Psychology and Psychiatry Archive

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on November 8th, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

 

 

November 8, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

KMSP Twin Cities
OPERATION MAGIC: Magician's journey may be best trick of all
by Jeff Baillon

He got his start some 50 years ago. Peter Gloviczki traveled the world with his bag of tricks, and after all that time and all those miles, it's plain to see he still loves to be in front of a crowd…In 1981, Gloviczki said goodbye to the spotlights, packed away his magic hat and moved to Rochester, where he's lived ever since. He came to Minnesota to pursue his true passion -- he traded in his wand for a scalpel.....left the stage for the operating room at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Minneapolis-St.Paul is the 16th largest television market in the United States with 1.7 million TV homes. FOX 9 News (WFTC) typically has good viewership for its 9 p.m., newscast, but lags behind its competitors at 5, 6 and 10 p.m.

Context: Peter Gloviczki, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vascular surgeon. The Mayo Clinic Gonda Vascular Center is devoted to providing state-of-the-art diagnosis and treatment in a compassionate environment for patients with vascular diseases. Mayo Clinic vascular and endovascular surgeons treat blood vessel and lymphatic system conditions (vascular diseases).

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

NPR
Bariatric Surgery Can Keep Pounds Off For Years
by Nancy Shute

Weight-loss surgery is becoming increasingly popular because it's the only treatment that pretty much guarantees weight loss. There is very little evidence on how it will affect people's health over the long haul…Parents and doctors should think about non-medical reasons why surgery may help teenagers, according to Michael Sarr, a bariatric surgeon at the Mayo Clinic. He wrote an editorial in JAMA Pediatrics arguing that having to go through adolescence weighing 300 or 400 pounds can result in "psychosocial retardation." Additional coverage: Bariatric News

Reach: The NPR Shots Blog covers news about health and medicine. It is written and reported by NPR’s Science Desk.

Context: Michael Sarr, M.D., is a bariatric surgeon at Mayo Clinic. The Division of Gastroenterologic and General Surgery at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., has one of the largest and most experienced groups of gastroenterologic and general surgeons in the United States. The 16 staff surgeons perform more than 7000 operations annually and have a combined 172 years of experience.

Public Affairs Contact: Brian Kilen

US News & World Report
The Push to Personalize Medicine
by Laura McMullen

At the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow Forum, industry experts discuss how to increase the value of care through personalization…While using gene sequencing seems to be valuable for patients, their families and medical institutions, the high cost seems to be slowing down its progression to the use by everyday patients. But as Gianrico Farrugia, director of the Center for Individualized Medicine at Mayo Clinic, pointed out: “It’s happening now. The future is now, it’s just uneven. This unevenness will level out.”

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. is director of the Center for Individualized Medicine at Mayo Clinic. The center seamlessly integrates the latest genomic and clinical sciences to transform health care. Mayo Clinic has a rich tradition of providing exceptional individualized and tailored medical care to its patients. The center provides another chapter in a 150-year patient care history by integrating up-to-date knowledge of genes and the human genome into personalized care for each Mayo patient.

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Sam Smith

NY Times
Tapping Medical Marijuana’s Potential
by Jane Brody

Marijuana has been used medically, recreationally and spiritually for about 5,000 years. Known botanically as cannabis, it has been called a “crude drug”: marijuana contains more than 400 chemicals from 18 chemical families. More than 2,000 compounds are released when it is smoked, and as with tobacco, there are dangers in smoking it…Dr. J. Michael Bostwick, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said the classification was primarily political and ignored more than 40 years of scientific research, which has shown that cellular receptors for marijuana’s active ingredients are present throughout the body. Natural substances called cannabinoids bind to them to influence a wide range of body processes.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month.

Context: J. Michael Bostwick, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist. Dr. Bostwick wrote about medical marijuana in the Feb. 2012 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week:
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Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on October 11th, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

 

 

October 11, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

NY Times
Researchers Press for Broad Ban on Hockey Fights
by Jeff Klein

Researchers at a Mayo Clinic conference on concussions in hockey called Wednesday for a ban on fighting at all levels of the sport, eight days after a Montreal Canadiens enforcer was hospitalized because of a fight on opening night of the N.H.L. season…Dr. Michael Stuart, a director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center and the chief medical officer for USA Hockey, cited the opening-night fight in calling for professional and junior hockey to replace five-minute fighting penalties with automatic ejections and suspensions.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Additional Coverage:
Globe & Mail, U.S. researchers press for ban on hockey fights

USA Hockey, USA Hockey Actively Involved in Safety of Game

KFAN,
Dan Barreiro: Dr. Michael Stuart joins Dan to talk about the physicality of youth hockey

KSTC,
Program Aims to Prevent Serious Hockey Injuries

KTTC
, Mayo Clinic holds second Concussion Summit 

Post-Bulletin,
Summit participants say it's time to get fighting out of hockey

Context:  Mayo Clinic's Sports Medicine Center held Ice Hockey Summit II: Action on Concussion on Oct. 8–9, 2013. The summit brought together top scientists, trainers, coaches, officials, retired professional players and manufacturers from across the United States, Canada and Europe to discuss concussion-related issues, including the science of concussion, impact on youth athletes and hockey community response.

"This is an opportunity for experts across the hockey world to come together to make the sport safer for our athletes," says Michael Stuart, M.D., co-director, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center. "Hockey players at all levels are bigger, stronger and faster. Therefore, we must improve our ability to diagnose, treat and prevent traumatic brain injury."

News Release: Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center to Host Second Concussion Summit

Mayo Clinic News Network: Youth Hockey Players: "Heads Up, Don’t Duck"

Mayo Clinic News Network: Water Sports and Concussions (pkg)

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

USA Today
What is postpartum depression?
by Elizabeth Weise

…Q: What is postpartum depression? A: It is a mood disorder that some women get after giving birth. It is characterized by unhappiness, an inability to sleep and eating difficulties, says Roger Harms, an obstetrician with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "It is not 'bad character.' You can't pull yourself up by your bootstraps to get over it. It's a real disease that is recognized as a medical condition that requires treatment," he says.

Circulation: USA TODAY has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

Additional Coverage: CNN

Context: Roger Harms, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic obstetrician and gynecologist. The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota supports women throughout their lifelong journey from childbearing age to menopause and beyond. Mayo Clinic's team-based approach includes you as a partner in care and healing. Doctors, surgeons, certified nurse midwives, nurse practitioners and physician assistants staff the department, and many also participate in research and education.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson, Kelley Luckstein

US News & World Report
Researchers Find Genes Linked to High Risk of Eating Disorders
by Allie Bidwell

… Leslie Sim, a clinical child psychologist at the Mayo Clinic, says these findings could provide relief to families and parents, who often blame themselves for a child's eating disorder. "We're really starting to see this as a true biological illness, where essentially we're seeing these kids sharing these temperament predispositions that likely places them at risk," says Sim, who serves as the clinical director of the Mayo Clinic's eating disorders program.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: Obese teenagers who lose weight are at risk of developing eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, Mayo Clinic researchers imply in a recent Pediatrics article. Eating disorders among these patients are also not being adequately detected because the weight loss is seen as positive by providers and family members. In the article, Mayo Clinic researchers argue that formerly overweight adolescents tend to have more medical complications from eating disorders and it takes longer to diagnose them than kids who are in a normal weight range. This is problematic because early intervention is the key to a good prognosis, says Leslie Sim, Ph.D., an eating disorders expert in the Mayo Clinic Children’s Center and lead author of the study.

News Release: Obese Teenagers Who Lose Weight at Risk for Developing Eating Disorders

Mayo Clinic News Network: Lead author of the study Leslie Sim, Ph.D., L.P., talks about the research

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Huffington Post
Rising Demand For Cataract Surgery Raises Cost Questions

The high costs and demand for medical procedures are putting a hefty price tag on independence for people over 50. Case in point: more and more post 50s are heading to their ophthalmologists for cataract surgery and the demand shows no sign of leveling off, a Mayo Clinic study found.

Circulation: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Additional Coverage: KAAL, Spire Healthcare, Post-Bulletin,  HealthCanal

Context: As baby boomers enter their retirement years, health care costs for complex and debilitating conditions such as Alzheimer's disease are expected to soar. Not drawing as much attention is the likelihood of similarly rising expenses for common age-related medical procedures. A Mayo Clinic study looked at one of those — cataract surgery — and found that more people are getting the vision-improving procedure, seeking it at younger ages and having both eyes repaired within a few months, rather than only treating one eye. The demand shows no sign of leveling off, raising the need to manage costs and ensure access to appropriate cataract treatment, the researchers say.

"Cataract surgery rates are rising in all age groups between 50 and 90, but the greatest increase is in the 70- and 80-year-olds. And part of that is that our older population, or the aging baby boomers, are working longer, they want to be more active, they have more demands on their vision," says senior author Jay Erie, M.D., a Mayo Clinic ophthalmologist. "That's why they're looking for surgery sooner — so that they can remain independent, remain active, continue to work."

News Release: Cataract Surgeries on the Rise as Boomers Age, Raising Access, Cost Issues

Mayo Clinic News Network: Cataract Surgeries on the Rise as Boomers Age

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Star Tribune
Tevlin: Nurse brings mission to make sure no one dies alone to Mayo

Sandra Clarke was working the night shift as a nurse in a West Coast hospital, checking in on a half-dozen patients as she made her initial rounds… The dying man asked if the busy nurse could stay with him for a little while. “I told him, ‘As soon as I was done checking on the other patients, I’ll come back to see you,’ ” Clarke recalls…Clarke returned to the room, only to find the man dead…“His arms were stretched out, as though he were reaching out for someone,” said Clarke. Clarke came up with the idea of a volunteer organization, No One Dies Alone (NODA), in which patients in their last days are assured bedside company as they die. Tuesday, Clarke met with the approximately 150 volunteers at Mayo Clinic/Methodist Hospital in Rochester to share stories of how the idea has comforted the dying while enriching the lives of those who witness death.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage: KAAL

Context: Sandra Clarke, the creator of the program, No One Dies Alone, was at Mayo Clinic this week to check up on Mayo's program, which was created two years ago. Since the inception of the program at Mayo Clinic, Mayo has guided more than 50 people at the end of their lives.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

WCCO
With 2/3 Of CDC Furloughed, There’s No One To Study The Flu
by Angela Davis

…On Thursday, the Mayo Clinic issued a statement explaining why doctors there are so concerned about the closure of the CDC, and what it means for this flu season…Dr. Gregory Poland is an infectious diseases expert at the Mayo Clinic, and he’s worried.

Reach: WCCO 4 News, a CBS afailiate, is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities

Context: Flu season is under way, but how many Americans have been hit so far, how badly, and which influenza bugs are to blame is unclear. That information is important to prevent and manage outbreaks, and it is crucial for creation of the next batch of influenza vaccines. But this flu season, the nation is flying (and coughing, and sneezing, and maybe worse) blind. That's because the agency that normally keeps the country on top of influenza outbreaks — the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — is largely out of commission due to the federal government shutdown. Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert Gregory Poland, M.D., explains what the CDC normally does and what federal furloughs mean to efforts to protect people from contagious illnesses.

Additional Coverage:
KAAL, HealthCanal, MedPage Today, KCRG Iowa, WJXT Fla., Post-Bulletin, AARP Blog

News Release: CDC Shutdown: Mayo Clinic Expert Explains What it Means for This Flu Season — and the Next

Mayo Clinic News Network:  Mayo Expert Explains What It Means This Flu Season and the Next

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

NBC News
The phenomenon of sleep texting

…You've heard of sleep walking, but what about sleep texting. Seriously, it's a real thing… Dr. Lois Krahn, a sleep specialist at the Mayo Clinic, has seen a number sleep texting cases."People have for years done things in their sleep whether it be sleep talking which is very common, sleep walking, sleep eating, but if a device is in arms reach and a person has a tendency to have any of those unusual sleep behaviors they could sleep text or sleep email," says Krahn.

Reach: NBC News Digital reaches an audience of more than 58 million unique visitors.

