Items Tagged ‘Yahoo! News’

July 29th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik

 

Washington Post
Complex jobs and social ties appear to help ward off Alzheimer’s, new research shows
by Tara Bahrampour

The studies support previous findings that more stimulating lifestyles are associated with better cognitive outcomes later in life, and bolster the importance of intellectual engagement, said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center. “Physical activity has been reasonably well-documented, but with intellectual activity the data get pretty soft…these two studies speakWashington Post newspaper logo to that,” he said. “What it may mean is the development of Alzheimer’s Disease or cognitive change with aging need not be a passive process; you can do something about it…staying intellectually active whether it be your job or other kinds of activities may actually be beneficial.”

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: NBC News

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

CBS News
Memory loss is not necessarily the first sign of dementia
by Ruslan Guzov

Memory loss may not always be the first warning sign that dementia is brewing -- changes in behavior or personality might be an early clue…"It's important for us to recognize that not everything's forgetfulness," CBS News Logosaid Dr. Ron Petersen, the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research chief. He wasn't involved in developing the behavior checklist but said it could raise awareness of the neuropsychiatric link with dementia.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Additional coverage: Associated Press

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

 

Washington Post
Men may get Alzheimer’s as much as women; we just haven’t known how to spot it
by Tara Bahrampour

Looking at the State of Florida’s brain bank, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found Alzheimer’s in 1,625 of 2,809 people who had donated their brains for autopsies. The donors were almost equally divided: 51 percent men and 49 percent women. But contrary to what has been seen in the general population, the Alzheimer’s cases in the brain bank were much more evenly divided: 54 percent of cases were women and 46Washington Post newspaper logo percent were men… It is hard to diagnose the disease in people under 70, according to Melissa Murray, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic’s department of neuroscience, who presented the study. “If you don’t know what the disease is then you can’t give even the modicum of treatment that we have available,” Murray said, noting that symptoms in men are often mistaken for cortico-basal syndrome, frontotemporal dementia, or other conditions.

Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage:

CBS News, 1 in 5 Alzheimer's cases may be misdiagnosed

Florida Times-Union, Mayo clinic study finds mens Alzheimer' misdiagnosed more often than women

ABC News, HealthDay, Neurology Today, Telegraph UK, Express UK, Daily MailActionNewsJax

Context: Mayo neuroscientist Melissa E. Murray, Ph.D., led the study, which suggests a high number of men are not accurately diagnosed during their lifetime. The Alzheimer’s Association issued a news release today about the research findings, which Dr. Murray is presenting at the 2016 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. “While it is well accepted that age is the strongest risk factor for Alzheimer’s, there is an enormous need to understand interacting factors that contribute to the development of the disease,” says Dr. Murray, assistant professor of Neuroscience on Mayo’s Jacksonville campus. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Star Tribune (Associated Press)
Behavior changes offer clues that dementia could be brewing
by Lauran Neergaard

If validated, the checklist could help doctors better identify people at risk of brewing Alzheimer's and study changes over time. "It's important for us to recognize that not everything's forgetfulness," said Dr. Ron Star Tribune LogoPetersen, the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's research chief. He wasn't involved in developing the behavior checklist but said it could raise awareness of the neuropsychiatric link with dementia.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage: Chicago Daily Herald, Post-Bulletin, Kansas City Star

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber LindquistDuska Anastasijevic

 

STAT
Promising Alzheimer’s treatment flops in new trial, crushing hopes
by Damian Garde

A closely watched treatment for Alzheimer’s disease came up short in a late-stage trial, marking the latest setback in a field wracked by years of failure. The drug, from biotech company TauRx, did no better than a sugar pill at improving patients’ scores on tests of cognitive and physical function, according to data presented early Wednesday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. The studySTAT Logo of Boston Globe looked at roughly 900 patients with mild to moderate forms of Alzheimer’s. “I must say I’m disappointed by the results,” said Dr. David Knopman, a Mayo Clinic neurologist not involved with the study.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage:

CNN, Does it pass the 'smell test'? Seeking ways to diagnose Alzheimer's early

Reuters, TauRx Alzheimer's drug fails in large study; some benefit seen

New York Times, USA Today, MedPage TodayFOX News, Huffington Post, NBC News

Contacts: Susan Barber LindquistDuska Anastasijevic

 

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic researcher wins international award
by Brett Boese

A Mayo Clinic scientist received a prestigious international award Monday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference that's being hosted in Canada. Dr. Guojun Bu, a neuroscientist at Mayo's Florida Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapercampus, received the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer's Disease, which is given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. Bu and his research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles on Alzheimer's over the past 20 years that have been cited more than 10,000 times. That work is widely recognized as being some of the most significant in the field.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context:  Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a neuroscientist onMayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease ─ one of the most prestigious awards given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. The award was presented to Dr. Bu today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. Over the past 20 years, Dr. Bu and his medical research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles that have been cited more than 10,000 times. Colleagues and other Alzheimer’s researchers say his team’s contributions to Alzheimer’s research rank among the most significant in the field. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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Tags: "liquid biopsies", 9&10 News (Michigan), Abby Bartz, ABC News, ActionNewsJax, Adult coloring, Allie Wergin, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers, Amber Kohnhorst, Andra Palmer, Anesthesiology News


April 29th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

 

Huffington Post
Melanoma Really Does Suck
by Brigitte Cutshall

Jimmy Carter is lucky. He was treated here in Atlanta at Emory for melanoma that had spread to his brain and was eligible to be involved with a new immunotherapy drug. My friend Rene is not so lucky. She’s been dealing with melanoma (multiple lesions) in the brain for about 18 months. The Mayo Clinic has been a great support to her and her family.HuffPost Healthy Living

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Other Mayo-related coverage in Huffington Post:

Huffington Post — 9 Superfoods You Should be Eating With Hypothyroidism

Huffington Post — 8 Seemingly Innocent Things That Are Sabotaging Your Sleep, Big Time

Huffington Post — 4 All-Natural Seasonal Allergy Remedies And One Big Myth

Huffington Post, 10 Things That Happen to Your Body When You Walk

Context: Melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, develops in the cells (melanocytes) that produce melanin — the pigment that gives your skin its color. Melanoma can also form in your eyes and, rarely, in internal organs, such as your intestines. The exact cause of all melanomas isn't clear, but exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight or tanning lamps and beds increases your risk of developing melanoma. Limiting your exposure to UV radiation can help reduce your risk of melanoma. At Mayo Clinic, dermatologists,oncologists, pediatric oncologists, pathologists,general surgeons, and plastic and reconstructive surgeons form a multidisciplinary team to provide whole-person care for those with melanoma. 

