Mayo Clinic Rochester Archive

January 14th, 2013

A Good Way to Measure Obesity? Fat Chance

By loganlafferty

A report last week that people who are slightly overweight have less chance of dying than those of normal weight had some researchers calling for further study of how a little extra fat can apparently be good for you. But others saw it as another sign that the standard way of measuring who is too heavy should be scrapped… "I suspect it's primarily an issue with BMI being unable to measure the things it's intended to measure, or what really matters," said Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Wall Street Journal by Carl Bialik

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Tags: body mass index, Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, Obesity, standard measuring, Wall Street Journal


January 9th, 2013

Surprising Teaching Tool in K-12 Science Education — Zebrafish Research

By loganlafferty

The world's leading zebrafish researchers contribute to the community's active global efforts to promote science education…"The emphasis is on teaching students how to think, rather than on what to think," says Stephen Ekker, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Zebrafish and Professor of Medicine at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. "This issue will have a substantial impact well beyond the zebrafish community."

Bio-Medicine

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Tags: Bio-Medicine, Dr. Stephen Ekker, science education, zebrafish


January 9th, 2013

Don’t Blame Parkinson’s Disease for Addiction: Study

By loganlafferty

Despite concerns that Parkinson's patients were more likely to become compulsive gamblers or shoppers, a new study says untreated patients don't have any more addictions than people without the disease…"This study seems to support that fact it's related to the medication," said Dr. Anhar Hassan, who was not involved with the new study but researches movement disorders. According to Hassan, from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, the link between the Parkinson's drugs and the addictions was first discovered between 2003 and 2004. Since then, she said, it's become a well-known side effect amongst Parkinson's patients.

Reuters by Andrew Seaman

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Tags: addiction, Dr. Anhar Hassan, parkinson's disease, Reuters, side effect



January 8th, 2013

Indonesia: The Tobacco Industry’s “Disneyland”

By loganlafferty

Arif Hidayat still feels a measure of guilt. As a vendor of cigarettes on an impoverished back street in the Indonesian city of Bogor, Hidayat says he realized most of his buyers were men who could barely afford to feed their families…"Because Indonesians are Islamic, alcohol is less of a curse than in many countries," he explains. "Unfortunately, though, tobacco addiction inflicts huge damage on household incomes and health." That's been exacerbated by what Dr. Richard Hurt, director of the Nicotine Dependence Research Program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, calls an "invasion" by international tobacco companies.

CMAJ

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Tags: CMAJ, Dr. Richard Hurt, Indonesia, international tobacco companies, Nicotine Dependence Research Program, tobacco


January 7th, 2013

Competition Affects Who Gets a Liver Transplant: Study

By loganlafferty

More competition between medical centers that perform liver transplants may mean sicker patients get lower-quality donor organs, according to a U.S. study…"If you're a sick, high-risk patient... then it's in your interest that somebody will take more of a risk on you. The alternative is not surviving," said Michael Charlton, a liver disease researcher from the Mayo Clinic Transplant Center in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reuters

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Tags: competition, Dr. Michael Charlton, liver disease, liver transplant, Mayo Clinic Transplant Center, Reuters


January 4th, 2013

Iowans Rail at Wellmark Premium Proposal

By loganlafferty

Scores of Iowans have written to the state health insurance commissioner, pleading that she decline to let Iowa’s dominant health insurer raise their premiums again…Jackson also noted that many Iowans continue to go to the Mayo Clinic for relatively routine care. Mayo treatment routinely costs Wellmark twice as much as the same treatment in Iowa, because the insurer has little bargaining leverage with the renowned Minnesota medical center. The insurer has been working for several years to persuade members to use Iowa facilities for routine care and reserve Mayo for special situations. 

Des Moines Register by Tony Leys

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Tags: Des Moines Register, health insurance, health insurance premiums, Wellmark


January 4th, 2013

He Flipped the Page on Cancer

By loganlafferty

A year ago, Ethan Polson of Ankeny made a New Year’s commitment to do a back flip each day of 2012 and document the journey through video…Some of the February flips were done at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., where he spent five weeks undergoing radiation treatments. “I think a lot of my unique shots were at the Mayo Clinic in front of the Mayo brothers’ statue and other artistic places,” Polson said.

Des Moines Register by Sara Sleyster

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Tags: back flip, Des Moines Register, Ethan Polson, radiation


January 3rd, 2013

Flu Season is Worst in a Decade

By loganlafferty

More than 120 Minnesotans were hospitalized in one week, because of the flu.  Now health officials are warning this may be the worst flu outbreak in a decade…ayo Clinic's  Dr. Greg Poland says this year’s strain can be downright deadly. "This can be a lethal virus, I mean we loose on average about 36,000 Americans each year."… "A really important point is that this particular influenza virus is h3n2 and it is in the vaccine, so there's a good match between what's in the vaccine and what's circulating," said Dr. Poland.

KAAL by Katie Eldred

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Tags: Dr. Greg Poland, flu, flu outbreak, H3N2, KAAL, lethal virus, vaccine


January 2nd, 2013

The Future of Medicine Is Now

By loganlafferty

In our era of instant gratification, the world of medicine seems like an outlier. The path from a promising discovery to an effective treatment often takes a decade or more…After years of controversy, gene therapy is poised to become a viable option for a variety of often life-threatening medical conditions, especially those resulting from a single defective gene. Last month, the European Union approved Glybera for treatment of a rare genetic disease, making it the first gene-therapy medicine approved in the Western world. The approval comes amid a flurry of research showing broader promise for the approach in a range of disorders, from a rare form of blindness to hemophilia to heart failure. Though outright cures are still elusive, gene therapy "is beginning to emerge as a meaningful clinical" strategy, says Stephen J. Russell, director of molecular medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Wall Street Journal

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Tags: blindness, defective gene, gene therapy, Glybera, heart failure, hemophelia, molecular medicine, Stephen J. Russell, Wall Street Journal