Items Tagged ‘anxiety’

November 15, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 15, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

NBC News, New NASA study finds long-haul danger for astronauts: Blood flow in reverse by Denise Chow — Spaceflight can halt and even reverse blood flow in astronauts’ upper bodies, a NASA report said Wednesday, a startling discovery that has important implications for future trips to Mars and other long-duration missions…“Medicine in space is a […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, anxiety, blood donation program, Breast Cancer, burning mouth syndrome, Cancer, cannabis, Carla Brunsvold, Carrie Apuan, CHAMPs, Chemotherapy, Cindy Shireman


November 8, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 8, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Quartz, Rare genetic mutations protected a woman from developing Alzheimer’s by Katherine Ellen Foley — This case study “leads us to think about the importance of such studies in relatively understudied populations,” says Nilufer Ertekin-Taner, a neurogeneticist with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, who was not involved with the study. Scientific knowledge of the […]

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Tags: Andrea Malenya, Anne Bauch, anxiety, artificial Intelligence, bariatric surgery, biotech, Breast Cancer, Bu, Cancer, cardiovascular disease, Chemotherapy, Children's Center


October 4, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for October 4, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

New York Times, Hysterectomy May Raise Depression and Anxiety Risk by Nicholas Bakalar — The observational study, in the journal Menopause, controlled for dementia, substance use disorders, hypertension, coronary artery disease, arthritis, all types of cancer and more than a dozen other mental and physical conditions. “Hysterectomy is right for some women,” said the lead author, […]

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Tags: Andy Sandness, anxiety, Blount Memorial, Breast Cancer, caffeine, Christopher Ross, Civica Rx, dementia, Dena Iverson, depression, destination medical center, Discovery Square


September 20, 2019

Hysterectomy tied to depression, anxiety

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

HealthDayby Robert Preidt Having a hysterectomy can be a traumatic experience, and new research now shows it may also increase the long-term risk for depression and anxiety. “Our study shows that removing the uterus may have more effect on physical and mental health than previously thought,” said senior author Dr. Shannon Laughlin-Tommaso, an ob-gyn at […]

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Tags: anxiety, depression, Dr. Shannon Laughlin-Tommaso, Health Day, hysterectomy and depression, Rochester Epidemiology Project


September 13, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for September 13, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

STAT, It’s not just bosses who harass health workers: Hospitals start addressing patients’ ‘egregious’ behavior by Jacquelyn Corley — At Mayo Clinic last year, a male patient groped a female doctor in the presence of several other staff members. She immediately notified hospital administrators using a new reporting system, and the patient was terminated from […]

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Tags: 9/11, alcoholism, anxiety, Apple Tree Dental, Ashley Zimmerman, Ashton Hanson, AVM, Battle of the Badges, belly fat, blastomycosis, brain health, chest pain


August 16, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for August 16, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Wall Street Journal, Deals Give Drugmakers Rights to DNA Data by Melanie Evans — Deals between drugmakers and hospital systems to mine the genetic profiles of hospital patients are triggering concerns over the control of valuable genetic data. Drugmakers have been spending hundreds of millions of dollars for access to patient information because of the […]

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Tags: Amy Stelpflug, anxiety, artificial Intelligence, backpacks, belly fat, Breast Cancer, cardio, carpal tunnel syndrome, celiac disease, chronic pain, climate change, cross training


August 16, 2019

Anxiety complicates life for dementia patients — and their caregivers

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

Washington Postby Mary-Ellen Deily …Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s disease Research Center, recommends playing a person’s favorite music and using other behavioral approaches to distract them. He also advises against trying to convince a person with dementia that they’re worrying about something that isn’t real. Opt for distraction over confrontation, he said. […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, anxiety, Dr. Ronald Petersen, Washington Post


July 12, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for July 12, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Science, Even if you don’t play contact sports, you could develop signs of traumatic brain injury by Sabine Galvis — Scientists looking for a link between repeated brain trauma and lasting neurological damage typically study the brains of soldiers or football players. But it’s unclear whether this damage—known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)—is prevalent in […]

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Tags: air quality, alzheimer's disease, Amazon Alexa, anxiety, ASCO, babysitting, belly fat, Chad Corey, Charles Allie, Cheryl Hadaway, Cognitive Impairment, dementia


June 21, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for June 21, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Washington Post, A rare skin disease left a man isolated and alone. Surgery is helping to give him back his life. by Lindsey Bever — Dusica Babovic-Vuksanovic, a physician who specializes in genetic syndromes and leads the Neurofibromatosis Clinic at the Mayo Clinic, said neurofibromatosis is rare, affecting 1 in about 3,000 people in the […]

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Tags: ACL repair, Aneurysm, anxiety, Big Blue Dragon Boat Festival, blood pressure, brain chipping, brain tumor, burnout, cannabis, Chris Norton, cystic fibrosis, Derin Gebhardt


May 24, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for May 24, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

New York Times, In Health Care, Too Much Privacy Is a Bad Thing by Luke Miner — Data-sharing agreements should be standardized so that doctors and hospitals don’t have to draft custom ones every time they want to share information. Some effort has already been made to reform fines by taking into account the “culpability” […]

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Tags: addiction, aging, alcoholism, alzheimer's disease, anxiety, ASU, bariatric surgery, blood donation, blood thinners, cardiac rehab, Chiari malformation, Christine Hughes


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