October 24, 2019

In search of snoring solutions

By Karl W Oestreich

New York Times
by Eric A. Taub

“With age, the muscle tone of our airways decreases. That decreased tone allows the tissues to move more readily and become more prone to collapse and to vibrate,” said Dr. Michael D. Olson, an ear, nose and throat doctor and sleep surgeon in the Mayo Clinic’s department of head and neck surgery. In addition, if the size of the airway decreases, air pressure increases, allowing for tissue vibration and snoring. “Combine that with nasal congestion, a big tongue and body fat, and that leads to an excessive collapse of the airways,” Dr. Olson said.

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Reach: The New York Times has a daily circulation of nearly 589,000. The New York Times online receives more than 29.8 million unique visitors each month.

Context: Michael D. Olson, M.D. is an ear, nose and throat doctor and sleep surgeon in the Mayo Clinic’s department of head and neck surgery. Dr. Olson specializes in the surgical treatment of sleep apnea and facial plastic and reconstructive surgery of the head and neck.

Contact: Kelley Luckstein

Tags: Dr. Michael D. Olson, New York Times, sleep medicine, snoring, Uncategorized

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