Additional Coverage: NECN, WCYB Va., WECT N.C., WTWO Ind., KWWL Iowa, KXAN Texas, WAND Ill., KWQC Ill., KSL Utah, KSHB Kansas City

Previous Coverage in July 3, 2013 Weekly Highlights

Previous Coverage in June 7, 2013 Weekly News Highlights

Context: Smartphones and tablets can make for sleep-disrupting bedfellows. One cause is believed to be the bright light-emitting diodes that allow the use of mobile devices in dimly lit rooms; the light exposure can interfere with melatonin, a hormone that helps control the natural sleep-wake cycle. But there may be a way to check your mobile device in bed and still get a good night’s sleep. A Mayo Clinic study suggests that dimming the smartphone or tablet brightness settings and holding the device at least 14 inches from your face while using it will reduce its potential to interfere with melatonin and impede sleep. “In the old days people would go to bed and read a book. Well, much more commonly people go to bed and they have their tablet on which they read a book or they read a newspaper or they’re looking at material. The problem is it’s a lit device, and how problematic is the light source from the mobile device?” says co-author Lois Krahn, M.D., a psychiatrist and sleep expert at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on October 4th, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

 

 

October 4, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

Globe and Mail
Are we really supposed to drink eight glasses of water a day?
by Carly Weeks

… Don’t drink your calories However, no one should mistake the questioning of water-intake guidelines for an argument against water consumption. “I do think we need to drink more water in an effort to drink less sugary drinks,” said Dr. Michael Joyner, a physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Circulation: The Globe and Mail is Canada’s national newspaper and has a daily circulation of more than 306,000. The Globe and Mail Online has more than 840,000 unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Public Radio International
Is it even possible for a human to run a marathon in under two hours?

The role of technology is another thing to consider in the breaking and creating of new records. Over years, equipment used by athletes to compete and to measure records have become more sophisticated allowing for more accurate and calibrated results. But Michael Joyner says that is not the whole story. Joyner works at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. He studies the physiological limits of the human body. He says there are many factors that make East African runners great at marathons. They grow up at high altitude--8,000 to 9,000 feet. They are tiny and lightweight.

Reach: Public Radio International (PRI) is an independent non-profit multi-media organization that creates and distributes news and cultural content that builds awareness and understanding of the world's people, conditions, issues and events. PRI is heard on almost 900 radio stations across the U.S. and on digital platforms that reach millions around the globe.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

NPR
Fish Guidelines For Pregnant Women May Be Too Strict, Study Suggests by Maanvi Singh

…Dr. Margaret Dow, an obstetrician and gynecologist with the Mayo Clinic, says the study's findings didn't surprise her. A 1997 study, she notes, linked moms' fish consumption with slight deficits in their kids' language and memory. But other subsequent studies haven't been able to replicate the results. "The quality of those older data were not very good," Dow says. Even so, Dow says she'll be sticking with the same nutritional advice she's always given her patients, based on the U.S. government recommendations. "This is just one study," she says. "I imagine we will probably relax the fish recommendations in the very near future ... but it's difficult to make that jump off of one study."

Reach: NPR's The Salt covers food news from the farm to the plate and beyond. NPR creates and distributes award-winning news, information, and music programming to a network of 975 independent stations, reaching 26 million listeners every week.

Context: Margaret Dow, MD. is a Mayo Clinic obstetrician and gynecologist.

Public Affairs Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Brian Kilen

KAAL
Genomics Conference Draws Medical Experts to Rochester

Hundreds of medical professionals from across the country are spending the week in Rochester. It's for the Individualizing Medical Conference, hosted by the Mayo Clinic. "People who have conditions that have been a mystery, doctors can't figure out what's going on. One of the tools you can turn to is genomics," said ABC's Dr. Richard Besser… Basically, doctors can look at a person's genes, to help figure out how to treat them. "Who will or will not respond to drugs and who might even have a bad reaction to drugs," said Dr. Richard Weinshilboum, a professor at the Mayo Medical School.

Reach: KAAL is owned by Hubbard Broadcasting Inc., which owns all ABC Affiliates in Minnesota including KSTP in Minneapolis-St. Paul and WDIO in Duluth. KAAL, which operates from Austin, also has ABC satellite stations in Alexandria and Redwood Falls. KAAL serves Southeast Minnesota and Northeast Iowa.

Context: From Promise to Practice, the second annual Individualizing Medicine Conference at Mayo Clinic, took place Sept. 30-Oct. 2. Physicians from more than 40 states and several countries came to Minnesota to hear and learn about the latest developments and research in genomic research and how to move these discoveries into the medical practice. "Our goal is to inform practicing physicians, but other care providers, students, media and the public as well," says Richard Weinshilboum, M.D., chair of this year's conference held by Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Hosts NIH Genomics Director at Individualizing Medicine Conference

Mayo Clinic News Network: Exploring Genomics in Patient Care (interview with Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, Mayo Clinic)

Mayo Clinic News Network: 10 Things That Have Happened Since Mapping the Human Genome – or, What’s Genomic Research Done for Me Lately?

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

KIMT
‘Heritage Days’ celebrating 150 years for Mayo

… Jeff Daehn has played the carillon at the Mayo Clinic for about ten years now. He is only the third to play this musical instrument for them since 1928. “It’s always interesting. It’s a rare opportunity and an honor to play and to keep this history alive and going,” Daehn said… Now, for the first time in many years, this carillon will be able to play the Westminster, or “Big Ben,” chimes every quarter hour. It is all just in time for Mayo Clinic’s 150th birthday. “It’s all about patients, it’s all about enjoying each other’s company. We will have music posters on display in the buildings,” said Matthew Dacy, Director of Heritage Hall at Mayo.

Additional Coverage:

KAAL
Mayo Clinic Celebrating 150 Years
by Brianna Long

It's a world-famous medical center, the home of two hospitals, and the future heart of the Destination Medical Center. But there is a rich history behind the Mayo Clinic. Wednesday, dozens of people came together to learn more about it. In particular, the history of the hospitals; Methodist, and Saint Marys. "Saint Marys begins its 125th anniversary, and Methodist Hospital, its 60th. We thought it would be wonderful to showcase the history of the two hospitals and how they were such a vital part of the growth of the city of Rochester.

Additional Coverage:  KTTC, Post-Bulletin, FOX47

Context: Heritage Days, a tradition for many years, celebrates the history, culture and values of Mayo Clinic. The events held across the Mayo Clinic campuses in Rochester, Florida, Arizona and the Mayo Clinic Health System recognize and thank all of the dedicated employees and volunteers who provide service to patients.

This year, Heritage Days also kicked off the Mayo Clinic Sesquicentennial, honoring 150 years of continuous service to patients. Dr. William Worrall Mayo settled his family in Rochester, Minn., in 1864 and opened a medical practice that evolved under his sons into Mayo Clinic, a global source of hope and healing.

Events for the Mayo Clinic Sesquicentennial will continue through December 2014. Visit the Sesquicentennial website at 150years.mayoclinic.org.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Celebrates Heritage Days, Sept. 30–Oct. 4

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Post-Bulletin
Historic sounds return to Plummer Building carillon
by Jeff Hansel

On Monday, many gathered below the bell tower to drink in the sound of a concert by carillonneur Jeff Daehn. "Just sitting here today, for us, waiting between appointments, what a wonderful thing for us to sit in the sun with the…flowers and the music," said Jeremy Wahlstrom of Dodge Center. "The arts are great for touching the spirit of our patients and staff," said Mayo historian Matt Dacy. He remembers hearing the Mayo brothers' songs when he first joined Mayo and missed them.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Additional Coverage:  KARE11

Context: Since its dedication on Sept. 16, 1928, the Rochester Carillon has become a Mayo Clinic landmark. In honor of its 85th anniversary, long-lost chimes and songs returned to the carillon Sept. 28 and many new musical selections became available, all through a new computerized clock function, made possible with a generous gift from Mayo Clinic benefactors.

The computerized clock enables automatic playing of the Westminster ("Big Ben") chimes at the quarter-hour, which William J. Mayo, M.D., originally requested for the carillon. In addition, the clock is programmed to play Sicilian Mariners ("Lord Dismiss Us with Thy Blessing") at 6 p.m., and St. Clement ("The Day Thou Gavest Lord Is Ended") at 9 p.m. Like the chimes, these songs were part of the carillon’s original repertoire, but were "lost" when the previous clock function (a mechanical device installed in 1953) went out of service. Computerization of the clock now makes it possible to program a wide range of additional songs and chime settings, significantly extending the carillon’s musical selection.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

MinnPost
Mayo Q&A: Once-overweight children at risk for bulimia, anorexia
by Susan Perry

… But few people, including parents and physicians, are aware that children and adolescents who were once overweight or obese are at risk of becoming anorexic or bulimic.But they are at risk — and significantly so, according to a Mayo Clinic report published in the October issue of the journal Pediatrics… In a phone interview last week, MinnPost talked with Leslie A. Sim, the report’s lead author and the clinical director of the Mayo Clinic’s eating disorders program, about the troubling relationship between obesity and eating disorders in children and adolescents. The following is an edited transcript of that interview.

Circulation: MinnPost is a nonprofit, nonpartisan enterprise which provides news and analysis based on reporting by professional journalists, most of whom have decades of experience in the Twin Cities media. According to MinnPost, the site averages more than 78,000 unique visits a month. MinnPost also has more than 25,000 followers on Twitter and its main Facebook page was liked by 9,200-plus readers.

Additional Coverage:

Chicago Tribune
Teen's weight-loss methods could be symptoms of eating disorder

Previous Coverage: Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights, Sept, 13, 2013

Context: Obese teenagers who lose weight are at risk of developing eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, Mayo Clinic researchers imply in a recent Pediatrics article. Eating disorders among these patients are also not being adequately detected because the weight loss is seen as positive by providers and family members. In the article, Mayo Clinic researchers argue that formerly overweight adolescents tend to have more medical complications from eating disorders and it takes longer to diagnose them than kids who are in a normal weight range. This is problematic because early intervention is the key to a good prognosis, says Leslie Sim, Ph.D., an eating disorders expert in the Mayo Clinic Children’s Center and lead author of the study.

News Release: Obese Teenagers Who Lose Weight at Risk for Developing Eating Disorders

Mayo Clinic News Network: Lead author of the study Leslie Sim, Ph.D., L.P., talks about the research

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

NBC Latino
Does your child play soccer or football? What to know about concussions
by Dr. Joseph Sirven

We Latinos love football and soccer. However, each of those games is associated with the risk of concussion. One million Americans have concussions annually.  A concussion is a traumatic brain injury when the brain hits the inside of the skull from the force of a hit.

Reach: NBC Latino is an English-language wesbite aimed at Hispanics featuring news and general interest information.

Context: Joseph Sirven, M.D., is chair of neurology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Dr. Sirven’s research pertains to all facets of the diagnosis and management of seizures and epilepsy.

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Washington Post
Teachers more likely to develop speech and language disorders, study finds
by Tara Bahrampour

Teachers more likely to develop speech and language disorders, study finds…Keith Josephs, a professor of neurology and a neurodegenerative specialist at Mayo and the report’s lead author, said the results do not necessarily mean that teachers are more likely to have SLDs, but that they may be more apt to notice when they start to lose language.

Circulation: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800.

Context: Keith Josephs, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist and the lead author on a study, "Occupational Differences Between Alzheimer’s and Aphasic Dementias: Implication for Teachers," which appeared in the American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

MPR
Mayo Clinic CEO hugs furry new partner
by Elizabeth Baier

Mayo Clinic President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy took the stage at the Clinton Global Initiative in New York this week with a new kind of partner – Sesame Street Muppet Rosita – and announced a new initiative to promote healthy behavior and disease prevention among women and children in five Latin American countries.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional Coverage: TV Balla

Context: During the Healthier Futures plenary at the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Annual Meeting on Sept. 24, Chelsea Clinton welcomed a number of guests on stage to announce a unique CGI Commitment to Action. Among the guests — Mayo Clinic’s President and CEO John Noseworthy, M.D.; Pro Mujer’s President and Chief Executive Officer, Rosario Perez; and Sesame Workshop President and CEO H. Melvin Ming who brought along Sesame Street Muppet Rosita. The commitment will use a new technology platform integrating mobile, web, and video technology along with remote training and access to specialists.