Contacts: Rhoda Fukushima Madson, Joe Dangor

 

HealthLeaders Media
3 Hospitals Wooing Patients with Virtual Tours
by Marianne Aiello

Mayo Clinic created its Periscope account in June 2015 with the goal of using it to stream behind-the-scenes tours, educational discussions with Mayo specialists, and live events. In July, it broadcast a 22-minute HealthLeadersguided tour of its Rochester, MN campus that showed off facilities and shared facts about the health system's history. "Mayo Clinic has patients from every U.S. state and over 140 countries every year, and we saw the opportunity to help those considering Mayo Clinic get a preview of what they can expect when they come here," Lee Aase, director of Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, told HealthLeaders in July.

Reach:  HealthLeaders Media has more than 40,000 readers each month and is targeted to senior executives with leading hospitals, health systems, health plans, physician organizations, and allied and ancillary service providers and provides in-depth, informed reports on the nation's most innovative and entrepreneurial healthcare service organizations across the continuum of care.

Context: You can find a virtual tour of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., on Mayo's YouTube Channel. Other virtual Mayo tours can be accessed on Mayo's Periscope page.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Wall Street Journal
New Tools Help Patients Make Tough Decisions In the ER
by Laura Landro

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is developing several such aids, including one for patients with low-risk chest pain. Dr. Hess and his team developed a decision aid, Chest PainWSJ Banner Choice, that includes information on the diagnosis, displays a patient’s 45-day risk of a heart attack and options for care. These include admission to an observation unit for tests, follow-up with a heart doctor within 24 to 72 hours—or letting the ER doctor make the decision. “Our goal is not to put the decisions in patient’s laps so they feel abandoned, but to involve them in the decision process to the degree they wish,” Dr. Hess says.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional video coverage: WSJ interview with Dr. Hess

Other Mayo-related coverage in The Wall Street Journal:

Wall Street Journal — Telemedicine Advocates Look to Expand Nursing Licenses’ Range

Wall Street Journal — Clues to a Family’s Heart Disease

Context:  Patients who arrive at the emergency department with low-risk chest pain and talk through treatment options with a physician show improved knowledge of their health status and follow-up options, compared with patients who received standard counseling from a physician, according to Mayo Clinic research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 65th Annual Scientific Session. Chest pain accounts for about 8 million emergency department visits each year in the U.S., but more than 90 percent of those patients are not experiencing a heart attack, says Erik Hess, M.D., lead author and emergency medicine physician at Mayo Clinic. “An electrocardiogram and blood tests can tell us if a patient is having a heart attack. Further testing may be needed to tell us if a patient faces an increased risk of heart attack in the near future. We wanted to know if there is value in discussing this further testing with patients.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Elizabeth Zimmerman Young

 

C-SPAN
Health Care in the U.S.

Dr. John Noseworthy talks about trends in health care and how the Affordable Care Act is affecting U.S. hospitals.

C-SpanReach: C-Span's Washington Journal focuses on the day's top Washington, D.C. public affairs stories. Some topics covered on the program include campaign finance, energy prices, and special interest groups. Washington Journal is watched predominantly by adults over 35 years old interested in public affairs.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

HealthDay
Nipple-Preserving Mastectomies Appear Safe for High-Risk Women: Study

"Nipple-sparing mastectomy is gaining wide acceptance because of its superior cosmetic results, but pockets of the medical community remain skeptical that it is the right choice for the BRCA population," said study lead author Dr. James Jakub, a breast surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Other coverage:

Medscape — More Proof: Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy Safe for BRCA Carriers

Health Day Logo

Context: Protective mastectomies that preserve the nipple and surrounding skin prevent breast cancer as effectively as more invasive surgeries for women with a genetic mutation calledBRCA that raises their risk of developing breast cancer, a multi-institution study led by Mayo Clinic found. The research should reassure patients and surgeons that nipple-sparing mastectomies, which leave women with more natural-looking breasts than other mastectomies, are a safe way to reduce breast cancer risk in BRCA carriers, the authors say. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Breast Surgeons in Dallas. “Nipple-sparing mastectomy is gaining wide acceptance because of its superior cosmetic results, but pockets of the medical community remain skeptical that it is the right choice for the BRCA population,” says study lead author James Jakub, M.D., abreast surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “This is the largest study of its kind to address the controversy, and to show that nipple-sparing mastectomy is as effective at preventing breast cancer as traditional mastectomy.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo Clinic Ventures Firm Explores Commercialization Of Gut Microbe Treatment
by Don Jacobson

Despite the presence of 100 trillion bacteria and other microorganisms that make up the human microbiome, how or even whether they may have a role to play in combatting a litany of maladies has never really Twin Cities Business Magazine Logobeen seriously considered. But that is quickly changing as the Mayo Clinic and the pharmaceutical industry continue a pattern of ever-bigger venture capital investments into a growing coterie of biotech companies at the cutting edge of microbiome research, which some are actually calling the next big thing in biotech. One such company is San Francisco-based Second Genome, which first became a Mayo Clinic Ventures portfolio company in 2014 as part of a clinical research collaboration. Last week, it was announced Mayo extended its venture stake in Second Genome as part of a $42.6 million Series B financing round led by Big Pharma giants Pfizer and Roche.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: Second Genome, Inc., a leader in the development of novel medicines through innovative microbiome science, entered into an extensive partnership with the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine in 2014 to support the development of therapeutic products for multiple disease indications, starting with inflammatory bowel disease, metabolic disorders, and colorectal cancer. "The microbiome is an important area of medical research for Mayo Clinic, and this collaboration represents a broad and significant effort in our attempt to develop therapeutics targeting microbiome-mediated pathways," says Heidi Nelson, M.D., director of the Microbiome Program in the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine. "We believe that Second Genome's drug discovery capability complements our clinical expertise, and our hope is that together we can develop new treatment approaches for patients across a wide range of diseases with significant unmet clinical need. The ultimate goal is to improve the lives of patients."

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

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Tags: “Assume positive intent”, AARP.org, advance care planning, Allergy Remedies, alzheimer's disease, Amber Gerber, anti-inflammatory benefits of honey, Astra Zeneca, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, Benzinga, Berg’s Phase II study, brain aneurysm


April 22nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Florida Times-Union
Renowned neurosurgeon recruited by Mayo Clinic
by Charlie Patton

Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, a brilliant neurosurgeon with a fascinating personal story, has been hired as the William J. and Charles H. Mayo Professor and chair of Neurologic Surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. “I think by any measure this is aFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo remarkably accomplished surgeon,” said Gianrico Farrugia, CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. “Any place in the world would be pleased to have him coming ... It’s a real coup to have him coming to Florida. I think he will have a remarkable impact on Jacksonville”. His recruitment is part of a strategy that Mayo in Jacksonville has been pursing for the last 15 months of increasing its status as a destination medical center for the Southeast United States and Latin America, Farrugia said.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, will join Mayo Clinic as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus in September, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Florida Times Union
Mayo Clinic researcher honored with prestigious award
by Charlie Patton

