Fri, Apr 29

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

 

Huffington Post
Melanoma Really Does Suck
by Brigitte Cutshall

Jimmy Carter is lucky. He was treated here in Atlanta at Emory for melanoma that had spread to his brain and was eligible to be involved with a new immunotherapy drug. My friend Rene is not so lucky. She’s been dealing with melanoma (multiple lesions) in the brain for about 18 months. The Mayo Clinic has been a great support to her and her family.HuffPost Healthy Living

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Other Mayo-related coverage in Huffington Post:

Huffington Post¬†‚ÄĒ¬†9 Superfoods You Should be Eating With Hypothyroidism

Huffington Post¬†‚ÄĒ¬†8 Seemingly Innocent Things That Are Sabotaging Your Sleep, Big Time

Huffington Post¬†‚ÄĒ¬†4 All-Natural Seasonal Allergy Remedies And One Big Myth

Huffington Post, 10 Things That Happen to Your Body When You Walk

Context:¬†Melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, develops in the cells (melanocytes) that produce melanin ‚ÄĒ the pigment that gives your skin its color. Melanoma can also form in your eyes and, rarely, in internal organs, such as your intestines.¬†The exact cause of all melanomas isn't clear, but exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight or tanning lamps and beds increases your risk of developing melanoma. Limiting your exposure to UV radiation can help reduce your risk of melanoma.¬†At Mayo Clinic, dermatologists,oncologists, pediatric oncologists, pathologists,general surgeons, and¬†plastic and reconstructive surgeons form a multidisciplinary team to provide whole-person care for those with melanoma.¬†

Contacts: Rhoda Fukushima Madson, Joe Dangor

 

HealthLeaders Media
3 Hospitals Wooing Patients with Virtual Tours
by Marianne Aiello

Mayo Clinic created its Periscope account in June 2015 with the goal of using it to stream behind-the-scenes tours, educational discussions with Mayo specialists, and live events. In July, it broadcast a 22-minute HealthLeadersguided tour of its Rochester, MN campus that showed off facilities and shared facts about the health system's history. "Mayo Clinic has patients from every U.S. state and over 140 countries every year, and we saw the opportunity to help those considering Mayo Clinic get a preview of what they can expect when they come here," Lee Aase, director of Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, told HealthLeaders in July.

Reach:  HealthLeaders Media has more than 40,000 readers each month and is targeted to senior executives with leading hospitals, health systems, health plans, physician organizations, and allied and ancillary service providers and provides in-depth, informed reports on the nation's most innovative and entrepreneurial healthcare service organizations across the continuum of care.

Context: You can find a virtual tour of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., on Mayo's YouTube Channel. Other virtual Mayo tours can be accessed on Mayo's Periscope page.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Wall Street Journal
New Tools Help Patients Make Tough Decisions In the ER
by Laura Landro

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is developing several such aids, including one for patients with low-risk chest pain. Dr. Hess and his team developed a decision aid, Chest PainWSJ Banner Choice, that includes information on the diagnosis, displays a patient‚Äôs 45-day risk of a heart attack and options for care. These include admission to an observation unit for tests, follow-up with a heart doctor within 24 to 72 hours‚ÄĒor¬†letting the ER doctor make the decision. ‚ÄúOur goal is not to put the decisions in patient‚Äôs laps so they feel abandoned, but to involve them in the decision process to the degree they wish,‚ÄĚ Dr. Hess says.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Additional video coverage: WSJ interview with Dr. Hess

Other Mayo-related coverage in The Wall Street Journal:

Wall Street Journal¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Telemedicine Advocates Look to Expand Nursing Licenses‚Äô Range

Wall Street Journal¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Clues to a Family‚Äôs Heart Disease

Context: ¬†Patients who arrive at the emergency department with low-risk chest pain and talk through treatment options with a physician show improved knowledge of their health status and follow-up options, compared with patients who received standard counseling from a physician, according to Mayo Clinic research presented at the American College of Cardiology‚Äôs 65th Annual Scientific Session.¬†Chest pain accounts for about 8 million emergency department visits each year in the U.S., but more than 90 percent of those patients are not experiencing a heart attack, says Erik Hess, M.D., lead author and emergency medicine physician at Mayo Clinic. ‚ÄúAn electrocardiogram and blood tests can tell us if a patient is having a heart attack. Further testing may be needed to tell us if a patient faces an increased risk of heart attack in the near future. We wanted to know if there is value in discussing this further testing with patients.‚ÄĚ More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Elizabeth Zimmerman Young

 

C-SPAN
Health Care in the U.S.

Dr. John Noseworthy talks about trends in health care and how the Affordable Care Act is affecting U.S. hospitals.

C-SpanReach: C-Span's Washington Journal focuses on the day's top Washington, D.C. public affairs stories. Some topics covered on the program include campaign finance, energy prices, and special interest groups. Washington Journal is watched predominantly by adults over 35 years old interested in public affairs.

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

HealthDay
Nipple-Preserving Mastectomies Appear Safe for High-Risk Women: Study

"Nipple-sparing mastectomy is gaining wide acceptance because of its superior cosmetic results, but pockets of the medical community remain skeptical that it is the right choice for the BRCA population," said study lead author Dr. James Jakub, a breast surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Other coverage:

Medscape¬†‚ÄĒ¬†More Proof: Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy Safe for BRCA Carriers

Health Day Logo

Context:¬†Protective mastectomies that preserve the nipple and surrounding skin prevent breast cancer as effectively as more invasive surgeries for women with a genetic mutation calledBRCA that raises their risk of developing breast cancer, a multi-institution study led by Mayo Clinic found. The research should reassure patients and surgeons that nipple-sparing mastectomies, which leave women with more natural-looking breasts than other mastectomies, are a safe way to reduce breast cancer risk in BRCA carriers, the authors say. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Breast Surgeons in Dallas.¬†‚ÄúNipple-sparing mastectomy is gaining wide acceptance because of its superior cosmetic results, but pockets of the medical community remain skeptical that it is the right choice for the BRCA population,‚ÄĚ says study lead author James Jakub, M.D., abreast surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. ‚ÄúThis is the largest study of its kind to address the controversy, and to show that nipple-sparing mastectomy is as effective at preventing breast cancer as traditional mastectomy.‚ÄĚ More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo Clinic Ventures Firm Explores Commercialization Of Gut Microbe Treatment
by Don Jacobson

Despite the presence of 100 trillion bacteria and other microorganisms that make up the human microbiome, how or even whether they may have a role to play in combatting a litany of maladies has never really Twin Cities Business Magazine Logobeen seriously considered. But that is quickly changing as the Mayo Clinic and the pharmaceutical industry continue a pattern of ever-bigger venture capital investments into a growing coterie of biotech companies at the cutting edge of microbiome research, which some are actually calling the next big thing in biotech. One such company is San Francisco-based Second Genome, which first became a Mayo Clinic Ventures portfolio company in 2014 as part of a clinical research collaboration. Last week, it was announced Mayo extended its venture stake in Second Genome as part of a $42.6 million Series B financing round led by Big Pharma giants Pfizer and Roche.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context: Second Genome, Inc., a leader in the development of novel medicines through innovative microbiome science, entered into an extensive partnership with the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine in 2014 to support the development of therapeutic products for multiple disease indications, starting with inflammatory bowel disease, metabolic disorders, and colorectal cancer. "The microbiome is an important area of medical research for Mayo Clinic, and this collaboration represents a broad and significant effort in our attempt to develop therapeutics targeting microbiome-mediated pathways," says Heidi Nelson, M.D., director of the Microbiome Program in the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine. "We believe that Second Genome's drug discovery capability complements our clinical expertise, and our hope is that together we can develop new treatment approaches for patients across a wide range of diseases with significant unmet clinical need. The ultimate goal is to improve the lives of patients."

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: AARP.org, advance care planning, Allergy Remedies, alzheimer's disease, Amber Gerber, anti-inflammatory benefits of honey, Astra Zeneca, Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review, Benzinga, Berg’s Phase II study, brain aneurysm, brain hemorrhage


Fri, Apr 22

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Florida Times-Union
Renowned neurosurgeon recruited by Mayo Clinic
by Charlie Patton

Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, a brilliant neurosurgeon with a fascinating personal story, has been hired as the William J. and Charles H. Mayo Professor and chair of Neurologic Surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. ‚ÄúI think by any measure this is aFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo remarkably accomplished surgeon,‚ÄĚ said Gianrico Farrugia, CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. ‚ÄúAny place in the world would be pleased to have him coming ... It‚Äôs a real coup to have him coming to Florida. I think he will have a remarkable impact on Jacksonville‚ÄĚ. His recruitment is part of a strategy that Mayo in Jacksonville has been pursing for the last 15 months of increasing its status as a destination medical center for the Southeast United States and Latin America, Farrugia said.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Context: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, will join Mayo Clinic as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus in September, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Florida Times Union
Mayo Clinic researcher honored with prestigious award
by Charlie Patton

In 2011, Rademakers’ lab identified a mutation of the C9orf72 gene, which turned out to be the most common cause of both Florida Times-Union newspaper logofrontotemporal dementia and of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often called Lou Gehrig’s disease. Her lab has since discovered several genetic factors that help explain why some people with the mutation develop ALS while others develop frontotemporal dementia and still others develop both.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:¬†Yahoo! News¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Two Researchers to Receive $100,000 Potamkin Prize for Dementia Research

Context: Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D., a neurogeneticist on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive one of the highest honors in neuroscience: the 2016 Potamkin Prize for Research in Pick’s, Alzheimer’s and Related Diseases. The $100,000 prize is an internationally recognized tribute for advancing dementia research. It recognizes major contributions to the understanding of the causes, prevention, treatment and cure for Pick's, Alzheimer's and related diseases. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic parasite researcher is ticked off by her work
by Allie Shah