News Release: Healthy Connections: Technology Promoting Family Health

Mayo Clinic News Network: Video of Dr. Noseworthy talking with Rosita about being healthy

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

Dallas Morning News
More Americans exercise while they work

…Treadmill desks designed for the workplace are normally set to move at 1 to 2 mph, enough to get the heart rate up but not too fast to be distracting. It’s been a decade since scientific studies began to show that too much sitting can lead to obesity and increase the risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. Even going to the gym three times a week doesn’t offset the harm of being sedentary for hours at a time, said Dr. James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Dallas Morning News has a daily circulation of more than 257,000 and more than 1.4 million unique vistors to its website each month.

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on August 29th, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

 

 

August 30, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

NPR
Patients Love A Gentler Approach To Surgery, But Surgeons Balk
by Nancy Shute

Surgery can be a necessary misery, endured in hope of health. But what if you took away the misery, and kept the benefits? When hospitals quit subjecting patients to prolonged fasting, nasogastric tubes, abdominal drains, and other commonplaces of surgical care, a study finds, patients feel less pain and recover faster… "The early feeding makes a big difference" in how people feel, says Dr. Sean Dowdy, a professor in obstetrics and gynecology at Mayo who led the study. But he told Shots it's not just that. "Whether it's the early feeding or the lack of bowel preps or the change in anesthesia delivery, regardless, patients are happier."

Reach: The NPR Shots Blog covers news about health and medicine. It is written and reported by NPR’s Science Desk.

Additional Coverage: MPR, KNAU Ariz., HealthLeaders Media, News Medical, Boise State Public Radio, Contemporary OB/GYN

Context: Patients who had complex gynecologic surgery managed by an enhanced recovery pathway (ERP) resulted in decreased narcotic use, earlier discharge, stable readmission rates, excellent patient satisfaction and cost savings, according to a Mayo Clinic study. The findings are published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.

"Patients are much happier when we are able to eliminate the use of unproven and unpleasant interventions such as bowel preparations, caloric restriction, sedating medications and the use of surgical drains," says Sean Dowdy, M.D., a Mayo Clinic gynecologic surgeon and lead study author. "We show that patients undergoing the most complex and invasive operations have the most to gain from this recovery pathway."

News Release: Mayo Clinic Study: Enhanced Recovery Pathway for Gynecologic Surgery Gets Patients Back To Health Faster

Interview with Mayo Clinic gynecologic surgeon and lead study author Sean Dowdy, M.D on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

USA Today
Experts: Mom has biggest impact on girls' body image

Women urged to avoid talk of diet, weight with young daughters…"Moms are probably the most important influence on a daughter's body image," said Dr. Leslie Sim, clinical director of Mayo Clinic's eating disorders program and a child psychologist. "Even if a mom says to the daughter, 'You look so beautiful, but I'm so fat,' it can be detrimental."

Reach: USA TODAY has a circulation of 1.8 million and a readership of 3.1 million. USA TODAY websites have 26.3 million unique visitors a month.

Context: In the U.S., 10 million women and 1 million men suffer from eating disorders. Millions more suffer from binge eating disorders. The peak onset of eating disorders occurs during puberty and the late teen/early adult years, but symptoms can occur as young as kindergarten. Leslie Sim, Ph.D., L.P. is a Mayo Clinic eating disorders expert with appointments in Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine and Psychiatry and Psychology.

Tips to prevent teen eating disorders can be found here.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

MPR
Medical researchers study ways to make hot temps less dangerous
by Lorna Benson

…Dr. Michael Joyner, a Mayo Clinic physiologist and anesthesiologist who studies how people respond to heat by warming and cooling his subjects with a water-filled suit adapted from the U.S. space program, is trying to figure out if sensors in the body that drive breathing also detect temperature changes. And if so, he's trying to determine whether these sensors are faulty in people with heart failure, hypertension and diabetes - the three conditions that cause the most problems for people during periods of high heat.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anthesiologist. Dr. Joyner and his lab team are interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Public Affairs Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Star Tribune
Rise in thyroid cancer diagnoses is challenged by Mayo researchers
by Jeremy Olson

The findings, published Tuesday by doctors at the Mayo Clinic, have prompted the researchers to recommend a new diagnostic term that could spare people with small throat tumors from surgery, medication and radiation that they might not need… “This is exposing patients to unnecessary and harmful treatments that are inconsistent with their prognosis,” said Dr. Juan P. Brito, a Mayo endocrinologist in Rochester.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: An increasing gap between the incidence of thyroid cancer and deaths from the disease suggests that low-risk cancers are being overdiagnosed and overtreated, a study from the Mayo Clinic Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery finds. The study appears in the current issue of BMJ.

"High tech imaging technologies such as ultrasound, CT and MRI can detect very small thyroid nodules many of which are slow growing papillary thyroid cancers, says the study's lead author Juan Pablo Brito, M.B.B.S. an endocrine fellow and health care delivery scholar at Mayo Clinic. "This is exposing patients to unnecessary and harmful treatments that are inconsistent with their prognosis."

Additional Coverage: WCCO-830, Chicago Tribune, Post-Bulletin, FOX47, CTV News, MinnPost, MedCity News, Yahoo! Noticias

News Release: Mayo Clinic: High-Tech Imaging Contributing To Overdiagnosis Of Low-Risk Thyroid Cancers

Public Affairs Contact: Shelly Plutowski

La Crosse Tribune
Monday profile: Dr. Margaret Grenisen makes her mark as women’s health advocate
by Mike Tighe

Colleagues describe Dr. Margaret Grenisen as a champion for women and a hero, while she deflects much of the credit to co-workers. Grenisen was one of the architects of the Center for Women’s Health at Mayo Clinic Health System-Franciscan Healthcare in La Crosse, which was the first of its kind and marked its 20th anniversary this month.

Circulation: The La Crosse Tribune covers local and state news that is relevant to the Western Wisconsin area and has a daily circulation of more than 24,000. La Crosse Tribune - Online has more than 182,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: The La Crosse Campus serves as the hub for the Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare medical practice and is home to most medical specialties and services. The Center for Women's Health at Franciscan Healthcare is a comprehensive women's health center established to meet the diverse and dynamic needs of adolescent and adult women. With a multidisciplinary, all-women staff, The Center for Women's Health offers a variety of services designed to address the physical, psychological, and spiritual needs. Our services include screening, diagnosis and management of conditions which are unique to women, more common in women, more serious to women, or manifest differently in women.

Public Affairs Contact: Rick Thiesse

WJXT Fla./News4Jax
Drug May Stop Invasive Breast Cancer

New research from the Mayo Clinic here in Jacksonville, could give twice as many cancer-fighting patients, more options. Researchers say a drug used to treat blood cancers, may also stop the spread of invasive breast cancers.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Additional Coverage: Big News Network, Health Canal, National Cancer Institute, Nature World News, Science Daily, Sify, Zee News, Globedia, KTTC

Context: A drug used to treat blood cancers may also stop the spread of invasive breast cancer, researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida have discovered. Their study, published online in Breast Cancer Research, found that in the lab and in animals, the drug decitabine turns on a gene coding for protein kinase D1 (PRKD1) that halts the ability of cancer cells to separate from a tumor and spread to distant organs.

"Treatment with low doses of decitabine in an animal model of breast cancer restored PRKD1 expression, reduced tumor size, and blocked metastasis to the lung," says the study's senior investigator, Peter Storz, Ph.D., a biochemist and molecular biologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

News Release: Drug Used for Blood Cancers May Stop Spread of Breast Cancer Cells, Mayo Clinic Finds

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

CBS5 Ariz.
Mayo Clinic to open stem cell lab in Phoenix 

Mayo Clinic will open its own stem cell laboratory next summer. It will store and process stem cells that are used for bone marrow transplants. The clinic has one of the most active bone marrow transplant programs in the U.S., with more than 200 procedures done each year.

Reach: KPHO-5 is the CBS affiliate in Phoenix and is owned by Meredith Corporation.

Additional Coverage:  KPNX, Stem Cell Daily

Context: Mayo Clinic in Arizona, with one of the most active bone marrow transplant programs in United States, will open its own stem cell laboratory in summer 2014. The laboratory will be initially dedicated to storing and processing stem cells used for bone marrow transplants at Mayo Clinic Hospital and Phoenix Children's Hospital.

Mayo Clinic is a regional referral center and performs more than 200 adult stem cell transplants each year and approximately 30 pediatric transplants with Phoenix Children's. The program is accredited by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy and the National Bone Marrow Donor Program.

News Release: Mayo Clinic to Open Stem Cell Laboratory in Phoenix

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

Chicago Tribune
Breast-feeding may lessen stuttering
by Janise Neuiviann

Dr. Esther Krych, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic, said she found the results "really interesting" and commended the authors for uncovering another potential benefit to breast-feeding.  "They highlight nicely that breast-feeding isn't a cure-all, but at the same time that there may be benefits to breast-feeding we still have not discovered," said Krych, explaining there are many factors that go into language development. "Because of that, moms who can't breastfeed don't need to feel guilty." Krych, who is also chief medical editor of the Mayo Clinic Guide to Your Baby's First Year, said the mere act of caressing a baby while either breast-feeding or bottle-feeding with formula offered babies intimacy and a sense of security.

Reach: The Tribune’s average weekday circulation is about 425,000. Average Sunday circulation is more than 781,000. According to the Tribune, its newspaper reaches more than five million consumers while covering 76% of the market.

Context: Esther Krych, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pediatrician with appointments in Community Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine and Mayo Clinic Children's Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Courier-News Ill.
Elgin man set to undergo fourth kidney transplant at Mayo Clinic Wednesday
by Mike Danahey

Peter Giannaris of Elgin is looking forward to being able to do something he hasn’t done in 12 years that most of us see as a chore and take for granted… Giannaris, 38, has polycystic kidney disease. The Mayo Clinic website explains the condition “is an inherited disorder in which clusters of noncancerous, fluid-filled sacs (cysts) develop within the kidneys ... (and) can cause cysts to develop elsewhere in the body, too. The disease causes a variety of serious complications.”

Reach: The Courier-News serves the Elgin, Ill. area and Kane County in Northeastern Illinois.

Additional Coverage: WBBM Chicago

Context: Mayo Clinic Transplant Center is one of the largest and most experienced surgical practices in the world. Mayo has more than 300 surgeons and 122 operating rooms among its three locations in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Mayo Clinic surgeons perform hundreds of transplant surgeries each year.

Public Affairs Contact: Ginger Plumbo

Modern Healthcare
100 Most Influential People in Healthcare – 2013

This year's ranking of the 100 Most Influential People in Healthcare includes 15 newcomers as well as seven leaders who have been on every list since it started in 2002…15. Dr. John Noseworthy, president and CEO, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.

Reach: Modern Healthcare, published by Crain Communications, is a healthcare news weekly that provides hospital executives with healthcare business news. The magazine specifically covers healthcare policy, Medicare/Medicaid, and healthcare from a business perspective. It also publishes a daily e-newsletter titled Modern Healthcare’s Daily Dose. The weekly publication has a circulation of more than 70,000 and its on-line site receives more than 29,700 unique visitors each month.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Public Affairs Contact: Karl Oestreich

CBS Harrisburg
New law changes focus on keeping truckers healthy
by Ewa Roman

…And people in the medical field are gearing up for the changes as well. Dr. Clayton Cowl made a pit stop in Dauphin County Friday, teaching doctors, nurses and chiropractors about the new federal medical examinations and requirements. "What we're trying to do is actually close the loophole, so when a driver goes and sees an examiner there will be a specific number and registry for when that examiner does an exam and they'll be reported to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration on at least a monthly basis if not sooner," said Cowl, Mayo Clinic physician. 

Reach: CBS-21 serves Harrisburgh, Penn.

Additional Coverage: WITF

Previous Coverage in Nov. 12, 2012 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Big changes are coming to the medical evaluations required for many commercial driver’s license holders, including truckers and bus drivers. Under new federal requirements, the medical examinations will only count if they are performed by a health care provider specially trained and certified to do so. The goal is preventing medical emergency-related truck and bus crashes through what likely will be more intense health exams, says Clayton Cowl, M.D., of Mayo Clinic.

