June 15, 2018

‘Female Viagra’ Probably Isn’t the Best Way to Boost Your Sex Drive

By Karl W Oestreich

Prevention
by Alisa Hrustic

For years, women had no such drug available to them. Then, in 2015, flibanserin (brand name: Addyi) was finally approved by the FDA for women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), a science-y term that simply means you’re Prevention logofeeling a chronic lack of sexual desire, fantasies, or activity that causes significant distress…Addyi was the first drug of its kind, and had to break through some serious misconceptions about female sexuality, “which is, in part, why it is so controversial,” explains Stephanie Faubion, MD, director of the Women’s Health Clinic and Office of Women’s Health at the Mayo Clinic.

Reach: Prevention, established in 1950 and serves as an authoritative, trustworthy and innovative source for practical health information and ideas on healthy living. Written to motivate, inspire and enable people to take charge of their health, become healthier and happier and improve the lives of family and friends. Prevention has a monthly circulation of more than 1.5 million. Its website has more than 9.3 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Stehanie Faubion, M.D. is director of the Women's Health Clinic and Office of Women’s Health at the Mayo Clinic. The Women's Health Clinic team provides personalized specialty care for women, with a mission to inspire hope, relieve suffering and advance the science of women's health.  As a clinician who has practiced in the Women's Health Clinic at Mayo Clinic for over 10 years and has evaluated and treated women with menopausal, hormonal and sexual health concerns, Dr. Faubion has a broad interest in women's health. Dr. Faubion's research encompasses sex- and gender-based differences in disease, menopause, hormone therapy, healthy aging, and sexual health and dysfunction in women. In Dr. Faubion's role as director of the Women's Health Clinic and Office of Women's Health, she is acutely aware of the need to improve the evidence base for medical practice. Her role in the research community is guided by the need to develop research strategies that will improve the clinical practice. Thus, research questions come directly from the clinical dilemmas faced every day in medical practice.

Contact:  Heather Carlson

Tags: Dr. Stephanie Faubion, Mayo Clinic Office of Women's Health, Mayo Clinic Women's Health Clinic, Uncategorized, Women's Health

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