In 2011, Rademakers’ lab identified a mutation of the C9orf72 gene, which turned out to be the most common cause of both Florida Times-Union newspaper logofrontotemporal dementia and of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often called Lou Gehrig’s disease. Her lab has since discovered several genetic factors that help explain why some people with the mutation develop ALS while others develop frontotemporal dementia and still others develop both.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! News — Two Researchers to Receive $100,000 Potamkin Prize for Dementia Research

Context: Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D., a neurogeneticist on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive one of the highest honors in neuroscience: the 2016 Potamkin Prize for Research in Pick’s, Alzheimer’s and Related Diseases. The $100,000 prize is an internationally recognized tribute for advancing dementia research. It recognizes major contributions to the understanding of the causes, prevention, treatment and cure for Pick's, Alzheimer's and related diseases. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic parasite researcher is ticked off by her work
by Allie Shah

A giant plush-toy tick hovers over Dr. Bobbi Pritt from atop the high-powered microscope at her Mayo Clinic office. She pays it no mind as she examines slides of various parasites, describing each creature in a merry tone of voice. “This one is the head ofStar Tribune Variety Logo
a tapeworm that lives inside your gut,” she chirped. “It basically just gets longer and longer and it kind of just absorbs the food that you’re eating. So you’re eating for two.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Bobbi Pritt, M.D., Mayo Clinic Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, research focus is in clinical parasitology, vector-borne diseases, trainee education and appropriate test utilization. As director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory in Mayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Dr. Pritt has coordinated the development of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for multiple tick and mosquito-borne pathogens such as Plasmodium knowlesi, Borrelia mayonii, Borrelia miyamotoi, Powassan virus and chikungunya virus. She is author of the Parasite Wonders blog where she posts a weekly parasite case.  You can also learn about the ABCs of ticks on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

 

Twin Cities Business
Q&A: How Mayo Is Integrating 3D Printing Into The Operating Room
by Sam Schaust

The emerging technology is revolutionizing the way surgeons tackle complicated operations, and the practice of simulating Twin Cities Business Magazine Logosurgeries with anatomically correct, patient-specific models is becoming a tactic widely adopted by medical professionals at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. Dr. Jonathan “Jay” Morris, a diagnostic and interventional neuroradiologist, and Dr. Jane Matsumoto, a pediatric radiologist, head the organization’s burgeoning 3D printing lab. (They instead call it “the anatomical modeling lab.”)

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: Not all great advances in surgery happen in the operating room. Some are coming off the printer – a 3D printer. At Mayo Clinic, radiologists and surgeons are teaming up to discover every possible detail about complex cases before the operation. In some situations, it means patients experience less pain, shorter hospital stays and quicker recoveries. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Ethan Grove, Dennis Douda

 

Post Bulletin
Mayo Clinic doctor wins award for MS research
by Brett Boese

A Mayo Clinic doctor will be honored this week in Canada for her groundbreaking research on multiple sclerosis. Dr. Claudia Lucchinetti will be given the 2016 John Dystel Prize for MS Research Tuesday at the American Academy of Neurology annualLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper meeting in Vancouver. She'll be given $15,000 for the award, the second time a Mayo doctor has been honored by the group since its inception in 1995.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: Claudia Lucchinetti, M.D., will be awarded the 2016 John Dystel Prize for Multiple Sclerosis Research for her outstanding contributions to understanding and treating multiple sclerosis. Dr. Lucchinetti is one of only a few neurologists in the world with expertise in neuroinflammation, and her research has led to paradigm shifts in our understanding of central nervous system demyelinating diseases over the past two decades. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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Tags: 3D printing lab, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC15's Rally for Red, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's Prevention Registry, amyloid beta production, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), anatomical modeling lab, AOL News, Aol.On


March 19th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

ESPN
Latest studies: Brain disease from contact sports more common
by Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada

Latest studies: Brain disease from contact sports more common. Armed with the new definition, researchers at the Mayo Clinic searched for signs of CTE among thESPN Outside the Linese 7,000 brains that are preserved at the clinic's Jacksonville, Florida, location. Kevin Bieniek, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Mayo Clinic's Department of Neuroscience, initially narrowed the number to a more manageable 1,800 in an effort to limit his sample to people who participated in contact sports. Bieniek then spent months combing through medical records, obituaries and other resources.

Reach: ESPN Outside the Lines is a sports program that focuses on the most significant sports news of the day. The program airs at 1 pm ET each week day and at 9 am ET on Sundays. ESPN averaged 2.1 million viewers in 2015.

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth. About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

US News & World Report
Asians and Obesity: Looks Can Be Deceiving
by Anna Medaris Miller

While only 11 percent of Asian-Americans are obese, they develop obesity-related complications – namely, hypertension and diabetes – at lower BMIs than do people of other backgrounds,
US News Wellness Logoresearch shows… "The educated [Asian] population knows that they're getting diabetes and hypertension and all these things at a much lower BMI, but if you're in a culture where everybody's really fat and you're thin, you tend to go around and think, 'Well, I'm protected,'" says Dr. Michael Jensen, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who studies how body fat, and its distribution, influences health. "But [you] may not be.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includeshttp://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

US News & World Report
What to Eat, Drink and Do to Relieve Constipation
by Michael O. Schroeder

“Exercises help the intestines squeeze and relax and act more normally,” says Dr. Amy Foxx-Orenstein, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona.  For those with limited mobility, she adds, Pilates done lying on the floor or tai chi can alsoUS News Wellness Logo assist in stimulating blood flow and intestinal activity, which may help get things going.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Finance Canada

Context: Amy Foxx-Orienstein, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

The Boston Globe
A new antidote to aging
by Kevin Hartnett

In a sense, your body is a junkyard, slowly filling up with defective cells that clutter your vital organs. The accumulation of Boston Globe Logothese cells—known as senescent cells—has long been thought to be an important reason why people deteriorate physically as they age. “The removal of cells had the same effect as not accumulating senescent cells to begin with,” says Jan van Deursen, a researcher at the Mayo Clinic and coauthor of the paper. “It had profound beneficial effects.”