News Release: Mayo Expert Explains New Medical Exam Rule

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on August 2nd, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

 

 

August 2, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

HealthDay
Bipolar Disorder May Vary Depending on Weight, Eating Disorders

Bipolar disorder develops differently in obese people and among those who binge eat, a new study finds…"The illness is more complicated, and then by definition how you would conceptualize how best to individualize treatment is more complicated," study co-author Dr. Mark Frye, a psychiatrist and chairman of the psychiatry/psychology department at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said in a Mayo news release.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique vistitors each month.

Additional Coverage Related to Bipolar Study: KBMT Texas, KCEN Texas, KCTV Kansas City, KTTC, U.S. News & World Report; MSN.com; KPTV, Oregon; WAFB-TV, Baton Rouge, La.; Fox25, Boston, Health24, WPTZ Vermont, Info7, Medline Plus

Context: Bipolar disorder evolves differently in patients who also binge eat, a study by Mayo Clinic, the Lindner Center of HOPE and the University of Minnesota found. Binge eating and obesity often are present among bipolar patients, but the mood disorder appears to take a different path in those who binge eat than it does in obese bipolar patients who do not, the researchers discovered. The findings are published online in the Journal of Affective Disorders.

Mark Frye, M.D., is a psychiatrist and chairman of the Psychiatry and Psychology department at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The Department of Psychiatry and Psychology at Mayo Clinic is one of the largest psychiatric treatment groups in the United States. At Mayo Clinic campuses in Rochester, Minn.; Jacksonville, Fla.; and Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz.; and across the upper Midwest in the Mayo Clinic Health System, about 150 psychiatrists and psychologists, supported by several hundred allied health staff, represent every aspect of psychiatric medicine. Highly-skilled specialists provide expert care to adults, teenagers and children who have mental, addictive and emotional disorders.

News Release: Bipolar Disorder Takes Different Path in Patients Who Binge Eat, Study Suggests

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Delta Sky
The Domestic Medical Tourist
by Eric Lucas

David Neenan’s only certainty was that something was terribly wrong…Tests were inconclusive, so Neenan arranged a trip to the Phoenix campus of the Mayo Clinic…Medical travel is big business for the half-dozen national-level clinics that have carved out a niche providing health reviews for corporate executives…”The focus is preventative rather than diagnostic. Companies want to be sure their execs maintain their health and vitality,” says Dr. Kurt Carlson, who manages the executive health and international medicine programs at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Reach: Delta Sky is the inflight magazine for Delta Airlines and has a monthly print circulation of more than 603,000. Delta Sky is published by Minneapolis-based MSP Communications, which has published nearly 200 consumer, business and custom titles over more than 30 years.

Context: Kurt Carlson, M.D., Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine, manages the executive healthand international medicine programs at Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic's Executive Health Program offers busy executives an efficient, cost-effective way to manage their health and reduce medical absences. Thousands of executives from companies throughout the world participate in the Executive Health Program, available at all three Mayo Clinic locations in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

MedPage Today
FDA Eyes Menthol in Cigarettes
by Todd Neale

The FDA has taken an initial step toward regulating -- and possibly banning -- the use of menthol in cigarettes… Richard Hurt, MD, director of the Mayo Clinic's Nicotine Dependence Center, said the evidence is clear that menthol -- which makes tobacco smoke more palatable -- helps people to start and continue smoking and makes it harder to stop. "So in that respect it really serves no purpose in the cigarette except to do all of those things, and if you were to ask me the question, 'Should we do away with menthol in cigarettes?,' the answer is absolutely Yes," Hurt said in an interview with MedPage Today.

Reach: MedPage Today covers breaking medical stories from the perspective of professional medical personnel. Its website received more than 419,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Richard Hurt, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic’s Nicotine Dependence Center and a leading expert on tobacco-related issues. As a former smoker, he once smoked three packs a day. Dr. Hurt had his last cigarette on Nov. 22, 1975.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Star Tribune
YOUR DESK JOB MAY BE HAZARDOUS TO YOUR HEALTH
by Richard A. Lovett

If Ann Ruschy is on the phone, she’s also on the move. “Whenever I’m on the phone, I’m walking,” she said over the phone — while walking…Ruschy is the chief talent officer at the downtown Minneapolis office of Salo, a financial consulting and staffing agency. Ever since being recruited to take part in a Mayo Clinic project in “inactivity research” — which suggests that sitting at a desk all day can be bad for your health, even if you regularly exercise — Salo has embraced what the company calls “a culture of movement.” (This article was originally published in New Scientist on July 4, 2013).

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage: Oman Tribune

Related Coverage:
HealthLeaders Media
Physicians on Treadmills Diagnose with Accuracy, Says Mayo Doc

Fitness World

Context: James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist who is often sought out by journalists for his expertise. Basing his techniques of non-exercise activity on years of Mayo Clinic research, he offers cost-effective alternatives to office workers, school children and patients for losing weight and staying fit. Author, inventor, physician and research scientist, Dr. Levine has built on Mayo’s top status as a center of endocrinology expertise and has launched a multi-nation mission to fight obesity through practical, common-sense changes in behavior and personal environment.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Star Tribune (NY Times)
Heavy smokers get lifesaving advice

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force on Monday recommended that heavy smokers get an annual CT scan to check for lung cancer, a major change in policy that experts say has the potential to save 20,000 lives a year…Dr. Stephen Cassivi, a Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon who was involved in the study, said Monday’s announcement marks “the first major federal body to recognize the benefit for patients in terms of saving lives of people with lung cancer.’’ But he noted that a complete cancer screening program involves more than just a CT scan; it also involves choosing the patients who are most at risk and developing “a structured plan when you find something.’’

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Related Coverage: New York Times

Context: The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, of which Mayo Clinic is a partner, announced a preliminary recommendation this week that people at high risk for lung cancer consider having annual low-dose CT scans. Smoking is the biggest risk factor for developing lung cancer, resulting in 85 percent of the lung cancers in the United States, and high-risk individuals are those 55 to 80 years old with a "30 pack year or greater smoking history." That can translate as someone who has smoked a pack a day for 30 years or someone who smoked two packs a day for 15 years.

Results of the National Lung Screening Trial, published in the fall of 2011, suggested that smokers and former smokers might benefit from lung CT scan screening. It found a 20 percent reduction in lung cancer deaths with CT scan screening. Federal agencies and medical professionals have been discussing the findings ever since. Mayo Clinic took part in that trial, and thoracic surgeon Stephen Cassivi, M.D., calls the announcement a mandate that will certainly save lives.

Mayo Clinic News Network: CT Lung Scans Recommended for High Risk Patients

Public Affairs Contact: Joe Dangor

U.S. News & World Report
How to Advocate for Yourself in a Hospital
by Kimberly Leonard

U.S. News Health moderated a conversation about hospital patient empowerment, discussing topics such as educating yourself about your condition and care, using electronic medical records, talking to your doctor and speaking up about your needs… Mayo Clinic @MayoClinic Looking forward to today's chat. Tweeting from Rochester, Minn., Annie LeBlanc, PhD @Annie_LeBlancAnnie LeBlanc, HSR researcher, focus on SDM, patient centered care @mayoclinic here with great Mayo team #patientchat.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context: The US News #patientchat July 25 based on the recent US News best hospital rankings reached about 1.5 million people and had more than 400 participants. Mayo Clinic was one of the top contributors and Sharonne Hayes, M.D., a Mayo cardiologist,  was one of the top tweeters.

Additional U.S. News Coverage:

US News & World Report
3 Meditation Techniques for Beginners
by Laura McMullen

…Amit Sood, author of the upcoming book "The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living," calls this autopilot daze, in which we're physically here, but mentally elsewhere – our "default mode." And it's not a great place to be. We spend about half of our day in default mode, in which we're typically unhappy, he says, adding that too much time in this mode can lead to increased risk of depression, anxiety and attention deficit.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Lauded in Quality Rankings, Most Recently by U.S. News & World Report

News Release: Mayo Clinic Ranked No. 1 in Arizona and Phoenix by U.S. News & World Report

News Release: U.S. News & World Report Ranks Mayo Clinic No. 1 in Jacksonville and a Leading Cancer Hospital Nationally

News Release: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Mankato rank among best in Wisconsin, Minnesota regions

Previous Coverage in July 17, 2013 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Hiighlights

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson (Mayo Clinic in Rochester), Jim McVeigh (Mayo Clinic in Arizona), Kevin Punsky (Mayo Clinic in Florida), Micah Dorfner (Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato, Minn.), Susan Barber-Lindquist (Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Clarie, Wisc.)

ABC News
Faked Surgeries Are Rare but Hard to Spot
by Liz Neporent

Mary Jeanne Altieri had surgery on her right shoulder in 2005 to repair a torn rotator cuff but said the pain never subsided…But when Altieri's pain worsened she sought a second opinion, and then another. The third doctor told her that he was able to explain why her shoulder wasn't getting better: Panos had never operated on it, she said…Dr. Timothy Morgenthaler, the chief patient safety officer for the Mayo Clinic, said one way patients can protect themselves from deceptive surgeries and other medical mismanagement is to carefully check the reputation of the surgeon and hospital and get recommendations from trusted, knowledgeable sources.

Reach:  ABCNews.com is the official website for ABC News.

Context: Timothy Morgenthaler, M.D., Mayo Clinic Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Center for Sleep Medicine, is a also a member of Mayo's Clinical Practice Quality Oversight Subcommittee.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on July 17th, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

 

 

July 19, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations 

NBC News
Memory loss worries may indicate Alzheimer’s risk

Dr. Ronald Petersen is interviewed as well as a Mayo Clinic patient. Researchers at Brigham and Women’s hospital in Boston asked 200 healthy volunteers to report concerns about their own memory and then received a brain scan looking for build up of amyloid plaque, a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Those most anxious about their memory also had the highest levels of plaque. NBC’s Dr. Nancy Snyderman reports.

Reach:  NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams continues to be the top rated evening newscast with more than 7.9 million viewers each night.

Additional Coverage:

Reuters
Some, mild slips of memory may be very early Alzheimer's

AP, NECN, FOX News

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Nick Hanson

NY Times
Dementia’s Signs May Come Early
by Pam Belluck

…And, in a significant shift highlighted at the conference, leading Alzheimer’s researchers are identifying a new category called “subjective cognitive decline,” which is people’s own sense that their memory and thinking skills are slipping even before others have noticed.  “The whole field now is moving to this area, and saying ‘Hey, maybe there is something to this, and maybe we should pay attention to these people,’ ” said Dr. Ronald C. Petersen, chairman of the advisory panel to the federal government’s new National Alzheimer’s Project. Dr. Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s center, said preliminary results of a Mayo study of healthy older adults in Minnesota suggested something similar.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services. Richard Caselli, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Dr. Caselli's research focuses on cognitive aging and the changes that can be detected before the symptomatic onset of memory loss and related symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein, Nick Hanson, Jim McVeigh, Lynn Closway

NPR
Patients Seek A Different Approach To Hip Replacement Surgery
by Pattie Neighmond

Every year more than a quarter of a million Americans have total hip replacement surgery. It's almost always a successful operation that frees patients from what's often described as disabling pain…Critics say the increased interest in anterior approach surgery may be more due to marketing from doctors, hospitals and companies that sell specialized operating tables and other gear rather than any benefits to patients. Clinical trials comparing the two methods are underway at the Mayo Clinic and at the Hospital for Special Surgery, but it may well be five years before that data is available. In the meantime, doctors says it's important to look at the big picture. Today "most healthy patients recover quickly, no matter which surgical technique is used," says orthopedic surgeon Mark Pagnano with the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: The NPR Shots Blog covers news about health and medicine. It is written and reported by NPR’s Science Desk.

Context: Mark Pagnano, M.D. is an orthopedic surgeon who also has an appointment with Mayo Clinic's Young Hip Clinic. The Young Hip Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota evaluates and treats young people who have hip pain. The clinic focuses on alternatives to hip replacement or joint preservation surgery.

