Items Tagged ‘exercise’

July 19, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for July 19, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

New York Times, Is Your Heartbeat Off, or Blood Sugar High? On the Road, You Can Keep Track by Joshua Brockman — Dr. Bithika Thompson, the director of the diabetes program at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, said the F.D.A.-approved wearable monitors — including the continuous glucose monitors and flash monitors like Abbott’s Freestyle Libre, […]

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Tags: aging brain, alzheimer's disease, Amazon Alexa, Biofourmis, blood donation, blood sugar, broken-heart syndrome, calcium, Cancer, celiac disease, Chris Fjosne, Coulee Recovery Center


May 24, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for May 24, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

New York Times, In Health Care, Too Much Privacy Is a Bad Thing by Luke Miner — Data-sharing agreements should be standardized so that doctors and hospitals don’t have to draft custom ones every time they want to share information. Some effort has already been made to reform fines by taking into account the “culpability” […]

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Tags: addiction, aging, alcoholism, alzheimer's disease, anxiety, ASU, bariatric surgery, blood donation, blood thinners, cardiac rehab, Chiari malformation, Christine Hughes


May 17, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for May 17, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Reuters, Home-based heart rehab may help patients who can’t get to clinics by Lisa Rapaport — “Patients who experience a cardiac event (such as a heart attack or heart surgery), should participate in a cardiac rehabilitation program,” said lead author of the statement Dr. Randal Thomas, medical director of the cardiac rehab program at the […]

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Tags: aging, AI, Alexandria Van Gilder, AliveCor, artificial heart valve, artificial Intelligence, Ashley Zimmerman, brain aneurysm, Brittany Burnham, Camp Wabi, Cancer, canine brucellosis


April 26, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for April 26, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Reuters, In many states, pregnancy invalidates a woman’s DNR by Linda Carroll — Most states have statutes that invalidate a woman’s advance directive if she is pregnant, a U.S. study finds. And because those statutes are often not clearly outlined in the DNR form, women filling out an advance directive most likely would not know […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, amputee, Aneurysm, Arthur Stanley, ASU, Beyoncé, Brooke Kluck, bubble boy, CPR, CSPAN, DNR, Dr. Ammar Killu


March 15, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for March 15, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

NBC News, Improved detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer provides hope by Elizabeth Chuck — While there are currently no approved early detection tests for pancreatic cancer, researchers say there are promising possibilities — particularly in blood tests that can pick up biomarkers for it. “We are slowly making inroads,” said Gloria Petersen, a professor […]

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Tags: alcohol, Alex Trebek, Amy Long, blood donation, breastfeeding, burnout, Colorectal Cancer, conjoined twins, COVR Medical, cremation, crisis center, Daylight Savings Time


March 1, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for March 1, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

CNN, Tech platforms, stop enabling the anti-vaxers by Megan Garcia — Anti-vaccine groups with subtle names like The National Vaccine Information Center and less subtle names like Rage Against Vaccines have, for decades, used debunked research to fuel parents’ fears of the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine, generating a surge in unvaccinated children in the […]

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Tags: Alliance to HEAL, alzheimer's disease, anti-vaxers, biomedical research, blizzard, Cancer, carillon, CBD oil, Centro Médico Puerta de Hierro, Chemotherapy, colon cancer, cough


February 8, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for February 8, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Washington Post, Daily exercise, even just a brisk walk, has been shown to lower blood pressure by William B. Farquhar — Often, there are no signs or symptoms of hypertension, which is why it is referred to as the “silent killer.” Even among adults who have been diagnosed with hypertension, nearly half do not have […]

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Tags: Alliance to HEAL, alzheimer's disease, anxiety, Breast Cancer, cognitive decline, cold, cold weather, CPR, Cybersecurity, destination medical center, diet, DMC


January 25, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for January 25, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

New York Times, Spinal Fractures Can Be Terribly Painful. A Common Treatment Isn’t Helping by Gina Kolata — Scientists warned osteoporosis patients on Thursday to avoid two common procedures used to shore up painful fractures in crumbling spines. The treatments, which involve injecting bone cement into broken vertebrae, relieve pain no better than a placebo does, […]

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Tags: affordable housing, AliveCor, alkaline water, alzheimer's disease, biomarkers, Bradly Prigge, brain disease, carillon, Center for Individualized Medicine, Chippewa Valley, colds, Colorectal Cancer


October 12, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for October 12, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

US News & World Report, Joining the Opioid Battle by Linda Marsa — Many hospitals, including Stanford Health Care, Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins, have launched pain management boot camps that provide alternatives to painkillers for people suffering from chronic pain. These outpatient programs integrate traditional and complementary medicine techniques. The Mayo Clinic’s […]

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Tags: 2018 Mayo Transform Conference, 3D Breast Imaging, 3D mammogram, alzheimer's disease, arthritis, artificial joints, autopsies, bacterial infections, Breast Cancer, breast health, cardiac arrest, Civica Rx


August 31, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for August 31, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Los Angeles Times, Noise causes stress. Here’s why you need to seek out some silence by Alene Dawson — It’s a noisy planet. So much so that research calls noise pollution a “modern plague” and a threat to our health and well-being. “Noisy, chaotic environments increase stress levels, and chronic stress has been shown to… […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer’s walk, art center, arthritis, ASU, Austin Ferguson, Bradley Prigge, breast milk, carillon, clay, Dan Gaz, Diversity


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