January 5th, 2018

Hysterectomy may have long-term health risks

By Karl W Oestreich

HealthDay
by Mary Elizabeth Dallas

Women who undergo a hysterectomy are at greater risk for heart disease and other health issues -- even if they keep their ovaries, new research suggests. "Hysterectomy is the second most common gynecologic Health Day Logosurgery, and most are done for benign reasons, because most physicians believe that this surgery has minimal long-term risks," said lead researcher Dr. Shannon Laughlin-Tommaso, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "With the results of this study, we encourage people to consider nonsurgical alternative therapies for fibroids, endometriosis and prolapse, which are leading causes of hysterectomy," she said.

Reach: HealthDay distributes its health news to media outlets several times each day and also posts its news on its website, which receives nearly 405,000 unique visitors each month.

Additional coverage: KIMT, US News & World Report, UPI.com, Hindustan Times, News-medical.net, Medical Xpress, MedPage Today, Science DailyDaily Mail

Context: Mayo Clinic researchers show that hysterectomy with ovarian conservation is associated with a significantly increased risk of several cardiovascular diseases and metabolic conditions. The findings are published in Menopause“This is the best data to date that shows women undergoing hysterectomy have a risk of long-term disease ─ even when both ovaries are conserved,” says Shannon Laughlin-Tommaso, M.D., study author and Mayo Clinic OB-GYN. “While women are increasingly aware that removing their ovaries poses health risks, this study suggests hysterectomy alone has risks, especially for women who undergo hysterectomy prior to age 35.” Women in this study were identified using the Rochester Epidemiology Project, a medical records database that includes the complete inpatient and outpatient records of all medical providers in Olmsted County, Minnesota. More information can be found on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Tags: Dr. Shannon Laughlin-Tommaso, HealthDay, hysterectomy, Uncategorized

Contact Us · Privacy Policy