned nonprofit is focused on medical care and research, helping millions every year.

Additional coverage:

Florida Today, Parrish to benefit from Mayo's expertise

Bay News 9Parrish Medical Center joins Mayo Clinic network

Post-Bulletin, KROC AM, Becker’s Hospital ReviewStamford Advocate, Cincinnati Finance, EMoney Daily,Virtual-Strategy magazine, Townhall Finance, Review Seeker, News13 Fla., MoneyShow.com, Minyanville, KVVU Las Vegas, Financial Content, KAIT 8 Ark., Florida Today

Context: Mayo Clinic and Parrish Medical Center officials have announced Parrish Medical Center (PMC) as the 29th member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. PMC is the first Central Florida member of the network and the third in Florida. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

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Tags: 2014 Practice Greenhealth Emerald Award., : ABC News Radio, A TransAtlantic Cardiovascular risk Calculator for Rheumatoid Arthritis, ABC, ABC News, ABC15 in Arizona, Adam Scott, addictions, aging, Albert Lea Tribune, Apple, Arizona Republic


April 11th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Star Tribune
Novel Mayo technique improves outlook for breast cancer surgeries
by Dan Browning

Mayo Clinic likes to say that its team-based, patient-centric approach to medical care increases value. On Tuesday it released the latest evidence — research showing that a novel technique improves outcomes for women with breast cancer, the nation’s No. 2 cause of death for women, after lung cancer…“In breast cancer,Star-Tribune-Logo-300x45 what I think is critical is that multidisciplinary team,” said Dr. Judy Boughey, a professor of surgery at Mayo who was the article’s lead author. “The pathologists here are making me look good … because I’m doing the same [excision] procedure I would do anywhere else.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

KAAL, Mayo Breast Cancer Treatment Sees Success A unique process that doctors at Mayo Clinic Hospital use when removing tumors in breast cancer patients is showing results…"Obviously opening the incision delays the wound healing, increases risk for infection, and takes the patient away from work and away from their family and is associated with more stress and anxiety," Dr. Judy Boughey said.

MedicalResearch.com
Breast Cancer: Frozen Section Analysis During Lumpectomy Decreases Need For Reoperation, MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Boughey: This study showed that the rate of reoperation after lumpectomy for breast cancer was significantly lower at Mayo Clinic in Rochester compared to national data. Mayo Clinic in Rochester uses frozen section analysis of margins at time of lumpectomy to direct any margin re-excisions during the surgery and therefore has a significantly lower rate of need for a second operation to ensure clean margins. The rate of reoperation was four times higher in the national data set than in the Mayo Clinic data set.

Context: Unique laboratory testing during breast cancer lumpectomies to make sure surgeons remove all cancerous tissue spares patients the need for a repeat lumpectomy in roughly 96 percent of cases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, a success rate much higher than the rate nationally, a Mayo study shows. During the years reviewed, 13.2 percent of breast cancer lumpectomy patients nationally had to return to the operating room within a month of their initial surgery, compared to 3.6 percent at Mayo in Rochester, which uses a technique called frozen section analysis to test excised tissue for cancer while  patient are still on the operating table. The findings are published in the journal Surgery. More information on this study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Channel12 Ariz.
First piece of Mayo Clinic proton beam installed

Channel 12 Arizona NBCCrews installed the first pieces of the new proton beam therapy center at the Mayo Clinic on Monday. The beam will work by isolating and treating cancer cells.

Reach: Channel 12 is an NBC affiliate in Phoenix, AZ.

Additional coverage: KPNX Ariz.KTVK Ariz.