A giant plush-toy tick hovers over Dr. Bobbi Pritt from atop the high-powered microscope at her Mayo Clinic office. She pays it no mind as she examines slides of various parasites, describing each creature in a merry tone of voice. “This one is the head ofStar Tribune Variety Logo
a tapeworm that lives inside your gut,‚ÄĚ she chirped. ‚ÄúIt basically just gets longer and longer and it kind of just absorbs the food that you‚Äôre eating. So you‚Äôre eating for two.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Bobbi Pritt, M.D., Mayo Clinic Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, research focus is in clinical parasitology, vector-borne diseases, trainee education and appropriate test utilization. As director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory in Mayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Dr. Pritt has coordinated the development of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for multiple tick and mosquito-borne pathogens such as Plasmodium knowlesi, Borrelia mayonii, Borrelia miyamotoi, Powassan virus and chikungunya virus. She is author of the Parasite Wonders blog where she posts a weekly parasite case.  You can also learn about the ABCs of ticks on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

 

Twin Cities Business
Q&A: How Mayo Is Integrating 3D Printing Into The Operating Room
by Sam Schaust

The emerging technology is revolutionizing the way surgeons tackle complicated operations, and the practice of simulating Twin Cities Business Magazine Logosurgeries with anatomically correct, patient-specific models is becoming a tactic widely adopted by medical professionals at Mayo Clinic‚Äôs Rochester campus. Dr. Jonathan ‚ÄúJay‚ÄĚ Morris, a diagnostic and interventional neuroradiologist, and Dr. Jane Matsumoto, a pediatric radiologist, head the organization‚Äôs burgeoning 3D printing lab. (They instead call it ‚Äúthe anatomical modeling lab.‚ÄĚ)

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Context:¬†Not all great advances in surgery happen in the operating room. Some are coming off the printer ‚Äď a 3D printer. At Mayo Clinic, radiologists and surgeons are teaming up to discover every possible detail about complex cases before the operation. In some situations, it means patients experience less pain, shorter hospital stays and quicker recoveries. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Ethan Grove, Dennis Douda

 

Post Bulletin
Mayo Clinic doctor wins award for MS research
by Brett Boese

A Mayo Clinic doctor will be honored this week in Canada for her groundbreaking research on multiple sclerosis. Dr. Claudia Lucchinetti will be given the 2016 John Dystel Prize for MS Research Tuesday at the American Academy of Neurology annualLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaper meeting in Vancouver. She'll be given $15,000 for the award, the second time a Mayo doctor has been honored by the group since its inception in 1995.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context: Claudia Lucchinetti, M.D., will be awarded the 2016 John Dystel Prize for Multiple Sclerosis Research for her outstanding contributions to understanding and treating multiple sclerosis. Dr. Lucchinetti is one of only a few neurologists in the world with expertise in neuroinflammation, and her research has led to paradigm shifts in our understanding of central nervous system demyelinating diseases over the past two decades. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 3D printing lab, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC15's Rally for Red, Albert Lea Tribune, Alzforum, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's Prevention Registry, amyloid beta production, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), anatomical modeling lab, AOL News, Aol.On


Fri, Apr 15

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

New York Times
Millions With Leg Pain Have Peripheral Artery Disease
by Jane Brody

More than eight million older Americans have a condition that can cause leg pain when they walk even short distances. The condition, called peripheral artery disease, or P.A.D., is marked by diseased or blocked arteries in the legs. More than half of those with such circulatory problems in the extremities also have coronary or cerebral artery disease, noted Dr. Iftikhar J. Kullo, The New York Times newspaper logoa cardiovascular specialist at the Mayo Clinic, in The New England Journal of Medicine in March.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Iftikar Kullo is a Mayo Clinic cardiovascular specialist. Dr. Kullo's research interests include investigating the use of new methodologies in refining cardiovascular risk stratification. These include genetic markers, circulating biomarkers, and noninvasive tests of arterial function and structure.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Star Tribune
Mayo, GE Ventures launch technology firm near San Francisco
by Christopher Snowbeck

Mayo Clinic and GE Ventures are launching a new company near San Francisco to sell software and manufacturing services to firms developing cell and gene therapies. Pharmaceutical Star Tribune Business section logocompanies, biotech firms and health care providers are among the potential customers for Vitruvian Networks Inc., company officials said during interviews on Monday...Mayo Clinic is the largest private employer in Minnesota. Last year, the system posted $526 million in income on $10.3 billion in revenue across operations that span six states.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Other coverage:

Silicon Valley Business Journal, Bloomberg, Canada Standard, Twin Cities Business, HIT Consultant, Healthcare Dive, Becker’s Hospital Review, Nasdaq, Fierce Pharma

Context:  GE Ventures and Mayo Clinic announced the launch of Vitruvian Networks, Inc., an independent platform company committed to accelerating access to cell and gene therapies through advanced, cloud-ready software systems and manufacturing services. Cell and gene therapy involve time and resource-intense processes to provide personalized therapies to patients. Efficient and cost-effective solutions are required to expedite the transition of promising and potentially curative therapies from early clinical trials to a portfolio of products that advances medical care. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

US News & World Report
Too Fat for Surgery
by Anna Medaris Miller

Ever since Phyllis Warr was about 10 years old, doctors told her she'd drop dead if she didn't lose weight. They told her she wouldn't be able to walk at 35. They told her weight-loss surgery was her only hope. Warr is among the more than one-third ofUS News Heath Logo Americans who are obese ‚Äď a height-weight combination that makes surgeries more complicated for surgeons, more risky for patients and more costly for the health care system, according to Dr. Robert Cima, a colorectal surgeon and chair of surgical quality at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. "Across all surgical specialties, obesity is associated with increased length of hospital stay, increased readmissions, decreased rate of dismissals to home and increased cost," he said to a group of journalists attending an obesity research fellowship program in February.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Finance

Context: Robert Cima, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic colorectal surgeon. Mayo Clinic surgeons helped develop minimally invasive (laparoscopic) colon and rectal surgery and use these techniques on almost all surgeries. Laparoscopic procedures use smaller incisions than conventional surgery, which decreases bleeding, lessens pain and shortens both expected hospital stays and overall recovery times. They are also skilled in robotic surgery, a specialized form of laparoscopic surgery, and ileoanal anastomosis surgery that avoids the need for a permanent colostomy.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

STAT
Records found in dusty basement undermine decades of dietary advice
by Sharon Begley

Dr. Robert Frantz, a physician at the Mayo Clinic, drove 90 minutes to his childhood home, to search file cabinets. On his third trip he spied moldering, unlabeled boxes in the far corner of the basement. Inside were ancient magnetic computer tapes and STAT Logo of Boston Globereams of yellowed documents. The subject line in his email to Ramsden was ‚ÄúEureka.‚ÄĚ After getting the tapes translated into formats that modern computers can read, Ramsden and his colleagues discovered what had been hidden for nearly half a century: records on 9,423 study participants, ages 20 to 97, all living in state mental hospitals or a nursing home. It was the largest experiment of its kind.

Reach: STAT covers the frontiers of health and medicine including science labs, hospitals, biotechnology board rooms, and political back rooms. Hosted by The Boston Globe, STAT launched on November 5, 2015. The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Additional coverage: New York Times

Context: Robert Frantz, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Frantz's research is centered on the varied forms of pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary vascular disease and right heart failure, including pathophysiology, hemodynamics, causes of exercise limitation and optimal management strategies. Dr. Frantz's research includes defining best strategies for management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

Action News Jax
Mayo Clinic Jacksonville completes 3,000 liver transplants

April is Organ Donor Month, and the Mayo Clinic Jacksonville just completed its 3,000th liver transplant. The program started back in 1998. The Mayo Clinic Jacksonville is the seventh center to reach the milestone out of about 120 in the nation.ActionNewsJax

Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Context: The liver transplant team at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, recently completed the 3,000th transplant since the liver program started in 1998. Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus is only the seventh transplant center in the country to complete 3,000 adult liver transplants. Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has one of the largest liver transplant programs in the country. The combined volume of theliver transplant program at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota makes it the largest overall program in the country. To date, 6,681 liver transplants have been completed at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. The Florida campus leads the way with the most liver transplants. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: AARP En Espanol, Action News Jax, allergy season, alzheimer's disease, American Journal of Gastroenterology, Amyloid and Tau Markers, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Austin Daily Herald, Becker’s Hospital Review, Bloomberg, brain tumors, Breast Cancer News


Fri, Apr 8

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Jimmy Kimmel Live
Jimmy Kimmel and Guillermo Learn How to Wash Their Hands

Washing your hands is very important. Jimmy wanted to make sure he was doing it right, so we got in touch with a doctor at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota named Dr Poland. He is a specialist in infectious disease and he flew all the way to LA just to teach Jimmy and Guillermo how to wash their hands.Jimmy Kimmel Live

Reach: Jimmy Kimmel Live averages more than 2.4 million viewers each night.

Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic infectious disease expert. Dr. Poland and his team within the Vaccine Research Group aim to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research. Dr. Poland recently appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live to demonstrate the proper hand washing technique.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Tampa Bay Times
Experts say research shows promise for a breast cancer vaccine
by Kathleen McGrory

There are vaccines to help the body fight off measles, mumps and the flu. But breast cancer? That's exactly the technology a Florida-based company is hoping to bring to the market in the Tampa Bay Timesnot-so-distant future. The company, TapImmune Inc., is teaming up with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville to test two vaccines that could help the body fend off certain types of breast, ovarian and lung cancers. Mayo plans to launch a 280-patient clinical trial on one of the vaccines this summer. "There's a lot of potential," said Keith Knutson, the Mayo faculty member who designed the vaccine.

