Mayo Clinic Care Network Archive

March 28th, 2013

Shriners, Mayo join forces for pediatric care

By loganlafferty

Today, the Mayo Clinic announced that the Shriners Hospitals for Children -- Twin Cities would be the first pediatric hospital to join its national, collaborative Mayo Clinic Care Network…“Both Mayo Clinic and Shriners have a heart for kids, and we’re excited to know that this new collaborative step together will increasingly benefit our young patients,” said Dr. Christopher Moir, director of Mayo's Children's Center. “Combining the knowledge of Mayo Clinic and Shriners experts can only benefit outcomes for patients who are the most vulnerable among us."

Additional Coverage: MedCity News, Post Bulletin, MPR, Pioneer Press

 

Star Tribune by Jeremy Olson

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Tags: Dr. Christopher Moir, Mayo Clinic Children's Center, pediatric hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Star Tribune


March 1st, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich

March 1, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

CNBC
Cancer Roundtable with Maria Bartiromo

Maria Bartiromo talks with Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy, Cleveland Clinic CEO Toby Cosgrove and Novartis CEO Joe Jimenez about breakthroughs in treating cancer and the road to finding a cure.

Reach: CNBC provides real-time financial market coverage and business information to more than 340 million homes worldwide, including more than 95 million households in the United States and Canada.

Context:  John Nosweworthy, M.D., is president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. Dr. Noseworthy recently appeared on CNBC as part of a panel interview about changes in health care in United States.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Duska Anastasijevic

Business Insider
Mayo Clinic CEO: Here's Why We've Been The Leading Brand In Medicine For 100 Years
by Max Nisen

For more than 100 years, the Mayo Clinic's built an enviable reputation and medical practice. People all over the world regard it as one of the best places to treat any illness, and it has routinely come in at the top of hospital rankings. We've already written about the Clinic's plan to spread that knowledge worldwide, but we also spoke to CEO Dr. John Noseworthy about how the clinic built its reputation, attracts the world's best doctors, and manages to stay at the top.

Related Coverage:
Business Insider, It Takes Mayo Clinic 3 Whole Years To Decide If A Doctor's Good Enough For Them

Previous Coverage:
Business Insider, Mayo Clinic Has A Radical Plan To Expand Its Reach Across The World

Reach: Business Insider has more than 19.6 million page views each month. The on-line publication focuses on business news. The site provides and analyzes business news and acts as an aggregator of top news stories from around the web. Its content is sometimes cited by other, larger, publications such as The New York Times and domestic news outlets like National Public Radio.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D., is president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. Dr. Noseworthy recently chatted with Business Insider about Mayo’s work and pioneering leadership in shaping the future of health care.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

American Medical News
Health system brands go national
by Victoria Stagg Elliott

Some of the biggest brand names in health care delivery are deciding that it’s not enough to be a prestigious place in the distance. Places like Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Cleveland Clinic and MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston have established affiliate programs…“We have to turn down patient requests to come to our campus for care,” said Mary Jo Williamson, administrative director of Mayo Clinic Care Network. “We’re trying to find ways to distribute Mayo Clinic culture and expertise and help physicians better serve local populations. We’ve always had lots of informal collaboration. This is an opportunity to extend our knowledge in a structured way…”

Reach: American Medical News is the print and online news publication for physicians published by the American Medical Association.

Context: Mary Jo Williamson is administrative director of Mayo Clinic Care Network, a network of like-minded organizations throughout the United States and world that share a common commitment to improving health care delivery in their communities.

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Star Tribune
Mayo’s Goal: Full Face-Lift for City
by Jennifer Brooks

There are company towns, and then there’s Rochester – where waiters make meal recommendations based on what sort of blood work you’re having drawn at Mayo Clinic the next morning…”When I first heard that figure, I gasped. ‘Are you kidding me? A [$585] million taxpayer handout?’” said Fran Bradley, a former state representative and fiscal conservative who has butted heads with Mayo on other issues – but not this one. “I can’t be opposed to it. I think the idea is way too creative.”