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona broke ground in December 2011 for a $182 million facility to house Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy program — marking the beginning of a new era in cancer treatment. Steven Schild, M.D., is chair of radiation oncology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

 

Becker’s Hospital Review
12 Things to Know About Mayo Clinic
by Helen Adamopoulos

Here are 12 key things to know about Rochester, Minn.-based Mayo Clinic, which was recently named one of 100 Great Hospitals in America in 2014 by Becker's Hospital Review. 1. Mayo Clinic — a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care and research — got its start in 1864, when William Worrall Mayo, MD, opened aBeckers Hospital Review private medical practice in Rochester. The organization officially took on the Mayo Clinic name in March 1914. 2. Mayo Clinic's operating income rose 55 percent from $395.4 million in fiscal year 2012 to $612.1 million in 2013. It saw total revenue of $9.42 billion last year.

Reach: Becker's Hospital Review features up-to-date business and legal news and analysis relating to hospitals and health systems. Content is geared toward high-level hospital leaders (CEOs, CFOs, COOs, CMOs, CIOs, etc.), and we work to provide valuable content, including hospital and health system news, best practices and legal guidance specifically for these decision-makers. Each of the 12 annual issues of Becker's Hospital Review reaches a qualified audience of approximately 18,500 healthcare leaders. 

Context: On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe. This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Florida Times-Union
Editorial: A major battle to combat child obesity

Nearly four of every 10 children in our community are either overweight or flat-out obese, say area health experts…“We’re seeing so many children in our community Florida Times-Union newspaper logostruggle to be at healthy weights,” said Dr. Alva Roche Green during a recent session with the Times-Union editorial board. A pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic, Roche-Green added that it’s “not an exaggeration to say childhood obesity is at a crisis level” across Jacksonville and Florida in general.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Alva Roche Green, M.D., is a Family Medicine physician at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Red Wing Republican-Eagle
MCHS report highlights growing improvements
by Anne Jacobson

Mayo Clinic Health System made substantial changes in 2013 toward better care and lower costs. These included more emphasis on primary care teams and launching Patient Online Services, according to MCHS officials.

Red Wing Republication Eagle logo

Reach: The Red Wing Republican Eagle has served residents of Red Wing, Minn., since 1857, The Red Wing Republican Eagle is owned by RiverTown Multimedia, a subsidiary of
Forum Communications and has a daily circulation of  more than 5,400.

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System held a public discussion on its 2013 annual report April 7 in Red Wing, Minn. Thomas Witt, M.D., president and CEO of the MCHS Cannon Falls, Lake City and Red Wing said now the three medical centers and their affiliated clinics work more seamlessly together and with the Mayo Clinic “hub” in Rochester.

Public Affairs Contact: Kristy Jacobson

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Tags: 100Reporters, 13 ABC, 8 News Now Las Vegas, ABC 7, Advance Healthcare Network, AIB Corporate Banking, allergies, Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Mayo Clinic, Am.com, American College of Cardiology, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Amethyst “Amy” Hiestand


March 7th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Steamboat Today
Yampa Valley Medical Center announces new partnership with the Mayo Clinic

...Yampa Valley Medical Center has announced a new partnership with the Mayo Clinic that will give physicians here the ability to consult with thousands of the clinic's specialists across the country. "We couldn't be more proud to have this relationship with this organization," hospital CEOSteamboat Today newspaper logo Frank May said Wednesday morning in a packed conference room as he was flanked by the Mayo Clinic's vice president and medical director. "This elevates our game."

Reach: Steamboat Today is a daily newspaper serving Steamboat Springs and the surrounding areas in Routt County, Colo. with a circulation of 7,000. Its website receive more than 30,500 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Post BulletinHeard on the Street: Mayo Clinic adds Colorado health-care provider as new member

Context: Mayo Clinic and Yampa Valley Medical Center officials announced this week that the Steamboat Springs hospital is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The network connects Mayo Clinic and health care providers who are interested in working together to enhance the delivery of locally provided high quality health care. Yampa Valley Medical Center is the second hospital in Colorado to be invited to join the network. More information about the announcement can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Wall Street Journal
The Debate Over Juice Cleanses and Toxin Removal
by Melinda Beck