Reach: The Tampa Bay Times has a daily circulation of more than 166,000 readers and serves readers in the greater St. Petersburg, Tampa, and Clearwater, Florida market. Its website has more than 4.6 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies. The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment. More information, including a video interview with Dr. Knutson, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Arizona Republic
Ask a Doc: Going vegan? Consider this

Question: Could vegans be at risk for deficiency of essential nutrients? Answer: The health benefits of a whole foods plant-based diet are well-known, but the question of essential nutrients remains….The Mayo Clinic review team recommends that health care providers monitor vegan patients for adequate blood levels of vitamin B-12, iron, ferritin, calcium and vitamin D.Arizona Republic newspaper logo

Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context: The health benefits of a plant-based diet is well-known, but the question remains: Could vegans be at risk for deficiency of essential nutrients? A retrospective review by Mayo Clinic physicians recently published in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association indicated that vegans should ensure adequate intake of a few nutrients.¬†‚ÄúWe found that some of these nutrients, which can have implications in neurologic disorders, anemia, bone strength and other health concerns, can be deficient in poorly planned vegan diets,‚ÄĚ says Heather Fields, M.D., Community and Internal Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Contrary to popular belief, "Vegans have not been shown to be deficient in protein intake or in any specific amino acids." More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

NPR
New Advances In The Understanding And Treatment Of Migraines

Severe, throbbing head pain, sensitivity to light, nausea…these are just some of the symptoms the 36 million migraine sufferers in the U.S. regularly endure…Interview with Dr. David Diane Rehm Show LogoDodick  director, migraine program at the Mayo Clinic; chair, American Migraine Foundation.

Reach: Each week, more than 2.4 million listeners across the country tune in to The Diane Rehm Show, which has grown from a small local morning call-in show on Washington’s WAMU 88.5 to one of public broadcasting’s most listened-to programs.

Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an expert in concussion care and director of the Mayo Clinic Concussion Program.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

WCCO-TV
Mayo Clinic Center Reaches Out To Young Athletes

Athletic training continues to get more sophisticated and more specialized. That is why the Mayo Clinic Center in downtown Minneapolis held a clinic Monday to bring in experts to talk to high school kids about what it really means to be a ‚Äúhealthy‚ÄĚ athlete in a variety of ways. The hottest topics in high school sports are changing. The athletes of today are getting moreWCCO logo information on the total being, meaning nutrition, athleticism and over-specialization.

Reach: WCCO 4 News is the most-watched newscast in the Twin Cities, in 5 out of 7 newscasts.

Context: Mayo Clinic now extends its global expertise in sports medicine to the Twin Cities with the opening of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine located at Mayo Clinic Square in downtown Minneapolis, across the street from Target Center. Mayo's Sports Medicine practice also offers athletes of all ages and abilities performance training programs.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 6681 liver transplants performed at Mayo Clinic campuses, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, Aberdeen News, Adding chemotherapy to radiation to brain tumors, AJMC.com, amyloid plaques, amyloid-beta peptides, Ann-Marie Knight, April is National Donate Life Month, Arizona Republic, Attn.com


Fri, Apr 1

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Wall Street Journal
Cancer Treatment’s New Direction
by Ron Winslow

Evan Johnson had battled a cold for weeks, endured occasional nosebleeds and felt so fatigued he struggled to finish his workouts at the gym. But it was the unexplained bruises and chest pain that ultimately sent the then 23-year-old senior at theWSJ Banner University of North Dakota to the Mayo Clinic. There a genetic test revealed a particularly aggressive form of acute myeloid leukemia..‚ĶDr. Kasi and his Mayo colleagues‚ÄĒNaseema Gangat, a hematologist, and Shahrukh Hashmi, a transplant specialist‚ÄĒare among the authors of an account of Mr. Johnson‚Äôs case published in January in the journal Leukemia Research Reports.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Naseema Gangat, M.B.B.S., is a Mayo Clinic hematologist, Shahrukh, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic hematologist and transplant specialist and Pashtoon Kasi is a Mayo oncology fellow. Evan Johnson’s case was published in the the journal Leukemia Research Reports and is an example of Mayo Clinic’s multidisciplinary-team based care approach. 

Contact: Joe Dangor

 

New York Times
On C.T.E. and Athletes, Science Remains in Its Infancy
by Benedict Carey

In the best study to determine risk so far, published in December, a research team at a Mayo Clinic bank in Jacksonville found The New York Times newspaper logoC.T.E. in 21 of 66 brains of people who had played contact sports. It found no evidence of the disorder in 198 people with no record of playing such sports. But the authors said they had no way to know whether those 21 former athletes had symptoms linked to C.T.E.; some had other neurological disorders as well when they died. ‚ÄúThese are very early days, and we badly need larger studies, that include both athletes and nonathletes,‚ÄĚ said Dr. Dennis Dickson, the study‚Äôs senior author.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Related coverage:

Washington Post¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Dale Earnhardt Jr. plans to donate his brain for concussion research

Previous coverage in March 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth. About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic will begin construction on two new buildings, costing $100 million, this year
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville announced Tuesday that it will begin $100 million in major construction projects this year. It will begin construction this summer on what Mayo officials are calling ‚Äúa destination medical building‚ÄĚ that will provideFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo integrated services for complex cancers, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. The 150,000-square-foot building will have four stories with the potential to add 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit in the first year after the building opens.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:

WJXT-TV Jacksonville¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Mayo Clinic announces $100M expansion;¬†¬†WOKV-Radio,¬†Jacksonville Daily Record, Jacksonville Business Journal, First Coast News, Twin Cities Business, WOKV-TV Florida

Context: Advancing its position as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience. This summer, Mayo Clinic will begin constructing an innovative destination medical building that will provide integrated services needed for complex cancer, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. Initially rising four stories, the 150,000-square-foot building has the potential for 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit the first year the building opens. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Fast Company
Mayo Clinic Technology Said To Alleviate Nausea From VR
by Dahniel Terdiman

VR sickness could soon be a thing of the past, thanks to new technology developed at the famed Mayo Clinic. Today, the clinic Fast Companyannounced that it has licensed its patented galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) technology to the Los Angeles-based entertainment company vMocion. GVS is aimed at helping to alleviate the nausea problem many people have when using virtual reality systems. The idea is to incorporate GVS into a platform, known as 3v‚ÄĒwhich stands for virtual, vestibular, and visual‚ÄĒinto VR and augmented reality systems, giving users what they call a three-dimensional movement experience.

Reach: Fast Company's editorial focus is on innovation in technology, ethonomics (ethical economics), leadership, and design. Written for, by, and about the most progressive business leaders, Fast Company and FastCompany.com inspire readers and users to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future of business.

Additional coverage: Forbes, Electronic Specifier, Engadget, (e) Science News, Digital Journal, Tech Crunch

Context:¬†¬†Mayo Clinic and Mocion, LLC, an entertainment technology company, today announced it is making available Mayo Clinic‚Äôs patented Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation (GVS) technology specifically for use in virtual reality and augmented reality. vMocion‚Äôs 3v‚ĄĘ Platform¬†(which stands for virtual, vestibular and visual) incorporates this patented GVS technology, which adds a complete sense of three-dimensional movement for the first time into a virtual reality or augmented reality environment. vMocion has been granted the exclusive, global, perpetual license for Mayo Clinic‚Äôs GVS patents and algorithms within all media and entertainment categories and will offer the 3v Platform to other media and entertainment companies through a licensing agreement. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: "MoodCheck", acute myeloid leukemia, AdWeek, Albuquerque Journal, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Anesthesiology News, Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine, benchmarks of good health, bioengineer replacement tissue, bladder cancer, BLR.com


Fri, Mar 25

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News LogoMayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Forbes
What Science Tells Us Can Affect Our Risk Of Alzheimer's Disease
by Alice G. Walton

‚ĶBut it‚Äôs not clear whether single components of the diet are enough to affect Alzheimer‚Äôs risk. I think the diet fads of blueberries, broccoli, coffee are all nonsense,‚ÄĚ says David S. Knopman, researchForbes Pharma and Healthcare logoer at the Mayo Clinic. ‚ÄúNo one eats food in¬†isolation, and trying to disentangle associations between foods, especially when all the data is observational, is a hopeless and useless task.‚ÄĚ

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Context:  David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Knopman is involved in research in late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Susan Barber Lindquist

 

US News & World Report
10 Most Competitive Medical Schools
by Delece Smith-Barrow

There's a strong demand for doctors in the workforce, but most people who apply to medical school don't get in‚Ķ. But at some US News Education Logoinstitutions, hardly anyone gets an acceptance letter. The Mayo Medical School in Minnesota accepted only 1.8 percent of applicants ‚Äď 81 out of the 4,616 who applied ‚Äď for fall 2015. It had the lowest acceptance rate among all ranked medical schools.¬† Mayo accepted an even smaller percentage of applicants than it did in fall 2014‚Äč, when it admitted just 2 percent.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.comand http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Additional coverage:

Post Bulletin¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Heard on the Street: Mayo health schools get good grades

Related coverage:

KTTC¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Mayo Medical School's biggest graduating class matched into residency programs;¬†Post Bulletin

Context:¬†U.S. News & World Report recently released its 2017 rankings for Best Graduate Schools across the nation.¬†Mayo Medical School and Mayo School of Health Sciences, two schools within Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, advanced significantly in the findings.¬†‚ÄúWe are competing with some of the largest, well-known universities in the nation,‚ÄĚ says Mark Warner, M.D., Juanita Waugh Executive Dean for Education, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. ‚ÄúThese high ratings reflect the commitment of our faculty to deliver the highest quality education to the extraordinary students who come to our schools.‚ÄĚ More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Deb Anderson

 

Wall Street Journal
The Healing Power of Forgiveness
by Diane Cole

A wealth of research has linked the isolation and loneliness that can result to increased health problems and higher mortality. It is tantamount to ‚Äúsuffocating‚ÄĚ yourself emotionally, says Amit Sood, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester,WSJ Banner Minn. The effects on one‚Äôs health from bottled-up anger and resentment can range from anxiety and depression to higher blood pressure and increased risk of heart attacks, he says.