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

MPR
Mayo, a financial powerhouse, is poised to propel expansion
by Martin Moylan

The clinic's success in attracting such donations is one reason Mayo looks like a very good bet to make good on its promise to kick in $3.5 billion over 20 years to fund its latest expansion. "I don't think it's any stretch at all, within our current financial strength," said Pat McCarty, Mayo's vice chair of financial planning and analysis… Mayo is strong, despite its challenges, said Elizabeth Keating, a Boston University expert in assessing the financial performance of nonprofits. "From a profitability standpoint they are successful," she said.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage:
KSTP, KAAL, Post Bulletin, San Francisco Chronicle, Pioneer Press

Minnesota Daily
Mayo upgrade could boost Rochester campus
by Alma Pronove

“If it’s good for Mayo and it’s good for their patients and their visitors, it’s good for us as an institution,” UMR Assistant Vice Chancellor Jay Hesley said. “Having those resources in place helps us with our recruitment and our retention of students, faculty and staff.”… “Our goal is to be known as the best health destination in the world,” said Lisa Clarke, co-chair of the Destination Medical Center initiative.

Related Coverage:
Minnesota Daily, Editorial: Keeping the Mayo competitive

Reach: The Minnesota Daily is the student newspaper of the University of Minnesota and has a circulation of 20,000.

Other Destination Medical Coverage:
Pioneer Press
(AP), Mayo Clinic expansion bill gets tighter financial controls

KTTC, DMC making doctors happy

MPR, Mayo vs. Vikings stadium: state aid requests compared

Additional Coverage:
WCCO, KAAL, KTTC, KARE 11, Fox 47

Context: On Jan. 30, Mayo Clinic announced Destination Medical Center (DMC), a $5 billion economic development initiative to secure Minnesota’s status as a global medical destination center now and in the future. The goal of DMC is to ensure that Minnesota and Mayo Clinic are destinations for medical care in the coming decades. This initiative is the culmination of a three-year study by Mayo Clinic to chart its future business strategy in an increasingly complex, competitive and global business environment.

Previous Coverage from Feb. 22 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from Feb. 15 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from Feb. 8 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage from Feb. 1 Weekly Highlights

News Release: Destination Medical Center Bill Introduced in Minnesota House, Senate

News Release: Mayo Clinic to Invest More than $3 Billion to Position Minn. as World Destination for Health Care

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Karl Oestreich, Bryan Anderson

Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal
Mayo Clinic says payments it receives could be cut 20-40 percent over five years
by Katharine Grayson

The Mayo Clinic could be paid between 20 and 40 percent less for its service over the next five years, due to cuts in reimbursement, the arrival of health-insurance exchanges, and other challenges facing the health care industry, CEO Dr. John Noseworthy said Wednesday…Noseworthy, speaking Wednesday at a news conference announcing the clinic’s 2012 financial results, outlined broad challenges the health provider faces, including aging demographics, chronic illness, and uncertainties related to health reform.

Related Coverage:
Pioneer Press, Mayo Clinic sees drop in earnings, endowment increase

Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal, How much Mayo Clinic makes off its cafeterias and ‘other’ revenue

Similar Coverage: Post Bulletin, MinnPost, Star Tribune, KAAL, Post Bulletin, ModernHealthcare, KIMT, Phoenix Business JournalKARE 11, Star Tribune

Context: Mayo Clinic reported Feb. 27 a solid 2012 financial performance as it works to provide high-quality care at lower cost, strengthen its destination medical center practice and deliver expertise to patients and physicians in new ways. Mayo Clinic reported annual revenue of $8.8 billion for 2012. Mayo, a not-for-profit, has more than 61,000 employees and treats more than 1 million patients each year from roughly 135 countries. As part of our operational plan in 2012, Mayo Clinic expected expenses to grow faster than revenue; expenses rose 9.6 percent, to $8.4 billion.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Reports Solid 2012 Financial Performance

Public Affairs Contact:  Karl Oestreich

Florida Times-Union
Five big announcements highlight Jacksonville's Mayo Clinic's emphasis on research
by Charlie Patton

Five significant announcements by the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville over the last two weeks highlight what is perhaps an underappreciated aspect of the clinic’s contribution to health care: a focus on research. Four of the announcements concerned the publication of important research studies. The fifth announced that the National Institutes of Health had given the clinic a five-year, $7 million extension on a grant to do research on Parkinson’s disease.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: For  more details about the five annoucements, refer to the news release below.