…Consuming more vegetables is great, mainstream doctors and nutritionists agree. But they dismiss the detox claims as a confusing jumble of The Wall Street Journal newspaper logoscience, pseudoscience and hype. They argue that humans already have a highly efficient system for filtering out most harmful substances—the liver, kidneys and colon..."Nobody has ever been able to tell me what these toxins are," says Donald Hensrud, an internist and nutrition specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is second in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 223 million copies on week days.  Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D., is Chair, Mayo Clinic Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine in Minnesota. Dr. Hensrud's research focuses on obesity, nutrition and disease prevention, physical activity and health promotion, and clinical preventive medicine.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Traci Klein

 

Philadelphia Inquirer
Getting Teeth Pulled Before Heart Surgery May Pose Serious Risks

If you're a heart patient, you might be wise to wait to have any infected teeth pulled if you're about to have cardiac surgery, a new study suggests. Philadelphia InquirerIn a small, retrospective study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that 8 percent of heart patients who did not wait to have teeth pulled suffered major adverse health outcomes, such as a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or death.

Circulation: The Philadelphia Inquirer has a daily circulation of more than 350,000 readers. Philadelphia Inquirer - Online has more than 1.7 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional coverage: Winnipeg Free PressNewsMedical.NetNew Jersey HeraldMyFoxTampaBayHealthYahoo!.netUPI.comKEYC (Mankato)Tech Times, State ColumnMedical ResearchYahoo! Health, NIH Medline Plus, MSN.com, ScienceDaily, CBSAtlanta.com, WDAM.com (Mississippi), KNOE.com (Louisiana), MyFoxDFW (Dallas based in Las Vegas), MyFoxNewYork, HawaiiNewsNow 

Previous Coverage in Feb. 28, 2014 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: To pull or not to pull? That is a common question when patients have the potentially dangerous combination of abscessed or infected teeth and the need for heart surgery.  In such cases, problem teeth often are removed before surgery, to reduce the risk of infections including endocarditis, an infection of the inner lining of the heart that can prove deadly.  But Mayo Clinic research suggests it may not be as simple as pulling teeth: The study found that roughly 1 in 10 heart surgery patients who had troublesome teeth extracted before surgery died or had adverse outcomes such as a stroke or kidney failure. The findings are published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Pulling Problem Teeth Before Heart Surgery to Prevent Infection May Be Catch-22

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

FOX9
INVESTIGATORS: Radiation and records

…Former Airman Nathan Edward Morris must run a medical drill once every four months. Blood is drawn, an MRI is taken and the oncologist My Fox KMSP TCwill read the results Morris believes can be linked back to what might be called friendly fire from 11 years ago…Morris's tumor is so invasive that only a surgeon at the Mayo Clinic was willing to operate on it last July…Doctors believe they were able to cut most of the cancer out…Morris finds himself back at Mayo Clinic so often. The system of sashaying patients from appointment to appointment is incredibly slick and is specifically designed so the sick don't have to wait for days to get results -- but every minute spent waiting is one that makes Morris "nervous."

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes. FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m.

Follow-up story: FOX9, Airman gets brain tumor resolution

Context: Nathan Morris is a patient of Mayo Clinic oncologist and neurologist Derek Johnson, M.D.  Dr. Johnson's research is part of Mayo's Neuro-Oncology Program. The goal of the Neuro-Oncology Program of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is to identify prevention and treatment strategies that improve the survival and quality of life for patients with primary brain tumors.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

 

KTTC
Small business start-ups finding success in Rochester
by Devin Bartolotta

The Rochester Area Economic Development, Inc. (RAEDI) held its annual meeting Thursday. It was all about the future of Rochester. "Growing the companies that are from here and want to stay here, you have the opportunity to create a new legacy," said Peter Barth, keynote speaker atKTTC today's meeting…"I think it's going to be a really positive change. Rochester, until now, has been dominated by a single industry or maybe two. And I think having these small satellite industries build up around Mayo Clinic will be really healthy," said Dr. Russell.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: RAEDI's primary goal is to attract, retain and assist the growth/expansion of base business within the Rochester Area. Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides infrastructure that enables entrepreneurism for the Rochester community.   Founded by RAEDI, City of Rochester, Mayo Clinic Treasury Services and Mayo Clinic Ventures, the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator provides collaborative space for new companies, venture capital firms and entrepreneurs.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

