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EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Buzzfeed What You Should Know About Zika If You’re Going To The Olympics by Anthony Rivas So much so that athletes from around the world — mostly golfers, but also basketball players and cyclists — have given up their chance at winning gold over concerns that they might get infected. Meanwhile, lots of other spectators getting ready to fly down are probably wondering, “Is it really worth the risk?” …For men and women who don’t plan on having kids anytime soon, “the impact of the Zika virus on you is probably going to be very minimal,” Tosh said. In fact, about 80% of people who become infected “have absolutely no symptoms whatsoever.” Reach: BuzzFeed receives more than 15.7 million unique visitors each month to its website and targets pop culture and social media enthusiasts. Additional coverage: HealthDay, Zika Won't Pose Risks at the Olympics: Health Experts Hospitals & Health Networks, Clinical Vaccine Trials Underway; Rio Olympics See Few Mosquitoes by Matt O’Connor Context: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an emergency travel advisory after health officials in Florida identified local transmission of Zika virus in a Miami neighborhood. The CDC advisory recommends pregnant women and their partners avoid nonessential travel to Lynwood, a neighborhood in Miami, Florida where the Zika virus is active. Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh says, "It is somewhat unprecedented for a travel advisory to be issued to a very specific neighborhood. That's a testament to the strength of the epidemiology that has been going on, and how well the CDC and other health authorities have been working at this." More information, including a video interview with Dr. Tosh, can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contacts: Bob Nellis, Deb Balzer   Chicago Tribune Dirty baby: Just how clean does your child need to be? by Bill Daley Cleanliness may be next to godliness, or so the old rhyme scolded us, but is it healthiest — particularly for babies and children? "People are very concerned, almost preoccupied, with their child touching a surface that is not clean," said Dr. Angela C. Mattke, a pediatrician at the Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn. "Early exposure to their environment full of germs, bacteria and viruses is not a bad thing." "Not everything a child touches should be sterilized," she added. "You don't have to wash their hands every time." Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000. Context: Angela Mattke, M.D. is a pediatrician with Mayo Children's Center which is rated in all US News & World Report pediatric specialty categories and is the only children’s hospital in the five-state region to rank in all 10 specialties. Contact: Kelley Luckstein   Chicago Tribune Crawling: The next best core workout? by Alison Bowen Your next best exercise doesn't involve equipment, running, jumping or even standing. "Make the floor your friend," says Danielle Johnson, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn. As a working mom, Johnson is always looking for ways to challenge exercise norms. "We're looking for things that are a little outside of the box sometimes," she said. Crawling is one of those things. She said it's an "amazing core exercise" that also benefits the legs, shoulders, arms and chest. Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000. Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. The program is research-driven around diet, exercise and resiliency, and, when all of these are connected, they encompass the power needed to make sustainable changes. For more information, visit https://healthyliving.mayoclinic.org/. Contact: Kelley Luckstein   Wall Street Journal At the Rio Olympics, Women Athletes Bump Against a Gold Ceiling by Kevin Helliker and Matthew Futterman Sports scientists say there is no physiological reason for shortening courses for female athletes or, for that matter, games such as tennis, where women play the best out of three sets versus best of five for men. In fact, some research suggests women are built to go farther than men, if at a slower pace. While that remains unproven, the notion that women have inferior endurance capacities has been debunked. “That’s totally anachronistic,” says Michael Joyner, a former competitive marathoner who studies sports science at the Mayo Clinic. Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions. Related coverage: ABC News, Olympic Swimmer Katie Ledecky Blows Competition Out of the Water Business Insider, Why Katie Ledecky's Olympic world record Sunday night is even more amazing than you think Business Insider, Here's an exact breakdown of why 6'4" Michael Phelps has the perfect body for swimming Business Insider, The internet is driving athletes to do crazy things no one knew were possible Tech Insider, People are stronger and faster than ever before, but the reason why isn’t what you think Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist.  Dr. Joyner's research team is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson   TIME What Is Cupping? Here’s What You Need to Know by Alexandra Sifferlin …There is a difference between how cupping is practiced in traditional Chinese medicine and how it is used in Western medicine, says Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. Bauer says a traditional Chinese medicine practitioner would likely offer cupping as part of a larger integrative health check, which might include recommendations around nutrition and other health things, and not just as a one-off therapy. “It’s kind of an American phenomena, I think, to consider cupping by itself,” he says. Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: HealthDayDoes 'Cupping' = Success for Olympic Athletes? Live ScienceMichael Phelps' Weird Bruises: Does Cupping Therapy Really Work? Jakarta Post, Phelps puts spotlight on cupping CCTV-AmericaIt works for Michael Phelps, so we tried “cupping” for the first time Context:  Brent Bauer, M,D., is director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program. As director of the program, Dr. Bauer has broad and varied research interests. Since its founding in 2001, the program has promoted a collaborative spirit that enables researchers from both within and outside Mayo Clinic to share resources, ideas and expertise regarding research in this exciting realm. Contact: Kelly Reller   WCCO-Radio Mayo Clinic ranks #1 in latest US News and World Report Rankings Interview with Dr. John Noseworthy and Dave Lee. Reach: WCCO radio, a CBS owned and operated affiliate in Minneapolis, boasts one of the largest coverage areas in the country as it reaches into portions of North and South Dakota during the day. At night, the station’s signal typically reaches across many U.S. states and Canadian provinces. Additional coverage: KTAR-TV, US News & World Report grades Phoenix’s Mayo Clinic top hospital in Arizona Arizona Daily Star, U.S. News & World Report ranks Tucson hospital third in state Healio, Mayo Clinic ranked as top hospital for neurology and neurosurgery WIBW-TV, New ranking proves patients are in good hands at Stormont Vail Health  Previous coverage in August 5, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Mayo Clinic was named the best hospital in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published online today. In addition, Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in more specialties than any other hospital in the country. Mayo Clinic took the No. 1 spot in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. It also ranked No. 1 in the Phoenix metro area and in the Jacksonville metro area. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson   Twin Cities Business Mayo’s New Blood Test Could Predict Chances Of Experiencing A Heart Attack by Sam Schaust Mayo Clinic launched a new type of blood test on Wednesday that is the first-of-its-kind in the U.S. With the new test, measurements are taken from blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids highly linked to cardiovascular disease events, such as a heart attack. It’s believed the test could even predict the chance of a cardiovascular event as much as a year before it occurs. “Through our strong collaboration with Zora Biosciences, we hope our new test will improve the evaluation of individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease,” said Jeff Meeusen, co-director of Mayo’s Cardiovascular Laboratory Medicine Group. Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website. Additional coverage: Clinical Lab Products, Mayo Clinic Launches Blood Test to Assess Heart Attack Risk Context: Mayo Clinic has launched a new type of blood test that will be used to predict adverse cardiovascular events in patients with progressing coronary artery disease (CAD). The test measures blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids that are highly linked to cardiovascular disease processes. Researchers say this test is especially useful for patients with CAD when it does not improve with treatment or for young patients with premature CAD. The new test will help clinicians identify at-risk individuals and is available to Mayo Clinic patients and health care providers worldwide through Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML). MML is the reference laboratory of Mayo Clinic, offering advanced laboratory testing and pathology services to more than 5,000 health care organizations in more than 60 countries. MML collaborated on the test with Zora Biosciences Oy, a diagnostics discovery company based in Finland that specializes in cardiovascular disease. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Gina Chiri-Osmond [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

    January 10, 2013 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you. Karl Oestreich, manager enterprise media relations Meet the Press Obamacare’s Impact: Two Doctors Discuss Drs. Delos Cosgrove and John Noseworthy of the Cleveland Clinic and Mayo Clinic discuss the impact of Obamacare. Reach: NBC's Meet The Press reaches more than 2.6 million total viewers each week. Additional coverage:  NBC News (Transcript)ABC News (AP)Post-BulletinHealthLeaders Media NewsMaxBusinessWeekRTT NewsKansas City Star (AP)Crain’s Cleveland Business, Minneapolis /St. Paul Business JournalNewsMaxKTTC Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Public Affairs Contact: Chris Gade New York Times For Sleep Apnea Patients, a Possible Alternative to Masks by Catherine St. Louis …The mask is unwieldy and uncomfortable, however; one study found that46 percent to 83 percent of patients with obstructive sleep apnea do not wear it diligently. Now scientists may have found an alternative, at least for some patients: a pacemaker-like device implanted in the chest that stimulates a nerve in the jaw, helping to keep part of the upper airway open…“This is a new paradigm of surgical treatment that seems to effectively control obstructive sleep apnea in selected patients,” said Dr. Sean M. Caples, a sleep specialist in the division of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. “It’s very exciting.” Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month. Context: Sean Caples, D.O., is a Mayo Clinic sleep expert with Mayo's Sleep Medicine Center and a specialist in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. Public Affairs Context: Alyson Gonzalez NY Times High-Dose Vitamin E Slows Decline of Some Alzheimer's Patients in Study by Pam Belluck Does vitamin E help people with Alzheimer’s disease? For years, scientists have been trying to find out, guessing that the vitamin’s antioxidant properties might be beneficial. But the results from clinical trials have been mixed and — following a report that high doses of vitamin E may increase the risk of death — cautionary…But other studies have found that vitamin E failed to delay dementia in people without symptoms or with mild cognitive impairment, which may precede Alzheimer’s. “It was dead stone cold in the M.C.I. trial,” said the leader of that study, Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s center. “You couldn’t have found a closer match to placebo.” Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of more than 735,000. Its website receives more than 16.2 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: APArab NewsFOX News LatinoVoice of RussiaChicago TribuneReutersStar TribuneSouth China Morning Post Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services. Public Affairs Contacts: Nick Hanson, Traci Klein MPR What's a sign of heart attack? Anything Former Mayor R.T. Rybak was in obvious good health when he suffered a serious heart attack last weekend. If someone as seemingly fit as Rybak could be vulnerable, who is safe? We asked two Mayo cardiologists for perspective on heart disease…Dr. Charanjit (Chet) Rihal: Interventional cardiologist at Mayo Clinic and chairman of Mayo's Cardiovascular Division; Dr. Sharonne Hayes: Cardiologist at Mayo Clinic and the founder of Mayo's Women's Heart Clinic. Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network. Public Affairs Contact: Traci Klein Additional Mayo Clinic News Highlights This Week: [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

December 20, 2013 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