Public Affairs Contacts: Dana Sparks, Brian Kilen

NBCNews.com
Can Big Data solve the mystery of suicide?
By Helen Popkin

Everywhere on the Internet, we're trailed by bots that inspect our searches and social chatter, attempting to predict what we're going to buy, watch or who we might date next. But in the middle of all that commerce-friendly jibber jabber, some people are saying, in not so many words, "I am going to kill myself." What if a computer program could spot those cries for help as well?... Even outside the military population, doctors miss cues. A review of studies by the Mayo Clinic found approximately 44 percent of people who commit suicide visited their primary care physician, and 20 percent visited a mental health care worker in the month before their deaths.

Reach: NBC News Digital reaches an audience of more than 58 million unique visitors.

Context: Suicide is the 11th leading cause of death in the United States. Every year, millions of Americans think about taking their own lives. Sadly, each year tens of thousands die by suicide. While suicides can be a shock to family and friends, some warning signs exist. Often a simple question from a family doctor can be enough to start a person toward help and treatment. A review in the August issue 2011 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings by researchers at Mayo Clinic and the University of Washington, Seattle highlights the opportunity that primary care physicians have to establish a successful treatment plan for these patients. Dr. Timothy Lineberry is a Mayo Clinic suicide prevention expert.

News Release: Mayo Clinic: Primary Physicians May Hold Key to Suicide Prevention

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Everyday Health
Need a New Hip? Press 'Print'
by Dr. Sanjay Gupta

Thousands of hip replacements are performed every year. These operations are life-changers for people with osteoarthritis and other conditions, ridding them of pain and returning them to an active life…Brooke was born with a misshapen pelvis. By the time she was in her 20’s, she was already severely debilitated by arthritis in her hips…Her doctors at Mayo Clinic were able to spare Brooke all those surgeries by turning to a new technology: 3-D printing…“You press print and a 3-D model is made,” says orthopedic surgeon Christopher Beauchamp, MD.

Reach: Everyday Health Media, LLC is a provider of online consumer health content across a broad portfolio of over 25 websites that span the health spectrum — from lifestyle offerings in pregnancy, diet and fitness to in-depth medical content for condition prevention and management.

Context: Joint replacements have been around for a long time. Most people with conditions such as osteoarthritis can expect good results if they have one. But what about those who have complicated cases or unusual deformities that a standard replacement can’t fix? In the past that’s meant few options, but now, doctors at Mayo Clinic in Arizona are using 3D printers to enable customized joint replacement surgeries. Many patients, who were previously out of luck, can now have a successful surgery and better quality of life.

Mayo Clinic News Network Package: 3D Printer Uses CT Scan to Print Out Model of Hip Joint Before Surgery (pkg)

Public Affairs Contact: Dana Sparks

Everyday Health
Stem Cells Heal a Damaged Heart
by Dr. Sanjay Gupta

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have made a breakthrough in doing that. They have trained stem cells harvested from a person’s bone marrow to become heart cells, by treating them with certain proteins that trigger heart development. They refer to these stem cells as “smart” stem cells. “This study helps us move beyond the science fiction notion of research,” said Andre Terzic, MD, PhD of Mayo Clinic, the study’s senior author.

Context: Physicians and researchers in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic say their work is developing completely new ways to treat and manage chronic diseases like diabetes, heart failure, or even degenerative nerve, bone and joint conditions. And in December, international experts will meet at the World Stem Cell Summit, to continue exploring and sharing ideas about the future of regenerative medicine. Here are some 101 basics of how this science benefits patients.

Mayo Clinic News Network Package: Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine 101 (Medical Edge TV)

Public Affairs Contact: Dana Sparks

US News & World Report
The Personalization of Medicine
by Katherine Hobson

…Just this past May, the Food and Drug Administration approved two drugs for advanced melanoma driven by certain mutations that join a crop of new therapies approved in the last few years. Also, in May, the Mayo Clinic launched an Individualized Medicine Clinic at its three locations in Minnesota, Arizona and Florida aimed at getting cutting-edge guidance to cancer patients who have failed standard treatments and to people with mysterious ailments that may have a genetic cause.

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Context:  Mayo Clinic has always been a destination for patients seeking answers. Now, Mayo is taking that concept to the next level with the public launch of its Individualized Medicine Clinic — at all three of its campuses, in Minnesota, Florida and Arizona.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Launches Individualized Medicine Consulting Clinic

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Pioneer Press (AP)
Mayo Clinic gets a silver in US News ranking

Johns Hopkins Hospital has regained its place atop U.S. News & World Report's annual rankings of the nation's best hospitals, one year after its 21-year stint at the top of the rakings was broken… The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., was ranked third, followed by the Cleveland Clinic and UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Reach: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news cooperative, owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members. News collected by the AP is published and republished by newspaper and broadcast outlets worldwide.

KEYC Mankato
Mayo Clinic Health System Mankato Ranked High in State
Mayo Clinic Health System Mankato is ranked 14th among the state's hospitals according to a U.S. News and World Report released today. With nearly 160 hospitals in Minnesota, the report came as good news to the hospital staff.

Reach: KEYC-12, is a Fox affiliate whcih broadcasts from Mankato, Minn.

WEAU Eau Claire
Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire ranked among best in state

Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire is ranked No. 4 in Wisconsin and is recognized among the Best Hospitals in northwest Wisconsin in the newly released 24th U.S. News & World Report annual America’s Best Hospitals list… “This national recognition from U.S. News underscores the commitment our staff makes to care for patients,” says Randall Linton, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic Health System’s northwest Wisconsin region.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Phoenix Business Journal
13 Phoenix-area hospitals ranked as best by U.S. News & World Report
by Angela Gonzales

Of all 56 hospitals in the Phoenix metro area, 13 were named best regional hospitals by U.S. News & World Report. At the top of the list was Mayo Clinic, which touts 10 nationally ranked specialties and three high-performing specialties.

Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Jacksonville Business Journal
Baptist, Mayo Clinic among top 5 hospitals in Florida
by Michael Clinton

Several of Jacksonville’s hospital systems ranked among the best in Florida in an annual ranking of the best hospitals in the nation. Baptist Medical Center and Mayo Clinic tied as the No. 1 hospitals in Jacksonville and No. 4 in Florida on the U.S. News & World Report annual Best Hospitals study, released today.

Reach: The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals.

Nephrology News
Cleveland Clinic loses #1 ranking to Mayo for nephrology care

Medscape Today
Mayo Clinic Keeps Top Spot for Diabetes in US News Rankings

Additional US News Best Hospitals Coverage: MSNBC, Star Tribune, KARE 11, CNN, Chicago Tribune, Twin Cities Business, FierceHealthcare, Post-Bulletin, FOX47, KTTC, Action News Jax, Huffington Post, Health Leaders Media, Arizona Daily Star, CBS News, KTLA, WXOW, Action News Jax

Context: Mayo Clinic was highly rated in the 24th U.S. News & World Report annual America's Best Hospitals list released today. As in 2012, Mayo earned the No. 3 overall spot on the "Best Hospitals" list. Mayo ranked No. 1 in the nation in five clinical areas — gynecology, diabetes and endocrinology, gastroenterology, nephrology and pulmonology. In addition, Mayo is ranked No. 2 in five additional specialties — cardiology & heart surgery, ear, nose & throat, geriatrics, neurology & neurosurgery and orthopedics. Mayo Clinic earned the No. 1 spot in Minnesota, ranked No. 1 in Arizona and specifically in the Phoenix metro area, and earned the No. 1 rank as best hospital in the Jacksonville area.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Lauded in Quality Rankings, Most Recently by U.S. News & World Report

News Release: Mayo Clinic Ranked No. 1 in Arizona and Phoenix by U.S. News & World Report

News Release: U.S. News & World Report Ranks Mayo Clinic No. 1 in Jacksonville and a Leading Cancer Hospital Nationally

News Release: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Mankato rank among best in Wisconsin, Minnesota regions

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson (Mayo Clinic in Rochester), Jim McVeigh (Mayo Clinic in Arizona), Kevin Punsky (Mayo Clinic in Florida), Micah Dorfner (Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato, Minn.), Susan Barber-Lindquist (Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Clarie, Wisc.)

KSTP
Doctors, Deputies Warn Against Cliff Jumping
by Josh Rosenthal

…That's largely because the water below the cliff is a maximum of 14-feet deep, and it's only three-feet deep close to shore. Deputies have handed out more than 100 citations to people jumping off the cliff, which is on private property, in just the last month. "We had 18 just yesterday," Englund said. "This is a big problem for us out here." It's a big problem at the Mayo Clinic Health System in Cannon Falls, too. "This is very dangerous," Trauma Program Coordinator Angela Schrader said. "The impact can be lifetime on a lot of these patients."

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: Angela Schraeder is the Trauma Program coordinator at Mayo Clinic Health System in Cannon Falls, Minn.

Public Affairs Contact: Kristy Jacobson

Post-Bulletin
Destination Medical Center: Hold on to your hats
by Jeff Hansel

The Minnesota Legislature's passage of Destination Medical Center means the project no longer belongs to Mayo Clinic. In many ways, it belongs as much to Rochester residents themselves, who, through their votes, control the Rochester City Council. City Council members will measure, critique and approve expansion proposals submitted by Mayo and private developers over the next 20 years. 

Additional stories from Post-Bulletin Related to DMC Report:
A new model of health care — for the well, Pediatrics a key part of Mayo Clinic's Destination Medical Center The affluent will be big part of Destination Medical Center, Rochester seeks to become biotech destination  

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC), an economic development initiative designed to secure Mayo Clinic and Minnesota’s future as a global medical destination, passed on May 20 as part of the Minnesota Legislature’s tax bill. It will help fund the public infrastructure required to keep pace with an estimated $5 billion private investment by Mayo Clinic and other private entities over the next 20 years.

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich

Bloomberg
U.S. Blood Supply Threatened as Donors Face Iron Losses
by Michelle Cortez

…In the U.S., 70 percent of the blood supply comes from repeat donors. Limiting their giving may hamper a system that already suffers shortages. The Mayo Clinic predicts a 10 percent drop in its supply from its restrictions on donors after finding that one-third had iron deficiency. “We want to make sure we don’t have a group of people walking around being iron deficient,” said Manish Gandhi, the medical director of the Mayo Clinic’s blood donation center. “Blood donation in the U.S. is an altruistic thing. We need to focus on what we should be doing to protect these wonderful donors.”

Circulation: Bloomberg has 2,300 media professionals in 146 bureaus across 72 countries. Bloomberg delivers its content across more than 400 publications, over 310 million households worldwide through Bloomberg Television and 500,000 in the New York metro area and 18.5 million subscribers through satellite radio.

Context: Manish Gandhi, M.D. is medical director of the Blood Donor Center at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Approximately 80,000 units of blood products are transfused at Mayo Clinic in Rochester annually. For more interesting facts about donating blood, click here.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

Action News Jax
Mayo Clinic CEO talks about health care
by Catherine Varnum

The CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville talked one on one with Action News about the proposed health care reform plan. "We can't continue as we are," said Dr. William Rupp. He's the CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Florida. He's been watching the news closely over the last few months, trying to figure out how the Mayo Clinic will be affected by Obama's proposed health care plan. "I think there's still a lot of confusion about what actually is going to come out," said Dr. Rupp.

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Fla.