 

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Tags: : KING 5 Wash., ABC News, acne, advisory board, Aftonbladet, Alice Echo News Journal, All Access, allParenting, Altoona Herald, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, anxiety


January 31st, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Modern Healthcare
Symptoms, diagnosis and a prescription: How we can modernize healthcare in America
by Dr. John Noseworthy

Modern Healthcare

It is a tough time in many ways for our country—and for patients. The slow economy, the rapid growth in our aging population, the rising cost of healthcare and the new healthcare law have come together to make this a time of great change in how healthcare is delivered and paid for in the U.S.

Reach: Modern Healthcare, published by Crain Communications, is a healthcare news weekly that provides hospital executives with healthcare business news. The magazine specifically covers healthcare policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and healthcare from a business perspective. It also publishes a daily e-newsletter titled Modern Healthcare’s Daily Dose. The weekly publication has a circulation of more than 70,000 and its online site receives more than 29,700 unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer,  Karl Oestreich

Reuters
U.S. says results encouraging for healthcare delivery reforms
By David Morgan

The Obama administration on Thursday reported what it called encouraging results from efforts to reduce healthcare costs and improve the quality of care for more than 5 million Medicare beneficiaries under Obamacare. As part of President Barack Obama's healthcare reform law, the Reutersefforts center around more than 360 accountable care organizations (ACOs), which are networks of doctors, hospitals and other providers specially organized to help move Medicare away from traditional fee-for-service medicine..."Today's report reflects important steps. More work is needed to modernize our antiquated Medicare payment system and base payment on evidence-based quality measures and proven patient outcomes," said Dr. John Noseworthy, chief executive of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, which is not part of the government's program.

Reach: Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing newsworld newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal financestock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, videomobile, and interactive television platforms.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

MPR
Mayo Clinic CEO John Noseworthy on the State of the Union

By Tom Crann

Minnesota got a brief shout-out in the State of the Union speech last night when President Obama pointed to the founder of Punch Pizza for the company's minimum wage practices. But Dr. John Noseworthy, President and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, was also at theMPR-News-300x45 address. Noseworthy spoke with MPR News' Tom Crann the State of the Union, the Affordable Care Act and the Mayo Clinic's 150th anniversary.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage: KAALPost-Bulletin, KTTCKIMT, C-SPAN

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Celebrates 150th Year Anniversary
by Ellen Galles

The Mayo Clinic is celebrating 150 years. In that time, the clinic has brought the world dozens of medical breakthroughs like cortisone and the heart-lung machine. But some of the most KSTP-TV Eyewitness News Logimportant medical breakthroughs could be yet to come…Doctors like Anthony Windebank are researching to see if stem cells can be used to regenerate vital organs in patients who have heart disease, kidney disease and Lou Gehrig's Disease.

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Additional Sesquicentennial coverage: Post-BulletinKSTP morning show, Politico

Context: On Jan. 27, 1864, English-born Dr. William Worrall Mayo first notified the public about his medical practice in Rochester, Minn., planting the seeds of what would eventually become an international medical organization with more than 59,000 expert physicians, scientists and health care professionals, attracting millions of patients from across the globe.

This year marks 150 years of continuous service to patients, and Mayo Clinic is launching a yearlong recognition that will honor a legacy of medical accomplishments and a model for the future of health care.