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Related coverage: MoneyLife, BCIndian.com

Previous coverage in Feb. 5, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells – cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age – negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects. “Cellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‘emergency brake’ used by damaged cells to stop dividing,” says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. “While halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‘emergency brake’ has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic, Boston Scientific team up to develop devices
By Joe Carlson

Passing a wire through a diseased heart valve is a bit like threading a wet noodle into a garden hose while the tap water is flowing. Passing a wire across a heavily calcified heart valve is the first step in many modern procedures to repair or replace it.Star Tribune newspaper logo But threading it through the jet of blood streaming out of the patient's narrowed valve can be a major technical challenge, especially since knocking bits of built-up calcium can trigger serious health problems. Doctors at Mayo Clinic recently had an idea: What if they could aim the wire at the valve using a special catheter with a small funnel on the end to capture the blood flow and center the gadget right above the jet? That idea will be put to use in a human clinical trial later this year as part of a collaboration between Mayo and Boston Scientific Corp. — a long-running collaboration being publicly unveiled Wednesday morning.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
Boston Business Journal — Boston Scientific to speed up research thanks to suspension of device tax

HIT ConsultantMedical Physics Web, Post Bulletin, KTTC, Twin Cities Business, Star Tribune, MedCity News

Context: Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) and Mayo Clinic announced this week a continuing collaboration where the two organizations share intellectual property and stimulate the rapid development of medical devices to address unmet clinical needs. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

KTTC-TV
Mayo Clinic to open a nanotechnology lab on Jacksonville, FL campus; will enhance cancer research efforts by Frannie Smith

Mayo Clinic is expanding its cancer research efforts with the opening of a nanotechnology lab at the Florida campus. Mayo KTTC TV logoClinic's location in Jacksonville, Florida has been given a $2 million grant from the state to open up the lab. The lab is a key part of Mayo's nanomedicine program.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: With support from the state of Florida, Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has opened a state-of-the-art laboratory for nanotechnology research, an emerging field of science that studies and applies materials that are the size of an atom. The laboratory is a key part of Mayo Clinic’s new Translational Nanomedicine Program. The goal is to develop, test and apply tiny materials in diagnosing and treating patients, particularly those with cancer. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

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March 11th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

International Business Times
Betting On Cancer: Phoenix Aims To Become Oncology Destination As More Cities Look To Biotech For Growth
by Elizabeth Whitman

A transformation has taken place in the Phoenix area over the past decade as oncology centers and research institutions have merged, expanded and reconfigured their operations….“We’ve said, ‘Hey, we’re good at cancer. We’re going to do more,’” saidInternational Business Times Logo Dr. Wyatt Decker, the CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Arizona as well as an emergency room physician. More than 20 percent of the clinic’s patients come from out of state, drawn by the Mayo brand's reputation and the perks of the temperate, picturesque desertscape of the Valley of the Sun. In 2010, the clinic generated a positive annual economic impact of more than $1.5 billion, the Mayo Clinic has calculated, and Decker estimated that amount has grown by 30 to 50 percent since then.

Reach:  The International Business Times has more than 1.6 million unique visitors to its website each month. International Business Times is a digital global news publication that provides comprehensive coverage and analysis of business, economic, political and technological issues around the world. It reaches over 55 million people every month in seven global editions and four different languages.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota in 2015 and in Arizona in mid March 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

International Business Times
Obesity In America: As Healthcare Costs Rise, Hospitals Weigh New Ways Of Caring For Larger Patients
by Elizabeth Whitman

“It’s those little things that add up,” said Robert Cima, a colorectal surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Many International Business Times Logohospitals have neither the equipment nor the resources to move their patients efficiently, he said, even though they long ago began buying parallel sets of surgical equipment for operating on larger patients. Now, “the real issue is caring for them on the floor. That cost is huge, relative to the operating room,” Cima said.

Reach:  The International Business Times has more than 1.6 million unique visitors to its website each month. International Business Times is a digital global news publication that provides comprehensive coverage and analysis of business, economic, political and technological issues around the world. It reaches over 55 million people every month in seven global editions and four different languages.

Context: Robert Cima, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic colorectal surgeon. Mayo Clinic surgeons helped develop minimally invasive (laparoscopic) colon and rectal surgery and use these techniques on almost all surgeries. Laparoscopic procedures use smaller incisions than conventional surgery, which decreases bleeding, lessens pain and shortens both expected hospital stays and overall recovery times. They are also skilled in robotic surgery, a specialized form of laparoscopic surgery, and ileoanal anastomosis surgery that avoids the need for a permanent colostomy.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

 

Los Angeles Times
As measures of health, fitness and fatness matter more than weight
by Melissa Healy

The new studies suggest that these caveats about BMI are especially true for people as they age beyond their 50s and enter seniority, said Mayo Clinic cardiologist Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, who researches obesity's health effects. In the CanadianLos Angeles Times Logo study and others that have raised what's called "the obesity paradox," Lopez-Jimenez said it's possible that older people who carry a few extra pounds are protected by having a reserve of excess weight they can afford to lose during an illness.

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez studies obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up.

Contacts: Joe Dangor, Traci Klein

 

Huffington Post
Why The Fat You Can See Isn’t The Fat You Should Worry About
by Erin Schumaker

In reality, the area of your body where you store your fat may be a better predictor of health -- regardless of your body mass index. "All fat is not the same," said Dr. Virend Somers, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Fat directly under the skin -- the stuff we can see -- isn't necessarily harmfuHuffPost Healthy Livingl.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Virend Somers, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic physician with joint appointments in cardivascular diseases and nephrology and hypertension. Dr. Somers directs the Cardiovascular Facility and the Sleep Facility within Mayo Clinic's Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CBS News
Can drinking lots of coffee lower risk for MS?
by Mary Brophy Marcus

In this case, a new study in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry suggests being a java drinker may lower the risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). Dr. Mark Keegan, professor of neurology and chair of the division of multiple sclerosis at theCBS News Logo Mayo Clinic, said, "They show some observational evidence that in two separate populations high amounts of coffee intake was associated with a reduction in the risk of MS," but he also cautioned that observational studies don't equal medical advice.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context: B. Mark Keegan, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Keegan is involved in clinical and translational research in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and other related inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo sees big potential for small MRI machine
by Brett Boese

After nearly nine years of planning, Mayo Clinic researchers are just weeks away from collecting data on a $5.7 million Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapercompact 3T MRI scanner on its Rochester campus. Lead researchers John Huston III, a neuroradiologist, and Matt Bernstein, a medical physicist, are optimistic that their targeted work on the brain will improve patient diagnoses and outcomes, particularly involving strokes, Alzheimer's, tumors and high-impact injuries such as concussions.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: The reality of magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, machines is one of great size — both in price and physical space. This, then, restricts access to needed medical screenings. But what if you could shrink both and still produce high-quality MR images? Mayo Clinic researchers, in a partnership with GE and funding through a National Institutes of Health grant, are hoping to answer that question, and many others, now that a new, one-of-a-kind compact 3-Tesla MRI scanner is in place at the Department of Radiology research labs. More information about the new MRI scanner can be found on Discovery's Edge, Mayo Clinic's research magazine.