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Related coverage:

Business Insider¬†‚ÄĒ¬†A doctor shares his No. 1 tip for tricking your mind into feeling happier

Cosmopolitan magazine¬†‚ÄĒ¬†‚Äč20 Ways to Reduce Work Stress in 1 Minute or Less

Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

NBC News
OpEd: Are You Getting Enough Vitamin D?
by Andrea King Collier

Donald Hensrud, MD, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program says, at least 20-50 percent of adults have NBCNewsComsome form of low vitamin D values. "Low vitamin D is more common in winter months, because of less sunlight, but it is more common in African-Americans because they convert less vitamin D from one form to another in the skin," Dr. Hensrud says. According to Dr. Hensrud, vitamin D deficiencies are also more common in obese individuals and for people with kidney or liver disease.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

 

Los Angeles Times
Intensive exercise may keep the aging mind sharp
by Melissa Healy

Mayo Clinic cardiologist Virend Somers said the new research may not illuminate direct relationships between exercise and cognitive aging, however. It may show, as many observational studies do, that cognitively healthier people are more likely toLos Angeles Times Science Now Logo engage in healthy behaviors, such as exercise, that in turn maintain their brain health… "Given its cost-free nature and the myriad other benefits of exercise, I think we should assume it helps until definitively shown otherwise," said Somers.

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Context: Virend Somers, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic physician with joint appointments in cardivascular diseases and nephrology and hypertension. Dr. Somers directs the Cardiovascular Facility and the Sleep Facility within Mayo Clinic's Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contacts: Traci Klein, Joe Dangor

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo opening lab for nanotech research

With support from the state of Florida, Mayo Clinic‚Äôs Jacksonville campus has opened a state-of-the-art laboratory for Florida Times-Union newspaper logonanotechnology research, an emerging field of science that studies and applies materials that are the size of an atom. The lab will be directed by Debabrata ‚ÄúDev‚ÄĚ Mukhopadhyay, a scientist in cancer and nanotechnology who was recruited by Mayo to open the lab with a $2 million grant from the state.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Previous coverage in March 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in News Weekly Highlights

Context: With support from the state of Florida, Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has opened a state-of-the-art laboratory for nanotechnology research, an emerging field of science that studies and applies materials that are the size of an atom. The laboratory is a key part of Mayo Clinic’s new Translational Nanomedicine Program. The goal is to develop, test and apply tiny materials in diagnosing and treating patients, particularly those with cancer. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Twin Cities Business
Mayo-Boston Scientific R&D Partnership Bridges Venture Capital Gap
by Don Jacobson

During the recent political debate over whether to repeal the federal excise tax on medical devices, manufacturers claimed part of the reason it was a bad policy is that it stifled research and development innovation. Now that the tax has been suspendedTwin Cities Business Magazine Logo for two years, Boston Scientific and Mayo Clinic say they‚Äôve been freed to greatly expand a unique R&D collaboration. In December, device makers celebrated when the tax was suspended for two years, and last week Boston Scientific -- which employs about 5,000 people in Minnesota ‚Äď announced it was using some of savings to ramp up a previously unrevealed scientific research collaboration with the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website.

Additional coverage:

Worcester Business Journal¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Mayo Clinic helps Boston Scientific speed development;¬†Cardiovascular Business, Qmed,DOTmed.com

Previous coverage in March 19, 2016 Mayo Clinic in News Weekly Highlights

Context: Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) and Mayo Clinic announced this week a continuing collaboration where the two organizations share intellectual property and stimulate the rapid development of medical devices to address unmet clinical needs. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: ActionNewsJax, Alcohol abuse among med students, allergies, Allevant Solutions, alzheimer's disease, amygdala, Angela Murad, AOL.com, Arab News, Atlanta Black Star, Australia News Network, Bad oral health


Sat, Mar 19

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

ESPN
Latest studies: Brain disease from contact sports more common
by Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada

Latest studies: Brain disease from contact sports more common. Armed with the new definition, researchers at the Mayo Clinic searched for signs of CTE among thESPN Outside the Linese 7,000 brains that are preserved at the clinic's Jacksonville, Florida, location. Kevin Bieniek, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Mayo Clinic's Department of Neuroscience, initially narrowed the number to a more manageable 1,800 in an effort to limit his sample to people who participated in contact sports. Bieniek then spent months combing through medical records, obituaries and other resources.

Reach: ESPN Outside the Lines is a sports program that focuses on the most significant sports news of the day. The program airs at 1 pm ET each week day and at 9 am ET on Sundays. ESPN averaged 2.1 million viewers in 2015.

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Previous coverage in Dec. 4, 2015 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth. About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

US News & World Report
Asians and Obesity: Looks Can Be Deceiving
by Anna Medaris Miller

While only 11 percent of Asian-Americans are obese, they develop obesity-related complications ‚Äď namely, hypertension and diabetes ‚Äď at lower BMIs than do people of other backgrounds,
US News Wellness Logoresearch shows… "The educated [Asian] population knows that they're getting diabetes and hypertension and all these things at a much lower BMI, but if you're in a culture where everybody's really fat and you're thin, you tend to go around and think, 'Well, I'm protected,'" says Dr. Michael Jensen, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who studies how body fat, and its distribution, influences health. "But [you] may not be.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includeshttp://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

US News & World Report
What to Eat, Drink and Do to Relieve Constipation
by Michael O. Schroeder

‚ÄúExercises help the intestines squeeze and relax and act more normally,‚ÄĚ says Dr. Amy Foxx-Orenstein, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona.¬† For those with limited mobility, she adds, Pilates done lying on the floor or tai chi can alsoUS News Wellness Logo assist in stimulating blood flow and intestinal activity, which may help get things going.

Reach: U.S. News & World Report is a multi-platform publisher of news and information, which includes http://www.usnews.com and http://www.rankingsandreviews.com.

Additional coverage: Yahoo! Finance Canada

Context: Amy Foxx-Orienstein, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

The Boston Globe
A new antidote to aging
by Kevin Hartnett

In a sense, your body is a junkyard, slowly filling up with defective cells that clutter your vital organs. The accumulation of Boston Globe Logothese cells‚ÄĒknown as senescent cells‚ÄĒhas long been thought to be an important reason why people deteriorate physically as they age. ‚ÄúThe removal of cells had the same effect as not accumulating senescent cells to begin with,‚ÄĚ says Jan van Deursen, a researcher at the Mayo Clinic and coauthor of the paper. ‚ÄúIt had profound beneficial effects.‚ÄĚ

Reach: The Boston Globe has a daily circulation of more than 274,000 and Sunday circulation of more than 362,000.

Related coverage: MoneyLife, BCIndian.com

Previous coverage in Feb. 5, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context:¬†Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells ‚Äď cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age ‚Äď negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects.¬†‚ÄúCellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‚Äėemergency brake‚Äô used by damaged cells to stop dividing,‚ÄĚ says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. ‚ÄúWhile halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‚Äėemergency brake‚Äô has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.‚ÄĚ More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

 

Star Tribune
Mayo Clinic, Boston Scientific team up to develop devices
By Joe Carlson

Passing a wire through a diseased heart valve is a bit like threading a wet noodle into a garden hose while the tap water is flowing.¬†Passing a wire across a heavily calcified heart valve is the first step in many modern procedures to repair or replace it.Star Tribune newspaper logo But threading it through the jet of blood streaming out of the patient's narrowed valve can be a major technical challenge, especially since knocking bits of built-up calcium can trigger serious health problems.¬†Doctors at Mayo Clinic recently had an idea: What if they could aim the wire at the valve using a special catheter with a small funnel on the end to capture the blood flow and center the gadget right above the jet? That idea will be put to use in a human clinical trial later this year as part of a collaboration between Mayo and Boston Scientific Corp. ‚ÄĒ a long-running collaboration being publicly unveiled Wednesday morning.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:
Boston Business Journal¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Boston Scientific to speed up research thanks to suspension of device tax

HIT Consultant, Medical Physics Web, Post Bulletin, KTTC, Twin Cities Business, Star Tribune, MedCity News

Context: Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) and Mayo Clinic announced this week a continuing collaboration where the two organizations share intellectual property and stimulate the rapid development of medical devices to address unmet clinical needs. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

KTTC-TV
Mayo Clinic to open a nanotechnology lab on Jacksonville, FL campus; will enhance cancer research efforts by Frannie Smith

Mayo Clinic is expanding its cancer research efforts with the opening of a nanotechnology lab at the Florida campus. Mayo KTTC TV logoClinic's location in Jacksonville, Florida has been given a $2 million grant from the state to open up the lab. The lab is a key part of Mayo's nanomedicine program.

Reach: KTTC is an NBC affiliate that serves the Rochester, Minn. area including the towns of Austin, Mason City, Albert Lea and Winona. Its website receives more than 73,300 unique visitors each month.