Mayo Clinic News Network: Mayo Clinic Commemorates 150th Anniversary in 2014

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Florida Times-Union
Progress for Jacksonville, but big hurdles ahead, quality-of-life report says
by Steve Patterson

…“We see Jacksonville’s potential and have raised our expectations. This community demands to reach a higher standard,” said William Rupp, CEO of Mayo Clinic, who chaired the committeeFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo behind JCCI’s 29th annual progress report.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Aguas Digital.com, Albert Lea Tribune, alcohol, Amber Sherman, Ana Gregg, Anti-VEGF drugs, AP, Assisi Heights, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atlanta storm, Austin Daily Herald, Bemidji Pioneer


January 10th, 2014

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x80

 

 

January 10, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Meet the Press
Obamacare’s Impact: Two Doctors Discuss

Meet the Press

Drs. Delos Cosgrove and John Noseworthy of the Cleveland Clinic and Mayo Clinic discuss the impact of Obamacare.

Reach: NBC's Meet The Press reaches more than 2.6 million total viewers each week.

Additional coverage:  NBC News (Transcript)ABC News (AP)Post-BulletinHealthLeaders Media NewsMaxBusinessWeekRTT NewsKansas City Star (AP)Crain’s Cleveland Business, Minneapolis /St. Paul Business JournalNewsMaxKTTC

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Chris Gade

New York Times
For Sleep Apnea Patients, a Possible Alternative to Masks

by Catherine St. Louis

…The mask is unwieldy and uncomfortable, however; one study found that46 percent to 83 percent of patients with obstructive sleep apnea do not wear it diligently. Now scientists may have found an alternative, at least for some patients: a pacemaker-like device NYT bannerimplanted in the chest that stimulates a nerve in the jaw, helping to keep part of the upper airway open…“This is a new paradigm of surgical treatment that seems to effectively control obstructive sleep apnea in selected patients,” said Dr. Sean M. Caples, a sleep specialist in the division of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. “It’s very exciting.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Sean Caples, D.O., is a Mayo Clinic sleep expert with Mayo's Sleep Medicine Center and a specialist in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine.

Public Affairs Context: Alyson Gonzalez

NY Times
High-Dose Vitamin E Slows Decline of Some Alzheimer's Patients in Study
by Pam Belluck

Does vitamin E help people with Alzheimer’s disease? For years, scientists have been trying to find out, guessing that the vitamin’s antioxidant properties might be beneficiaNYTl. But the results from clinical trials have been mixed and — following a report that high doses of vitamin E may increase the risk of death — cautionary…But other studies have found that vitamin E failed to delay dementia in people without symptoms or with mild cognitive impairment, which may precede Alzheimer’s. “It was dead stone cold in the M.C.I. trial,” said the leader of that study, Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s center. “You couldn’t have found a closer match to placebo.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: APArab NewsFOX News LatinoVoice of RussiaChicago TribuneReutersStar TribuneSouth China Morning Post

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Traci Klein

MPR
What's a sign of heart attack? Anything

Former Mayor R.T. Rybak was in obvious good health when he suffered a serious heart attack last weekend. If someone as seemingly fit as Rybak could be vulnerable, who is safe? We asked two Mayo cardiologists fMPR-News-300x45or perspective on heart disease…Dr. Charanjit (Chet) Rihal: Interventional cardiologist at Mayo Clinic and chairman of Mayo's Cardiovascular Division; Dr. Sharonne Hayes: Cardiologist at Mayo Clinic and the founder of Mayo's Women's Heart Clinic.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

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Tags: 2014 Diversity Champions, A.L.S., Abba Zubair, ABC News, ABC NEWS (AP), ABC Radio News, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Amit Sood, Antonita Slaughter, AP, Arab News


April 1st, 2013

Himalaya, India’s booming herbal healthcare company

By loganlafferty

Its raw materials are plants and it bases its products on texts dating back millennia, but don't dare call India's biggest herbal healthcare group a maker of "alternative medicine"…Jon Tilburt, an expert on modern Western and traditional medicine at the Mayo Clinic healthcare group in the United States, says he understands why Himalaya rejects the "alternative" label. "There are plenty of herbal companies and all of them in some ways would like to have the esteem of a pharmaceutical company but then none of them wants the regulatory burden," he told AFP. "They really want their own category of a sort of executive club for herbal players."