    June 28, 2013 Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you. Karl Oestreich, [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highhlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   CNBC Important not to lose ground on ACA Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president & CEO, and Bernard Tyson, Kaiser Permanente CEO, talks about implementing reforms in the health care system. Reach: CNBC is a 24-hour cable television station offers business news and financial information. The channel provides real-time financial market coverage to an estimated 175 million homes worldwide. CNBC online receives more than 26 million unique visitors each month. Additional CNBC coverage: CNBC, Drug pricing and regulations: Mayo Clinic CEO — Dr. John Noseworthy, Mayo Clinic president & CEO, and Bernard Tyson, Kaiser Permanente CEO, talk about the rising cost of drugs. Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Contact: Duska Anastasijevic   New York Times Getting Older, Sleeping Less by Jane E. Brody Nonmedical causes of insomnia are often successfully treated by practicing “good sleep hygiene,” a concept developed by the late Peter J. Hauri, a sleep specialist at the Mayo Clinic. That means limiting naps to less than 30 minutes a day, preferably early in the afternoon; avoiding stimulants and sedatives; avoiding heavy meals and minimizing liquids within two to three hours of bedtime; getting moderate exercise daily, preferably in the morning or early afternoon; maximizing exposure to bright light during the day and minimizing it at night; creating comfortable sleep conditions; and going to bed only when you feel sleepy. Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million. Context: The Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine (CSM) is a multidisciplinary enterprise comprised of pulmonologists, neurologists, psychiatrists and pediatricians who — with the support of a physician assistant, nurses and polysomnographic technologists — are engaged in a vibrant array of clinical, educational and research activities. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep disorders evaluate and treat adults and children in the Center for Sleep Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Center for Sleep Medicine is one of the largest sleep medicine facilities in the United States. Staff in the center treats about 6,500 new people who have sleep disorders each year. The Center for Sleep Medicine is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Contact: Traci Klein   Washington Post Why the ‘gluten-free movement’ is less of a fad than we thought by Caitlin Dewey There’s growing evidence that severe gluten sensitivities exist outside the realm of celiac disease. And researchers simply don’t know how many of the people following a gluten-free diet may actually have a legitimate health complaint — as opposed to a baseless fear of all things gluten, or a misplaced desire to lose weight. “We have no real inkling from our results,” said Joseph Murray, a celiac researcher at the Mayo Clinic and one of the authors of the new research. “We didn’t think to ask why people avoid gluten. When we designed this study 10 years ago, no one avoided gluten without a celiac diagnosis.” Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post is more than 356,000. The Post's website receives more than 32.7 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: Chicago Tribune, News Herald Other recent coverage regarding celiac disease and Dr. Joseph Murray: January 6, 2017 edition of Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights November 4, 2016 edition of Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Joseph Murray, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. Dr. Murray's research interests focus in two distinct areas: celiac disease and esophageal disorders. To learn more about celiac disease, check out this Mayo Clinic radio interview with Dr. Murray. Contact: Joe Dangor   Bloomberg The Two-Day, $5,000 C-Suite Physical by Sam Grobart I am in good health. I am out of shape. These two facts—one I hoped to be true, and one I absolutely knew to be true—were delivered to me at the end of a thorough two-day medical exam in early November at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. I underwent this battery of tests not because I was at risk for any major illness, nor because I’m a hypochondriac (I mean, no more of one than any unfit 42-year-old man has a right to be), but because the renowned medical center offers something called the Executive Health Program, which sounded exceedingly fancy. Reach: Bloomberg BusinessWeek has a weekly circulation of more than 990,000 and has more than six million unique visitors to its online site each month. Context: For more than 40 years, the Mayo Clinic Executive Health Program has been leveraging our nationally recognized expertise to help executives, business owners and entrepreneurs maintain good health. Contact:  Kelley Luckstein     KJZZ Summit Features Experts Making Sense Of Health-Care Payments by Steve Goldstein Paying for health care is complicated and confusing. Does a provider accept your health plan? How many bills can you expect to receive after the fact? What about catastrophic care? Mayo Clinic and ASU’s School for the Science of Health Care Delivery have teamed up to host a Payment Reform Summit featuring a number of experts trying to figure out what makes sense in the realm of health-care payments. We talked about some possible reforms with Dr. Lois Krahn of the Mayo Clinic and Dr. Victor Trastek, director of ASU’s School of Science and Health Care Delivery. Reach: KJZZ-FM is a commercial station owned by Maricopa Community Colleges in Tempe, AZ. The format of the station is news and jazz. KJZZ-FM's target audience is news and jazz music listeners, ages 18 to 64, in the Tempe, AZ area. Additional coverage: Fierce Healthcare Context: The Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care Payment Reform Summit convened subject matter experts from around the country, including the voice of patients, to inform the development of alternative payment models. With a focus on the needs of patients, the expert participants examined data drawn from a variety of sources to assess the impact of various payment models on patient access and patterns of health care use. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Jim McVeigh   WOKV Jacksonville Mayo Clinic receives $1.6 million to fund Alzheimer’s research in Jacksonville by John Engel Eight programs at Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus are receiving a total of $1.6 million in grants to fund Alzheimer’s research in Jacksonville. Kevin Bieniek, a post-doctoral research fellow at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, will benefit from this most recent round of grant funding from the state. His study examines the relationship between brain trauma and Alzheimer’s disease. “There are so many people that get Alzheimer’s disease that have no family history of this disorder,” Bieniek told WOKV. “It’s really a complex interaction of your genetics; the environment; your lifestyle; there are so many factors that come into play.” Reach: WOKV-FM is Jacksonville's 24 hour news station. Additional coverage: Healthcare Business News Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida were awarded eight grants from the Florida Department of Health to investigate the prevention or cure of Alzheimer’s disease. These awards followed a peer-reviewed and competitive grant application process, where the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Grant Advisory Board reviewed applications and selected 27 studies statewide. “Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus is home to international leaders in neuroscience research who are focused on addressing the unmet needs of patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., vice president, Mayo Clinic, and CEO of Mayo Clinic in Florida. “We integrate basic and clinical research and immediately translate our findings into better patient care. We very much appreciate the state’s investment in finding solutions for Alzheimer’s disease.” More information about the grants can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact:  Kevin Punsky [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   First Coast News The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 1 First Coast News The Chat Wednesday January 11: Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa Part 2 Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon, joined “The Chat,” a live afternoon show on Jacksonville’s First Coast News. The show’s web site breaks up the segments in two parts (see links below). The first segment focuses on his early life/career with images of his time at Johns Hopkins, and the second segment focuses on his role and work at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. Reach: First Coast News refers to two television stations in Jacksonville, Florida. WJXX, the ABC affiliate and WTLV, the NBC affiliate. Previous coverage in September 23, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Previous coverage in April 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D., prominent neurosurgeon, researcher and educator, joined Mayo Clinic in 2016 as chair of the Department of Neurosurgery on the Florida campus, along with several members of his research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine. Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa is renown nationally and internationally as a surgeon, researcher, humanitarian and author. His laboratory has published many manuscripts and articles, submitted a number of patents and obtained three NIH grants. Students and fellows who worked with Dr. Quinones-Hinojosa have gone on to join leading neuroscience programs throughout the world. Mayo Clinic's world-renowned neurosurgeons perform more than 7,000 complex surgical procedures every year at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Contact: Kevin Punsky Yahoo! News Robert M. Jacobson stresses importance of flu vaccine The Minnesota Department of Health released a report on Thursday on the increase of flu activity throughout the state. Friday afternoon, we spoke with a health professional at Mayo Clinic about the importance of getting the flu vaccine. According to the Minnesota Department of Health's report released on Thursday flu season is in full swing, and can indeed continue to increase in activity. In fact, Dr. Jacobson, a primary care physician and professor of pediatrics at Mayo Clinic, said in the last two weeks alone, there were 50 hospitalized patients in Minnesota from the flu. Reach: Yahoo News receives more than 8.4 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: KTTC Context:  Robert Jacobson, M.D. is a pediatrician with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Dr. Jacobson also serves as the medical director for the Population Health Science Program at Mayo Clinic's Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. He also leads Mayo's Employee and Community Health (ECH) Research Initiative. You can read about his medical research here. Contact: Kelley Luckstein   Wisconsin Public Radio The Mayo Clinic Diet: Second Edition It's the beginning of a new year, a time when many people resolve to make healthier choices--like eating a healthier diet. We learn how to improve health while losing weight with the medical editor of "The Mayo Clinic Diet." He says this plan is a lifestyle and not a diet in the traditional sense. We learn how it works. Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio consists of 34 radio stations programmed by seven regional studios and carrying programming on three content networks: the Ideas Network, the NPR News and Classical Network and the All Classical Network. Additional coverage:  Post-Bulletin, The Mayo Clinic Diet earns top honor KTTC, Mayo Clinic Diet is #1, according to U.S. News & World Report KWLM Willmar Radio, KFGO Fargo-Moorhead, 104.7 DukeFM, WXOW La Crosse Previous coverage in the January 6, 2017 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context:  As the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet hits store shelves, the diet plan has been named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report.  “We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. Learn more about the Mayo Clinic by watching this Mayo Clinic Minute or read more about it on Mayo Clinic Network. “The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.” Contact: Kelley Luckstein   MPR For Rochester, becoming the 'Silicon Valley of Medicine' won't be easy by Catharine Richert The Destination Medical Center project wants to give Rochester a reputation for something it's never been: a magnet for tech start-ups and entrepreneurs. But turning the city into what the DMC calls the "Silicon Valley of Medicine" won't be easy. The DMC is a multibillion, 20-year economic development effort to remake Rochester so Mayo can better compete for both patients and top talent. It's also meant to help diversify the region's economy by attracting new businesses. But Rochester's risk-averse culture has held it back, said Jamie Sundsbak, an entrepreneur and former Mayo Clinic researcher. "When you have a large medical institution like the Mayo Clinic — a world renowned, top medical institution in the world — you get that way by eliminating risk," he said. "If you look at some of the entrepreneurial communities, risk is what they are excited about." Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network. Context: With Mayo Clinic at its heart, the Destination Medical Center (DMC) initiative is the catalyst to position Rochester, Minnesota as the world’s premier destination for health and wellness; attracting people, investment opportunities, and jobs to America’s City for Health and supporting the economic growth of Minnesota, its bioscience sector, and beyond. Contacts: Duska AnastasijevicSusan Barber Lindquist [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. This will be our last edition of 2016.  Look for us again on January 6, 2017. Thank you and happy holidays.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Los Angeles Times A senior-friendly workout to improve movement and prevent injury Jogging outdoors, running on a treadmill or lifting weights at the gym aren’t always practical — or enjoyable — activities for everyone. However, one type of exercise works for everyone, no matter your age or ability, because it relies on improving practical movements often involved in everyday activities. “Natural movement is universal, and it’s about bringing movement back to the basics,” says Bradly Prigge, wellness exercise specialist with the Mayo Clinic’s Healthy Living Program. “It’s not about following the latest fitness craze or learning the newest secret to weight loss. Natural movement is about connecting with your body and cultivating an awareness of your full abilities.” Reach:  The Los Angeles Times has a daily readership of 1.9 million and 2.9 million on Sunday, more than 8 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.5 million. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 128 years. Additional coverage: Mountain Grove News-Journal Other recent coverage in the Los Angeles Times related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program Cosmopolitan, Do You Really Need to Take Vitamins? WTOP Washington, Mayo Clinic expert: 4 actions for a healthy holiday season Yahoo! News, 9 Ways to Boost Your Immune System by Michael O Schroeder WEAU Eau ClaireTODAY INTERVIEW: Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Recipes Previous coverage related to Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living program in the December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Contacts: Kelley Luckstein, Joe Dangor   Star Tribune Mayo Clinic in Rochester adds customized plane to air fleet The Mayo Clinic in Rochester has unveiled a customized $8.5 million airplane to transport high-risk patients to its facilities. The fixed-wing aircraft adds to the Mayo One fleet that was created in 1984. The program began with a single helicopter based in Rochester and now boasts four — two in Rochester, one in Mankato and one in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Additional coverage: KSTP, Becker’s Hospital Review, KIMT Context: While a certain red sled usually owns the flight-related headlines this month, Santa's sleigh isn't the only one getting press this December. Several news outlets, it seems, are reporting on another vehicle taking flight. But instead of delivering toys to good girls and boys, the new Mayo One airplane delivers patients in need of immediate, advanced care to Mayo Clinic. And like Santa's ride, this one also has some pretty unique features, and the equipment, medication and staff to make it function as a sky-high Emergency Department. You can read more about the new Mayo one airplane in Mayo Clinic in the Loop. Contact:  Glenn Lyden   KIMT St. Mary’s nurse returns to work after hiking accident by DeeDee Stiepan It’s an incredible story of survival that we first brought you in May when a St. Mary’s nurse fell 100ft while hiking in Arizona. Amber Kohnhorst spent 24 hours in extreme pain, without food or water until she was rescued by helicopter. Now, the 25-year old is back in Rochester, and it’s been quite some time since she was working as a Registered Nurse on the 5th floor at St. Mary’s Hospital. “My last shift was Friday May 13th, she tells us. “I’ve never really believed in Friday the 13th but now it kind of freaks me out.” Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market. Previous coverage in December 2, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Amber Kohnhorst loves animals and adventure. The trip she'd planned to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Utah promised both. She'd spend time volunteering at the shelter and do some hiking in nearby Cane Beds, Arizona. But what sounded like a perfect vacation quickly became a nightmare when the 25-year-old Mayo Clinic nurse fell 100 feet down a cliff during what was supposed to be a short hike. You can read more about Amber's story on Mayo Clinic In the Loop. Contacts:  Ginger Plumbo, Kelly Reller   NBC News Why Heart Attacks Are Striking Healthy Young Women by Lauren Dunn and Parminder Deo Researchers are discovering that SCAD heart attacks occur more frequently than once thought..."SCAD is a type of heart attack, but completely different than the one we normally think of," says cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. "It's caused by a split or tear in an otherwise healthy artery that leads to a drop in blood flow to the heart leading to a heart attack." Reach: NBC News provides information about breaking news in business, health, entertainment, politics etc… and receives more than 21,547,025 unique visitors each month. Context:  Sharonne Hayes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Hayes studies cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. With a clinical base in the Women's Heart Clinic, Dr. Hayes and her research team utilize novel recruitment methods, social media and online communities, DNA profiling, and sex-specific evaluations to better understand several cardiovascular conditions. A major area of focus is spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), an uncommon and under-recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome (heart attack) that occurs predominantly in young women. Contact: Traci Klein   Florida Times-Union Mayo Clinic sees innovation as key to the future Mayo Clinic recognizes the historic changes taking place in the health care landscape. The health care provider has become famous for treating the whole patient by integrating various specialties of care. Now Mayo is going to be using its of health care innovation system as a model for generating revenue. Mayo-Jacksonville is setting aside spaces for innovators and is taking part in more collaborations. Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday. Context: Charles Bruce, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and serves as medical director of Mayo Clinic Ventures at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida. James (Jim) Rogers is chair of Mayo's newly formed Business Development Department, which combines the functions of Mayo Clinic Ventures and the Office of Business Development. The new department will oversee Mayo's partnerships with external organizations, spearhead new business opportunities and support the advancement of medical technology in conjunction with Mayo Clinic leaders, entrepreneurs and inventors. Contacts: Kevin Punsky, Duska Anastasijevic [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Chicago Tribune Is bone broth the next hot health trend? by Alison Bowen Jason Ewoldt, a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., said patients often ask him about something new they've read about. People often think, he said, "if a little bit's good, maybe a lot is better." But far from assuming what's best is tripling your bone broth intake after reading about its benefits, he said, "that's not necessarily the case." He said some people consider bone broth a magic elixir, crediting it with improving joint function and gut health. Reach:  The Chicago Tribune has a daily circulation of more than 384,000 and a weekend circulation of more than 686,000. Context: Jason Ewoldt is a dietitian at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, which is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. Contact: Kelley Luckstein   HealthDay Was football safer back in the day? In a finding that suggests football used to be a less dangerous sport, a small study shows that men who played in high school in the 1950s and 1960s may not be at increased risk for dementia or memory problems…"What we can say is, for that era, football did not increase the risks of neurodegenerative disease compared with other sports," said senior researcher Dr. Rodolfo Savica, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: NWI Times, Healthline, KTTC, WebMD, KIMT, CBS News, Medical News TodayWTAJ Pennsylvania, MSN Context: A Mayo Clinic study published online recently in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that varsity football players from 1956 to 1970 did not have an increased risk of degenerative brain diseases compared with athletes in other varsity sports. The researchers reviewed all the yearbooks and documented team rosters for Mayo High School and Rochester High School, now called John Marshall High School. The high school football players were compared with non-football playing athletes who were swimmers, basketball players and wrestlers. More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Susan Barber Lindquist   Reuters Rural U.S. babies hardest hit by opiate addiction at birth by Lisa Rapaport These babies may have central nervous system issues like seizures and tremors, gastrointestinal problems and feeding difficulties, breathing challenges, as well as unstable body temperatures. “It is clear that neonatal abstinence syndrome is a growing problem across the country,” said Dr. William Carey, a pediatric researcher at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota. “While some state-level data has suggested that neonatal abstinence syndrome disproportionately affected rural counties, this is the first study to show that rural communities throughout America are particularly affected by this epidemic,” Carey, who wasn’t involved in the study, added by email. Reach: Reuters has 196 editorial bureaus in 130 countries and 2,400 editorial staff members and covers international news, regional news, politics, social issues, health, business, sports and media. Additional coverage: Yahoo! Sports Context: William Carey, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic pediatrician with Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatric and adolescent medicine specialists provide comprehensive care for the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions. Contact: Kelley Luckstein   Tonic The First Legit Study of Stem Cells and Arthritis Had Surprising Results by Evy Pitt Stoller According to a study led by the Mayo Clinic's Shane Shapiro, an orthopedic and sports medicine physician, the recent use of bone marrow stem cells in painful, arthritic joints has dramatically increased, while exactly how well the treatment works—or how safe it is—has yet to be made clear. "So many of these therapies are going on without the science to back it up," he says. "We weren't comfortable offering this treatment to patients until we or someone else had studied it in a rigorous fashion." Reach: Tonic is a website hosted by Vice covering health and wellness, science, health issues, world health news and other topics. Context: Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida have conducted the world’s first prospective, blinded and placebo-controlled clinical study to test the benefit of using bone marrow stem cells, a regenerative medicine therapy, to reduce arthritic pain and disability in knees. The researchers say such testing is needed because there are at least 600 stem cell clinics in the U.S. offering one form of stem cell therapy or another to an estimated 100,000-plus patients, who pay thousands of dollars, out of pocket, for the treatment, which has not undergone demanding clinical study.“Our findings can be interpreted in ways that we now need to test — one of which is that bone marrow stem cell injection in one ailing knee can relieve pain in both affected knees in a systemic or whole-body fashion,” says the study’s lead author, Shane Shapiro, M.D., a Mayo Clinic orthopedic physician. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Kevin Punsky   Twin Cities Business Mayo Researchers Land Patent For Non-Invasive Pancreatic Cancer Test by Don Jacobson The same Mayo Clinic research team that developed the Cologuard DNA-based stool test for colorectal cancer has also been working on similar technology for the early detection of pancreatic cancer. After encouraging early studies, they have now landed a patent for their methods. Dr. David Ahlquist, a Mayo Clinic medical professor and consultant in its division of gastroenterology and hepatology, led the team that, late in the last decade, developed the genomic science behind the Cologuard test, which Mayo licensed in 2009 to Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) of Madison, Wisconsin. Now, in a patent dated November 29, Ahlquist and Mayo colleagues Dr. John Kisiel, William R. Taylor, Tracy Yab and Douglas Mahoney were also granted rights to their method of “Detecting Neoplasm,” through which bio-samples, such as those collected from stool, can be analyzed for pancreatic cancer-related DNA biomarkers. Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website. Context:  David Ahlquist M.D. is a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and co-inventor of the Cologuard test. Contact: Joe Dangor   ActionNewsJax Air Force veteran hopes to meet donor's family after lung transplant in Jacksonville — A Georgia Air Force veteran got a double lung transplant at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville hours after his wife was told he was going to die… An hour after doctors said he wasn’t going to make it, two healthy lungs became available. The 21-year-old woman’s lungs were a match for Terry Junn. Doctors flew them into Mayo Clinic from Mississippi and Terry Junn went into surgery. Reach: WAWS-TV/30 is the Fox affiliate. WTEV-TV/47 is the CBS affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida. Related coverage:  ActionNewsJax, Veteran gets double lung transplant in Jacksonville hours after doctors said he was going to die Context: A lung transplant is a surgical procedure to replace a diseased or failing lung with a healthy lung, usually from a deceased donor. A lung transplant is reserved for people who have tried other medications or treatments, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved. At Mayo Clinic, a team of doctors and staff work together to evaluate and treat people who may need lung transplants. Mayo Clinic's Transplant Center staff at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota works together to evaluate and treat people who may need a lung transplant. Mayo Clinic offers common recommendations, evaluation processes, treatment, post-surgical care and follow-up care for lung transplant candidates at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Mayo Clinic uses technology to help make patient information available as needed at all three locations. Contact: Paul Scotti [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   MPR Your genes can affect how medications work in your body Doctors are learning about a new tool that can help them determine what the best treatment option is for each individual patient. It's called individualized medicine and it's the topic of a conference happening this week at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. MPR's Phil Picardi spoke with Dr. Keith Stewart, who is the director of the Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine. Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network. Context: Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B is a Mayo Clinic hematologist and director of Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine.  Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for a century and a half at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers. Contact: Susan Buckles   TIME The Case for Being Messy by Tim Harford Messy disruptions will be most powerful when combined with creative skill. The disruption puts an artist, scientist or engineer in unpromising territory—a deep valley rather than a familiar hilltop…We’re often told that good work comes from the ability to focus, to shut out distractions. To choose from a plethora of self-help tips along these lines, a Mayo Clinic psychologist, Dr Amit Sood, advises us to focus more effectively by turning off the TV, logging out of email and taking up “attention training” to “train your brain.” Reach: Time magazine covers national and international news and provides analysis and perspective of these events. The weekly magazine has a circulation of 3.2 million readers and its website has 4.6 million unique visitors each month. Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. Dr. Sood is editor of the  Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness and The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living. Contact: Traci Klein   Wall Street Journal Can New Smartphone Apps Help Migraine Sufferers? by Laura Johannes David Dodick, a professor of neurology and director of headache medicine at Mayo Clinic, in Phoenix, says some migraine sufferers may not need the apps if they have obvious triggers, such as alcohol use or menstruation. More likely to benefit are people whose migraine attacks occur when several triggers “stack” on top of each other. “For example, you’re an accountant and it’s tax time, you’re stressed, sleep-deprived and you have a glass of wine to unwind. All those factors together have pushed you over the edge,” suggests Dr. Dodick, who is president of the International Headache Society. Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions. Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Contact: Jim McVeigh   Huffington Post What Your Body Type Can Reveal About Your Health by Deborah Long It’s important to know which body type you are, because your health risks vary accordingly. A quick look in the mirror should tell you whether you’re an apple or a pear, but if you’re not sure, you can ask your doctor next time you have a physical. Michael Jensen, M.D., an endocrinologist with the Mayo Clinic, is an expert on the health risks associated with excess weight. He has spent fully three decades studying the risks overweight patients face and is considered a pioneer of correlating how body type – or where excess weight is carried – relates to the likelihood of developing various diseases. His research has led him to conclude that there is no question that one body type is especially at risk for life-threatening conditions. Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique visitors. Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects. Contact: Bob Nellis   Florida Times-Union Mayo Clinic hits 30th year in Jacksonville by Mayo Clinic hits 30th year in Jacksonville by Charlie Patton The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville opened to patients 30 years ago, including 2,700 people from 30 states who already made appointments. By today’s standards, the facility was a small scale operation: One medical building, 37 physicians, 158 other employees. Contrast that to what Mayo is today — a medical center today that sprawls over 18 buildings and a parking garage on the campus located off San Pablo Road. Four-hundred-ninety-five physicians and scientists — many researchers with doctorates — and 4,664 other employees work there. Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday. Context: Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida is celebrating 30 years of providing high-quality medical care in Northeast Florida. Since the clinic opened in 1986, more than 600,000 unique patients from all 50 states and 143 countries have come to the Florida campus for Mayo’s unique, patient-centered approach to medical care. “Innovation is in our DNA at Mayo Clinic,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “Through three decades of growth, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida has invested in people, space and technology to carry forward the vision of our founders and meet the needs of patients, today and into the future.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Paul Scotti [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik Today.com 12-year-old boy finally goes home — with a new heart by Gabrielle Frank For three years, the Panama native had suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy, a condition that affects the heart's ability to pump blood. Gonzalez-Salas received his new heart last July, but because transplant surgeries are not done in Panama, doctors at the Mayo Clinic requested he and his parents stay in Rochester, Minnesota for a year…"Speaking for our surgeons, cardiologists, nurses, and the whole care team, it has been an honor to care for Joseph and his family over the last two years," said Dr. Jonathan Johnson, Gonzalez-Salas' pediatric cardiologist. Reach: Today.com is online site for NBC's Today Show. Previous Coverage in July 8, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Jonathan Johnson, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist and hear transplant surgeon. Dr. Johnson's research encompasses several different areas of pediatric cardiology. Dr. Johnson's primary focus is researching clinical outcomes in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease, as well as those with cardiomyopathy or heart failure, or those who have required heart transplantation or ventricular assist device (VAD) placement. Dr. Johnson is also interested in cardiac imaging, including fetal, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and studies how these imaging modalities can be used to improve patient outcomes. Contact: Kelly Reller   Huffington Post Mayo Clinic Putting a Spin on the Typical Pitch Competition by Jason Grill It’s hard to imagine that any American has not heard of the Mayo Clinic. However, if you have not, it’s a nonprofit that is heavily involved in clinical practice, education and research that works with individuals who need medical care or healing. The Mayo Clinic is based in Rochester, Minnesota. Now what many, if not all Americans, don’t know is the Mayo Clinic has a Center of Innovation and a Mayo Clinic Ventures operation that is turning pitch competitions upside down with the Think Big Challenge. Talk about flying under the radar. Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 38.7 million monthly unique viewers. Additional coverage: Twin Cities Business Context: The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation and Mayo Clinic Ventures today announced the second Mayo Clinic Think Big Challenge, a national competition for innovators and entrepreneurs. This year, one business or entrepreneur will earn the opportunity to license Mayo Clinic technology, lead a team and score a $50,000 cash prize. The 2016 Mayo Clinic Think Big Challenge opens today at transformconference.mayo.edu/thinkbig. Application deadline is Aug. 15. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Duska Anastasijevic   Live Science Everything You Need to Know About Flexibility Exercise by Rachael Rettner Flexibility exercises stretch your muscles and may improve your range of motion at your joints…Dynamic stretches are intended to get your muscles used to the types of movement you'll be doing during some other part of your workout, said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. For example, if you plan to do an aerobic activity such as running, warm up with some dynamic stretches for your legs (see some examples below).   Live Science The 4 Types of Exercise You Need to Be Healthy by Rachael Rettner When you think of exercise, you may imagine strenuous activities such as running or biking — the ones that make you breathe hard, turn flush and drip with sweat. But aerobic activity is only one type of exercise, and although it is critical for boosting fitness, there are actually three other types of exercise that are also important: strength training, balance training and flexibility training. "While aerobic exercise is very important, it's not as effective for overall health" when done alone compared with when people include all four types of exercise in their routine, said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. "They all kind of go together" and complement each other, Laskowski said.   Live Science Aerobic Exercise: Everything You Need to Know by Rachel Rettner Doing aerobic exercise can also have other long-term advantages. A recent study of 1.4 million people in the United States and Europe found that high amounts of aerobic exercise were linked with a reduced risk of 13 types of cancer… Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota, recommended that people use the mantra, "start out low, and progress slow." This means starting with a level of activity that's fairly light, and gradually increasing the duration and intensity of your exercise sessions.   LiveScience Strength Exercise: Everything You Need to Know by Rachel Rettner Strength exercise, or resistance training, works your muscles by using resistance, like a dumbbell or your own body weight. This type of exercise increases lean muscle mass, which is particularly important for weight loss, because lean muscle burns more calories than other types of tissue. … It's very important that you have the correct form and body position when you do resistance training. "If you do some of these exercises poorly, with bad technique, you can injure yourself," said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. You may need to work with a professional trainer, or watch exercise videos online, to make sure you use the correct technique.   LiveScience Balance Exercise: Everything You Need to Know by Rachel Rettner …These exercises are also important for reducing injury risk. For example, if you sprain your ankle, you could be at risk for reinjury if you don't retrain your balance, said Dr. Edward Laskowski, co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Rochester, Minnesota. That's because when you sprain your ankle, the muscles around the joint stop contracting in a coordinated fashion, and this destabilizes the joint, Laskowski said. If you do balance exercises after the injury, it retrains the muscles to contract together, which better stabilizes the joint during movements and prevents reinjury, he said. Reach: LiveScience has more than 9.7 million unique visitors to its site each month. Geared toward a general consumer audience, LiveScience addresses the intellectually curious audience hungry for ideas, events, culture and things that cross the line from being merely academic to being cool, engaging and relevant in their lives. Context: Edward Laskowski, M.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, a global leader in sports and musculoskeletal injury prevention and rehabilitation, concussion research, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, sports performance optimization, and surgical and nonsurgical management of sports-related injuries. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Wall Street Journal Can Adults Grow Taller? By Heidi Mitchell Nearly everyone shrinks with age. But some people insist, often after an annual visit to their doctor, that they’ve added a half-inch or so. If they aren’t children or teens, they’re probably mistaken, says Todd Milbrandt, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who explains the significance of physes and what makes 20 a special number. “There may be a 21-year-old patient that is young, in terms of his bone age, which is why he may still be growing in college, whereas others may have stopped when they are 13 or 14,” says Dr. Milbrandt, who does research on growth plates. Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions. Context: Todd Milbrandt, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon who is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic's Children's Center.  Dr. Milbrandt investigates pediatric muscle, tendon and bone dysfunction. Specifically, he is interested in re-creating naturally found tissue when that tissue is damaged. By using tissue-engineering techniques, Dr. Milbrandt looks to reform cartilage in growth arrest from childhood trauma, to prevent hip collapse in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease and to eradicate bone infections. Contact: Bob Nellis   Twin Cities Business Signature Mayo Heart Cell Regeneration Technique Passes Key European Trial by Don Jacobson A signature research project of the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine – using stem cells to treat ischemic heart failure – has proven effective on enough patients in a European clinical trial to prompt its corporate backer to accelerate commercialization efforts. The results, announced last week, heralded the first time heart cell regeneration has been shown effective in a large-scale trial and could represent a major win for the Mayo center, which began work on the concept a decade ago. The product, C-Cure, is being developed by the Belgian company Celyad S.A. under an exclusive license from Mayo. Touted as a potential paradigm-shifter in treating the dire condition, the technique was co-developed by Dr. Andre Terzic, director of the Rochester clinic’s regenerative medicine center, as one of its first big projects. Reach: Twin Cities Business is a monthly business magazine with a circulation of more than 30,000 and more than 74,000 readers. The magazine also posts daily business news on its website. Context: Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D.  is director of Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine and a Mayo cardiologist. Mayo Clinic and center leaders believe that regenerative medicine, which makes it possible to actually repair diseased, injured or congenitally defective tissues and organs, will be a vital component of medical and surgical practice in the coming years. By harnessing the potential of regenerative medicine, Mayo Clinic is poised to create new models of health care and transform medicine and surgery. Contact: Bob Nellis   Business Insider USA Swimming director gave an astonishing quote about how Katie Ledecky is going to dominate and change the sport Sheinin also spoke to Michael J. Joyner, a researcher for the Mayo Clinic, who fueled the notion that we haven’t seen an athlete like Ledecky before. Joyner illustrated what Ledecky’s dominance would look like for athletes in other sports. “She’s dominating by the widest margin in international sport, winning by 1 or 2 percent,” Joyner said. “If [a runner] won the 10,000 meters by that wide a margin, they’d win by 100 meters. One or 2 percent in the Tour de France, over about 80 hours of racing, would be 30 or 40 minutes. It’s just absolutely remarkable.” Reach: Business Insider has more than 11 million unique visitors each month. The on-line publication focuses on business news. The site provides and analyzes business news and acts as an aggregator of top news stories from around the web. Its content is sometimes cited by other, larger, publications such as The New York Times and domestic news outlets like National Public Radio. Context: Michael Joyner, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist. His laboratory is interested in how humans respond to various forms of physical and mental stress during activities such as exercise, hypoxia, standing up and blood loss. Dr. Joyner and his team study how the nervous system regulates blood pressure, heart rate and metabolism in response to these forms of stress. They are also interested in how blood flow to muscle and skin responds to these stressors. These responses are studied in young healthy subjects, healthy older subjects and people with conditions such as heart failure. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson   KIMT-TV 11-year-old heart transplant patient going home after 2 years by DeeDee Stiepan A young patient from Panama who has been receiving treatment following a heart transplant at Mayo Clinic will finally get to go home after living in Rochester for more than two years. But before he left, Mayo Clinic staff threw him and his family a surprise going away party on Thursday. “He’s done so much better than we could have ever imagined,” explains Jonathan Johnson, M.D., Joseph’s heart transplant surgeon. “He’s really done great and he keeps up with other kids his age and does everything we could have ever hoped — we’re really, really pleased.” Reach: KIMT 3, a CBS affiliate,  serves the Mason City-Austin-Albert Lea-Rochester market. Context: Jonathan Johnson, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiologist and hear transplant surgeon. Dr. Johnson's research encompasses several different areas of pediatric cardiology. Dr. Johnson's primary focus is researching clinical outcomes in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease, as well as those with cardiomyopathy or heart failure, or those who have required heart transplantation or ventricular assist device (VAD) placement. Dr. Johnson is also interested in cardiac imaging, including fetal, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and studies how these imaging modalities can be used to improve patient outcomes. Contact: Kelly Reller [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Huffington Post 8 Reasons You Can’t Get Rid Of Your Belly Fat by Emily Haak A lot of medications have weight gain as a potential side effect, but corticosteroids like prednisone (used to treat arthritis, multiple sclerosis and more) and cortisone (used for arthritis, ulcerative colitis, among other conditions) lead to pounds in your stomach, specifically, says Michael Jensen, MD, an endocrinologist and obesity expert at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. They’re often used to treat asthma too. Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique visitors. Context:  Michael Jensen, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects. Contact: Bob Nellis   MPR Mayo Clinic touts planned bio-research campus The next big phase of Rochester's transformation is getting underway. A few years ago, Mayo Clinic initiated a 20-year plan called the Destination Medical Center... Wednesday, Mayo is starting the process of finding a developer to start building one of those districts. It's called Discovery Square. It will be a big bio-research campus that will more than double the footprint Mayo currently has in Rochester. Tom Weber talked with Dr. John Noseworthy, President and CEO of Mayo Clinic. Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network. Additional coverage: KTTC-TV, Mayo's Discovery Square to bring big changes to downtown Twin Cities Business magazine, Mayo’s ‘Transformational Centers’ Could Be First Beneficiaries Of DMC Build-Out Sioux Falls Argus LeaderWest Central Tribune, NuJournal Previous Discovery Square coverage in June 10, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Contact: Karl Oestreich   Forbes Why Aren't Women Told About New, Better Way To Detect Breast Cancer? A Real Scandal by Steve Forbes Mammograms aren’t very good at discovering early-stage cancers in women who have dense breast tissue, which accounts for about 45% of all women. But there is a major advance whose efficacy has been confirmed in a study conducted by the Mayo Clinic . It’s called molecular breast imaging (MBI), and it vastly improves the chances of early detection. Reach: Forbes magazine focuses on business and financial news with core topics that include business, technology, stock markets, personal finance, and lifestyle. The magazine is published twice each month and has more than 925,000 subscribers. Forbes Online receives more than 10.4 million unique visitors each month. Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D., is a physician with Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity. Dr. Rhodes recently spoke at Forbes Women's Summit 2016. Contact: Traci Klein   Jacksonville Business Journal Mayo Clinic transplantation leader wins top honor by Alexa Epitropoulos A pioneer in transplantation at the Mayo Clinic has been awarded one of the top honors in his field. The American Society of Transplantation gave its Lifetime Achievement Award to Dr. Thomas Gonwa, who has been working at Mayo's Jacksonville campus since 2001. Gonwa has, during his time at Mayo, worked to advance its organ transplant program, particularly liver transplantation, where he has done significant research on transplant patients who suffer from chronic kidney disease. He has had a particular focus on promoting regenerative medicine. Reach:  The Jacksonville Business Journal is one of 61 newspapers published by American City Business Journals Context: Thomas Gonwa, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic nephrologist at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. His primary research interests have been in the development of new immunosuppressive drug regimens in solid organ transplantation. Contact: Kevin Punsky   ABC15 Arizona Mayo Clinic discusses cholesterol and the importance of your numbers Reza Arsanjani, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of Sonoran Living Live to discuss cholesterol and how important it is to know your cholesterol numbers. Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona. Additional coverage on ABC15 Arizona: ABC15 Arizona, Want to be heart healthy? Go to sleep! Context: Reza Arsanjani, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's top-ranked team of cardiologists diagnoses and treats many heart conditions, including many rare and complex disorders. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients. Contact:  Jim McVeigh [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Emily Blahnik   Pioneer Press John Noseworthy: Telemedicine will increase access to care, reduce costs As the American Telemedicine Association convened in Minneapolis last month for its annual conference, it was interesting to recall that a little more than 20 years ago, another ATA conference was held in Minnesota. It was in Rochester and featured a Mayo Clinic-trained physician and astronaut conducting the first telemedicine conference from space. Since that time, telemedicine – the remote delivery of health care through a secure video or computer link – has experienced profound progress, increasing access to care while also lowering the cost of care. Reach: The St. Paul Pioneer Press has a daily circulation of more than 194,000 Its TwinCities.com website receives moire than 1.3 million unique visitors each month. Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Contacts: Duska Anastasijevic, Karl Oestreich   Star Tribune Mayo Clinic wins a key building block for medicine's future About a week ago, the federally funded NIH announced a five-year, $142 million grant to Mayo Clinic to establish the “world’s largest research-cohort biobank for the Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program.” This difficult-to-understand appellation likely limited celebration in the state over this welcome news. But here’s a helpful translation from Mayo’s Dr. Stephen Thibodeau, who will oversee the biobank: This, he said during an interview, is a “big deal.’’ Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Previous coverage in June 3, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context: Mayo Clinic will be awarded $142 million in funding over five years by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to serve as the national Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Cohort Program biobank. The biobank will hold a research repository of biologic samples, known as biospecimens, for this longitudinal program that aims to enroll 1 million or more U.S. participants to better understand individual differences that contribute to health and disease to advance precision medicine. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Colette Gallagher   Star Tribune Mayo Clinic unveils plans for expanded research space by Matt McKinney The Mayo Clinic will add 2 million square feet of research space in downtown Rochester in less than 20 years, a key piece of its Destination Medical Center (DMC) plan. The plan, announced Tuesday by the clinic, will create an urban bioresearch campus to drive the quest for new cures as private researchers collaborate with Mayo doctors on the frontiers of medicine, said Mayo CEO John Noseworthy. Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Additional coverage: Post-Bulletin, KIMT-TV, Washington Times, KTTC-TV, BloombergFinance & Commerce, Capitol ReportDuluth News Tribune, Austin Herald, KIMT-TV, Pioneer Press, Bemidji Pioneer, NH Voice, MPR, KAAL-TVBoston Globe Context: Mayo Clinic announced the next major step in realizing Destination Medical Center’s (DMC) vision of creating Discovery Square, a first-of-its-kind urban bioresearch campus that brings together renowned physicians, researchers, scientists and entrepreneurs to address unmet patient needs in an ultramodern setting for science innovation. Mayo Clinic is initiating a process to identify a strategic real estate development firm to expand its Rochester, Minnesota, campus by building more than 2 million square feet on Mayo Clinic-owned land as research, commercial and product development space over the next 20 years. This is in addition to Mayo’s current research footprint in Rochester of 1.3 million square feet. Discovery Square, which will include Mayo and other private businesses, is a key milestone for DMC, the largest public-private partnership in Minnesota state history, and one of the largest economic development initiatives in the U.S. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Karl Oestreich SELF magazine 10 Signs Of Skin Cancer You Shouldn’t Ignore by Amy Marturana Along with outdoor happy hours and weekends at the beach, summertime calls for an important reminder of skin cancer risk. Since you’re probably spending more time in the sun wearing less clothes, it’s important to take note of any new or different growths on your skin. “Most skin cancers really are not symptomatic,” Aleksandar Sekulic, M.D., principal for Stand Up To Cancer’s Melanoma Research Alliance Dream Team and Mayo Clinic dermatologist, tells SELF. That means a cancerous spot won’t hurt, or even itch most of the time. “Occasionally people will say a red and scaly spot has become more red and tender, but most true cancers are asymptomatic.” Reach:  Self magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 1.4 million readers and is geared toward active, educated women who are interested in health, fitness, career issues and relationship balance. Context: Aleksandar Sekulic, M.D., Ph.D. is a Mayo Clinic dermatologist. Dr. Sekulic is also affiliated with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Contact: Jim McVeigh   [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker   Post-Bulletin Bug-zapping 'robots' help prevent infections by Jeff Kiger Mayo Clinic is rolling out a number of "bug zapper-like" devices to help battle bacteria and reduce potentially deadly patient infections. Unlike other U.S. hospitals, Mayo Clinic has seen the C-diff infections decline in recent years. However, they still have about 200 cases a year, said Dr. Priya Sampathkumar, chair of Mayo Clinic's infection control committee in Rochester. Mayo Clinic has not seen any C-diff-related deaths in at least two years, she added. Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and Southeast Minnesota. Additional coverage: Med City Beat, KTTCKIMT Context: Mayo Clinic has added robots in its fight against Clostridium difficile (C-diff) bacteria. In the U.S., C-diff is one of the most common infections patients can get while receiving care at a health care facility. C-diff can cause a variety of symptoms, including potentially deadly diarrhea. A recent national report shows some progress in reducing C-diff infections; however, more work remains. “C-diff is extremely distressing for our patients,” says Priya Sampathkumar, M.D., chair of Mayo Clinic’s infection control committee on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. “It can be debilitating, decrease quality of life and can even result in death.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Rhoda Fukushima Madson   Twin Cities Public Television (Almanac) Senator Franken, Mayo health survey, more capitol art Dr. John Wald appeared to talk about Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up. Dr. Wald's interview is the second one in the line up and appears at 13:15 of the program. Reach:  Twin Cities Public Television's "Almanac" program is a Minnesota institution. It has occupied the 7 o'clock time slot on Friday nights for more than a quarter of a century. It is the longest-running prime time TV program ever in the region. "Almanac" is a time capsule, a program of record that details our region's history and culture during the past twenty five years. The hour-long mix of news, politics and culture is seen live statewide on the six stations of the Minnesota Public Television Association. Almanac was the first Minnesota TV show that virtually everyone in the state could watch together. The program's unusual format has been copied by numerous PBS stations around the country and it has led to Almanac being honored with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's award for Best Public Affairs Program. Almanac has also earned six regional Emmy awards. Previous coverage in January 22, 2016 Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights Context:  According to the first-ever Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up, most Americans experience barriers to staying healthy, with their work schedule as the leading barrier (22 percent), particularly among men and residents of the Northeast. While work schedule is a top barrier for women, as well, they are significantly more likely than men to cite caring for a child, spouse or parent. “The Mayo Clinic National Health Check-Up takes a pulse on Americans’ health opinions and behaviors, from barriers to getting healthy to perceptions of aging, to help identify opportunities to educate and empower people to improve their health,” says John T. Wald, M.D., Medical Director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic. “In this first survey, we’re also looking at ‘health by the decades’ to uncover differences as we age.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Ginger Plumbo   New York Times (Well blog) The Health Benefits of Knitting by Jane E. Brody …Perhaps most exciting is research that suggests that crafts like knitting and crocheting may help to stave off a decline in brain function with age. In a 2011 study, researchers led by Dr. Yonas E. Geda, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., interviewed a random sample of 1,321 people ages 70 to 89, most of whom were cognitively normal, about the cognitive activities they engaged in late in life. Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 649,000 and a Sunday circulation of 1.18 million. Context: Yonas Geda, M.D, is a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist. Dr. Geda's research interests can be found here and you can learn more about his study here. Contact: Bob Nellis   Robb Report Six Life-Changing Ways to Eat Healthier in the New Year by Janice O’Leary Earlier this month, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released their first update in five years to the national dietary recommendations. For many physicians and scientists who contributed to the report upon which these guidelines are based, the federally approved guidelines are a watered-down version of the original suggestions because they eliminated such advice as cutting back on red and processed meat, says Dr. Donald Hensrud, MD, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet. Reach:  The Robb Report is a monthly magazine with a circulation of more than 101,000. Its website has more than 632,000 unique visitors each month. Robb Report Health & Wellness covers methods for healthy and fulfilling lifestyles. Context: Donald Hensrud, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet Book. Contact:  Kelley Luckstein Mpls. St. Paul Magazine Mind + Body Revolution by Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl Peek into Minnesota’s leading hospitals, health care systems, doctor’s offices, and psychiatry practices today and you’ll see hundreds of examples of integrative medicine. At the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, throat cancer survivors learn new cooking methods and cardiac patients fill yoga classes led by yogis specializing in Reiki, an energy-based healing therapy. Dr. Deborah Rhodes, an internist at the Mayo Clinic, emphasizes that wellness goes beyond soothing white robes and pretty smells. “If you want to optimize cancer outcomes based on true data, we don’t see anywhere to go but with integrative medicine,” she says. Reach:  Published for the residents of the Twin Cities, Minneapolis-St. Paul Magazine has a monthly circulation of more than 68,000. Context: Deborah Rhodes, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician with multiple departments.  Dr. Rhodes studies the application of a new breast imaging device, molecular breast imaging, to breast cancer screening. The long-term goal of Dr. Rhodes' research is to develop an individualized approach to breast cancer screening that incorporates breast density, age, and other factors that impact breast cancer risk and mammography sensitivity. The goal of an individualized approach to screening is to improve breast cancer detection while minimizing both the cost of screening and the harms associated with false-positive results and overdiagnosis. Contact:  Kelley Luckstein   Star Tribune Skipping lunch? Your doctor wants you to think again by Allie Shah Just one in five Americans steps away from his or her desk to eat lunch, studies show. Working straight through the day without a break can lead to higher levels of stress, mental fatigue, physical exhaustion and eventually burnout. “It’s really important that people keep in perspective the big picture — that they will really burn out,” said Dr. John Murphy, a family physician with Mayo Clinic Health System. “That lunch break is critically important.” Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Context: John Murphy, M.D. is a Family Medicine physician with Mayo Clinic Health System in Sparta, WI. Contact: Rick Thiesse [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to

Heather Privett  with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you.

Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker   FOX Los Angeles Dr. David Dodick of the Mayo Clinic talks concussions in sports … So what are the truths about concussions and sports? The Mayo Clinic, hoping to get some answers out there have made some of their experts available this morning. Joining us from their facility in Phoenix was Dr. David Dodick - Medical Director of the Headache Program and the Sports Neurology and Concussion Program. Reach: Good Day-L.A. is an Emmy award-winning morning show which serves the greater Los Angeles area. Additional coverage: Fox 11 Los Angeles   David Dodick of the Mayo Clinic talks concussions in sports Context: David Dodick, M.D. is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an expert in concussion care and director of the Mayo Clinic Concussion Program. Contact: Jim McVeigh   Wall Street Journal New Weapons in the Fight Against Multiple Myeloma by Ron Winslow Few types of cancer research have witnessed more progress in the past decade than the fight against the blood cancer known as multiple myeloma… “Of all the cancers, in terms of progress in the last 10 years, multiple myeloma is at the top of the list,” says S. Vincent Rajkumar, professor of medicine and a hematologist/oncologist at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn. Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions. Context:  S. Vincent Rajkumar, M.D. is a hematologist with  Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Contact: Joe Dangor   MPR The loneliness of the Alzheimer’s care giver by Bob Collins When I fill in for Kerri Miller on Wednesday, I’m doing a segment on Alzheimer’s. If there’s a more despicable disease, I’m unaware of it. Perhaps that’s why you don’t hear a lot of politicians criticizing a huge increase in Alzheimer’s research. “It’s perhaps some of the most encouraging news we’ve had on Alzheimer’s disease in several years,” Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center, told the Washington Post. “This is truly very, very exciting in the field.” Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network. Context: Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen is regularly sought out by reporters as a leading expert in his medical field. Dr. Petersen chairs the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services. Contact: Joe Dangor   MPR The story of the year 2015 by Bob Collins …I was impressed yesterday with the show we did on immunotherapy (you can find the podcast version here). It was sparked by President Carter’s recovery from cancer, thanks — it would seem — to a drug called Keytruda, which appears to be a “magic bullet” that allows the immune system to attack cancer, and then turns it off before it attacks something it shouldn’t be attacking. Here’s the thing: My guests were cancer researchers: Dr. Roxana Dronca of Mayo Clinic and Dr. Christopher Pennell of the University of Minnesota, who, like all cancer researchers, get up every day and go to work, hoping for success, but more often find failure. That’s the nature of success. “I’m not the most patient person in the real life, but I learned that I can be patient in research and in the clinic,” Dr. Dronca said. Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network. Context: Roxana Dronca, M.D. is an oncologist with Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. Contact: Joe Dangor   CBS News 7 ways to recapture happiness at family holidays by Mary Brophy Marcus "Home for the holidays" may conjure lovely images of grandma baking cookies, piles of gifts, and long snowy walks with loved ones. But for many, the picture may not be as lovely: tight budgets, long work hours, illness, stress, and long-running family tensions may dampen spirits. And long walks may be the last thing you want to take with certain curmudgeonly relatives. "Holidays are physical, emotional, and financial stress tests," Dr. Amit Sood of the Mayo Clinic told CBS News. "What should be enjoyable becomes a stressful event." Sood, a professor of medicine and the author of the books "The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living" and "The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness," said many people try too hard to overachieve during holiday time. Reach: CBSNEWS.com is part of CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation. The CBS web properties have more than 250 million people visit its properties each month. Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment. Contact: Joe Dangor   Star Tribune The slow growth of a state biotech sector and the rise of a Destination Medical Center by Matt McKinney …In Rochester, city officials and others are hoping to turn that exodus into an influx of promising biotech researchers and companies. Central to that effort is Destination Medical Center, the ambitious, 20-year multibillion-dollar plan to remake the Mayo Clinic and the city itself into a global hub for health care and medical research…The Mayo Clinic will soon open its own clean-room facility for the production of regenerative medicine products. Dr. Atta Behfar, director of the cardiac regeneration program and the Advanced Product Incubator, said it should begin manufacturing in the first quarter of next year. Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Context: The Advanced Product Incubator (API) establishes cell-free platforms to develop regenerative therapies. Built according to Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMP) set forth by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the API adheres to rigorous standards of facility design, monitoring and process control. This multidisciplinary, first-of-its-kind facility bridges teams of researchers and physicians with scientific and industry experts to accelerate product development. Atta Behfar, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Dr. Behfar's lab uses state-of-the-art technologies developed at Mayo Clinic to understand heart disease at its most elemental level. With this understanding, Dr. Behfar and his colleagues are doing cardiovascular regeneration research with the aim of developing novel therapies to prevent and cure chronic heart conditions. Contact: Karl Oestreich     [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you. Note:  This edition of Mayo Clinic in the News will be the last issue of 2015. We will see you again in early 2016. Editor, Karl Oestreich;  Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker   Wall Street Journal Is Lab Testing the ‘Wild West’ of Medicine? by Thomas Burton Descending in darkness, a FedEx cargo jet touched down on a runway at 5:44 a.m., filled with hundreds of identical, raspberry-colored boxes. A truck painted the same color soon sped the boxes, all human blood and cell samples, to more than 40 laboratories at the nearby Mayo Clinic, based here…Dr. Michael O’Sullivan, creator of Mayo Medical Laboratories, the operation that tests outside samples, also was its original delivery network. He drove around southern Minnesota to pick up vials and slides. Before long, the business grew large enough to support a fleet of vans. A sales force was added by 1986 and now has more than 100 employees. Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has an average circulation of 2.3 million daily which includes print and digital versions. Additional coverage: Wall Street Journal — Video: Inside the Mayo Clinic Diagnostic Testing Labs; Yahoo! Health Canada Becker’s Hospital Review — FDA wants to crack down on lab-developed tests: 3 things to know by Emily Rappleye…2. Cost Context: Mayo Medical Laboratories is a global reference laboratory operating within Mayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. Mayo Medical Laboratories staff collaborates with clinicians to provide knowledge of, and access to, the latest testing and treatment guidance. We provide clinical laboratory testing to support health care systems, hospitals, specialty clinics, and other clinical laboratories all working toward expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. Contact: Sharon Theimer   USA Today Study suggests link between flavor in e-cigarettes and lung disease by Mary Bowerman …Researchers at the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health tested 51 types of flavored e-cigarettes and flavor canisters for diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-pentanedione; three chemicals known to cause respiratory problems in factory workers…With around 7,000 e-cigarette flavors on the market, consumers are essentially at the mercy of the manufacturers, with little hope of knowing what chemicals are used in the products, according to Taylor Hays, director of Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center. “There are no FDA regulations on these products. It’s the Wild West of e-cigarettes,” Hays told USA TODAY Network. Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content. Additional coverage: USA TODAY — Survey: Teens still intrigued by e-cigarettes; KARE11Times of India Context: Dr. Taylor Hays is director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center. The Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center (NDC) was one of the first centers in the country to focus exclusively on treatments for tobacco dependence. The NDC's model of care has now become the standard in many medical centers around the United States. The treatment team at the center offers you support and works with you to help develop the motivation and skills needed to stop using tobacco. Contact: Kelley Luckstein Wisconsin Public Radio Physician Burnout Is Bad For Patients A new study by the Mayo Clinic shows that burnout among physicians is bad, and getting worse. We find out how that affects patients, and what needs to change. Host:  Veronica Rueckert Guest(s):  Tait Shanafelt Producer(s): Judith Siers-Poisson. Reach: Wisconsin Public Radio consists of 34 radio stations programmed by seven regional studios and carrying programming on three content networks: the Ideas Network, the NPR News and Classical Network and the All Classical Network. Additional coverage: Healthcare Dive Context: Burnout among U.S. physicians is getting worse. An update from a three-year study evaluating burnout and work-life balance shows that American physicians are worse off today than they were three years earlier. These dimensions remained largely unchanged among U.S. workers in general, resulting in a widening gap between physicians and U.S. workers in other fields. The study conducted by Mayo Clinic researchers in partnership with the American Medical Association compared data from 2014 to metrics they collected in 2011 and found that now more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing professional burnout. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Burnout manifests as emotional exhaustion, loss of meaning in work, and feelings of ineffectiveness,” says Tait Shanafelt, M.D., “What we found is that more physicians in almost every specialty are feeling this way and that’s not good for them, their families, the medical profession, or patients.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Bob Nellis   Washington Post Don’t forget about vaccinations, even if you think you’re too old for them by Emily Sohn R.D. Zimmerman had been to northern Africa and the Caribbean, spent lots of time in Russia, and visited Mexico multiple times. But a couple of weeks after returning home to Minneapolis in April from a visit to Cabo, on the southern tip of Baja California, he developed a persistent cough that landed him in the emergency room with an unexpected diagnosis: hepatitis A…But anecdotal evidence suggests that Zimmerman’s experience is common, says Greg Poland, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group in Rochester, Minn. He sees patients every week who come home from trips with illnesses they could have avoided, including hep A, which often comes from consuming contaminated food or water. Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800. Context: Gregory Poland, M.D. is director of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. The Vaccine Research Group works to improve the health of individuals across the world by pursuing challenges posed by infectious diseases and bioterrorism through clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic vaccine research. Contact: Bob Nellis   Washington Post Proposed budget for Alzheimer’s research may rise by over 50 percent by Tara Bahrampour The spending deal Congress reached Tuesday night includes an unprecedented increase in funding for Alzheimer’s research: $350 million in fiscal 2016. If approved by the White House, it will increase government spending on the disease by over 50 percent… “It’s perhaps some of the most encouraging news we’ve had on Alzheimer’s disease in several years,” said Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and the Mayo Alzheimer’s Research Center. “This is truly very, very exciting in the field.” Reach: Weekday circulation of The Washington Post averages 518,700, and Sunday circulation averages 736,800. Context: Under the federal spending bill, released this week, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) would receive $200 million for President Obama’s Precision Medicine initiative and a $350 million increase for Alzheimer’s research funding in 2016. “We applaud the agreement for the first increase in research funding for the NIH in over a decade. This significant act recognizes the importance of funding research and innovation in our nation,” says Gregory Gores, M.D., executive dean for Research at Mayo Clinic. “The increase in funding and commitment to research in areas such as precision medicine and Alzheimer’s disease would support discovery and translation to bring forward new treatments for our patients.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contacts: Susan Barber Lindquist, Sharon Theimer   News4Jax Flu deaths reported; Doctors urge people get shot by Ashley Mitchem Doctors are encouraging people to get the flu shot as new details emerge about some of the first flu deaths of the season… Vandana Bhide with Mayo Clinic believes the flu is just beginning to spread this season. “I think it's early in the season, so we're going to see more activity in January and February,” said Bhide. Reach: WJXT is an independent television station serving Florida’s First Coast that is licensed to Jacksonville. Context: Vandana Bhide, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic Hospital Internal Medicine physician. More information on flu shots can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Kevin Punsky   ABC15 Arizona Mayo Clinic Cardiologist talks about blood pressure Todd Hurst, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cardiologist, joined the hosts of Sonoran Living Live to discuss the prevalence of high blood pressure is in the U.S., simple life style changes that can help lower blood pressure and how you can easily monitor your blood pressure at home. Reach:  KNXV-TV, ABC 15, is the ABC television station affiliate in Phoenix, Arizona. Additional coverage on ABC15: ABC15 Arizona — Rally for Red: You've seen the commercials, but what is A-fib? ABC15 Arizona  — Mayo Clinic News Network: Reduce your blood pressure with these 10 tips from the Mayo Clinic  Context: R. Todd Hurst, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Mayo Clinic's Division of Cardiovascular Diseases is one of the largest and most integrated in the United States, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout Mayo Clinic Health System. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota include more than 200 cardiologists and 1,100 allied health staff trained in caring for heart patients. Contact: Jim McVeigh [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic In the News Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you. Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker   Star Tribune Mayo lobbies U.S. panel to accept noninvasive colon cancer test by Jim Spencer Ron Cox’s doctor recommended a check for colon cancer when he turned 50. He did not get one. Nor did he get one when he turned 51, 52 or 53. Maybe when I’m 60, Cox told himself…Cox isn’t sure he would ever have gotten checked for colon cancer if doctors at the Mayo Clinic had not developed a painless, accurate, noninvasive screening. He took Mayo’s Cologuard stool DNA test in the privacy of his bathroom and sent it to a lab for analysis. The Mayo test “could save tens of thousands of lives in the next few years,” said Mayo gastroenterologist David Ahlquist, who worked two decades to help develop it.  Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Additional coverage: The Star Context: Cologuard stool DNA testing for colorectal cancer was found to be an accurate noninvasive screening option for Alaska Native people, a population with one of world’s highest rates of colorectal cancer, concluded researchers from the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium and Mayo Clinic. The remote residence of many Alaska Native people in sparsely distributed communities across vast roadless regions creates a barrier to screening with conventional tools, such as a colonoscopy. Stool DNA testing, which was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), may offer a workable and effective screening method for this population. The research was published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings and funded by a competitive grant from the Richard M. Schulze Family Foundation. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contacts: Brian Kilen, Sharon Theimer   MPR 'Handbook for Happiness': Resilience is key Amit Sood has written the book on happiness. "The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness" proclaims that "happiness is a habit." Sood's guide identifies strategies and techniques for finding — and keeping — the right attitude. Sood joined MPR News' Kerri Miller to talk about a key part of happiness: resilience. He likened resilience to the rumble strips on the side of the highway. Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network. Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment. Contact: Brian Kilen   Yahoo! Health Men Who Played High School Contact Sports at Risk for Brain Injury by Korin Miller …Scientists from the Mayo Clinic have discovered that about one-third of men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain bank had evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repeated brain trauma…Lead study author Kevin Bieniek, a pre-doctoral student in the Mayo Graduate School’s Neurobiology of Disease program tells Yahoo Health that the study was launched after he noticed that a man in the brain bank who had evidence of CTE had played high school football. Reach: Yahoo Health provides medical and health-related news and information for consumers and healthcare professionals. Yahoo Health receives more than 200,000 unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: Star Tribune — Youth contact sports linked to brain disease in Mayo study; Post-Bulletin, Athletic Business, Trail ChampionSports Illustrated, FOX 9, KTTC, Bloomberg, Medical Xpress Context: Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth. About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.More information on the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Kevin Punsky   Reuters More than half of U.S. doctors experience burnout by Andrew Seaman Burnout among U.S. doctors is becoming more common and now affects more than half of practicing physicians, according to a new study. About 54 percent of U.S. doctors experienced at least one symptom of burnout in 2014, compared to about 46 percent of doctors in 2011, researchers report in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Overall, the researchers found that doctors are about twice as likely to experience burnout as the average U.S. worker. "Things are unfortunately getting worse for physicians," said lead author Dr. Tait Shanafelt, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Reach:  Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world newsbusiness newstechnology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile and interactive television platforms. Additional coverage: WBUR Boston, DoctorsLounge, NY Post, Latinos Health, Chicago Tribune, Newsmax, Business Insider India, Neurology Advisor, Philadelphia InquirerMedscapeExaminer, Consumer Affairs, US News & World Report, HealthDay, TechInsider, Medical Daily, NWI Times Context: Burnout among U.S. physicians is getting worse. An update from a three-year study evaluating burnout and work-life balance shows that American physicians are worse off today than they were three years earlier. These dimensions remained largely unchanged among U.S. workers in general, resulting in a widening gap between physicians and U.S. workers in other fields. The study conducted by Mayo Clinic researchers in partnership with the American Medical Association compared data from 2014 to metrics they collected in 2011 and found that now more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing professional burnout. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings“Burnout manifests as emotional exhaustion, loss of meaning in work, and feelings of ineffectiveness,” says Tait Shanafelt, M.D., “What we found is that more physicians in almost every specialty are feeling this way and that’s not good for them, their families, the medical profession, or patients.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Bob Nellis   Phoenix Business Journal Behind the Scenes: Proton beams to target cancer at Mayo by Jim Poulin Last week, I had the opportunity to look behind the scenes of the Radiation Oncology Department at the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix. Reach: The Phoenix Business Journal is published by American City Business Journals which owns more than 40 other local business newspapers. Context:  Mayo Clinic introduced its Proton Beam Therapy Program, with treatment for patients available in new facilities in Minnesota this past June and in Arizona in spring 2016. Proton beam therapy expands Mayo Clinic's cancer care capabilities. In properly selected patients — especially children and young adults and those with cancers located close to critical organs and body structures — proton beam therapy is an advance over traditional radiotherapy. More information about Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Jim McVeigh [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you. Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editors: Carmen Zwicker, Emily Blahnik   HealthDay Just One Energy Drink Sends Young Adults' Stress Hormone Levels Soaring by Dennis Thompson Just one energy drink can cause potentially harmful spikes in both stress hormone levels and blood pressure in young, healthy adults, a new study shows. After drinking a 16-ounce can of "Rockstar Punched," young adults had a 74 percent increase in blood levels of the "fight-or-flight" hormone norepinephrine, said lead researcher stress hormone levels , a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives more than 39,000 unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: Esquire — Are Energy Drinks Slowly Killing All the Bros? FOX9 — Mayo Clinic: Single 16-ounce energy drink can increase blood pressure 'significantly' Additional coverage: LA Times, Univision Salud, The Daily Beast, ATTN:, Yahoo!, Steelers LoungeInverse.com, Medscape, Business Standard, Mirror UK, Daily Mail UKSeating Chair, Youth Independent  (Canada), Consumer Reports, Next Shark, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, QuartzCTV News, Tiempo Argentino Context: New research shows that drinking one 16-ounce energy drink can increase blood pressure and stress hormone responses significantly. This raises the concern that these response changes could increase the risk of cardiovascular events, according to a study presented this week at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015. The findings also are published in the Journal of the American Medical Association“In previous research, we found that energy drink consumption increased blood pressure in healthy young adults,” says Anna Svatikova, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiology fellow and the first author. “We now show that the increases in blood pressure are accompanied by increases in norepinephrine, a stress hormone chemical, and this could predispose an increased risk of cardiac events – even in healthy people.” More information about the study can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Other news from the American Heart Association's Scientific Session 2015 Wall Street Journal — Inappropriate Stent Procedures Decline, Study Shows by Ron Winslow — Researchers said Monday that unnecessary use of devices called stents to clear blockages in diseased coronary arteries fell by about 50% between 2010 and 2014. The drop came after new practice guidelines were issued in 2009 as a quality improvement strategy designed to discourage stent use in patients with stable disease and minimal symptoms of chest pain…“The absolute decline in the nonacute PCI numbers is striking,” said Dr. Raymond Gibbons, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic, who wasn’t involved with the study. He described the data as supporting “true quality improvement.” Additional coverage: MedPage Today AP — Study: Even the normal-weight should watch that apple shape by Lauren Neergaard — New research suggests normal-weight people who carry their fat at their waistlines may be at higher risk of death over the years than overweight or obese people whose fat is more concentrated on the hips and thighs…"We see this with patients every day: 'My weight is fine, I can eat whatever I want,'" said study senior author Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, preventive cardiology chief at the Mayo Clinic. "These results really challenge that." Additional coverage: USA TodayCBS News,CNN, TODAY Show, LA Times, HealthDay KARE11, Telegraph UK, KCCI Des Moines, Medscape, com, Healthline News, The GuardianABC News, Star Tribune, NY Times, NBC News, Huffington PostNews4Jax, Yahoo! UK, Scotsman, Yorkshire Evening Post, CNN EspanolDaily Star UK, The Atlantic, Economic Times, CBC Canada, Michigan Live, Kansas City Star, Independent UK, Nature World ReportABC15 Arizona (Newsy)  Medscape — Activity Levels Drop on Nitrate Therapy in Preserved-EF Heart Failure: NEAT-HFpEF by Steve Stiles — Activity levels in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) fell while they were on isosorbide mononitrate for a month compared with a similar period on placebo, in a small randomized, crossover trial in which participants wore accelerometers for activity measurement…Nitrates are often used for symptom relief in patients with reduced-EF heart failure, and in the literature they are used in a substantial minority of patients with HFpEF, even though they are far less well studied in that syndrome, explain Dr. Margaret Redfield (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN) and associates in the New England Journal of Medicinereport on the study. Reuters — Advising people about heart risk genes helped cut cholesterol: study by Julie Steenhuysen — In the study presented on Monday at the American Heart Association meeting in Orlando, Florida, researchers at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, tested the theory that incorporating genetic risk information into an assessment of a person's heart disease risk could lead to lower levels of LDL, the portion of cholesterol that leads to heart attacks and strokes…"What we found is six months after the risk disclosure, the LDL cholesterol in those who got the genetic risk information was about 10 points lower, which was statistically significant," said Dr. Iftikhar Kullo, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist who led the study, said in a telephone interview. Additional coverage: Yahoo!, FOX News, Daily Mail UK, Philadelphia Inquirer, MyInforms, News List, MedPage Today, AP — Big study suggests steep drop in needless heart procedures by Lindsey Tanner — Fewer heart patients are getting inappropriate angioplasties, a new study suggests. The analysis showed overuse of the common procedure to open clogged heart arteries has declined dramatically since 2009 guidelines, which were aimed at curbing inappropriate use…While some signs suggest up-coding could be happening, others "suggest true quality improvement," said Dr. Raymond Gibbons, a former American Heart Association president from the Mayo Clinic. Additional coverage: Pioneer Press, NY Times Contact: Traci Klein   Huffington Post The Pressure To Perform Is Destroying Our Well-Being by Lindsay Holmes …Amit Sood, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, says that while stressful circumstances are unavoidable, it's important to regularly take stock of our physical and emotional health before it results in an incident like a collapse. Below, Sood offers some tips for anyone facing a high-pressure situation -- whether it's a job presentation, an athlete in a game or just making a decision. Reach: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers. Context: Amit Sood, M.D. is a Mayo Clinic physician in General Internal Medicine and the Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness combines wisdom from neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and spirituality to help people choose contentment. Contact: Rhoda Fukishima Madson   CNN Alzheimer's is a young(er) person's disease -- so get to work by Sanjay Gupta Giving drugs to mildly or asymptomatic people is new," agreed clinical neurologist David Knopman at the Mayo Clinic. Researchers are exploring some fringe areas as well. Most intriguing to me was the reason why some people form the plaques in the first place. After all, it's just too easy to chalk it up to bad luck. As it turns out, the plaques may not be all bad. Just recently, we have learned that some people with Alzheimer's have higher levels of yeast, bacteria and viruses in their brains as compared to people of similar age without the disease. Reach: CNN.com has 74.2 million unique visitors to its website each month. Context: David Knopman, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic neurologist. Dr. Knopman's research focuses on late-life cognitive disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Knopman's specific interests are in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease, in cognitive impairment due to stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and in cognitive impairment due to frontotemporal degeneration. He is involved in epidemiology, clinical trials and diagnostic studies of these disorders. Contact: Duska Anastasijevic   NPR Will Drinking Green Tea Boost Your Metabolism? Not So Fast by Eliza Barclay … Other studies have established that green tea contains caffeine and catechins that stimulate the nervous system, which can increase thermogenesis (burning stored energy) and fat oxidation. "The caffeine in green tea could raise your metabolic rate ever so slightly, but it wouldn't have a different effect than coffee," Michael Jensen, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic, tells The Salt. Reach:  The Salt is a blog from National Public Radio's Science Desk about what we eat and why we eat it. Context: Michael Jensen, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. Dr. Jensen and his lab study the effects of obesity and how body fat (adipose tissue) and body fat distribution influence health. The regulated uptake, storage and release of fatty acids from adipose tissue play a major role in determining its health effects. Contact: Bob Nellis   Star Tribune New Mayo Clinic service has health care for pilots on radar by Chris Snowbeck Mayo Clinic has treated plenty of pilots over the years, including many who came to Rochester by corporate jet so their CEOs could get executive physicals…With a new service called ProPilot, Mayo Clinic promises to provide not just the physicals required of pilots by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), but also preventive care that can minimize the amount of time pilots are grounded for health reasons. One of the goals is to “break the old culture of … what the FAA doesn’t know won’t hurt them,” said Dr. Clayton Cowl, chairman of Mayo Clinic’s division for preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine. “These guys end up getting substandard medical care.” Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Additional coverage:

Post-Bulletin, Heard on the Street: Mayo launches health program for pilots

Aviation Pros, (from Star Tribune) New Mayo Clinic Service Has Health Care For Pilots On Radar

Context: Mayo Clinic announced this week ProPilot, a new program for corporate flight departments that offers bundled services designed to keep and get pilots back on the flight deck quickly and safely. Mayo Clinic’s Section of Aerospace Medicine is launching the Mayo Clinic ProPilot Program on its Rochester, Minnesota, campus. more information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Ginger Plumbo Arizona Republic Phoenix researcher secures $12 million to study pancreatic cancer by Ken Alltucker A pancreatic cancer researcher in metro Phoenix will spearhead a research team that secured a $12 million grant to study new drug therapies for pancreatic cancer…Dr. Daniel Von Hoff, physician in chief of Phoenix-based Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), will head the research team, which will include scientists from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies of La Jolla, Calif., and the University of Cambridge. Mayo Clinic will also be part of the research team. Reach: The Arizona Republic reaches 1.1 million readers every Sunday and has an average daily circulation of more than 261,000 readers. The newspaper’s website Arizona Republic - Online, averages more than 5.4 million unique visitors each month. Additional coverage: Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology NewsTracking Cancer Progression in Real Time Using Circulating DNA  Context: A team of researchers, including scientists from the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), has reported that analyzing circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can track how a patient's cancer evolves and responds to treatment. In a study published recently in Nature Communications, Dr. Muhammed Murtaza  of TGen and Mayo Clinic, and colleagues, describe an extensive comparison between biopsy results and analysis of ctDNA in a patient with breast cancer. The researchers followed the patient over three years of treatment. "When patients receive therapy for advanced cancers, not all parts of the tumor respond equally, but it has been difficult to study this phenomenon because it is not practical to perform multiple, repeated tissue biopsies," said Dr. Murtaza, Co-Director of TGen's Center for Noninvasive Diagnostics, and one of the study's lead authors. "Our findings empirically show that ctDNA analysis from blood samples allows us to detect cancer mutations from multiple different tumor sites within a patient and track how each of them responds." Contact: Jim McVeigh [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic In the News Weekly Highlights

  Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would   like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News.  Thank you. Editor, Karl OestreichAssistant Editor: Carmen Zwicker   Star Tribune Teamwork is the key to unlocking the brain's secrets by John Noseworthy Right now you’re using millions of cells in your brain to translate these words into conscious thought. Understanding language. Summoning memories. Feeling emotion. Solving problems. These are merely a fraction of the marvels made possible by the human brain. It’s the most complex and least understood part of our bodies. Despite all of the incredible medical advances made to improve our health over the last century, the brain’s inner workings, relatively speaking, remain mostly a mystery. Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO.  Contact: Duska Anastasijevic   Florida Times-Union Mayo Clinic, St. Vincent's to be partners on cancer center in Riverside By Charlie Patton St. Vincent’s HealthCare and the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville agreed to collaborate on a new cancer clinic which will be located on the campus of St. Vincent’s Medical Center Riverside. St. Vincent’s will build and equip the 11,500-square-foot clinic and provide administrative and support staff. The Mayo Clinic will provide the physicians for what will be called the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at St. Vincent’s Riverside. Reach: The Florida Times-Union reaches more than 120,000 daily and 173,000 readers Sunday. Additional coverage: Jacksonville Business Journal — Mayo Clinic, St. Vincent’s HealthCare to partner in cancer care; WJAX Fla., My InforumsBecker’s Hospital Review  Context: Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a ministry of Ascension Health, are collaborating to bring Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked cancer services to patients in a newly built medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. The goal is to offer Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center’s programs and services to more patients directly in the community. Construction of the 11,500-square-foot medical suite is expected to be completed in summer of 2016. Financial details of the agreement will not be disclosed. “We are thrilled to collaborate with a local health system that is known worldwide for delivering superior cancer care,” says Michael Schatzlein, M.D., President and CEO of St. Vincent’s HealthCare. “Every year, thousands of patients travel across the globe to be treated by Mayo Clinic physicians, and, now, St. Vincent’s will offer our patients the same high-quality care right here on our Riverside campus.” More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network. Contact: Kevin Punsky   USA Today Health: Schoolchildren get into stand-up act by Karen Weintraub By now, most adults have gotten the message that slumping in a desk chair all day long isn’t very healthy. Over the last five years, standing desks have gone from an office oddity to a staple…James Levine said his own research and others’ suggests that children benefit from any extra time to burn off energy. “If you give children the opportunity to move while learning, they will do so,” said Levine, co-director of obesity solutions at the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University. “They’ll double the amount of daily movement.” Reach: USA TODAY  has an average daily circulation of 4.1 million which includes print, various digital editions and other papers that use their branded content. Additional coverage: Reuters — Fidgeting while you work might be good for you;  Business Insider, Philly Voice, Philadelphia Inquirer, Grand Forks Herald Context: James Levine, M.D. PH.D. is a world authority on obesity, serving as a named expert at the United Nations, an invitee to the President's Cancer Panel, and a consultant to governments internationally. He is the Dr. Richard F. Emslander Professor of Endocrinology and Nutrition Research at Mayo Clinic. He holds five tenured professorships at ASU, is the Dean's Distinguished Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, and the Regents Professor at Umea University, Sweden. He also serves as the co-director of Obesity Solutions, a collaboration between Mayo Clinic and ASU, and is the international director of Obesity Solutions' sister center in Sweden. Contact: Jim McVeigh   U.S. News & World Report Mayo Clinic CEO: Health Care Focuses on Outcomes, Sharing Knowledge by Steve Sternberg …U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow keynote speaker Dr. John Noseworthy, president and chief executive officer at Mayo Clinic, spoke with U.S. News about some of the changes affecting the nation's health care system and Mayo's approach to improving health care for tens of thousands of patients inside – and outside – its walls. (The interview has been edited for clarity and length.) Reach: US News reaches more than 10 million unique visitors to its website each month. Context: John Noseworthy, M.D. is Mayo Clinic President and CEO. Dr. Noseworthy is the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow keynote speaker. Contacts: Traci Klein, Karl Oestreich  [...]

EDITORIAL

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights

Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Laura Wuotila with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. Thank you. Editor, Karl Oestreich; Assistant Editors: Carmen Zwicker, Emily Blahnik   Star Tribune Mayo makes case for Medicare reimbursement for telemedicine by Jim Spencer Nurses Jennifer Meindel and Chad Ditlevson stand in front of monitors in a small room at the Mayo Clinic reading vital signs and occasionally calling up video images of patients lying in beds. All of the 40-some patients cycling across the screens are in intensive care in the Mayo Clinic Health System. But none of them are actually at Mayo. The clinic’s electronic intensive care unit, known as eICU, is one of the frontiers of telemedicine. Backed by Dr. Daniel Brown, Mayo’s chief of critical care, and nurse manager Sarah Bell, Meindel and Ditlevson direct the care of very vulnerable patients from afar. Reach: The Star Tribune Sunday circulation is 518,745 copies and weekday circulation is 300,277. The Star Tribune is the state’s largest newspaper and ranks 16th nationally in circulation. Additional coverage: Insurance News Net Context: Each year, Mayo Clinic physicians see people from all 50 states. Advances in technology are helping patients who may be faced with long-distance travel and logistical hurdles connect with Mayo Clinic’s specialized health care providers easier and faster. However, the patchwork of state-by-state medical licensing rules presents a costly and time-consuming barrier to telehealth care delivery. Steve Ommen, M.D. is medical director of Center for Connected Care, Mayo Clinic. Contact: Sharon Theimer   Wall Street Journal Seeking Better Ways to Treat the Lows of Bipolar Disorder by Melinda Beck Distinguishing between regular depression and bipolar disorder is one of the toughest calls psychiatrists face. The symptoms are often similar, but medications that ease depression can make bipolar patients worse by triggering manic episodes. The dilemma is fueling new research efforts to understand how the two conditions differ and how to predict which patients will respond to which drugs. Scientists at the Mayo Clinic, which treats some 3,000 patients a year with bipolar disorder, are collecting DNA samples, blood tests, brain scans and clinical information in hopes of identifying genetic risk factors, or biomarkers, that can lead to earlier diagnoses and individualized treatments. Reach: The Wall Street Journal, a US-based newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company, has the largest print circulation in America with 1.4 million (60 percent) of a total of 2.3 million. Its website has more than 4.3 million unique visitors each month. Context: The Individualized Medicine Biobank for Bipolar Disorder is intended to serve as a resource for the bipolar research community. This biobank will be open to collaborations after a three-year infrastructure development. Researchers are establishing a large-scale biobank of Bipolar Type I and II Disorder, collecting both biologic samples and clinical data from 2,000 individuals ages 18-80. This is a multi-site endeavor, with Mayo Clinic Minnesota serving as the primary project site. Researchers at Mayo Clinic will collaborate with other researchers at the University of Minnesota, Lindner Center of Hope (Cincinnati, Ohio) as well as the Mayo Clinic sites of Arizona and Florida. Mark Frye, M.D., is chair of psychiatry and psychology at Mayo Clinic. Contact: Bob Nellis   MPR How hospitals are improving heart attack care, survival by Emily Kaiser "We've been advocating for getting our act together and moving quickly for literally two decades," said Dr. Sharonne Hayes, a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic. "What has really happened is we put the systems in place to achieve this and when you have a little success it makes everybody get on board." The time for care dropped when all sides of the system coordinated: from recognition and speed on first contact with a paramedic or emergency room to transfer to hospitals with the technology required for proper care, said Dr. Chet Rihal an interventionalist and the chairperson of the Cardiology Department at Mayo Clinic. Reach: Minnesota Public Radio operates 43 stations and serves virtually all of Minnesota and parts of the surrounding states. MPR has more than 100,000 members and more than 900,000 listeners each week, which is the largest audience of any regional public radio network. Context: Charanjit "Chet"Rihal, M.D., is an academic interventional cardiologist and an expert in the field of coronary and valve and structural cardiology. As the principal investigator on multiple research grants, Dr. Rihal oversees studies focusing on valvular and structural heart disease (for example, percutaneous aortic valve therapies), clinical trials in coronary artery disease, and developing novel genetic approaches to anti-thrombotic therapy. Sharrone Hayes, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. Her research focuses on cardiovascular disease and prevention, with a focus on sex and gender differences and conditions that uniquely or predominantly affect women. Contact: Traci Klein   Post-Bulletin Good Health: Doctors belong in the social media conversation Next fall, Mayo hosts the first ever global meeting for its social media health network, a gathering planned to be in Australia."Mayo encourages physicians to understand how to use these tools appropriately," said Dr. Farris Timimi, medical director of Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media. "Most patients make their decisions based on a reference network. More and more often that includes online communications. We check our phones an average of 14 times a day." Reach: The Post-Bulletin has a weekend readership of nearly 45,000 people and daily readership of more than 41,000 people. The newspaper serves Rochester, Minn., and southeast Minnesota. Context: Farris Timimi, M.D., is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and also serves as the medical director for the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media. Contact: Lee Aase   [...]

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