News Release: Bracelet-Like Device Controls Chronic Acid Reflux, Study Finds

News Release:
NIH Extends Udall Grant Supporting Mayo Clinic's Parkinson's Research

News Release: Combo of Avastin, Second Drug Shows Promise Fighting Brain Cancer, Mayo Clinic Finds

News Release: Novel Protein May Help Detect Lou Gehrig's Disease and Dementia, Mayo Clinic Finds

News Release: National Screening Benchmarks For Finding Polyps During a Colonoscopy Might be Too Low, Mayo Clinic Says ABC 15-Phoenix

ABC-15, Phoenix
Talking robot helps stroke patients

A robot known as “Jimmy” roams the hospital rooms at Casa Grande Regional Medical Center. The purpose of the robot is to help patients in rural areas interact with experts at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. “Telemedicine was deployed in order to bring the expert to the patient, when they needed it most, where they needed it most as opposed to transferring the patient from the rural community to the large urban neurological center,” says Doctor Demaerschalk, a Medical Director at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15,  is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona.

Context: Bart Demaerschalk, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. In stroke telemedicine, also called telestroke, doctors who have advanced training in the nervous system (neurologists) remotely evaluate people who’ve had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations to emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Doctors communicate using digital video cameras, internet telecommunications, robotic telepresence, smartphones and other technology.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: A.L.S., ABC-15, Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, alzheimer's disease, American Gastroenterological Association, American Medical News, avastin, Barrett's esophagus, brain cancer, branding, Business Insider, chronic acid reflux


January 14th, 2013

Gazette Opinion: A Good Match: Mayo Clinic, Billings Clinic

By loganlafferty

For decades, the Billings Clinic has worked to be the “Mayo clinic of Montana.” Now a formal affiliation will make Billings Clinic a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. Network membership doesn’t involve any change in ownership or governance of Billings Clinic, which is a private, nonprofit organization based in Billings. Many Billings Clinic physicians, such as heart surgeon Scott Millikan, trained at Mayo. Billings Clinic physicians long have consulted Mayo specialists when caring for their Montana and Wyoming patients.

Additional Coverage: Sheridan Media, KTVQ

Billings Gazette

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Tags: Billings Clinic, Billings Gazette, Sheridan Media


October 8th, 2012

Bismarck Hospital Joins Mayo Clinic Network

By Kelley Luckstein

St. Alexius Medical Center in Bismarck has joined a national network of hospitals connected with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The move is not an acquisition or a merger, but a collaboration that will enable St. Alexius doctors to connect electronically with Mayo specialists, allowing more patients to stay closer to home, according to St. Alexius and Mayo officials…The network is relatively new, said Dr. David Hayes, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. Mayo began discussing the idea two years ago and the first network member, Altru Health System of Grand Forks, joined about a year ago.

Additional coverage: Health Leaders Media, Dickinson Press, Becker’s Hospital Review, Post-Bulletin, Star Tribune, KTTC, NECN Mass., KELO Land, Jamestown Sun, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

 

Inforum N.D. (AP)

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Tags: Altru Health System, collaboration, Dr. David Hayes, Inforum N.D., St. Alexius Medical Center


October 8th, 2012

Missouri’s Heartland Health Sees Early ROI From Membership in Mayo Care Clinic Network

By Admin

Heartland and by its breast cancer care has seen a quick return on its membership in the Mayo Care Clinic Network since announcing the partnership in May. "This allows us to have one more opportunity to increase our knowledge in managing breast cancer," says Dr. Robert C. Johnson, who specializes in oncology and radiation at Heartland Health. Heartland utilizes the network's E-Consult system to complement its care of all cancer patients, including those diagnosed with breast cancer. The process, Dr. Johnson says, allows Heartland's specialists to request additional evaluation by the Mayo Clinic's physician experts when unique issues call for further analysis.

 

MedCity News by Kevin Krauskopf

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Tags: Dr. Robert C. Johnson, E-Consult system, Heartland Health, MedCity News


August 3rd, 2012

DHMC Partners With Mayo Clinic

By Admin

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center is the newest member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a network of seven hospitals, according to David Hayes, medical director for the Mayo Clinic Care Network. Membership in the network will allow DHMC to offer electronic consultations and share best practices with other member institutions, DHMC CEO and President of James Weinstein said.