Contact: Ethan Grove

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February 19th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

New York Times
Ask Well: Are Pomegranates Good For You?
By Roni Caryn Rabin

Pomegranates are rich in micronutrients with potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and are often compared favorably with red wine and green tea in terms of health benefits. But there’s little good evidence that the level of nutrientsNew York Times Well Blog Logo found in the fruit translates into true gains for human health, said Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic’s complementary and integrative medicine program, because few clinical trials have been done. “There’s a suggestion pomegranate can do a lot of things,” Dr. Bauer said. “The trouble is there’s very limited data.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context:  Brent Bauer, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine physician who is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. As director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

ABC News
Loss for words can be a rare brain disorder, not Alzheimer's
by Lauran Neergaard

A mysterious brain disorder can be confused with early Alzheimer's disease although it isn't robbing patients of their memories ABC News logobut of the words to talk about them…Speech and language are hugely complex. Just to speak requires activating 100 muscles between the lungs and lips to produce at least 14 distinct sounds per second, said Dr. Joseph Duffy of the Mayo Clinic.

Context: New ways to diagnose and treat individuals who cannot speak, hear, or process language might not just ensure the right care—early intervention could also help treat or avoid other related disorders, according to findings presented by researchers at the AAAS Annual meeting recently.  Joseph Duffy, M.D., a Mayo clinic speech pathologist, is studying links between a particular speech disorder and other neurodegenerative problems.

Additional coverage:
The New York Times online, Star Tribune, Times of India, , Dajiworld.com, Business Standard, The Western Star, Yahoo! Maktoob News, The Economic Times, South China Morning PostDaily Mail, Yahoo! News Canada, Deccan Chronicle, The China Post, The Jordan Times

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

FOX News
Innovative treatment holds promise for new approach to Alzheimer's treatment

In decades of research, scientists have focused on eliminating the signature plaques of Alzheimer’s to fight the devastating disease…“TheFox News Health Logo field is taking a step back and re-examining where we are with regard to what we know, what we don’t know and what might be some of the best avenues going forward to look for treatments,” Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, who is not involved in the LM11A-31 research, told Time.

Reach:  Fox News is available to 102 million households in the United States and further to viewers internationally. Fox News Channel Online has more than 22.9 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Arizona Horizon (PBS)
Proton Beam Therapy interview with Dr. Sameer Keole

Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Arizona PBSMayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix will soon open its proton beam center to treat cancer. In properly selected patients proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program is unique, using pencil beam scanning, which allows closer targeting of a tumor. Dr. Sameer Keole (key-olee), the medical director of the Mayo Clinic Proton Beam Center in Arizona, will tell us more.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent of the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Additional coverage: KWGN-TVKFAB-Radio

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota in 2015 and in Arizona in by mid March 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

New York Times
New Culprit in Lyme Disease
by Karen Weintraub

Mosquitoes may be receiving all the attention amid the Zika virus epidemic, but they are hardly the only disease vectors to worry about. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., have discovered a new species of tick-borne bacteria thatThe New York Times newspaper logo causes Lyme disease… Dr. Bobbi Pritt, the medical director of the microbiology laboratory at the Mayo Clinic, where the new strain was first detected, recommended that patients with exposure to ticks in Minnesota and Wisconsin receive antibody and polymerase chain reaction testing to detect B. mayonii if they are concerned about Lyme infection but do not have the telltale bull’s-eye rash.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage: Scientific American, Outbreak News Today, Paul Pioneer Press, Yahoo! News, Business Insider UK

Previous coverage in February 12, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and health officials from Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin, have discovered a new bacterial species that causes Lyme disease in people. The new species has been provisionally named Borrelia mayonii. Prior to this finding, the only species believed to cause Lyme disease in North America was Borrelia burgdorferi. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

 

Florida Times-Union
26.2 With Donna marathon winner runs the race of his life for his wife
By Clayton Freeman

Marc Burget dashed down the finishing straight at Sunday’s 26.2 With Donna marathon, broke the tape at the line and immediately looked to his right...The 42-year-old Burget dedicated Florida Times-Union newspaper logohis win to wife Christina, who was diagnosed with breast cancer on Jan. 7. “Cancer’s not going to stop us doing what we love to do,” he said. “We’re going to keep on pushing through it.” Christina began chemotherapy about two weeks ago at the Mayo Clinic, practically a stone’s throw from the race’s finish line.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
Jacksonville Daily Record — $365,000 from runners in annual 26.2 With Donna
Augustine Record — Marc Burget dedicates 26.2 with Donna win to wife after she was diagnosed with breast cancer Jan. 7
WJXT.com 26.2 with Donna grows stronger
First Coast News 26.2 runners with Donna runners strive to end breast cancer

Context: For nine years, runners have gathered every February to participate in the 26.2 with Donna. It's a marathon to raise money and awareness for breast cancer research and care. Founder Donna Deegan is a three-time breast cancer survivor who was treated at Mayo Clinic. She wants to give back to the people and institution that cared for her. With funds raised from the marathon, Donna helped create and support a program at Mayo Clinic where experts can study breast cancer genes. The goal is to develop new and better ways to diagnose and treat breast and other cancers, tailored to each woman's needs. More information, including a video interview with Donna Deegan, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

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February 5th, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo chief John Noseworthy talks about the future of health care
By Joe Carlson

Dr. John Noseworthy is best known as president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, but he’s also a governor with the WorStar Tribune Business section logold Economic Forum (WEF). At the group’s 46th annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, earlier this month Noseworthy spoke on a WEF panel with U.S. Health and Human
Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell and others about the future of health care. In a phone interview after the discussion, Noseworthy talked about Mayo’s work for Medicare’s value-based purchasing program on hip and knee surgeries, and whether the developing world can benefit from lessons learned in expensive health care systems in developed nations like the U.S.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

HealthLeaders Media — Mayo chief John Noseworthy talks about the future of healthcare

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Device experiment program saves lives, speeds products to market: Mayo is part of a plan to get devices to market faster. 
By Jim Spencer

Ron Hall owes his life to Mayo Clinic surgeon Gustavo Oderich and a Food and Drug Administration early feasibility study that helps get medical Star Tribune Business section logodevices to market faster. In December, the 80-year-old Blue Earth County man was preparing for a wrist operation when a test showed that the major artery carrying blood through his stomach was at high risk of rupturing. Hall and his wife first thought of going to the Department of Veterans Affairs for treatment. “Then my brain clicked on that we were near the Mayo Clinic,” said Val Hall, Ron’s spouse. “And we got referred there.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Gustavo Oderich, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vascular surgeon. Dr. Oderich conducts ongoing clinical research focused on complex aortic aneurysms and treatment of mesenteric artery disease.

