Items Tagged ‘Dr. Ronald Petersen’

November 15, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 15, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

NBC News, New NASA study finds long-haul danger for astronauts: Blood flow in reverse by Denise Chow — Spaceflight can halt and even reverse blood flow in astronauts’ upper bodies, a NASA report said Wednesday, a startling discovery that has important implications for future trips to Mars and other long-duration missions…“Medicine in space is a […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, anxiety, blood donation program, Breast Cancer, burning mouth syndrome, Cancer, cannabis, Carla Brunsvold, Carrie Apuan, CHAMPs, Chemotherapy, Cindy Shireman


November 1, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 1, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Washington Post, Health-care system causing rampant burnout among doctors, nurses by William Wan — Complex regulations on hospital reimbursement gives rise to a long list doctors must tic through in physical exams, even as they try to figure out what’s ailing a patient, so hospitals can charge more or less based on the exam’s complexity…“It’s […]

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Tags: AI, artificial Intelligence, Ashley Musch, asthma, Barbara Slaggie, Ben Merck, Biogen, blood pressure, brain tumor, breakfast, Breast Cancer, breast cancer vaccine


October 25, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for October 25, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

New York Times, That New Alzheimer’s Drug? Don’t Get Your Hopes Up Yet by Gina Kolata — Biogen, the drug company, said on Tuesday that it would ask the Food and Drug Administration to approve an experimental drug, aducanumab, to treat people with mild cognitive impairment and the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease…Dr. Ronald Petersen, […]

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Tags: 3D imaging, aneurysm repair, Angie Murad, anti-aging medicine, brain scans, cancer diagnosis and pregnancy, Cassie Masters, CMG Community Navigator program, DMC and bus rapid transit, dog owners and health, Dr. Adam Cole, Dr. Alina Allen


October 11, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for October 11, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Wall Street Journal, Doctors Limit What to Tell Patients About Their DNA Test. Should They? by Melanie Evans and Anna Wilde Mathews — The Mayo Clinic is scanning 20,000 genes for thousands of patients to study genes’ role in disease. It will hand over results for just 59. Mayo will look for certain disease-causing gene […]

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Tags: 3D mammography, aging, alzheimer's disease, apps, Bounce Day, Cancer, cancer vaccine, celiac disease, centers of excellence, childhood trauma, Civica Rx, dermoid cyst


September 27, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for September 27, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Reuters, Patients, doctors may not share priorities for chronic diseases by Carolyn Crist — Patients and doctors often have different views about which chronic health conditions are their top priorities, suggests a study in France.  After separate surveys of patients and their physicians, researchers found that priorities matched up for some conditions, such as diabetes […]

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Tags: ADHD, aging, AI, alzheimer's disease, Andreas Cancer Center, anti-aging, artificial Intelligence, Best Buy, biotin, birth control, board of trustees, Breast Cancer


September 20, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for September 20, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Wall Street Journal, Israel Prepares to Unleash AI on Health Care by Dov Lieber — Israel is becoming a testing ground for the power of artificial intelligence to improve health care… ​In May, Israel’s Innovation Authority signed a memorandum with the Mayo Clinic for Israeli health startups to team up with the U.S. institution’s researchers […]

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Tags: ADHD, aging, AI, alzheimer's disease, Apple Tree Dental, artificial Intelligence, Ben Crenshaw, BioSig, Blood Donor Program, board of trustees, bone marrow transplant, C. diff


August 16, 2019

Anxiety complicates life for dementia patients — and their caregivers

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

Washington Postby Mary-Ellen Deily …Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s disease Research Center, recommends playing a person’s favorite music and using other behavioral approaches to distract them. He also advises against trying to convince a person with dementia that they’re worrying about something that isn’t real. Opt for distraction over confrontation, he said. […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, anxiety, Dr. Ronald Petersen, Washington Post


July 19, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for July 19, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

New York Times, Is Your Heartbeat Off, or Blood Sugar High? On the Road, You Can Keep Track by Joshua Brockman — Dr. Bithika Thompson, the director of the diabetes program at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, said the F.D.A.-approved wearable monitors — including the continuous glucose monitors and flash monitors like Abbott’s Freestyle Libre, […]

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Tags: aging brain, alzheimer's disease, Amazon Alexa, Biofourmis, blood donation, blood sugar, broken-heart syndrome, calcium, Cancer, celiac disease, Chris Fjosne, Coulee Recovery Center


June 14, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for June 14, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

CNN, Changing your meat-eating habits could mean a longer life, study suggests by Jacqueline Howard — The study provides “valuable and informative” data regarding the associations of red meat with poor health outcomes, said Dr. Heather Fields, an internal medicine specialist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, who was not involved in the research. “We’ve also […]

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Tags: AI, air quality, Altoona Fun Fitness Trail, anal cancer, Aussie Peppers, blood donation, Breast Cancer, Cindy Shireman, cold cap therapy, community garden, dementia, diabetes


May 24, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for May 24, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

New York Times, In Health Care, Too Much Privacy Is a Bad Thing by Luke Miner — Data-sharing agreements should be standardized so that doctors and hospitals don’t have to draft custom ones every time they want to share information. Some effort has already been made to reform fines by taking into account the “culpability” […]

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Tags: addiction, aging, alcoholism, alzheimer's disease, anxiety, ASU, bariatric surgery, blood donation, blood thinners, cardiac rehab, Chiari malformation, Christine Hughes


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