 

The Dartmouth by Sharla Grass

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Tags: Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Dr. David Hayes, James Weinstein, The Dartmouth


July 30th, 2012

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Joins Mayo Network

By Admin

Dartmouth-Hitchcock, Lebanon, N.H., is the latest provider to join the ever-expanding Mayo Clinic Care Network. The New Hampshire system will remain an independent entity as part of a collaboration with Mayo. Dartmouth-Hitchcock, which includes a 371-bed hospital in Lebanon, will gain access to Mayo's doctors and electronic health records and other Mayo resources…"Healthcare in America is at a crossroads," said Dr. John Noseworthy, president and CEO of Mayo Clinic, in the release. "Providers are seeking meaningful relationships that allow them to best address their patients' needs while improving the efficiency and effectiveness of care.”

Additional coverage: Boston Globe, Bennington Banner Vt., MedCity News, Star Tribune, Post-Bulletin, Pioneer Press, Seacoast Online, WHIO Radio(Ohio), WCAX Vt., PhysOrg, WFTV Orlando, NorthJersey.com, San Francisco Chronicle, The Republic Ind.

 

Modern Healthcare by Ashok Selvam

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Tags: Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Dr. John Noseworthy, Healthcare, Modern Healthcare


July 26th, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Admin

July 26, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Kelley Luckstein
Public Affairs Associate
Guest Editor

Associated Press
Alzheimer’s drug fails in 1 study, 2nd continues

by Linda Johnson

A closely watched experimental Alzheimer's treatment has failed to slow the disease in one late-stage study, a big disappointment for doctors and patients but not the end of the road for the drug. Pfizer Inc. said Monday that it will continue to study its effect on a different group of patients…Biomarkers are genes or measurable characteristics that indicate a normal biologic process, a disease or a response to a treatment. "I would defer complete judgment on the drug until I see some biomarker data," said Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. "It still may leave the door open for some positive news if there are any biomarker movements."

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services. Additional coverage: Businessweek, Khaleej Tmes, Washington Post, York Dispatch, Yahoo! Finance

Public Affairs Contact: kilen.brian@mayo.edu

Star Tribune
Unrelenting heat can wither your meds, too
By Jeff Strickler

This has been a difficult summer for Aylssa McDermott. The Maplewood 12-year-old, who wears an insulin pump for diabetes, has landed in the emergency room three times after softball tournaments in which hot, humid air combined with her body heat to destroy her medication…At the Mayo Clinic emergency room in Rochester, Dr. Torrey Laack sees a lot of patients facing heat problems that have been brought on by their medicines. "There's a huge list of medications that impact the body's ability to deal with heat," he said. "They predispose people to heat-related medical problems. People taking those medications need to be aware of that."

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 514,457 copies and weekday circulation is 300,330. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Dr. Torrey Laack is an emergency medicine physician at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, and was sought out by the Star Tribune during the recent heat wave for comment about medications that can become less effective in the heat.

Public Affairs Contact: luckstein.kelley@mayo.edu; eisenman.rebecca@mayo.edu

NY Times
Why Some Olympic Athletes Need to Gorge
By Gretchen Reynolds

Endurance athletes, unlike the rest of us, have the unusual problem of having to work hard to keep weight on. “In your super-high-calorie-burning sports, like distance running, cycling or the triathlon, elite athletes can burn 15 or 20 calories a minute,” says Dr. Michael Joyner, a researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who conducts studies of endurance athletes. At the peak of training, these athletes are working out four or five hours a day, he continues.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Context: Dr. Michael Joyner is an anesthesiologist and the associate dean for research at Mayo Clinic, Rochester. He is an expert in the field of human integrative physiology. The primary focus in his laboratory is studying how the peripheral circulation and autonomic reflexes operate as the human body adapts to physical stresses such as standing, exercise or body heating.

Public Affairs Contact: anderson.bryan@mayo.edu; klein.traci@mayo.edu

Reader’s Digest Canada
The Latest Word on Breast Cancer
By Deena Waisberg

This year, more than 22,000 Canadian women were diagnosed with breast cancer. That’s a pretty frightening statistic, but advances in diagnostic techniques as well as in treatments are improving our odds of beating the disease… New Treatment Options: Tykerb - About 20% of breast cancer cases are HER-2, an aggressive form of cancer. A drug called Herceptin has been the best treatment for women with HER-2 cancer. “Herceptin attacks the outside of the HER-2 protein,” says Dr. Edith Perez, hematologist, oncologist and researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Circulation: Reader's Digest Canada has a circulation of 948,019 and is the #1 reach to Canadian adults.