Context: With support from the state of Florida, Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has opened a state-of-the-art laboratory for nanotechnology research, an emerging field of science that studies and applies materials that are the size of an atom. The laboratory is a key part of Mayo Clinic’s new Translational Nanomedicine Program. The goal is to develop, test and apply tiny materials in diagnosing and treating patients, particularly those with cancer. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: AAMC, ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, AJMC.com, alzheimer's disease, America Unraveled, Amyloidosis, antidote to aging, AOL News, Archer racing in Trans Am Series, Arizona Daily Star, Arizona Daily Sun


Fri, Mar 11

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

International Business Times
Betting On Cancer: Phoenix Aims To Become Oncology Destination As More Cities Look To Biotech For Growth
by Elizabeth Whitman

A transformation has taken place in the Phoenix area over the past decade as oncology centers and research institutions have merged, expanded and reconfigured their operations‚Ķ.‚ÄúWe‚Äôve said, ‚ÄėHey, we‚Äôre good at cancer. We‚Äôre going to do more,‚Äô‚ÄĚ saidInternational Business Times Logo Dr. Wyatt Decker, the CEO of the Mayo Clinic in Arizona as well as an emergency room physician. More than 20 percent of the clinic‚Äôs patients come from out of state, drawn by the Mayo brand's reputation and the perks of the temperate, picturesque desertscape of the Valley of the Sun. In 2010, the clinic generated a positive annual economic impact of more than $1.5 billion, the Mayo Clinic has calculated, and Decker estimated that amount has grown by 30 to 50 percent since then.

Reach:  The International Business Times has more than 1.6 million unique visitors to its website each month. International Business Times is a digital global news publication that provides comprehensive coverage and analysis of business, economic, political and technological issues around the world. It reaches over 55 million people every month in seven global editions and four different languages.

Context: ¬†Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota in 2015¬†and in Arizona in mid March¬†2016.¬†Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients ‚ÄĒ especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures ‚ÄĒ proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

International Business Times
Obesity In America: As Healthcare Costs Rise, Hospitals Weigh New Ways Of Caring For Larger Patients
by Elizabeth Whitman

‚ÄúIt‚Äôs those little things that add up,‚ÄĚ said Robert Cima, a colorectal surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Many International Business Times Logohospitals have neither the equipment nor the resources to move their patients efficiently, he said, even though they long ago began buying parallel sets of surgical equipment for operating on larger patients. Now, ‚Äúthe real issue is caring for them on the floor. That cost is huge, relative to the operating room,‚ÄĚ Cima said.

Reach:  The International Business Times has more than 1.6 million unique visitors to its website each month. International Business Times is a digital global news publication that provides comprehensive coverage and analysis of business, economic, political and technological issues around the world. It reaches over 55 million people every month in seven global editions and four different languages.

Context: Robert Cima, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic colorectal surgeon. Mayo Clinic surgeons helped develop minimally invasive (laparoscopic) colon and rectal surgery and use these techniques on almost all surgeries. Laparoscopic procedures use smaller incisions than conventional surgery, which decreases bleeding, lessens pain and shortens both expected hospital stays and overall recovery times. They are also skilled in robotic surgery, a specialized form of laparoscopic surgery, and ileoanal anastomosis surgery that avoids the need for a permanent colostomy.

Contact:  Sharon Theimer

 

Los Angeles Times
As measures of health, fitness and fatness matter more than weight
by Melissa Healy

The new studies suggest that these caveats about BMI are especially true for people as they age beyond their 50s and enter seniority, said Mayo Clinic cardiologist Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, who researches obesity's health effects. In the CanadianLos Angeles Times Logo study and others that have raised what's called "the obesity paradox," Lopez-Jimenez said it's possible that older people who carry a few extra pounds are protected by having a reserve of excess weight they can afford to lose during an illness.

Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years.

Context: Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Lopez-Jimenez studies obesity and cardiovascular disease from different angles, from physiologic studies assessing changes in myocardial mechanics and structural and hemodynamic changes following weight loss, to studies addressing the effect of physicians' diagnosis of obesity on willingness to lose weight and successful weight loss at follow-up.

Contacts: Joe Dangor, Traci Klein

 

Huffington Post
Why The Fat You Can See Isn’t The Fat You Should Worry About
by Erin Schumaker

In reality, the area of your body where you store your fat may be a better predictor of health -- regardless of your body mass index. "All fat is not the same," said Dr. Virend Somers, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Fat directly under the skin -- the stuff we can see -- isn't necessarily harmfuHuffPost Healthy Livingl.

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Virend Somers, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic physician with joint appointments in cardivascular diseases and nephrology and hypertension. Dr. Somers directs the Cardiovascular Facility and the Sleep Facility within Mayo Clinic's Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

CBS News
Can drinking lots of coffee lower risk for MS?
by Mary Brophy Marcus

In this case, a new study in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry suggests being a java drinker may lower the risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). Dr. Mark Keegan, professor of neurology and chair of the division of multiple sclerosis at theCBS News Logo Mayo Clinic, said, "They show some observational evidence that in two separate populations high amounts of coffee intake was associated with a reduction in the risk of MS," but he also cautioned that observational studies don't equal medical advice.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Context: B. Mark Keegan, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Keegan is involved in clinical and translational research in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and other related inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Post-Bulletin
Mayo sees big potential for small MRI machine
by Brett Boese

After nearly nine years of planning, Mayo Clinic researchers are just weeks away from collecting data on a $5.7 million Logo for Post-Bulletin newspapercompact 3T MRI scanner on its Rochester campus. Lead researchers John Huston III, a neuroradiologist, and Matt Bernstein, a medical physicist, are optimistic that their targeted work on the brain will improve patient diagnoses and outcomes, particularly involving strokes, Alzheimer's, tumors and high-impact injuries such as concussions.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Context:¬†The reality of magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, machines is one of great size ‚ÄĒ both in price and physical space. This, then, restricts access to needed medical screenings.¬†But what if you could shrink both and still produce high-quality MR images?¬†Mayo Clinic researchers, in a partnership with GE and funding through a National Institutes of Health grant, are hoping to answer that question, and many others, now that a new, one-of-a-kind compact 3-Tesla MRI scanner is in place at the Department of Radiology research labs. More information about the new MRI scanner can be found on Discovery's Edge, Mayo Clinic's research magazine.

Contact: Ethan Grove

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 24news.ca, AARP, alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer’s Research Center at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Amazon.com, Ambient Clinical Analytics, APoE4 gene, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atypical Afib, AWARE, bariatric patients



Fri, Feb 26

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Florida Times-Union
Stenting and surgery equally effective in treating a narrowed carotid artery, according to study
by Charlie Patton

Stenting and surgery are equally effective at reducing the risk of stroke in someone with a narrowed carotid artery, Thomas Brott, a physician who is a professor of neurosciences at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, told participants in the AmericanFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo Heart Association‚Äôs International Stroke Conference in Los Angeles Thursday‚Ķ ‚ÄúThe second phase completes a story, and the results are very encouraging,‚ÄĚ Brott told the Times-Union this week.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Medscape, Medical News Today, HealthDay, com, Healio.com, Health.com, Doctors Lounge, US News & World Report, New Hampshire Voice, Bismarck Tribune, Arizona Daily Star, La Crosse Tribune, MedPage Today, The Daily Star, MedPage Today 

Context:¬†Stenting and surgery are equally effective at lowering the long-term risk of stroke from a narrowed carotid artery, according to results of CREST ‚Äď a 10-year, federally funded clinical trial led by researchers at Mayo Clinic‚Äôs campus in Florida. The results were¬†published recently online in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at theAmerican Heart Association‚Äôs International Stroke Conference in Los Angeles. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

 

NBC News
Want to Reduce Your Cholesterol? Doctors Suggest Lowering Stress

As millions of Americans tackle high cholesterol, experts say one of the most significant risk factors ‚ÄĒ stress ‚ÄĒ is often NBC News With Lester Holt Logooverlooked. Interview with Dr. Stephen Kopecky.

Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month.

Context: Stephen Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

KJZZ Ariz.
Phoenix Mayo Clinic Opens New Cancer Center, Proton Beam Therapy Program
 by Andrew Bernier

Traditional radiation treatment for cancer can hurt as many healthy cells as cancerous ones. Now a Valley hospital is opening a new cancer center linked to a national network which includes pencil-thin radiation targeting often deadly tumors. The MayoKJZZ NPR -AZ Logo Clinic Cancer Center in north Phoenix provides a dedicated facility to the hospital's practicing oncologists. Ruben Mesa, director of the Cancer Center, said having a common facility can better unite doctors and researchers working on a wide variety of cancers.

Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area.

Additional coverage: AZ Bio.org

Previous coverage

Context: ¬†Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota in 2015¬†and in Arizona in by mid March¬†2016.¬†Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients ‚ÄĒ especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures ‚ÄĒ proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

New York Times
I Don’t Drink Coffee. Should I Start?
by Daniel Victor

As someone who doesn‚Äôt drink coffee, I‚Äôm sometimes forced to ponder whether I‚Äôve escaped an unhealthy addiction or if I‚Äôve New York Times Well Blog Logojust been asleep my whole life‚Ķ‚ÄúThere aren‚Äôt any guidelines to help guide you on this,‚ÄĚ said Dr. Donald Hensrud, director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. ‚ÄúThis is kind of an individual decision.‚ÄĚ

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Donald Hensrud, M.D. is the program’s medical director.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: AARP, ABC 6 News, ABC Salud, ACS Surgery News, Advisory, Alto Nivel, alzheimers, amyloid deposition, anti-ageing drugs, APoE4 gene, Arizona Daily Star, Attn.com


Fri, Feb 19

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

New York Times
Ask Well: Are Pomegranates Good For You?
By Roni Caryn Rabin

Pomegranates are rich in micronutrients with potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and are often compared favorably with red wine and green tea in terms of health benefits. But there‚Äôs little good evidence that the level of nutrientsNew York Times Well Blog Logo found in the fruit translates into true gains for human health, said Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic‚Äôs complementary and integrative medicine program, because few clinical trials have been done. ‚ÄúThere‚Äôs a suggestion pomegranate can do a lot of things,‚ÄĚ Dr. Bauer said. ‚ÄúThe trouble is there‚Äôs very limited data.‚ÄĚ

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context:  Brent Bauer, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic General Internal Medicine physician who is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. As director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

ABC News
Loss for words can be a rare brain disorder, not Alzheimer's
by Lauran Neergaard

A mysterious brain disorder can be confused with early Alzheimer's disease although it isn't robbing patients of their memories ABC News logobut of the words to talk about them…Speech and language are hugely complex. Just to speak requires activating 100 muscles between the lungs and lips to produce at least 14 distinct sounds per second, said Dr. Joseph Duffy of the Mayo Clinic.