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic's new Jacoby Center for Breast Health consolidates services in one spot
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville’s new Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health should create a more efficientFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo, more integrated approach to breast care, said Sarah A. McLaughlin, a breast surgeon with Mayo. The new center, which consolidates all of Mayo’s operations involving breast health on one floor, was funded by a $5 million gift from philanthropists Robert E. and Monica Jacoby of Ponte Vedra Beach.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Washington Times Online, Sun Herald Online, Tampa Tribune Online

Context: Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus today announced the opening of the Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health, which was funded by a $5 million gift from Robert E. and Monica Jacoby of Ponte Vedra, Florida. The new 16,000-square-foot  multidisciplinary breast center offers patients a comprehensive array of diagnostic, treatment and after-care services for all types of breast disease, including breast cancer, in a single location. “As a state-designated Cancer Center of Excellence, Mayo Clinic continues to expand and enhance comprehensive cancer care services to make them available to more patients in Jacksonville as well as all of Florida and the Southeast,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “The Jacoby Center for Breast Health will have a positive impact on patients seeking high quality breast health care. We greatly appreciate the generous gift from the Jacoby family that has made the new breast health center possible on our Florida campus.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

New York Times blog
Pursuing the Dream of Healthy Aging
by Jane Brody

“Aging is by far the best predictor of whether people will develop a chronic disease like atherosclerotic heart disease, stroke, New York Times Well Blog Logocancer, dementia or osteoarthritis,” Dr. James L. Kirkland, director of the Kogod Center on Aging at the Mayo Clinic, said in an interview. “Aging way outstrips all other risk factors.”

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D. leads the  Mayo Clinic Kogod Center on Aging. Dr. Kirkland's research focuses on the impact of cellular aging (senescence) on age-related dysfunction and chronic diseases, especially developing methods for removing these cells and alleviating their effects. Senescent cells accumulate with aging and in such diseases as dementias, atherosclerosis, cancers, diabetes and arthritis.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

 

Wall Street Journal
The Small Warnings Before Cardiac Arrest
by Ron Winslow

…Say someone has a brief episode of chest pain during exercise for the first time and goes without further symptoms and, after having no further symptoms, suffers sudden cardiac arrest three weeks later. “Should that person have called 911, or soughtWSJ Banner assistance from his or her physician?” asks Roger White, an anesthesiologist and cardiac arrest expert at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. “That sort of question is left completely unanswered.”

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context:  Roger White, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. White's research focuses on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

NPR
Boosting Life Span By Clearing Out Cellular Clutter
by Nell Greenfieldboyce

Mice were much healthier and lived about 25 percent longer when scientists killed off a certain kind of cell that accumulates in NPR Shots Health Newsthe body with age… These are cells that have stopped dividing, though not necessarily because the cells themselves are old. "It's a normal cell that experienced an unusual amount of stress, and it decided to stop dividing," says Jan van Deursen, who studies senescent cells at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: NPR's Shots blog provides news about health and medicine. The blog has more than 68,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Fast Company, Newsweek, The Telegraph UK, The Atlantic, Yahoo News, HealthDay, nature.com, The Mirror UK, The Independent UK, Fortune

Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells – cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age – negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects. “Cellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‘emergency brake’ used by damaged cells to stop dividing,” says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. “While halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‘emergency brake’ has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

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January 22nd, 2016

Mayo Clinic in the News

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

HealthDay
Study Questions Use of Physical Therapy for Early Parkinson's

Physical therapy might not benefit people with mild-to-moderate Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests. "These results should be interpreted with attention to the study details," Dr. J. Eric Ahlskog of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., wrote in an accompanying editorial. Only patients Health Day Logowith mild to moderate Parkinson's disease were included, and the study excluded patients thought to need physical or occupational therapy, he said.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Canoe.ca, Dublin News, Business Standard - Online, Cambodian Times, Doctors Lounge, Financial Express, Health.com, Israel Herald, MedPageToday

Context:  You’ve likely heard this before: Exercise is good for you. It helps your heart, bones, back and more. But here’s one thing you might not have heard: Ongoing aerobic exercise may slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system. “Aerobic exercise means vigorous exercise, which makes you hot, sweaty and tired” says  J. Eric Ahlskog, Ph.D., M.D., a neurologist at Mayo Clinic. This could include activity such as walking briskly or using an elliptical machine. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Huffington Post
Which Should You Do First: Cardio or Strength?
by Chris Freytag

The fact that you are even questioning the order of your workout means you are working out. This puts you ahead of most of the population and HuffPost Healthy Livingthis is truly what matters. If you are working out consistently, chances are the order of your workout will not make THAT much of a difference. Even the Mayo Clinic remains neutral. According to Edward R. Lasowski, M.D. "whether you do weightlifting before or after an aerobic workout is up to you. Research hasn't definitively shown that one way is better than another."

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Bloomberg Business
Integris Health announces partnership with Mayo Clinic

After almost 30 years in oncology, Dr. Brian Geister has treated several types of cancer in several types of patients. Most of the tiBloomberg Business Logome, Geister feels confident about what he should do -- but sometimes, a patient will come along with a truly difficult case. Recently, Geister asked for advice through an electronic consultation with the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a new collaborative opportunity that's available for Integris Health physicians.

Reach: Bloomberg BusinessWeek has a weekly circulation of more than 990,000 and has more than six million unique visitors to its online site each month.

Additional coverage: 

KWTV Oklahoma — Integris First Okla. Healthcare Organization To Join Mayo Clinic Network

The Oklahoman — Oklahoma ScissorTales: Better care through collaboration

Post-BulletinHeard on the street

Four States HomepageKOCO Oklahoma City, com, Enid News & Eagle, KFOR OklahomaTulsa World, Miami News Record, NewsUnited.com, KROC-AM

Context: INTEGRIS has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of health care providers committed to better serving patients and their families through collaboration. INTEGRIS is the first health care organization in Oklahoma to join the network. The formal agreement gives INTEGRIS access to the latest Mayo Clinic knowledge and promotes physician collaboration to benefit patients. Through shared resources, more patients can get answers to complex medical questions — and peace of mind —while staying close to home. “While INTEGRIS works with some of the most accomplished and preeminent physicians in the region, we are constantly striving for ways to provide our patients with the best care possible,” says Bruce Lawrence, president and CEO, INTEGRIS. “This collaboration between INTEGRIS and Mayo Clinic brings together two trusted names – each with unique strengths – to the betterment of all Oklahomans.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

News 4 Jax
Mayo Clinic offers new life-saving treatment

Mayo Clinic is ready to break ground on a center that could revolutionize the way lungs are transplanted. Scientists and doctors have come up News Jax 4 Logowith a way to rejuvenate lungs that were previously considered not good enough for transplant. News4Jax spoke with the first Florida woman ever to get the life-saving treatment.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Additional coverage:

WJXT Jacksonville — Construction begins on Mayo Clinic's lung restoration center

Florida Times-Union, Mayo Clinic's lung restoration center ready to break ground in Jacksonville

Jacksonville Business Journal, Mayo Clinic begins construction on new lung transplant center

Bloomberg Business, Mayo Clinic's lung restoration center ready to break ground in Jacksonville

Context: Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, and United Therapeutics Corporation (NASDAQ: UTHR) broke ground this week on a lung restoration center on the Mayo campus. The goal is to significantly increase the volume of lungs for transplantation by preserving and restoring selected marginal donor lungs, making them viable for transplantation.  The restored lungs will be made available to patients at Mayo Clinic and other transplant centers throughout the United States. Construction of the center is expected to be completed in late 2017. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

Star Tribune
Mayo survey finds 30-somethings less optimistic about aging
by Jeremy Olson

The first-ever national survey on attitudes toward health and aging found that Americans in their 30s are the least liStar Tribune newspaper logokely to believe they will age better than their parents…Some 56 percent of respondents aged 30 to 39 said they expect to age better, according to the Mayo survey released Wednesday. That was well below the levels of confidence expressed by Americans in their 40s (79 percent), 50s (67 percent) and 60s (72 percent).