Context: Edith Perez, M.D., deputy director of the Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center in Florida and director of the Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program, is frequently sought out by journalists for her expertise.

Public Affairs Contacts: scotti.paul@mayo.edu

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center plan joint announcement
By Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, of Lebanon, N.H., have issued a joint notice saying they plan on Friday to announce "a formal agreement between the two organizations." Attending the announcement will be Dr. David Hayes, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. The Care Network is a collaboration among a number of medical centers nationwide and Mayo, which provides electronic consultations ("econsults"), access to Mayo treatment protocols, and other services in exchange for payments from member hospitals.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: A media advisory was sent on July 25, 2012, to inform media that Mayo and Dartmouth-Hitchcock will announce a formal agreement between the two organizations.

Public Affairs contact: anderson.bryan@mayo.edu

For more coverage of Mayo Clinic in the News, please link to our news clip blog here.

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: Alzheimer's Treatment, Associated Press, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Dr. David Hayes, Dr. Michael Joyner, Dr. Ron Petersen, Edith Perez, heat-related medical problems, Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center, Pfizer, Post Bulletin, Reader's Digest Canada


July 13th, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Admin

July 13, 2012

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

NY Times
Conventional Cancer Therapy and Whole Genome Sequencing

Current cancer therapies attempt to find, test and treat specific genetic mutations that are shared by groups of patients, but largely ignore individual differences. A new method of identifying cancer treatments, known as whole genome sequencing, is based on the idea that many cancers differ from patient to patient, and may have different genetic causes…Beth McDaniel developed a rare form of cancer, a T cell lymphoma. After exhausting all the standard treatments, her family sent samples of her saliva and cancer tumors to Illumina and the Mayo Clinic.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Context:  This story involves Mayo Clinic collaborators from the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and is a great illustration of how individualized medicine is making a difference at Mayo Clinic.

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

Huffington Post
Your Start-Up Life: Why Serving Is the New Leading
by Rana Florida

Patients from around the world travel to Rochester, Minnesota to be cared for by Mayo Clinic physicians. Renowned for its innovative and effective treatments and advancements in outside-the-box medical thinking, practices, and research, the Mayo Clinic consistently leads in quality standard listings. For more than two decades it's topped the annual U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals list.  The Mayo Clinic is not only a great place for patients; it is also a terrific place to work. For eight years straight, it's been on Fortune Magazine's list of America's 100 Best Companies to Work For.  At the helm is President and CEO John Noseworthy, MD, the former medical director of the Mayo Clinic's Department of Development, as a professor in its Department of Neurology, and as the former editor-in-chief of Neurology (the journal of the American Academy of Neurology).

Reach:  The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: Dr. Noseworthy recently reponded to a series of questions posed by Rana Florida, CEO of The Creative Class Group. She writes a weekly column on how readers can optimize their lives. She also features  conversations -- like the one here with Dr. Noseworthy -- with successful entrepreneurs and thought leaders about how they manage their businesses, relationships and careers.

Public Affairs Contact: Alyson Fleming

NY Times
The 400: Aching to Win
by Mary Pilon

…A Surprising Key: Relaxation. Toward the finish line, the upper body helps carry the runners through their final push. But this is also where the distinction between sprinters and distance runners becomes clear. Montsho’s arms shred the air, her legs still pumping high with each kick…It is here that relaxation, perhaps counterintuitively, can help win the race.  Michael Joyner, a physiologist at the Mayo Clinic, said that runners who tensed up, especially in the arms, moved more slowly. It is known as a “bear jumping on your back” or “turning to stone.” The tension makes a runner less efficient biomechanically; she expends the same amount of energy but does not travel as far.