Context:¬†New ways to diagnose and treat individuals who cannot speak, hear, or process language might not just ensure the right care‚ÄĒearly intervention could also help treat or avoid other related disorders, according to findings presented by researchers at the AAAS Annual¬†meeting¬†recently. ¬†Joseph Duffy, M.D., a Mayo clinic speech pathologist, is studying links between a particular speech disorder and other neurodegenerative problems.

Additional coverage:
The New York Times online, Star Tribune, Times of India, , Dajiworld.com, Business Standard, The Western Star, Yahoo! Maktoob News, The Economic Times, South China Morning Post, Daily Mail, Yahoo! News Canada, Deccan Chronicle, The China Post, The Jordan Times

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

FOX News
Innovative treatment holds promise for new approach to Alzheimer's treatment

In decades of research, scientists have focused on eliminating the signature plaques of Alzheimer‚Äôs to fight the devastating disease‚Ķ‚ÄúTheFox News Health Logo field is taking a step back and re-examining where we are with regard to what we know, what we don‚Äôt know and what might be some of the best avenues going forward to look for treatments,‚ÄĚ Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer‚Äôs Disease Research Center and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, who is not involved in the LM11A-31 research, told Time.

Reach:  Fox News is available to 102 million households in the United States and further to viewers internationally. Fox News Channel Online has more than 22.9 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Arizona Horizon (PBS)
Proton Beam Therapy interview with Dr. Sameer Keole

Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Arizona PBSMayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix will soon open its proton beam center to treat cancer. In properly selected patients proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program is unique, using pencil beam scanning, which allows closer targeting of a tumor. Dr. Sameer Keole (key-olee), the medical director of the Mayo Clinic Proton Beam Center in Arizona, will tell us more.

Reach: Eight, Arizona PBS is a PBS station that has focused on educating children, reporting in-depth on public affairs, fostering lifelong learning and celebrating arts and culture. Its signal reaches 86 percent of the homes in Arizona. With more than 1 million viewers weekly, Eight consistently ranks among the most-viewed public television stations per capita in the country. Eight is a member-supported service of Arizona State University.

Additional coverage: KWGN-TV, KFAB-Radio

Context: ¬†Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota in 2015¬†and in Arizona in by mid March¬†2016.¬†Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients ‚ÄĒ especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures ‚ÄĒ proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

New York Times
New Culprit in Lyme Disease
by Karen Weintraub

Mosquitoes may be receiving all the attention amid the Zika virus epidemic, but they are hardly the only disease vectors to worry about. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., have discovered a new species of tick-borne bacteria thatThe New York Times newspaper logo causes Lyme disease… Dr. Bobbi Pritt, the medical director of the microbiology laboratory at the Mayo Clinic, where the new strain was first detected, recommended that patients with exposure to ticks in Minnesota and Wisconsin receive antibody and polymerase chain reaction testing to detect B. mayonii if they are concerned about Lyme infection but do not have the telltale bull’s-eye rash.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Additional coverage: Scientific American, Outbreak News Today, Paul Pioneer Press, Yahoo! News, Business Insider UK

Previous coverage in February 12, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and health officials from Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin, have discovered a new bacterial species that causes Lyme disease in people. The new species has been provisionally named Borrelia mayonii. Prior to this finding, the only species believed to cause Lyme disease in North America was Borrelia burgdorferi. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

 

Florida Times-Union
26.2 With Donna marathon winner runs the race of his life for his wife
By Clayton Freeman

Marc Burget dashed down the finishing straight at Sunday‚Äôs 26.2 With Donna marathon, broke the tape at the line and immediately looked to his right...The 42-year-old Burget dedicated Florida Times-Union newspaper logohis win to wife Christina, who was diagnosed with breast cancer on Jan. 7.¬†‚ÄúCancer‚Äôs not going to stop us doing what we love to do,‚ÄĚ he said. ‚ÄúWe‚Äôre going to keep on pushing through it.‚Ä̬†Christina began chemotherapy about two weeks ago at the Mayo Clinic, practically a stone‚Äôs throw from the race‚Äôs finish line.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage:
Jacksonville Daily Record¬†‚ÄĒ¬†$365,000 from runners in annual 26.2 With Donna
Augustine Record¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Marc Burget dedicates 26.2 with Donna win to wife after she was diagnosed with breast cancer Jan. 7
WJXT.com¬†‚ÄĒ 26.2 with Donna grows stronger
First Coast News¬†‚ÄĒ 26.2 runners with Donna runners strive to end breast cancer

Context: For nine years, runners have gathered every February to participate in the 26.2 with Donna. It's a marathon to raise money and awareness for breast cancer research and care. Founder Donna Deegan is a three-time breast cancer survivor who was treated at Mayo Clinic. She wants to give back to the people and institution that cared for her. With funds raised from the marathon, Donna helped create and support a program at Mayo Clinic where experts can study breast cancer genes. The goal is to develop new and better ways to diagnose and treat breast and other cancers, tailored to each woman's needs. More information, including a video interview with Donna Deegan, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: ABC 15 Arizona, ABC News, ABC15's Rally for Red, Advances in Radiation Oncology Journal, Alzforum, Arizona Horizon (PBS), Arizona Republic, Augustine Record, basal carcinoma, Becker’s Hospital Review, bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS), Bloomberg News


Fri, Feb 12

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Forbes
A New Bacteria Causing Lyme Disease Discovered - Borrelia mayonii
by Judy Stone

There’s a new Borrelia bacterium on the block, joining its cousin in causing Lyme disease. B. mayonii has recently been identified as a new cause of Lyme in the Midwest. Researchers at the Mayo clinic were testing blood of people with suspectedForbes magazine logo Lyme, and came across unexpected findings in six of 9000 patients tested between 2012-14.

Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KSTP.com, NBCNews.com, CBS News, WCCO.com,US News & World Report, NPR, Time, FOX News, Newsweek, Latinos Health, Reuters, MPR, Allentown Morning Call, TeenVogue.com, The Indian Republic, Medical Daily, KAAL-TV.com, Doctors Lounge, Huffington Post, The Inquisitr, Post Bulletin, Daily Mail, The Scientist Magazine, WebMD

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and health officials from Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin, have discovered a new bacterial species that causes Lyme disease in people. The new species has been provisionally named Borrelia mayonii. Prior to this finding, the only species believed to cause Lyme disease in North America was Borrelia burgdorferi. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond

 

Science Friday
Can the Placebo Effect Have Real Clinical Value?
by Jo Marchant

Bonnie Anderson didn‚Äôt notice the water on her kitchen floor until it was too late. ...But the water purifier had been leaking and she slipped on the Science Fridaywet tiles, landing flat on her back. Unable to move, Bonnie felt an excruciating pain in her spine‚Ķ‚Äô‚ÄĚBonnie‚Äôs surgeon at the Mayo Clinic, David Kallmes, says he too had seen ‚Äúpositive‚ÄĚ results from the procedure, with around 80 percent of his patients getting substantial benefit from it. But nonetheless he was starting to have doubts. The amount of cement that surgeons injected didn‚Äôt seem to matter much. And Kallmes knew of several cases in which cement was accidentally injected into the wrong part of the spine, and yet the patients still improved. ‚ÄúThere were clues that maybe there was a lot more going on than just the cement,‚ÄĚ he says.

Reach: Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4pm Eastern time as part of NPR's 'Talk of the Nation' programming. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand.

Context: David Kallmes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon and radiologist.

Contact: Sharon Theimer

 

Reader’s Digest
Sitting Is Killing You: What One Office Decided to Do About It
by James A. Levine, MD, Ph.D.

…I have spent the last 25 years running the anti-chair movement from my laboratory at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. I’ve learned that people with obesity who lived in the same environment as people who are lean sit 2 hours and 15 minutesReaders Digest Logo more a day than lean people.

Reach:  Reader's Digest has a circulation of more than 3.4 million and is published 10 times per year. Its website has nearly 1.7 million unique visitors each month.

Related coverage:
My Palm Beach Post¬†‚ÄĒ¬†5 reasons why sitting too much is killing you

Context: James Levine, M.D. PH.D. is a world authority on obesity, serving as a named expert at the United Nations, an invitee to the President's Cancer Panel, and a consultant to governments internationally. He is the Dr. Richard F. Emslander Professor of Endocrinology and Nutrition Research at Mayo Clinic. He holds five tenured professorships at ASU, is the Dean's Distinguished Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, and the Regents Professor at Umea University, Sweden. He also serves as the co-director of Obesity Solutions, a collaboration between Mayo Clinic and ASU, and is the international director of Obesity Solutions' sister center in Sweden.

Contact: Jim McVeigh

 

USA Today
Study finds dementia rates falling steadily
by Liz Szabo

‚ÄĒ A long-running study has found that dementia rates fell steadily over the past four decades, most likely due to declining USA Today newspaper logoates of heart disease‚Ķ."We‚Äôve been preaching for years that what‚Äôs good for the heart is good for the brain," said Ronald Petersen, who directs the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. "Maybe our efforts to watch our diet and exercise are having a spillover effect, leading to less dementia."

Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content.

Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Wall Street Journal
Stress Raises Cholesterol More Than You Think
by Betsy McKay

Christopher Edginton was taking medication and trying to improve his diet when his cholesterol shot uWSJ Bannerp anyway four years ago. His doctor suggested a new approach‚Ķ.‚ÄúStress will make your cholesterol go up,‚ÄĚ says Stephen Kopecky, a preventive¬†cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who is treating Mr. Edginton. ‚ÄúWithout a doubt, that has been underrecognized.‚ÄĚ

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context: Stephen Kopecky, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. His research interests include cardiovascular clinical trials primarily in coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes.

Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Traci Klein

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 123, AARP.org, ACL, Action News Jacksonville, ADHD, African Descendants Mayo Employee Resource Group, Allentown Morning Call, American Council on Exercise, AskMen, Becker’s Hospital Review, BioBusiness Center plan, Black History Month presentation


Fri, Feb 5

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Star Tribune
Mayo chief John Noseworthy talks about the future of health care
By Joe Carlson

Dr. John Noseworthy is best known as president and CEO of the Mayo Clinic, but he’s also a governor with the WorStar Tribune Business section logold Economic Forum (WEF). At the group’s 46th annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, earlier this month Noseworthy spoke on a WEF panel with U.S. Health and Human
Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell and others about the future of health care. In a phone interview after the discussion, Noseworthy talked about Mayo’s work for Medicare’s value-based purchasing program on hip and knee surgeries, and whether the developing world can benefit from lessons learned in expensive health care systems in developed nations like the U.S.

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

HealthLeaders Media¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Mayo chief John Noseworthy talks about the future of healthcare

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

 

Star Tribune
Device experiment program saves lives, speeds products to market: Mayo is part of a plan to get devices to market faster. 
By Jim Spencer

Ron Hall owes his life to Mayo Clinic surgeon Gustavo Oderich and a Food and Drug Administration early feasibility study that helps get medical Star Tribune Business section logodevices to market faster.¬†In December, the 80-year-old Blue Earth County man was preparing for a wrist operation when a test showed that the major artery carrying blood through his stomach was at high risk of rupturing.¬†Hall and his wife first thought of going to the Department of Veterans Affairs for treatment.¬†‚ÄúThen my brain clicked on that we were near the Mayo Clinic,‚ÄĚ said Val Hall, Ron‚Äôs spouse. ‚ÄúAnd we got referred there.‚ÄĚ

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: Gustavo Oderich, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic vascular surgeon. Dr. Oderich conducts ongoing clinical research focused on complex aortic aneurysms and treatment of mesenteric artery disease.

 

Florida Times-Union
Mayo Clinic's new Jacoby Center for Breast Health consolidates services in one spot
by Charlie Patton

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville’s new Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health should create a more efficientFlorida Times-Union newspaper logo, more integrated approach to breast care, said Sarah A. McLaughlin, a breast surgeon with Mayo. The new center, which consolidates all of Mayo’s operations involving breast health on one floor, was funded by a $5 million gift from philanthropists Robert E. and Monica Jacoby of Ponte Vedra Beach.

Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday.

Additional coverage: Washington Times Online, Sun Herald Online, Tampa Tribune Online

Context:¬†Mayo Clinic‚Äôs Florida campus today announced the opening of the Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health, which was funded by a $5 million gift from Robert E. and Monica Jacoby of Ponte Vedra, Florida. The new 16,000-square-foot ¬†multidisciplinary breast center offers patients a comprehensive array of diagnostic, treatment and after-care services for all types of breast disease, including breast cancer, in a single location.¬†‚ÄúAs a state-designated Cancer Center of Excellence, Mayo Clinic continues to expand and enhance comprehensive cancer care services to make them available to more patients in Jacksonville as well as all of Florida and the Southeast,‚ÄĚ says¬†Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. ‚ÄúThe Jacoby Center for Breast Health will have a positive impact on patients seeking high quality breast health care. We greatly appreciate the generous gift from the Jacoby family that has made the new¬†breast health center possible on our Florida campus.‚ÄĚ More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Paul Scotti

 

New York Times blog
Pursuing the Dream of Healthy Aging
by Jane Brody

‚ÄúAging is by far the best predictor of whether people will develop a chronic disease like atherosclerotic heart disease, stroke, New York Times Well Blog Logocancer, dementia or osteoarthritis,‚ÄĚ Dr. James L. Kirkland, director of the Kogod Center on Aging at the Mayo Clinic, said in an interview. ‚ÄúAging way outstrips all other risk factors.‚ÄĚ

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D. leads the  Mayo Clinic Kogod Center on Aging. Dr. Kirkland's research focuses on the impact of cellular aging (senescence) on age-related dysfunction and chronic diseases, especially developing methods for removing these cells and alleviating their effects. Senescent cells accumulate with aging and in such diseases as dementias, atherosclerosis, cancers, diabetes and arthritis.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

 

Wall Street Journal
The Small Warnings Before Cardiac Arrest
by Ron Winslow

‚ĶSay someone has a brief episode of chest pain during exercise for the first time and goes without further symptoms and, after having no further symptoms, suffers sudden cardiac arrest three weeks later. ‚ÄúShould that person have called 911, or soughtWSJ Banner assistance from his or her physician?‚ÄĚ asks Roger White, an anesthesiologist and cardiac arrest expert at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. ‚ÄúThat sort of question is left completely unanswered.‚ÄĚ

Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions.

Context:  Roger White, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. Dr. White's research focuses on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

Contact: Traci Klein

 

NPR
Boosting Life Span By Clearing Out Cellular Clutter
by Nell Greenfieldboyce

Mice were much healthier and lived about 25 percent longer when scientists killed off a certain kind of cell that accumulates in NPR Shots Health Newsthe body with age… These are cells that have stopped dividing, though not necessarily because the cells themselves are old. "It's a normal cell that experienced an unusual amount of stress, and it decided to stop dividing," says Jan van Deursen, who studies senescent cells at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minn.

Reach: NPR's Shots blog provides news about health and medicine. The blog has more than 68,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Fast Company, Newsweek, The Telegraph UK, The Atlantic, Yahoo News, HealthDay, nature.com, The Mirror UK, The Independent UK, Fortune

Context:¬†Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells ‚Äď cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age ‚Äď negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects.¬†‚ÄúCellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‚Äėemergency brake‚Äô used by damaged cells to stop dividing,‚ÄĚ says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. ‚ÄúWhile halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‚Äėemergency brake‚Äô has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.‚ÄĚ More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contacts: Bob Nellis, Megan Forliti

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: "un-Minnesotan.", ABC News, ADHD may Link to Obesity, alcohol during pregnancy, Argentina News, Austin Daily Herald, Baby & Kids Expo, Baltimore Sun blog, Bloomberg News online, Brainerd Daily Dispatch, C.T.E., caffeine


Fri, Jan 29

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

Post-Bulletin
Bug-zapping 'robots' help prevent infections
by Jeff Kiger

Mayo Clinic is rolling out a number of "bug zapper-like" devices to help battle bacteria and reduce potentially deadLogo for Post-Bulletin newspaperly patient infections. Unlike other U.S. hospitals, Mayo Clinic has seen the C-diff infections decline in recent years. However, they still have about 200 cases a year, said Dr. Priya Sampathkumar, chair of Mayo Clinic's infection control committee in Rochester. Mayo Clinic has not seen any C-diff-related deaths in at least two years, she added.

Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota.

Additional coverage: Med City Beat, KTTC, KIMT

Context:¬†Mayo Clinic has added robots¬†in its fight against Clostridium difficile (C-diff) bacteria.¬†In the U.S., C-diff is one of the most common infections patients can get while receiving care at a health care facility. C-diff can cause a variety of symptoms, including potentially deadly diarrhea. A recent national report shows some progress in reducing C-diff infections; however, more work remains.¬†‚ÄúC-diff is extremely distressing for our patients,‚ÄĚ says Priya Sampathkumar, M.D., chair of Mayo Clinic‚Äôs infection control committee on Mayo Clinic‚Äôs Rochester campus. ‚ÄúIt can be debilitating, decrease quality of life and can even result in death.‚ÄĚ More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Twin Cities Public Television (Almanac)
Senator Franken, Mayo health survey, more capitol art

Dr. John Wald appeared to talk about Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up. Dr. Wald's interview is the second one in the line up and appears at 13:15 of the program.

Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of TPTrecord that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program. Almanac has also earned six regional Emmy awards.

Previous coverage in January 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Context: ¬†According to the first-ever Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up, most Americans experience barriers to staying healthy, with their work schedule as the leading barrier (22 percent), particularly among men and residents of the Northeast. While work schedule is a top barrier for women, as well, they are significantly more likely than men to cite caring for a child, spouse or parent.¬†‚ÄúThe Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up takes a pulse on Americans‚Äô health opinions and behaviors, from barriers to getting healthy to perceptions of aging, to help identify opportunities to educate and empower people to improve their health,‚ÄĚ says¬†John T. Wald, M.D., Medical Director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic. ‚ÄúIn this first survey, we‚Äôre also looking at ‚Äėhealth by the decades‚Äô to uncover differences as we age.‚ÄĚ More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

New York Times (Well blog)
The Health Benefits of Knitting
by Jane E. Brody

New York Times Well Blog…Perhaps most exciting is research that suggests that crafts like knitting and crocheting may help to stave off a decline in brain function with age. In a 2011 study, researchers led by Dr. Yonas E. Geda, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., interviewed a random sample of 1,321 people ages 70 to 89, most of whom were cognitively normal, about the cognitive activities they engaged in late in life.

Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million.

Context: Yonas Geda, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist. Dr. Geda's research interests can be found here and you can learn more about his study here.

Contact: Bob Nellis

 

Robb Report
Six Life-Changing Ways to Eat Healthier in the New Year
by Janice O’Leary

Earlier this month, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released their first update in five years to the national dietary Robb Report Health & Wellness Logorecommendations. For many physicians and scientists who contributed to the report upon which these guidelines are based, the federally approved guidelines are a watered-down version of the original suggestions because they eliminated such advice as cutting back on red and processed meat, says Dr. Donald Hensrud, MD, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet.