 

Yahoo! News (AFP) by Adam Plowright

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Tags: alternative medicine, Dr. Jon Tilburt, herbal healthcare, India, raw materials, Yahoo! News


February 1st, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich


February 1, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

FORTUNE
Social media superstars
The Mayo Clinic started the Center for Social Media in July 2010, unofficially becoming the global face of social media for the healthcare industry. Since its creation, the center has accumulated more than 140 member organizations worldwide. The group offers hospitals, medical professionals, and patients a platform to discuss the role of social media in the medical community. In October, Mayo Clinic released its first book on the subject, "Bringing the Social Media #Revolution to Health Care."

Circulation: FORTUNE has a circulation of more than 845,000 readers.

Additional Coverage: KPHO-Phoenix, Post-Bulletin, WCCO, Star Tribune

Context: Mayo Clinic ranks 41st on the 16th "Best Companies to Work For" list, up from 71st in 2012.  This is Mayo's 10th consecutive year on the magazine's annual compilation of companies that rate high with employees.  

News Release:
Mayo Clinic Named to Fortune's "100 Best Companies to Work For" List

Public Affairs Contact: Alyson Fleming 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic lays out $6 billion package of improvements for Rochester

by Jackie Crosby

The Mayo Clinic laid out plans Wednesday for an ambitious $6 billion, 20-year initiative that would support its effort to turn its Rochester-based hospital complex into one of the world's top medical centers…"While Mayo Clinic is also evaluating plans for additional expansion outside Minnesota in future years, we believe Rochester can and should remain Mayo's global headquarters and a premier destination for medical care well into the future, assuming we can attract the additional private business investments and finance the necessary public infrastructure needed to support an expansion of this scale," said Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy in a statement.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Pioneer Press
Mayo Clinic lays out $6 billion development plan
by Christopher Snowbeck

The Mayo Clinic is seeking more than $500 million in state support for economic development projects in the medical center's hometown of Rochester -- a deal that clinic officials say would guarantee the world-famous clinic stays and grows in Minnesota. At a news conference Wednesday, Jan. 30, at the state Capitol, Mayo officials said they would spend about $3.5 billion on clinic-financed capital investments over the next 20 years to help ensure that the medical center continues to draw patients from around the world. And, they said, an additional $2.1 billion in private investment could come through spinoff developments, such as research labs for companies that serve Mayo. The Mayo Clinic wants to grow so it can hold off competitors and stand as one of just two or three global destination medical centers, said Dr. John Noseworthy, the clinic's chief executive officer.

Related Story:
Pioneer Press
Mayo Clinic pitch has supporters, skeptics lining up

Circulation: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of 226,108 and its Sunday newspaper circulation is 270,811. Its TwinCities.com website had approximately 18.6 million page views (March 2011) and the Pioneer Press and TwinCities.com reaches about 3.3 million people each month.

WCCO
Rochester Reacts To Mayo Clinic Expansion News
by Jamie Yuccas

A little more than 100,000 people live in Rochester – but how is the city reacting to the news of a possible influx of 30,000 new Mayo Clinic employees?... “If one thing starts thriving downtown, then everything starts thriving,” said one of Chester’s patrons. Many are also excited for new housing options, restaurants and art shops for their families.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts. WCCO 4 News is #1 in 5 out of the 7 newscasts for all viewers in the 25-54 age range and WCCO 4 News is #1 in 7 out of 7 newscasts for female viewers in the 25-54 age range.

MPR
Mayo Clinic seeking state help for major Rochester expansion
by Tom Scheck, Minnesota Public Radio

ST. PAUL, Minn. — The Mayo Clinic has proposed a $5 billion investment in Rochester and surrounding communities designed to make the region a "Destination Medical Center" and create up to 45,000 jobs statewide. The plan calls for $3.5 billion in capital investments at its Rochester campus over the next 20 years. Mayo Clinic officials also say they expect an estimated $2.1 billion in additional private investment.