Circulation:  The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic physician-scientist often sought for his expertise in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Traci Klein

USA TODAY
Sitting less could extend your life
by Nanci Hellmich

Sitting less could lead to a longer life, a new study says…"Sitting is a dangerous risk factor for early death, on par with smoking and being obese," says Peter Katzmarzyk, a researcher at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge and lead author of the study, published online Monday in BMJ Open. Smoking also cuts about two years off of life expectancy, he says… James Levine, a professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who did some of the first research on sitting disease but was not involved in this study, says, "It's extraordinary to see the coming to life of the concept that your chair really does appear to be killing you, one year after another."

Circulation: USA TODAY has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Nick Hanson

MPR
Mayo expanding through affiliations
by Elizabeth Stawicki

There's a lot of jockeying for position in the health care market as medical centers prepare to implement the provisions of the federal Affordable Care Act. The debate over the health care law has created a lot of uncertainty in the market. Many health care providers are responding by linking with each other to manage the risk. The relationships range from outright mergers and acquisitions to more flexible relationships, called affiliations. Rochester-based Mayo Clinic has increasingly affiliated with smaller medical centers in and out of state through its Mayo Clinic Care Network.

Related story:
MPR
Mayo tries different approach to healthcare consolidation by Jennifer Vogel

Increasingly, health care systems like Duluth-based Essentia and North and South Dakota-based Sanford have been buying or striking up agreements to run local independent hospitals across the state. In one of the most recent moves toward consolidation, the commission helping determine the fate of Virginia Regional Medical Center on the Iron Range voted in late June to partner with Essentia, though the city would continue to own the hospital… New models for collaboration are emerging, as MPR News' Elizabeth Stawicki reported this morning on All Things Considered. According to her story, Rochester-based Mayo Clinic is establishing what it calls the Mayo Clinic Care Network, whereby independent medical facilities in Minnesota and elsewhere are able to tap the prestigious health system for second opinions and advice on complicated cases--all for a fee, of course.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Mayo Clinic Care Network extends Mayo Clinic’s knowledge and expertise to physicians and providers interested in working together in the best interest of their patients. Sparrow’s physicians will have access to Mayo Clinic, including the ability to connect with Mayo Clinic physicians, who can help them care for their patients and improve their systems and the health of their communities. Additional coverage: Minneapolis/ St. Paul Business Journal, Kaiser Health News.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Brian Kilen

KAAL
Skin Protection From Sun Exposure
by Brianna Long
With the hot weather driving people to pools and lakes, doctors are warning people about what the sun can really do to your skin. The first thing to look at is the SPF. An SPF of 30 will block about 90% of the sun's rays. An SPF of 50 will block about 99. Anything higher than that really won't offer too much added protection…Doctors say that's what everyone needs to remember sunscreen. Even on a cloudy day. "Some of the most drastic sunburns happen when people think they're protected from the clouds," said Dr. Jerry Brewer, a dermatological surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: “Increasing Incidence of Melanoma in Young Adults: An Epidemiologic Study in Olmsted County, Minnesota” was published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings Monday, April 2, 2012. According to the study led by Jerry Brewer, M.D, a Mayo Clinic dermatologist, the incidence of melanoma has escalated, and young women are the hardest hit. Even as the rates of some cancers are falling, Mayo Clinic is seeing an alarming trend: the dramatic rise of skin cancer, especially among people under 40. A news release, highlighting the results of the study, was distributed worldwide April 1. The study was picked up by more than 1,700 media outlets (online, broadcast and print) around the world. Previous coverage can be found here and here.

Public Affairs Contact: Alyson Fleming

For more coverage of Mayo Clinic in the News, please link to our news clip blog here.

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Tags: Affordable care act, Dr. James Levine, Dr. Jerry Brewer, Dr. John Noseworthy, Dr. Michael Joyner, genome sequencing, Huffington Post, KAAL, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, melanoma, MPR, Pennington Biomedical Research Center


June 19th, 2012

For Altru Health System, Distant Ally Brings Local Benefits

By Admin

The 400 miles between Grand Forks and Rochester, Minn., is a long drive, but the route is traveled frequently by area patients facing the most serious medical diagnoses as they seek care at the Mayo Clinic. For the past year, technology and collaboration have brought Mayo’s famous quality of care closer to Grand Forks through the Mayo Clinic Care Network.

 

Grand Forks Herald by Christopher Bjorke

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Tags: Grand Forks Herald, patient travel, quality of care