Context: William Rupp, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vice president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punsky

WEAU
Mechanical heart gives local man a second chance
by Courtney Everett

In our Health Alert, according to the Centers for Disease Control, about 5.7 million people in the United States have heart failure. But, a mechanical device is giving people with heart failure a new chance at life…Many hospitals don't have the capability to do this surgery, but Mayo Clinic Health System is helping patients with the devices and plans to open a special center this fall. "We will be a share cared center and what that means is that we will care for the patient in conjunction with the center that put the device,” said Dr. Kincaid.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Context: Cardiologist Daniel Kincaid, M.D., discusses how the ventricular assist device --VAD -- works. Beginning this fall, patients will be able to receive follow-up VAD care at the Cardiac Center at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Wisc. For patient David Evans, this partial mechanical heart is a lifesaver until he hopefully receives a heart transplant someday.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber-Lindquist

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on July 3rd, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

 

 

July 3, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

We are publishing early this week since we will be away celebrating America's Independence Day. Please stay safe and sound during your celebrations. Mayo Clinic doctors offer Five Tips to Keep Your Summer Safe and Injury Free. And take some time to watch a new "Saving Lives with Gus" video that shows what can happen if we aren't careful when using fireworks. The brainchild behind Gus is Raaj Ruparel, M.D., a Mayo resident.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

National Review
How to Save $213 billion — and Your Own Life
by Grace-Marie Turner

Are we taking too many drugs? The Twitterverse is abuzz over a new study released by the Mayo Clinic which found that 70 percent of Americans are taking at least one prescription drug. A second independent study, conducted by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics, provides relevant insights. IMS found that if we used prescription drugs more wisely, the U.S. could save at least $213 billion a year in health-care expenses. The key is reducing medication overuse, underuse, and improper use.

Reach: National Review and National Review Online provide news, commentary and opinion targeted toward a Republican audience. The magazine has a circulation of 130,000 readers and its website has 2.5 million unique visitors each month.

Additional Coverage:

NY Daily News
Prescription drugs: Study says 7 out of 10 Americans are taking at least one

FOX6 Milwaukee
Mayo Clinic study: 70% of Americans on prescription medication
 

Post-Bulletin
Our View: Study of prescription drug use is tip of the iceberg

UPI
7-in-10 U.S. adults take at least one prescription

Star Tribune Blog
7 in 10 Americans takes at least one prescription drug,
Nearly 7 in 10 Americans are on at least one prescription drug, and more than half take two, according to a new study by the Mayo Clinic. Antibiotics are the most common medication, with antidepressants and painkillers close behind.The statistics came from the Rochester Epidemiology Project in Olmsted County, Minn., and were published in the online journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

MPR, Huffington Post, WCCO, KSTC45, FOX9, Drug Store News, KSTP, KAAL; WTOP Radio; abclocal.go.com; HealthFinder.gov;  Medical News Today, Big News Network, KSHB Kansas City, Medscape, MinnPost, Houston Business Journal, BET, RTT News, CBS News, Headline & Global News, KTAR, Pharmaceutical International, The Guardian UK, Opposing Views, Drudge Report, TIME; msnbc.com, onAOL.com; Yahoo! Lifestyle India, Phillyburbs.com, Health Day;  Louisville Courier-Journal, Medical News Today, Big News Network, KSHB Kansas City, Medscape, MinnPost, Houston Business Journal, USAToday.com, CSN, MN Daily, KTVK, esciencenews.com, KXLF, Breitbart, Silicon Investor, Black Christian News, Blogs.MarketWatch.com, KFIAM640;   Newstalk1160, Ron Paul Forums, US News & World Report, Examiner.com, New York Daily News, WTSP, Right Side News, Amarillo.com, Catholic Online, Science 2.0, Science Codex, American News Report, WKRG-TV, Newser, Yeshiva World News, News-Medical.net, PharmaLive,  Headlines & Global News, Newsroom America, Psych Central, Infection Control Today, Federal Nutrition, BringMetheNews.com, KLFD1410, ThirdAge.com, Drugs.com; CityPages, Consumer Affairs, Before It’s News, Investment Watch Blog,  Claims Journal, Yeshiva World, New Kerala, Courier-Journal

Context: Nearly 70 percent of Americans are on at least one prescription drug, and more than half take two, Mayo Clinic and Olmsted Medical Center researchers say. Antibiotics, antidepressants and painkilling opioids are most commonly prescribed, their study found. Twenty percent of patients are on five or more prescription medications, according to the findings, published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

News Release: Nearly 7 in 10 Americans Take Prescription Drugs, Mayo Clinic, Olmsted Medical Center Find

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Sharon Theimer

Rheumatology Practice News
The Mayo Brothers’ Clinic: A History of Excellence
by James Prudden

Through extensive on-site interviews with several members of Mayo Clinic’s Rheumatology Division, an impression of this celebrated hospital was formed, but the overall nuanced picture did not come without the addition of 3 unlikely, diverse factors: the parking lot, the piano, and the necktie. Each one shined a surprising light on the impressive care to be found at Mayo that gives the patient experience there such depth. There is clinical expertise aplenty, surely, but there is more to it than that. It might come as a surprise to some that a nonclinical item like the placement of a new parking lot would demand the attention of an esteemed member of the Mayo rheumatology staff, but there she was, Sherine E. Gabriel, MD, former president of the American College of Rheumatology, engaged in a long conversation about the wisdom of placing a parking lot in a particular area of the Mayo campus.

Reach: This edition of the Rheumatology News was distributed to more than 10,000 rheumatologists and general practice physicians as well as the European League Agaainst Rheumatism annual meeting in Madrid in June. The issue will also be broadly distributed at the American College of Rheumatology fall conference.

Context: Rheumatologists at Mayo Clinic provide state-of-the-art diagnosis and treatment for diseases that affect the body's connective tissue. Physicians in the specialty see nearly 20,000 patients each year.

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

TODAY Show
Difference Between Headaches and Migraines

Cindy McCain, who has suffered from migraines for more than 20 years, launched the 36 Million Migraine Campaign on TODAY Thursday, an effort by the American Migraine Foundation to raise $1 for each of the 36 million American migraine sufferers. Dr. David Dodick, Mayo Clinic Arizona appears on the show.

Reach: The TODAY Show reaches an average daily audience of 5.5 million viewers.

Context: Cindy McCain has teamed up with the American Migraine Foundation (AMF) to launch a major national program to help millions of Americans who suffer with this disorder. McCain, who went public with her own struggle with migraines four years ago, is seeking to mobilize public attention to increase our nation’s research investment in migraine and raise public visibility for the condition.  David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist and director of Mayo Clinic in Arizona’s Comprehensive Concussion Program. Dr. Dodick's research focuses on prevention and treatment for migraine and cluster headaches.

News Release: Cindy McCain and American Migraine Foundation

Public Affairs Contact: Jim McVeigh

San Francisco Chronicle
Sleep may be impaired by devices' bright screens
by Kathryn Roethel

It may seem like the screens on your electronic devices consume your every waking hour. Now, new research indicates that, if you use smartphones and tablets before bed, they may be cutting into your sleep hours, too - or at least delaying them. New research from the Mayo Clinic shows that smartphones and tablets set at their brightest settings and held very close to the face emit enough light to suppress the body's production of melatonin, a hormone the brain releases when lighting is dark or dim.

Reach: The San Francisco Chronicle is the largest newspaper in Northern California with a daily circulation of more than 212,000 and is the second largest on the West Coast. Its website has more than 3.1 million unique visitors each month. The San Francisco Chronicle is owned by Heart Corporation which owns 15 daily newspapers.

Previous Coverage in June 7, 2013 Weekly News Highlights

Context: Smartphones and tablets can make for sleep-disrupting bedfellows. One cause is believed to be the bright light-emitting diodes that allow the use of mobile devices in dimly lit rooms; the light exposure can interfere with melatonin, a hormone that helps control the natural sleep-wake cycle. But there may be a way to check your mobile device in bed and still get a good night’s sleep. A Mayo Clinic study suggests that dimming the smartphone or tablet brightness settings and holding the device at least 14 inches from your face while using it will reduce its potential to interfere with melatonin and impede sleep. “In the old days people would go to bed and read a book. Well, much more commonly people go to bed and they have their tablet on which they read a book or they read a newspaper or they’re looking at material. The problem is it’s a lit device, and how problematic is the light source from the mobile device?” says co-author Lois Krahn, M.D., a psychiatrist and sleep expert at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz.

News Release: Are Smartphones Disrupting Your Sleep? Mayo Clinic Study Examines the Question

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

KTAR
Phoenix's Mayo Clinic reaches construction milestone
by Aaron Granillo

One of the country's top cancer research centers is one step closer to opening a cutting-edge treatment facility in Phoenix. On Thursday construction crews put the final steel beam into place, where the Mayo Clinic will operate with proton- beam therapy. "It's a $182 million investment in a laserlike beam of matter," said Dr. Wyatt Decker, CEO of Mayo Clinic Arizona. "Protons go deep into the human body, release very little energy until they hit their target, then they release a burst of energy that kills tumor cells."

Reach: KTAR-FM 92.3 is a commercial News/Sports/Talk station in the Phoenix, Ariz. area. Its signal reaches parts of California and Nevada.

Additional Coverage: ABC15

Context: On June 27, the last piece of steel went into place onto the newest building on Mayo Clinic's Phoenix campus — a building that will be the future Arizona home to Mayo Clinic's Cancer Center and the first proton beam therapy facility of its kind in the Southwest. The new Cancer Center will begin to be occupied in early 2015, with proton beam therapy expected to begin by 2016. Mayo Clinic's proton beam therapy program will be the first of its kind in the Southwest.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Cancer Center Topping off Ceremony

Public Affairs Contact: Julie Janovsky-Mason

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on June 21st, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

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 June 21, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thanks to Kelley Luckstein for serving as guest editor this week.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

NY Times
Ask Well: How Often to Exercise
By Gretchen Reynolds

Q. Does it really matter if I work out three days in a row, rather than spreading my exercise through the week?

A. It probably does matter. As Dr. Michael Joyner, a physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., points out, exercise has long-lasting, cumulative effects on your health and fitness, but it also produces acute effects that don’t necessarily linger.

Circulation: The New York Times has the third highest circulation nationally, behind USA Today (2nd) and The Wall Street Journal (1st) with 1,150,589 weekday copies circulated and 1,645,152 circulated on Sundays.

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. His research focuses on how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss. Dr. Joyner and his team study how the nervous system regulates blood pressure, heart rate and metabolism in response to these forms of stress.

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis, Bryan Anderson

CBS News
Mayo Clinic: Teens with chronic pain should not use medical marijuana
By Michelle Castillo

Teens with chronic pain should not be prescribed medical marijuana, according to the Mayo Clinic. Due to a lack of information on the risks and benefits of medical marijuana for adolescents, the Mayo Clinic is not recommending that youth be given pot for pain conditions.

While the drug may help alleviate some of their other conditions or symptoms, marijuana can lead to some negative short-term side effects including fatigue, impaired concentration and slower reaction times. 

"The consequences may be very, very severe, particularly for adolescents who may get rid of their pain -- or not -- at the expense of the rest of their life," commentary co-author Dr. J. Michael Bostwick, a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist, said in a press release.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Additional coverage: KSTC, Post-Bulletin, WLS Chicago, Dublin News, KSTP, News Medical, American News Report

Context: Adolescents can have chronic pain, just like adults. It can interfere with normal development, making it difficult for teens to attend school, socialize or be physically active, the cause may be hard to find, and medications are sometimes tried without success. As patients, their parents and physicians search for solutions, there is one increasingly available option they should avoid, Mayo Clinic researchers say: medical marijuana. The commentary by Dr. J. Michael Bostwick appears in the July issue of the medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

News Release: Medical Marijuana Not the Answer for Teens with Chronic Pain, Mayo Clinic Doctors Say

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Nick Hanson

Wall Street Journal
New Views of Motion Sickness
By Sumathi Reddy

Researchers from the Navy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and academia are studying causes and potential treatments of motion sickness, hoping to formulate better products for situations that range from the extreme (space!) to the mundane (road trip to Grandma's, anyone?)…

In other words, our inner ear tells our brain that we are moving, but our eyes tell us we aren't, or vice versa. "When one of these is telling you you're in motion and the other one is telling you you're sitting, the brain gets confused with the mixed signals, and it causes this sense of sickness," says Abinash Virk, director of the travel and tropical medicine clinic at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Circulation: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, is tops in newspaper circulation in America with an average circulation of 2 million copies on weekdays.

Context: Sumathi Reddy and Abinash Virk, M.D., had been working on a different story together, so Sumathi reached out to Dr. Virk directly to see if she would be interested in speaking with her about motion sickness. Dr. Virk worked with Traci Klein in media relations to coordinate the interview.

