September 20, 2019

Hysterectomy tied to depression, anxiety

By Karl W Oestreich

HealthDay
by Robert Preidt

Having a hysterectomy can be a traumatic experience, and new research now shows it may also increase the long-term risk for depression and anxiety. "Our study shows that removing the uterus may have more effect on physical and mental health than previously thought," said senior author Dr. Shannon Laughlin-Tommaso, an ob-gyn at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "Because women often get a hysterectomy at a young age, knowing the risks associated with the procedure even years later is important," she said in a clinic news release. She and her colleagues reviewed the health records of nearly 2,100 women who underwent removal of the uterus but not the ovaries. They found they had about a 7% increased risk of depression and a 5% increased risk of anxiety over 30 years.

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Additional coverage: Everyday Health

Context: Hysterectomy is associated with an increased risk of long-term mental health issues, especially depression and anxiety, according to a cohort study by Mayo Clinic researchers involving nearly 2,100 women.

The review of health records from 1980 to 2002 involved women who underwent removal of the uterus but not the ovaries. The study, which used data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project, considered only new diagnoses of depression, anxiety, dementia, substance abuse and schizophrenia after hysterectomy, and excluded women with prior diagnoses.

Researchers found an absolute risk increase of 6.6% for depression and 4.7% for anxiety over 30 years, says senior author Shannon Laughlin-Tommaso, M.D., a Mayo Clinic OB-GYN. For women who underwent hysterectomy between the ages of 18 and 35, the risk of depression was higher, with absolute risk increase over 30 years of 12%. You can read more about the study on Mayo Clinic News Network.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Tags: anxiety, depression, Dr. Shannon Laughlin-Tommaso, Health Day, hysterectomy and depression, Rochester Epidemiology Project, Uncategorized

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