Reach:  The Robb Report is a monthly magazine with a circulation of more than 101,000. Its website has more than 632,000 unique visitors each month. Robb Report Health & Wellness covers methods for healthy and fulfilling lifestyles.

Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet Book.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein
Mpls. St. Paul Magazine
Mind + Body Revolution
by Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl

Peek into Minnesota‚Äôs leading hospitals, health care systems, doctor‚Äôs offices, and psychiatry practices today and you‚Äôll see hundreds of examples Mpls-St. Paul Magazaine logoof integrative medicine. At the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, throat cancer survivors learn new cooking methods and cardiac patients fill yoga classes led by yogis specializing in Reiki, an energy-based healing therapy. Dr. Deborah Rhodes, an internist at the Mayo Clinic, emphasizes that wellness goes beyond soothing white robes and pretty smells. ‚ÄúIf you want to optimize cancer outcomes based on true data, we don‚Äôt see anywhere to go but with integrative medicine,‚ÄĚ she says.

Reach:  Published for the residents of the Twin Cities, Minneapolis-St. Paul Magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 68,000.

Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician with multiple departments.  Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity. The goal of an individualized approach to screening is to improve breast cancer detection while minimizing both the cost of screening and the harms associated with false-positive results and overdiagnosis.

Contact:  Kelley Luckstein

 

Star Tribune
Skipping lunch? Your doctor wants you to think again
by Allie Shah

Just one in five Americans steps away from his or her desk to eat lunch, studies show. Working straight through the day without a break can lead Star Tribune newspaper logoto higher levels of stress, mental fatigue, physical exhaustion and eventually burnout. ‚ÄúIt‚Äôs really important that people keep in perspective the big picture ‚ÄĒ that they will really burn out,‚ÄĚ said Dr. John Murphy, a family physician with Mayo Clinic Health System. ‚ÄúThat lunch break is critically important.‚ÄĚ

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Context: John Murphy, M.D. is a Family Medicine physician with Mayo Clinic Health System in Sparta, WI.

Contact: Rick Thiesse

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: "bug zapper-like" devices battle bacteria, #FlexForAnn, $6 billion Destination Medical Center, a zoonotic disease, A.L.S., ABC News, Afilbercept costs $1800 per dose, Aflibercept given for macular degeneration, afternoon slump, Albert Lea Tribune, Albuequerque Journal, Almanac


Fri, Jan 22

Mayo Clinic in the News

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Mayo Clinic in the News Logo

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker

 

HealthDay
Study Questions Use of Physical Therapy for Early Parkinson's

Physical therapy might not benefit people with mild-to-moderate Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests. "These results should be interpreted with attention to the study details," Dr. J. Eric Ahlskog of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., wrote in an accompanying editorial. Only patients Health Day Logowith mild to moderate Parkinson's disease were included, and the study excluded patients thought to need physical or occupational therapy, he said.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: Canoe.ca, Dublin News, Business Standard - Online, Cambodian Times, Doctors Lounge, Financial Express, Health.com, Israel Herald, MedPageToday

Context: ¬†You‚Äôve likely heard this before: Exercise is good for you. It helps your heart, bones, back and more.¬†But here‚Äôs one thing you might not have heard: Ongoing aerobic exercise may slow the progression of Parkinson‚Äôs disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system.¬†‚ÄúAerobic exercise means vigorous exercise, which makes you hot, sweaty and tired‚ÄĚ says ¬†J. Eric Ahlskog, Ph.D., M.D., a neurologist at Mayo Clinic. This could include activity such as walking briskly or using an elliptical machine. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist

 

Huffington Post
Which Should You Do First: Cardio or Strength?
by Chris Freytag

The fact that you are even questioning the order of your workout means you are working out. This puts you ahead of most of the population and HuffPost Healthy Livingthis is truly what matters. If you are working out consistently, chances are the order of your workout will not make THAT much of a difference. Even the Mayo Clinic remains neutral. According to Edward R. Lasowski, M.D. "whether you do weightlifting before or after an aerobic workout is up to you. Research hasn't definitively shown that one way is better than another."

Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors.

Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

Bloomberg Business
Integris Health announces partnership with Mayo Clinic

After almost 30 years in oncology, Dr. Brian Geister has treated several types of cancer in several types of patients. Most of the tiBloomberg Business Logome, Geister feels confident about what he should do -- but sometimes, a patient will come along with a truly difficult case. Recently, Geister asked for advice through an electronic consultation with the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a new collaborative opportunity that's available for Integris Health physicians.

Reach: Bloomberg BusinessWeek has a weekly circulation of more than 990,000 and has more than six million unique visitors to its online site each month.

Additional coverage: 

KWTV Oklahoma¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Integris First Okla. Healthcare Organization To Join Mayo Clinic Network

The Oklahoman¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Oklahoma ScissorTales: Better care through collaboration

Post-Bulletin, Heard on the street

Four States Homepage, KOCO Oklahoma City, com, Enid News & Eagle, KFOR Oklahoma, Tulsa World, Miami News Record, NewsUnited.com, KROC-AM

Context:¬†INTEGRIS has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of health care providers committed to better serving patients and their families through collaboration.¬†INTEGRIS is the first health care organization in Oklahoma to join the network. The formal agreement gives INTEGRIS access to the latest Mayo Clinic knowledge and promotes physician collaboration to benefit patients. Through shared resources, more patients can get answers to complex medical questions ‚ÄĒ and peace of mind ‚ÄĒwhile staying close to home.¬†‚ÄúWhile INTEGRIS works with some of the most accomplished and preeminent physicians in the region, we are constantly striving for ways to provide our patients with the best care possible,‚ÄĚ says Bruce Lawrence, president and CEO, INTEGRIS. ‚ÄúThis collaboration between INTEGRIS and Mayo Clinic brings together two trusted names ‚Äď each with unique strengths ‚Äď to the betterment of all Oklahomans.‚ÄĚ More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson

 

News 4 Jax
Mayo Clinic offers new life-saving treatment

Mayo Clinic is ready to break ground on a center that could revolutionize the way lungs are transplanted. Scientists and doctors have come up News Jax 4 Logowith a way to rejuvenate lungs that were previously considered not good enough for transplant. News4Jax spoke with the first Florida woman ever to get the life-saving treatment.

Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville.

Additional coverage:

WJXT Jacksonville¬†‚ÄĒ¬†Construction begins on Mayo Clinic's lung restoration center

Florida Times-Union, Mayo Clinic's lung restoration center ready to break ground in Jacksonville

Jacksonville Business Journal, Mayo Clinic begins construction on new lung transplant center

Bloomberg Business, Mayo Clinic's lung restoration center ready to break ground in Jacksonville

Context: Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, and United Therapeutics Corporation (NASDAQ: UTHR) broke ground this week on a lung restoration center on the Mayo campus. The goal is to significantly increase the volume of lungs for transplantation by preserving and restoring selected marginal donor lungs, making them viable for transplantation.  The restored lungs will be made available to patients at Mayo Clinic and other transplant centers throughout the United States. Construction of the center is expected to be completed in late 2017. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kevin Punsky

Star Tribune
Mayo survey finds 30-somethings less optimistic about aging
by Jeremy Olson

The first-ever national survey on attitudes toward health and aging found that Americans in their 30s are the least liStar Tribune newspaper logokely to believe they will age better than their parents…Some 56 percent of respondents aged 30 to 39 said they expect to age better, according to the Mayo survey released Wednesday. That was well below the levels of confidence expressed by Americans in their 40s (79 percent), 50s (67 percent) and 60s (72 percent).

Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation.

Additional coverage:

Post Bulletin, Mayo survey looks at health opinions

Politico, KARE KSNV-NBC Las Vegas, fox2now.com, WTBX Radio Hibbing, KDAL Radio Duluth, KMSP-Fox 9, Medindia.com, KIMT

Context: ¬†According to the first-ever Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up, most Americans experience barriers to staying healthy, with their work schedule as the leading barrier (22 percent), particularly among men and residents of the Northeast. While work schedule is a top barrier for women, as well, they are significantly more likely than men to cite caring for a child, spouse or parent.¬†‚ÄúThe Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up takes a pulse on Americans‚Äô health opinions and behaviors, from barriers to getting healthy to perceptions of aging, to help identify opportunities to educate and empower people to improve their health,‚ÄĚ says John T. Wald, M.D., Medical Director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic. ‚ÄúIn this first survey, we‚Äôre also looking at ‚Äėhealth by the decades‚Äô to uncover differences as we age.‚ÄĚ More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Ginger Plumbo

 

CBS News
Mayo Clinic CEO: How data science is making health care more effective, affordable

With U.S. health care costs surpassing $3 trillion a year -- an unsustainable 20% of the American economy -- we all must find ways to cut costs. CBS News LogoAt the World Economic Forum in Davos, Dr. John H. Noseworthy, head of the famed Mayo Clinic, explains how the latest advances in computer science offer a promising solution, where better collection and understanding of the billions of data points generated by medical research and treatments can improve patient "outcomes" and lead more effective and affordable health care for millions of people.

Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month.

Additional coverage: MSN.com

Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy participated in the World Economic Forum annual meeting recently in Davos, Switzerland. This annual meeting engages the world’s top leaders in collaborative activities focused on shaping the global, regional and industry agendas.

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry

Tags: 2016 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, ABC News, ABC Online (Australia), alcohol associated with bigger waists, Anesthesia After 40, Anza Valley Outlook - Online, AOL News, B-Line Medical, Barham K. Abu Dayyeh, Bel Marra Health, Bloomberg Business, Body after Birth Control