Public Affairs Contacts: Traci Klein

TODAY Show
Obesity is a disease, doctors’ group says
By Maggie Fox

…One third of Americans are obese – and that’s on top of the one-third who are overweight. Obesity is more than just a matter of carrying around too much fat, says Dr. Michael Joyner, an exercise physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

“The fat cells themselves we thought of for a long time as just warehouses for energy,” Joyner said in a telephone interview. But they also secrete chemicals, including chemicals that can cause inflammation, raise blood pressure and that down the road help harden the arteries.

Reach: The TODAY Show is the #1 ranked national morning news show and has held that position consistently since December 1995. TODAY reaches an average daily audience of 5.5 million viewers.’

Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., participated in several media interviews regarding the announcement that the American Medical Association officially designated obesity as a disease. Dr. Joyner is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. His research focuses on how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss.

Additional coverage: NBC News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Public Affairs Contacts: Bob Nellis

Ladies’ Home Journal
Freckle, Mole, or Skin Cancer?
By Julie Bain

Yes, You Could Be at Risk

"Melanoma can happen to anybody," says Jerry D. Brewer, M.D., a dermatological surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. "And it can kill you, even when you're young." Melanoma has grown a whopping 705 percent among women under 40 in the past four decades…

"About 70 percent of those who use tanning beds are young women," Dr. Brewer says. "Tanning beds give you nearly 10 times the dosage of UVA you would receive on a hot day in the Mediterranean, which speeds up the formation of skin cancer. That's why melanomas can start to show up in your mid-20s and 30s."

Circulation: Ladies’ Home Journal is an American magazine published by the Meredith Corporation. Ladies' Home Journal engages women with relevant conversations about health and relationships; beauty and style; food and finance. Their circulation is 3,831,000.

Context: Jerry D. Brewer, M.D., a dermatological surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, was interviewed about his research in melanoma and the dangers of sun exposure.

Public Affairs Contacts: Alyson Fleming

Star Tribune (Blog)
 7 in 10 Americans takes at least one prescription drug

Nearly 7 in 10 Americans are on at least one prescription drug, and more than half take two, according to a new study by the Mayo Clinic.

Antibiotics are the most common medication, with antidepressants and painkillers close behind.

The statistics came from the Rochester Epidemiology Project in Olmsted County, Minn., and were published in the online journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Circulation: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Health Check blog: Star Tribune blog which features the latest trends, research and news in medicine, health and science. A team of Star Tribune staffers aggregates updates from news wires, websites, magazines and medical journals.

Additional coverage: MPR, Huffington Post, WCCO, KSTC45, FOX9, Drug Store News, KSTP, KAAL, NY Daily News, CBS New, Huffington Post, Headline & Global News, KTAR, Pharmaceutical International, The Guardian UK, Opposing Views, Drudge Report, TIME

Context: Twenty percent of patients are on five or more prescription medications, according to the findings, published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The findings offer insight into prescribing practices. The statistics from the Rochester Epidemiology Project in Olmsted County, Minn. are comparable to those elsewhere in the United States, says study author Jennifer St. Sauver, Ph.D., a member of the Mayo Clinic Population Health Program in the Mayo Clinic Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery.

News Release: Nearly 7 in 10 Americans Take Prescription Drugs, Mayo Clinic, Olmsted Medical Center Find

Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

To unsubscribe: To remove your name from the global distribution list, send an email to Emily Blahnik with the subject: UNSUBSCRIBE from Mayo Clinic in the News.

 

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on June 7th, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

 

 

June 7, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

CNBC
Mayo Clinic's CEO on $5 Billion Expansion

John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO, discusses what his company is doing to create more jobs, the best opportunities internationally for growth and Obamacare.

Reach: CNBC provides real-time financial market coverage and business information to more than 340 million homes worldwide, including more than 95 million households in the United States and Canada.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic President and CEO, was interviewed by Maria Bartiromo on CNBC’s Closing Bell.

Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein

Florida Times-Union
What Northeast Florida hospitals charge for procedures can vary by thousands
by Kate Perry

To treat a Medicare patient with chest pain, Orange Park Medical Center charges almost $36,000 — more than three times the cost at the Mayo Clinic. But when the federal government sends payment, the Hospital Corporation of America-owned hospital gets paid $3,300. It’s a far cry from their listed charge and $1,000 less than the Mayo Clinic will receive for the same procedure, according to data released this month by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services showing the hospital charge and the rate Medicare paid for the 100 most popular procedures in 2011.

Circulation: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Bob Brigham is chair, administration at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Public Affairs Contact: Kevin Punksy

MPR – The Daily Circuit
Is your iPad an anti-sleeping tablet?

Many people spend their last moments before sleep reading on a tablet computer or checking messages on a smart phone. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic wondered whether the light emitted by such devices might be disrupting users' sleep patterns. The initial findings of a sleep study suggest that dimming a smartphone and holding it at least 14 inches from your face might help you sleep better. Dr. Lois Krahn, a psychiatrist at Mayo's Scottsdale, Ariz., clinic, conducted the study to determine if smartphones and tablets were interfering with melatonin, a hormone that helps control the body's sleep cycle.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Additional coverage:

KARE11 , Using your smartphone and not disrupting your sleep 
ABC News Radio, Innovations Report, Deccan Chronicle, Yahoo! Noticias, Yucatan Hoy, starMedia, El Imparcial, Headlines and Global News, Daily Mail UK, Biomedicine, Yahoo! Noticias, RxPG NEWS, Medical News Today, Times of India, Headlines & Global NewsHealth News Digest, Health Canal, Times of India, NDTV Gadgets, Indian Express, , Medical Daily, Science Codex, Sisat Daily, Cyber India Online, Innovations Report

Context: Smartphones and tablets can make for sleep-disrupting bedfellows. One cause is believed to be the bright light-emitting diodes that allow the use of mobile devices in dimly lit rooms; the light exposure can interfere with melatonin, a hormone that helps control the natural sleep-wake cycle. But there may be a way to check your mobile device in bed and still get a good night's sleep. A Mayo Clinic study suggests that dimming the smartphone or tablet brightness settings and holding the device at least 14 inches from your face while using it will reduce its potential to interfere with melatonin and impede sleep. "In the old days people would go to bed and read a book. Well, much more commonly people go to bed and they have their tablet on which they read a book or they read a newspaper or they're looking at material. The problem is it's a lit device, and how problematic is the light source from the mobile device?" says co-author Lois Krahn, M.D., a psychiatrist and sleep expert at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz.

News Release: Are Smartphones Disrupting Your Sleep? Mayo Clinic Study Examines the Question

Public Affairs Contact: Sharon Theimer

MPR
Making the most out of doctor-patient conversations

As doctors engage patients in conversations about their health, they need skills they didn't necessarily learn in medical school…Less medicine for overwhelmed patients "It's hard enough to live with a chronic condition like diabetes, says Dr. Victor Montori of the Mayo Clinic. But sometimes doctors make it harder, by piling on more tests and treatments than the patient can bear.

Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network.

Context: The research of Victor Montori, M.D., takes place in the Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Montori is interested in how knowledge is produced, disseminated and taken up in practice — and how this leads to optimal health care delivery and patient outcomes. Dr. Montori also serves as director of the Health Care Delivery Research Program in the Mayo Clinic Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery.

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

Post-Bulletin
Officials, residents pack Rochester City Council meeting about Mayo Clinic's DMC
by Edie Grosfield

City and Mayo Clinic officials and citizens packed a Rochester City Council committee-of-the-whole meeting Monday afternoon to hear an overview of the Destination Medical Center legislation that was passed recently as part of the state's tax bill.

Post-Bulletin
DMC has big plans
by Mike Klein

The words "infrastructure plan" conjure images of utilitarian streets and sewers, but Mayo Clinic'sDestination Medical Center calls for far more than that. The $500-million-plus plan envisions creating a pleasing urban environment in downtown Rochester where pedestrians could walk on leafy plazas with shopping and restaurants, and be trundled to their appointments by streetcars, based on documents created by DMC and the city of Rochester.

Related Coverage:
Post-Bulletin
Fran Bradley: DFL took some of the shine off of DMC

MPR
Mayo Clinic expansion boosts talk of high-speed rail

MPR
Mayo Clinic win could help attract high-speed rail

Post-Bulletin
Destination Twin Cities? Rochester high-speed rail plan studied

Additional Coverage: Star Tribune, Post-Bulletin, KAAL, Post-Bulletin, MPR, KAAL, MPR

Context: Destination Medical Center (DMC), an economic development initiative designed to secure Mayo Clinic and Minnesota’s future as a global medical destination, passed on May 20 as part of the Minnesota Legislature’s tax bill. It will help fund the public infrastructure required to keep pace with an estimated $5 billion private investment by Mayo Clinic and other private entities over the next 20 years.

Destination Medical Center Website

Public Affairs Contacts: Bryan Anderson, Karl Oestreich, Nora O'Sullivan (Zip Rail)

MinnPost
Mayo doctors propose higher — and new — 'sin taxes'
by Susan Perry

Two Mayo Clinic physicians have joined the growing ranks of health professionals who believe we should be using our tax codes to help change behavior and improve health. In a provocative commentary published in the June issue of the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, anesthesiologists Dr. Michael Joyner and Dr. David Warner propose increasing current taxes on alcohol and tobacco and implementing new taxes on fatty foods and sugary beverages.

Circulation: MinnPost is a nonprofit, nonpartisan enterprise which provides news and analysis based on reporting by professional journalists, most of whom have decades of experience in the Twin Cities media. According to MinnPost, the site averages more than 450,000 visits and more than 850,000 page views a month. At the end of 2010, MinnPost also had 8,800 followers on Twitter and its main Facebook page was liked by 3,500-plus readers.

Additional Coverage: BringMeTheNewsNewsTrackIndia, Business Standard, FOX9 News, Medical Xpress, Feed My Science, Science Newsline, Science Codex, Toronto Telegraph, Post-Bulletin, ThirdAge, KAAL

Context: Go ye and sin no more — or pay for it, when it comes to junk food, smoking and consuming alcohol. That's the message from two Mayo Clinic physicians who say raising "sin" taxes on tobacco and alcoholic beverages and imposing them on sugary drinks and fatty foods would lead many people to cut back, improving public health. The article by Michael Joyner, M.D., and David Warner, M.D., appears in the June issue of the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

News Release: Smoking, Sugar, Spirits and 'Sin' Taxes: Higher Price Would Help Health, Mayo Clinic Doctors Say

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

MinnPost
The telemedicine tourniquet
by Denise Logeland

Inside the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Innovation in Rochester, a new initiative is taking shape: the development of Mayo’s Center for Connected Care. “This is a major initiative of the Mayo Clinic across all of its campuses,” says Dr. Bart Demaerschalk, director of the Mayo Clinic’s telestroke and teleneurology program and a vascular neurologist with the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix. The vision is to “provide virtual care to patients regionally, within states that are historically Mayo Clinic territories, but also nationally and globally.” And not just in Demaerschalk’s specialty of stroke diagnosis and treatment.

Circulation: MinnPost is a nonprofit, nonpartisan enterprise which provides news and analysis based on reporting by professional journalists, most of whom have decades of experience in the Twin Cities media. According to MinnPost, the site averages more than 450,000 visits and more than 850,000 page views a month. At the end of 2010, MinnPost also had 8,800 followers on Twitter and its main Facebook page was liked by 3,500-plus readers.

Context: Bart Demaerschalk, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and also director of the Mayo Clinic Telestroke and Teleneurology program. In stroke telemedicine, also called telestroke, doctors who have advanced training in the nervous system (neurologists) remotely evaluate people who've had acute strokes and make diagnoses and treatment recommendations to emergency medicine doctors at other sites. Doctors communicate using digital video cameras, Internet telecommunications, robotic telepresence, smartphones and other technology.

Public Affairs Contact: Shelly Plutowski

Star Tribune
Mayo swings for fences in sports medicine
by Jackie Crosby

The Mayo Clinic is making a big play to attract ailing athletes and weekend warriors with aching knees to its campus. The hospital system plans to open a 22,000-square-foot sports medicine facility in Rochester next spring that will double its existing practice. The center aims to be a sort of high-tech medical playground that will help the injured get back in the game and the healthy hone their skills. “A lot of people think of Mayo as the last resort,” said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of Mayo’s Sports Medicine Center. “We want to change that.”

