Items Tagged ‘diabetes’

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for April 19, 2019

April 19, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for April 19, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Washington Post, CTE researchers discover possible step toward diagnostic test for living patients by Jacob Bogage — Medical researchers have made what they cautiously characterized as a possible first step toward diagnosing the neurodegenerative illness chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in living patients, according to an article published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. […]

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Tags: A.L.S., aging, arthritis, Ashley Schmitt, Aspirin, Breast Cancer, burnout, cannabis, carillon, Cathy Fraser, Christie Vogel, Cris Ross


April 12, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for April 12, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

  NBC News, UC Davis Medical Center warns 200 people of potential measles exposure by Linda Carroll — “With the drop in vaccination rates, we may be headed back in that direction,” said Roberto Cattaneo, a measles researcher and a professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “It seems […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Bill Bastian, burnout, Cancer, CBD oil, Chemotherapy, Christine Hughes, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD, destination medical center, diabetes


March 22, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for March 22, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

New York Times, When Email Comes to the Doctor’s Office, Wait Times Decrease by Austin Frakt — Most studies report high satisfaction from specialists, but one found that a large minority (26 percent) of them were dissatisfied. The concerns expressed included unclear clinical questions and the possible liability associated with providing medical advice for patients […]

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Tags: allergy season, Alliance to HEAL, alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Aspirin, asthma, Bret Adler, burnout, C-SPAN, CABANA, Chad Corey, chicken pox


March 15, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for March 15, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

NBC News, Improved detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer provides hope by Elizabeth Chuck — While there are currently no approved early detection tests for pancreatic cancer, researchers say there are promising possibilities — particularly in blood tests that can pick up biomarkers for it. “We are slowly making inroads,” said Gloria Petersen, a professor […]

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Tags: alcohol, Alex Trebek, Amy Long, blood donation, breastfeeding, burnout, Colorectal Cancer, conjoined twins, COVR Medical, cremation, crisis center, Daylight Savings Time


February 22, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for February 22, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Wall Street Journal, The Fitness Plan for Serious Schmoozers by Jen Murphy — “You really need to make an effort to counteract the effects of sitting for eight hours a day,” says Donald Hensrud, director of the Healthy Living Program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. “Just being active won’t cut it. You need […]

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Tags: Alexa, alzheimer's disease, Anatomage Table, anesthesia, aquatic physical therapy, asthma, Big Blue Dragon Boat, blood sugar, board of trustees, burnout, caregivers, cervical cancer


December 14, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for December 14, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

HealthDay, AHA: Exercise After Heart Attack May Improve Survival — The study supports exercise as “one of the most important medicines people can take before cardiac events but, in particular, after them as well,” said Dr. Randal Thomas, medical director of the cardiac rehabilitation program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The study sends […]

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Tags: 3-D breast imaging, A.L.S., Alexander D. Weston, All Abilities Park, Annie Redlin, apple cider vinegar, Balloon Brigade, BioSig, breathing techniques, Cancer, CBD, chatbots


November 21, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 21, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

New York Times, Why Don’t We Have Vaccines Against Everything? by Donald G. McNeil Jr. — …And as with weaponry, fear changes everything. In epidemiologically quiet times, the anti-vaccine lobby sows doubts; when Ebola or pandemic flu strikes, Americans clamor for protection. There are two obstacles to faster progress, said Dr. Gregory A. Poland, director […]

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Tags: active shooter, aging, AI, alcohol, Alex Biagi, Amanda Dernbach, antibiotics, artificial Intelligence, Breast Cancer, Cancer, carpal tunnel, Cathy Deimeke


November 9, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 9, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

USA Today, How Daylight Saving affects your sleep and overall health by Ashley May — Daylight Saving Time ends and clocks will “fall back” an hour this weekend, giving Americans the feeling of an extra hour in the morning, which could negatively affect their health. “Ever since the institution of Daylight Saving Time, there has […]

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Tags: blood donation, Breast Cancer, broken-heart syndrome, cellulitis, coffee, daylight saving time, diabetes, DNA kits, Dr. Adrian Vella, Dr. Ala Dababneh, Dr. Amaal Starling, Dr. Fred M. Kusumoto


June 29, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for June 29, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

CNN, Sunscreen 101: Your guide to summer sun protection and sunburn care by Maddie Bender — The active ingredients of sunscreens are regulated by the FDA, so FDA-approved sunscreens are safe for adults and children over 6 months. However, Mayo Clinic dermatologist Dr. Dawn Davis previously told CNN that people with sensitive skin or allergies […]

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Tags: allergies, alzheimer's disease, Atul Gawande, BCBS, Becky Spee, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, breathing tubes, bug-borne diseases, Cancer, Career Immersion Program, coffee


June 22, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for June 22, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

        USA Today, Landmark Mediterranean diet study was flawed. Authors retract paper published in NEJM by Ashley May — We’ve been hearing about the benefits of a Mediterranean diet for years, and now authors of a major study long cited for suggesting its heart-healthy benefits said the research was flawed. The original study, published […]

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Tags: 3-D microscope, alzheimer's disease, Ambient, autopsies, back pain, BCBS, biking, Breast Cancer, Camp Sweet Life, Cancer, Charlie Mayo, clinical trials


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