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Post BulletinMayo survey looks at health opinions

Politico, KARE KSNV-NBC Las Vegas, fox2now.com, WTBX Radio Hibbing, KDAL Radio Duluth, KMSP-Fox 9, Medindia.com, KIMT

Context:  According to the first-ever Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up, most Americans experience barriers to staying healthy, with their work schedule as the leading barrier (22 percent), particularly among men and residents of the Northeast. While work schedule is a top barrier for women, as well, they are significantly more likely than men to cite caring for a child, spouse or parent. “The Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up takes a pulse on Americans’ health opinions and behaviors, from barriers to getting healthy to perceptions of aging, to help identify opportunities to educate and empower people to improve their health,” says John T. Wald, M.D., Medical Director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic. “In this first survey, we’re also looking at ‘health by the decades’ to uncover differences as we age.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

CBS News
Mayo Clinic CEO: How data science is making health care more effective, affordable

With U.S. health care costs surpassing $3 trillion a year -- an unsustainable 20% of the American economy -- we all must find ways to cut costs. CBS News LogoAt the World Economic Forum in Davos, Dr. John H. Noseworthy, head of the famed Mayo Clinic, explains how the latest advances in computer science offer a promising solution, where better collection and understanding of the billions of data points generated by medical research and treatments can improve patient "outcomes" and lead more effective and affordable health care for millions of people.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Additional coverage: MSN.com

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy participated in the World Economic Forum annual meeting recently in Davos, Switzerland. This annual meeting engages the world’s top leaders in collaborative activities focused on shaping the global, regional and industry agendas.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

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December 11th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

By Kelley Luckstein KelleyLuckstein

Mayo Clinic in tMayo Clinic in the News Logohe News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Guest Editor, Kelley Luckstein; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Yahoo! Health
How to Stay Well When the Person Sleeping Next to You Is Germ-Infested
by Sabrina WeissYahoo Health Logo

…1. Build up your immunity all year long Before anyone gets sick, it’s a good idea to prepare yourself at this time of year. “The most important thing people can do is well ahead of time, and that is taking good care of themselves and getting vaccinated [for the flu],” Pritish Tosh, an infectious diseases doctor at Mayo Clinic and a member of the Mayo Vaccine Research Group, told Yahoo Health. “The healthier people are to begin with, the more likely they are to bounce back readily from an influenza infection.”

Reach: Yahoo Health provides medical and health-related news and information for consumers and healthcare professionals. Yahoo Health receives more than 200,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Sabrina reached out to Mayo Clinic for an expert for a story she was working on about how to care for a significant other with a cold or flu without getting sick yourself.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

NBC News
7 Things to Know About Twin-To-Twin Transfusion Syndrome
by Felix Gussone, M.D.

Twin-To-Twin Tranbcnews.comnsfusion Syndrome Awareness Day is Dec. 7. Even though I'm a doctor and learned about pregnancies in medical school, "TTTS" was something that wasn't well understood… TTTS is not the mother's fault. TTTS is caused by abnormal connections between twins that form when the placenta first develops. This is a purely mechanical and random event that can't be avoided. "The mother can do absolutely nothing to prevent it," says Dr. Norman Davies, maternal fetal medicine consultant at Mayo Clinic. "There are also no known risk factors in a mother's life that make it more likely TTTS occurs."

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: Felix contacted Sharon Theimer based on a previous interview they worked on and needed to speak with one of our maternal fetal medicine consultants about this topic. Dr. Davies called Felix within a couple of hours.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

MPR
Many diabetes patients overtested and overtreated, Mayo study says
by Lorna BensonMPR News logo

Many Type 2 diabetes patients are being overtested and overtreated, according to a new finding from Mayo Clinic researchers. Their study, published Wednesday in the BMJ medical journal, found that six out of 10 patients who don't require insulin have their average blood sugar levels checked far more frequently than guidelines recommend, a practice that can lead to potentially harmful, excessive treatments… Lead researcher Dr. Rozalina McCoy said the over-testing led to over-treatment, which can be harmful. "Nine percent had their treatment intensified even further. And that was surprising and alarming," she said.

Additional coverage: Philadelphia Inquirer, HealthDay, MedPage Today, South Florida Reporter, The BMJ

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Lead researcher Dr. Rozalina McCoy was interviewed about her study published in The BMJ that showed a national trend toward overtesting glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) levels in adult patients with Type 2 diabetes.

Contact: Elizabeth Zimmerman

 

USA Today
Study suggests link between flavor in e-cigarettes and lung disease
by Mary Bowerman

USA Today newspaper logoFlavored e-cigarettes may seem like an alternative to smoking, but researchers warn that flavored e-cigarettes may not be worth the unknown long-term risks. Researchers at the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health tested 51 types of flavored e-cigarettes and flavor canisters for diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-pentanedione; three chemicals known to cause respiratory problems in factory workers…With around 7,000 e-cigarette flavors on the market, consumers are essentially at the mercy of the manufacturers, with little hope of knowing what chemicals are used in the products, according to Taylor Hays, director of Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center. “There are no FDA regulations on these products. It’s the Wild West of e-cigarettes,” Hays told USA TODAY Network.

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Dr. Taylor Hays, director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center was interviewed for a study that was linking flavor in e-cigarettes to lunch disease or “popcorn lung.”

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Harvard Business Review
What Health Care Leaders Need to Do to Improve Value for Patients
by Jacob Lippa

More and more health care organizations are beginning to track their performance on outcomes – and they’re finding that getting started isn’t easy. The change that’s needed can be overwhelming. Measuring outcomes requires redesigned workflows, enhanced coordination Harvard Business Review Logoacross departments, and investment in new resources.  Above all, it requires strong resolve and adept leadership…Dr. Ryan Uitti, a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, used a simple spreadsheet to track outcomes for patients with Parkinson’s disease for more than a decade. Last year, Mayo’s Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery (CSHCD) worked with Dr. Uitti to launch a broader outcomes measurement program. Dr. Uitti championed the initiative, helping to expand the program across the Mayo enterprise.

