Items Tagged ‘Dr. Robert Jacobson’

March 22, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for March 22, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

New York Times, When Email Comes to the Doctor’s Office, Wait Times Decrease by Austin Frakt — Most studies report high satisfaction from specialists, but one found that a large minority (26 percent) of them were dissatisfied. The concerns expressed included unclear clinical questions and the possible liability associated with providing medical advice for patients […]

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Tags: allergy season, Alliance to HEAL, alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Aspirin, asthma, Bret Adler, burnout, C-SPAN, CABANA, Chad Corey, chicken pox


January 11, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for January 11, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

USA Today, A medical rarity: Two patients get back-to-back, triple-organ transplants by Ken Altucker — …Mayo Clinic Rochester has completed 100 multi-organ transplants, including four heart-liver-kidney transplants, said Alfredo Clavell, Mayo Rochester’s medical director of the heart transplant program. Clavell agreed that a new liver often allows patients to take lower levels of anti-rejection drugs […]

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Tags: anxiety, artificial Intelligence, blood drive, Cancer, Chron's disease, Civica Rx, concussion, diet, Dr. Alfredo Clavell, Dr. Amy L. Lightner, Dr. Charles Peters, Dr. Claude Deschamps


December 21, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for December 21, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Happy holidays!  Mayo Clinic in the News will be taking a week off.  We’ll be back on January 4, 2019. Wall Street Journal, How pilates helps fight atrophy by Jen Murphy — Pilates can be particularly helpful for people with stability and motor-related issues, says Jane Hein, a physical therapist and lead Pilates instructor at the Mayo […]

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Tags: 3D mammogram, aging, Alison Ecklund, All Abilities Trane Park, altitude sickness, alzheimer's disease, Amelia Davis, Anita Bissinger, Anna Beth Morgan, Antonio Wimbush, Antwan Dixon, Aromatherapy


November 9, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 9, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

USA Today, How Daylight Saving affects your sleep and overall health by Ashley May — Daylight Saving Time ends and clocks will “fall back” an hour this weekend, giving Americans the feeling of an extra hour in the morning, which could negatively affect their health. “Ever since the institution of Daylight Saving Time, there has […]

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Tags: blood donation, Breast Cancer, broken-heart syndrome, cellulitis, coffee, daylight saving time, diabetes, DNA kits, Dr. Adrian Vella, Dr. Ala Dababneh, Dr. Amaal Starling, Dr. Fred M. Kusumoto


November 1, 2018

How safe is the flu shot? Everything you need to know about side effects and reactions

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

BuzzFeed by Caroline Kee The flu shot, like any vaccine or medication, does not come without risks. But these are small and limited to certain groups. So we spoke to two experts about flu shot safety, side effects, and possible reactions to clear things up and put your mind at ease: Dr. Tom Shimabukuro, deputy […]

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Tags: BuzzFeed, Dr. Robert Jacobson, flu shots


October 26, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for October 26, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Harvard Business Review, Lessons from Mayo Clinic’s Redesign of Stroke Care by W. David Freeman — Facing escalating costs of medications and technology, health care patients and providers in the United States continue to search for opportunities to reduce overall costs while maintaining and improving health care outcomes. At the Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Stroke Center […]

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Tags: 3D mammography, Acute Flaccid Myelitis, asthma, bariatric surgery, Chip Duncan, Christine Feller, contact lenses, COPD, dementia, destination medical center, diet, DMC


October 19, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for October 19, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Washington Post, ‘We lived like we were Wall Street’ by DeNeen L. Brown — Before it was destroyed in the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, Greenwood was one of the most affluent black communities in the country. It was known as “Black Wall Street” because of its concentrated wealth…“At the time of the riot, there were […]

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Tags: Acute Flaccid Myelitis, All of Us, alzheimer's disease, Amanda Dernbach, antibiotic resistance, breastfeeding, c-section, Chad Pennington, Charles Rosen, cough medicine, croup, dental health


August 6, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for August 3, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Washington Post, Hookworms burrowed into a teenager’s skin during a trip to Florida. You can’t unsee these images. by Lindsey Bever — There are two main types of hookworm: human hookworms and animal, or zoonotic, hookworms. Bobbi Pritt, director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory in the Mayo Clinic’s Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, said […]

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Tags: Alan Alda, alzheimer's disease, Aneurysms, Biogen, birth control pills, blood cancer, breast cancer research, breastfeeding, Bryan Duncan, Cancer, CAR-T cell, diets


July 13, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for July 9, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

        Wall Street Journal, New Effort for Lyme Disease Vaccine Draws Early Fire by Sumathi Reddy — Gregory Poland, director of the vaccine research group at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., published a 2011 study in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases detailing what happened with the previous Lyme vaccine and lessons learned […]

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Tags: age-related disease, alzheimer's disease, Angie Murad, artificial Intelligence, asthma exacerbation, Biogen, Career Immersion Program, cervical cancer, Darla Lytle, dementia, Diversity, Dr Felipe Sierra


March 2, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for March 2, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

      CNBC, Why unlikely partnerships will spark the health-care revolution by John Noseworthy — Our team from Mayo Clinic — the 150-year-old health-care organization that invented the first group practice of medicine — was looking to learn from a start-up in Chinatown. Innovation springs up in unlikely places through unconventional collaborations. Late last […]

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Tags: bloody stool, breast cancer lymphoma, burnout, Children's Museum, clinical trials, Danielle Johnson, Dennis Dahlen, destination medical center, diabetes, DMC, Donna Bryan, Dr. Adrian Vella


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