MPR
Mayo Clinic's 'destination medical center' needs taxpayer help
by Elizabeth Baier, Minnesota Public Radio

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The Mayo Clinic and the city of Rochester are in the midst of a construction boom, with cranes marking the downtown skyline and three multi-million dollar expansions under way on the Rochester campus.

MPR
Head of Mayo Clinic describes plans for 'destination medical center'
by Tom Crann, Minnesota Public Radio

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Mayo Clinic announced plans today to invest $5 billion over 20 years in Rochester and surrounding communities to build what it describes as a "destination medical center." The Rochester-based health care provider is also seeking more than $500 million in state funding to develop the area's infrastructure. Mayo Clinic president and CEO John Noseworthy announced the plan alongside Gov. Mark Dayton on Wednesday at the state Capitol. MPR's Tom Crann interviewed Noseworthy soon after the announcement.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

KMSP
Mayo Clinic announces $3B investment in Minn. health care
by Shelby Capacio

Saying they intend to position Minnesota as a world destination for health care services , Mayo Clinic announced Wednesday it would invest more than $3 billion in what will become the state's largest economic development project.

KMSP
Can $5B make Rochester a fun place to live?
by Bill Keller

ROCHESTER, Minn. (KMSP) - The world-renowned Mayo Clinic draws patients from 130 countries, and it's a trend they hope will continue as they invest billions in expanding their campus -- but they want Rochester to expand too. With the $5-billion investment announced, one of the hopes is that a more vibrant city will give people another reason to visit Rochester

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes.  FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m.

Post Bulletin
Mayo Clinic looks to state to help back $6 billion growth plan
by Heather J. Carlson

ST. PAUL — Mayo Clinic leaders joined Gov. Mark Dayton Wednesday at the state Capitol to unveil a $5 billion economic development initiative aimed at ensuring the clinic remains a top global destination for health care. “We want to defend our turf. That’s what this basically boils down to,” said Mayo Clinic President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, in an interview prior to the announcement in the governor's reception room.

Related Post Bulletin Story:
City, business officials: Mayo Clinic proposal good for Rochester
By Eddie Grossfield

With $5.5 billion in private sector investment over the next 20 years, including Mayo Clinic's $3.5 billion to expand its Rochester campus, the proposed Destination Medical Center legislation calls for another $585 million in public investment from the state and local governments.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage: Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal, Star Tribune, KSTC, ModernHealthcare, KTTC, KAAL, Valley News Live (ND), WDAZ (ND), St. Cloud Times, HealthNewsDigest, Pittsburg Post-Gazette, MPR, Post Bulletin, Palm Beach Post, San Francisco ChronicleKAAL, News Tribune (WA), Finance & Commerce, MinnPost, MPR, Becker’s Hospital Review, Sioux Falls Argus Leader, The Advisory Board CompanyKAAL, KAAL, WJXT, KTTCYahoo! News (AP)

Context: This week, Mayo Clinic announced Destination Medical Center (DMC), a $5 billion economic development initiative to secure Minnesota's status as a global medical destination center now and in the future. The goal of DMC is to ensure that Minnesota and Mayo Clinic are destinations for medical care in the coming decades. This initiative is the culmination of a three-year study by Mayo Clinic to chart its future business strategy in an increasingly complex, competitive and global business environment.

News Release: Mayo Clinic to Invest More than $3 Billion to Position Minn. as World Destination for Health Care

Destination Medical Center Website

DMC Media Kit

Frequently Asked Questions About DMC

Public Affairs Contacts: Karl Oestreich, Nick Hanson, Traci Klein

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Tags: Becker’s Hospital Review, Best Places to Work, destination medical community, DMC, Dr. John Noseworthy, Fortune Magazine, HealthNewsDigest, http://www.dmc.mn/, KAAL, KMSP, KPHO-Phoenix, KSTC