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional Coverage:
MinnPost
Mayo Clinic to build sports medicine center

Post-Bulletin
Our View: Sports Medicine Center is part of paradigm shift 

Additional Coverage: Sioux City Journal

Previous Coverage

Context: Mayo Clinic announced this week an expansion to its sports medicine practice to meet the growing regional, national and international demand for its expertise. The expansion is part of the 100,000-square-foot Mayo Clinic Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center building project, and is scheduled to open in spring of 2014. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Centeris a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Planning Major Sports Medicine Center Expansion

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic starts individualized medicine consulting clinic

Mayo Clinic has announced a new individualized medicine consulting clinic for patients with serious medical conditions who have not found answers through conventional testing. The IM Clinic does not focus on research. Rather, Mayo reports, whole-genome sequencing will be used as a standard part of care by a team of 20 genomics-trained physicians. Genetic counselors will guide patients through the process. The IM Clinic startup period began about six months ago.

Circulation: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota.

Context: You have a serious medical condition, but the conventional tests fail to find an answer. You still have no diagnosis and no effective treatment. What do you do? Mayo Clinic has always been a destination for patients seeking answers. Now, Mayo is taking that concept to the next level with the public launch of its Individualized Medicine Clinic — at all three of its campuses, in Minnesota, Florida and Arizona.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Launches Individualized Medicine Consulting Clinic

Public Affairs Contact: Bob Nellis

WEAU Eau Claire
Mayo to make change to help avoid infections

There will be a change at a local hospital starting next week to try to avoid infections. Mayo Clinic Health System Eau Claire says it will start washing all critical care patients with a powerful germ-killing soap to prevent MRSA infections. It says currently it only uses the soap on select critical care patients, like people who have had heart surgery.  Registered Nurse and Critical Care Director Marguerite Paradris with the hospital says the germs they’re most worried about, are not actually that uncommon outside the hospital.

Reach: WEAU-TV is the NBC affiliate for much of western Wisconsin, including Eau Claire and La Crosse. WEAU is licensed to Eau Claire and its transmitter is located in Fairchild, Wisc.

Context: Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire says it will start washing all critical care patients with a powerful germ-killing soap to prevent MRSA infections. It says currently it only uses the soap on select critical care patients, like people who have had heart surgery. Registered Nurse and Critical Care Director Marguerite Paradis with the hospital says the germs they’re most worried about are not actually that uncommon outside the hospital.

“Those resistant organisms exist probably everywhere in our environment, and many of us probably have touched them or been around them. What happens is when you come to the hospital it's when you're the most vulnerable and those organisms can then cause infections in people who are in the hospital," Paradis said.

A recently released study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found washing all ICU patients with the soap daily can help prevent MRSA infections, but the hospital says their change was already in the works before the study was released.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

WQOW Eau Claire
Eau Claire man bikes, swims, and runs road to recovery after heart attack

Within the first five minutes of meeting 53-year-old Tom Draz, you'd probably discover he's a seasoned athlete… But a year ago, his fast pace was faced with a shock. Tom says, "Last year, before the Eau Claire Half Marathon I was scheduled to run, I was swimming in the pool at the YMCA and started feeling really weak and tired." After some persuasion from his wife, Geralyn, Tom went to the hospital where he learned he was having a heart attack…Amy Olson, a Registered Nurse, at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, says, "Being a runner myself, runners tend to connect on a different level. So my heart went out to him knowing he had spent so much time training for such an event and not being able to do it."

Reach: WQOW-TV is an ABC-affiliated television station in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. The station broadcasts its channel 18 DTV signal on UHF RF channel 15. The station is owned and operated by Quincy Newspapers Inc., which also owns WXOW-TV in La Crosse.

Context: Our friends at Mayo Clinic Health System report on the Hometown Health blog, the lifelong runner and Eau Claire, Wis., resident was at the local YMCA getting in some last-minute training for a half marathon when he began to feel "unusually tired and had chest pain." The pain and fatigue was such that it kept him from finishing his workout and forced him to make a trip to the Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, where doctors told him he was having a heart attack. They stabilized him, but while recovering in the hospital the next day, Draz went into cardiac arrest. "One minute I was alive, and the next minute I was dead," he told Hometown Health. Quick action by his nurses, who used a defibrillator to restore his heart rhythm, "got my heart beating again and saved my life," Draz says.

Public Affairs Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

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Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Posted on May 31st, 2013 by Karl W Oestreich

 

 

May 31, 2013

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Thank you.

Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations

US News & World Report
What to Know Before You Glow
by Rachel Pomerance

It's officially summer. You want to get your glow on, but you know better than to do it the old-fashioned way. In case you missed the memo, tanning is bad for you. Sure, the rays get you vitamin D. But so does milk. Even a so-called "baseline tan" is not OK, says Jerry Brewer, chair of dermatologic surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Plain and simple: Tanned skin equals DNA damage, he says. "Asking what's a safe amount of tan is kind of like asking how much cyanide do you want in your breakfast."

Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month.

Additional Coverage:
KMSP FOX9
Sun Smart Campaign
KAAL
National Don’t Fry Day - Sun Safety Awareness

Previous Coverage

Context: Have fun in the sun, but be sun smart. That’s the message two cartoon-style moles deliver to kids of all ages in new public service announcements released by Mayo Clinic as part of Skin Cancer Awareness Month in May. Melanoma is on the rise, particularly among teens and young adults. It can be deadly. In the public service messages, available for use on television, radio, online and other platforms, two moles — animal moles, that is — illustrate the importance of four, key skin cancer prevention and early detection tips…

YouTube: Mayo Clinic: Have Fun in the Sun, But Be Sun Smart – Skin Cancer Prevention PSA

News Release: Have Fun in the Sun, But Be Sun Smart

News Release: Mayo Clinic: Melanoma Up to 2.5 Times Likelier to Strike Transplant, Lymphoma Patients

News Release: Mayo Clinic Study Finds Dramatic Rise in Skin Cancer in Young Adults

Public Affairs Contacts: Sharon Theimer, Nick Hanson

KSTP
Mayo Clinic Experts Work with Schools to Fight Obesity
by Scott Theisen

The state health department says obesity is one of its most serious concerns in Minnesota. Twenty-five percent of adults are obese, and for kids 2 to 5 years old, 13 percent are obese; more are overweight… Mayo Clinic Dr. Esther Krych and colleagues developed the BMI screening material. They want to identify kids whose BMI is too high and educate parents. "Our goal is to try to stop the problem before it starts, and that's really prevention," Krych said.  

Reach: KSTP-TV, Channel 5, is an ABC affiliate serving the Twin Cities area, central Minnesota and western Wisconsin, the 15th largest market in the U.S.

Context: There's a serious obesity epidemic in the United States and it's a growing concern when it comes to children. Being overweight or obese as a child puts you at greater risk of being overweight as an adult and increases the risk of heart disease and diabetes. So, experts at Mayo Clinic are exploring ways to help prevent childhood obesity. One project has Mayo teaming up with school districts to add body mass index (BMI) screening to the standard kindergarten screening.  Esther Krych, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic pediatrician.

Public Affairs Contact: Dana Sparks

Star Tribune
As May fades to gray, we’re kind of blue
By Bill McAuliffe

It might be the end of May, but at one St. Paul tanning parlor, wintry blues are knocking on the door. “The ones that tan normally in the winter, they’re coming back,” said Chris Frank, owner of Perfect Tan in the Merriam Park neighborhood, where the gray May has helped boost business by 20 percent over last year. “They want that vitamin D. They’re saying they thought the longer days would help, but they’re really dragging.’’…The conditions aren’t quite enough to trigger seasonal affective disorder, a chronic condition tied to the short days and long nights of winter, said Dr. Katherine M. Moore, a psychiatrist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Psychiatry and Psychology. But the disappointments and the altered routines that have come with the cool and wet May have certainly been enough to make people feel, well, gloomy.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277.

Context: Katherine Moore, M.D., is a psychiatrist in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, which is one of the largest psychiatric treatment groups in the United States. Highly skilled specialists provide expert care to adults, teenagers and children who have mental, addictive and emotional disorders.

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Chicago Health
Growing Up with Tragedies

Terribly violent storms, like the one witnessed in Oklahoma this week, can leave lasting damages much more permanent than a shredded earth. This is especially so for children. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem in kids and adults. Mayo Clinic Children’s Center anxiety prevention expert and psychologist Stephen Whiteside, Ph.D., offers tips to help conquer weather-related fears.

Reach: Chicago Health: Top Doctors & Hospitals offers expert insight into modern healthcare and lifestyle, the best practices and treatments, and more through engaging editorial and professional profiles. It is a resource for Chicagoans to advocate for their own care and an opportunity for medical institutions and practitioners at the apex of their field to educate the public. Chicago Health: Top Doctors & Hospitals is published by Northwest Publishing, LLC, a Chicago based media company.

Previous Coverage

Context: Violent storms — often accompanied by lightning, thunder, heavy rain, powerful winds and even tornado warnings — can be stressful for anyone, but severe weather can trigger much more severe anxiety, especially among children. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem in kids and adults. Mayo Clinic Children’s Center anxiety prevention expert and psychologist Stephen Whiteside, Ph.D., offers tips to help conquer weather-related fears.

News Release: Thunderphobia: Mayo Experts Offer Tips to Help Children Conquer Severe Weather Fears

Public Affairs Contact: Nick Hanson

Twin Cities Business Magazine
Mayo Clinic to Build Sports Medicine Center
by Rebecca Omastiak

Mayo Clinic announced Tuesday that it plans to build a 22,000-square-foot sports medicine center to meet the demands for its growing sports medicine and rehabilitation practice. The Sports Medicine Center aims to provide both sports rehabilitation and training equipment and facilities and is part of the 100,000-square-foot, four-floor, Mayo Clinic Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center building project… “Mayo Clinic is able to serve athletes of all levels in a multidisciplinary environment that can manage the entirety of our patients’ needs,” Edward Laskowski, Mayo’s Sports Medicine Center co-director, said in a statement.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional Coverage:
Pioneer Press
Rochester: Mayo to double up on sports medicine

Post-Bulletin
Mayo Clinic hopes to triple Sports Medicine Center numbers

MPR, KELOland S.D., Argus Leader S.D., KSTP, KARE 11, KTTC, BringMeTheNews, News Medical, FOX47, KAAL, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, News Medical , Post-Bulletin

Context:
Mayo Clinic announced this week an expansion to its sports medicine practice to meet the growing regional, national and international demand for its expertise. The expansion is part of the 100,000-square-foot Mayo Clinic Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center building project, and is scheduled to open in spring of 2014. The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries.

News Release: Mayo Clinic Planning Major Sports Medicine Center Expansion

Public Affairs Contact: Bryan Anderson

Green Bay Press-Gazette
Unusual medical condition gives Abe, his parents tough start to new
life by Peter Srubas

Baby Abe’s sucking and breathing skills still aren’t what they should be, but the little guy once known as “the big boy of the NIC unit” at Mayo Clinic is giving every indication he’s eventually going to have a normal life, his doctor says. Abe, son of Emma and Mike Slowinski of De Pere, was born Feb. 11 and already has been through three major surgeries, thanks to an uncommon ailment called a congenital diaphragmatic hernia — that is, due to a flaw in his diaphragm, his stomach and intestines were up in his chest, shoving his heart to the wrong side and interfering with his lung development…“It happens in about one in every 3,000 births,” said Dr. Chris Colby, a neonatologist at Mayo Clinic’s Children’s Center in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: The Green Bay Press-Gazette is one of 10 daily newspapers within Gannett Wisconsin Media and has a daily circulation of more than 40,000 subscribers. Its web site attracts more than 337,000 unique visitors each month.

Context: Abraham Slowinski was born in Rochester after the family had received the diagnosis of him having an uncommon ailment called a congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Chris Colby, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neonatologist at Mayo Clinic’s Children’s Center.

Public Affairs Contact: Kelley Luckstein

To subscribe: Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

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