Reach: Harvard Business Review – Online provides editorial content designed to complement the coverage found in its parent print publication, which focuses on business management. The site receives more than 232,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Ryan Uitti, M.D.,  a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida, used a simple spreadsheet to track outcomes for patients with Parkinson’s disease for more than a decade. Last year, Mayo’s Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery (CSHCD) worked with Dr. Uitti to launch a broader outcomes measurement program.  Dr. Uitti championed the initiative, helping to expand the program across the Mayo enterprise.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Florida-Times Union
Mayo study finds brain trauma goes beyond NFL
by Charlie Patton

With the recent decision by former professional football player Frank Gifford’s family to donate his brain to research and the upcoming release of Florida Times-Union newspaper logothe movie “Concussion,” renewed attention is being focused on chronic traumatic encephalopathy…Bieniek, who is close to completing a doctorate in biomedical sciences at the Mayo Graduate School’s Neurobiology of Disease program, said the finding that almost one in three of the brains from men who played contact sports showed evidence of CTE is surprisingly high. “This could present a real challenge down the road,” he said.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: KARE11, Education Week, CBS ChicagoInternational Business Times, Y94, KFGO N.D., WXOW La Crosse, ThinkProgress, Popular Science, Austin Daily Herald, BringMeTheNewsWashington Post

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth. About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

 

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October 29th, 2015

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Scientists Probe Indoor Work Spaces for Clues to Better Health
by Sumathi Reddy

… Clinical trials are due to get underway early next year at the Well Living Lab, a new, 7,500-square-foot research facility adjacent to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., designed to study indoor environments with the aim of creating healthier spaces.WSJ Banner Sensors throughout the building monitor factors ranging from noise levels to air quality and temperature; other sensors in furniture will tell how long people stay seated and their posture. “The ultimate goal is to improve health,” said Brent Bauer, medical director of the Well Living Lab and professor of medicine for the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. “If we spend 90% of our time in an indoor environment there are almost endless opportunities to find better ways to do what we’re doing inside the building,” he said.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has anaverage circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Exposure to indoor environments is at an all-time high. In fact, Americans spend more than 90 percent of their time indoors, whether at home, work, school, retail stores, fitness centers, health care facilities and more. But what many people don’t realize is that buildings, and everything in them, can affect human health and well-being. Today marked the opening of the Well Living Lab, a new research facility dedicated to studying these environments and creating healthier indoor spaces in which to live, work and play. “There is a growing awareness and body of scientific evidence that indoor, built environments can affect human health and well-being, with the perception often being that indoor environments have a negative impact on health,” said Brent Bauer. M.D., medical director of the Well Living Lab and professor of medicine for Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. “But new knowledge shows that by building healthier indoor environments, we can actually preserve and enhance human health and quality of life.” More information about the Well Living Lab can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

MPR
What is the best research on breast cancer screenings?

On Monday morning, Kerri Miller and her guests try to bring clarity these new MPR News logoevidence-driven guidelines. Dr. Nancy Keating is a primary care physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and Dr. Sandhya Pruthi, who specializes in breast cancer research at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, join Miller to sort through the latest research on breast cancer screenings.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: The American Cancer Society (ACS) has updated its recommendations for breast cancer screening for women at average risk of the disease. The recommendations strongly support the value of mammograms and provide some further direction for women at both ends of the age spectrum. Sandhya Pruthi, M.D., a Breast Clinic physician and Mayo Clinic Cancer Center researcher says,"This is an important paper and we are pleased that ACS has paid attention to and respected patient preferences and values in its recommendation. While the ACS now recommends annual screening mammograms for women who have no risk factors at age 45, it did recommend that women age 40 and up still receive an annual screening mammograms if they choose to seek screening. This shared-decision making approach between a patient and her provider is something we support at Mayo Clinic. Overall, the new ACS recommendations reaffirm that screening mammography for women in their 40s is associated with a decrease in breast cancer deaths." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

KIMT 
Special day for special kid

A Minnesota toddler who has battled brain cancer for more than half his life had a very special day on Monday in Rochester. Vito from Waconia rang a bell at MayoKIMT Clinic to signify the end of his proton beam therapy in Rochester. The now two-year-old was first diagnosed with Medullblastoma at 11 months old and we are told that type of cancer is usually treated with giving radiation to the brain. However, that can be difficult for someone with a developing brain, like Vito. That’s why the family decided to come to Mayo so doctors could focus their treatment, with the proton beam, on specific areas of the brain.

Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market.

Additional coverage:

KTTC — 2-year-old boy celebrates completion of proton beam therapy; KWWL Iowa, KOMU Mo., KJRH Okla.

Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota this past June and in Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

Billboard magazine
Meet Music's Top Throat Doctors Who've Saved the Voices of Adele, Sam Smith and More
by Carolina Buia

DAVID LOTT, Phoenix  Specializing in regenerative ­medicine, Lott, the Mayo Clinic’s ­director of its head and neck ­regeneration program, has developed a process to re-create parts of the voice box and vocal folds using stem cells and 3D printing. Although the technology is still in the investigation stage, he plans to offer Billboard magazine logothe treatment to patients (which includes opera and Broadway stars) in 2016…“By addressing the physical and mental aspects of the pain in addition to retraining her vocal system, she could speak with confidence,” he says.

Reach: Billboard has served the entertainment business since 1894. Beginning as a weekly for the bill posting and advertising business, Billboard and its popular music charts have evolved into the primary source of information on trends and innovation in music, serving music fans, artists, top executives, tour promoters, publishers, radio programmers, lawyers, retailers, digital entrepreneurs and many others. Written for music industry professionals and fans. Functions as the trade journal for the music and entertainment industries. Contents provide news, reviews and statistics for all genres of music, including music videos, related internet activity and retail updates. The weekly publication has an audience of 18,000 and its website receives more than 24.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Davi Lott, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic ENT who is dedicated to investigating disorders of the larynx (voice box) and airway. This includes bioengineering of laryngeal and tracheal tissues, laryngeal transplantation techniques and immunotherapy, laryngeal cancer, and functional outcomes of various laryngeal surgical procedures. Read more about Dr. Lott's research here.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

Florida Times-Union
Lead Letter: Mayo Clinic is a leader in telemedicine
by Sarvam P. TerKonda, medical director, Connected Care, Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus

The Federal Communications Commission and Mayo Clinic recently sponsored a forum for Florida policy makers on the future of telemedicine — delivery of patientFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo care through a secure video or computer link… Studies have shown that for management of chronic conditions that become more prevalent with age, such as congestive heart failure, diabetes and stroke, outcomes are improved when patients and their local caregivers can be connected remotely to specialty care.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Sarvam TerKonda, M.D., is Mayo Clinic's medical director for Connected Care at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Connected Care integrates new care and service delivery models into traditional outpatient and inpatient care.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

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