Items Tagged ‘headache’

November 27, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 27, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

New York Times, Fitting in Family Fitness at the Holidays by Gretchen Reynolds — Jump Around: Consider also supplying the household with jump ropes, said Dr. Michael Joyner, an anesthesiologist and exercise physiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and a committed athlete. Jump ropes, by themselves, provide all the equipment needed for a […]

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Tags: Abu Dhabi, alzheimer's disease, Cancer, carbon ion treatment, Carteret Health, Chateau Theatre, chocolate milk, cholesterol, Dennis Dahlen, diabetes, Dr. Andrew Jagin, Dr. David Knopman


November 8, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 8, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Quartz, Rare genetic mutations protected a woman from developing Alzheimer’s by Katherine Ellen Foley — This case study “leads us to think about the importance of such studies in relatively understudied populations,” says Nilufer Ertekin-Taner, a neurogeneticist with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, who was not involved with the study. Scientific knowledge of the […]

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Tags: Andrea Malenya, Anne Bauch, anxiety, artificial Intelligence, bariatric surgery, biotech, Breast Cancer, Bu, Cancer, cardiovascular disease, Chemotherapy, Children's Center


November 1, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 1, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Washington Post, Health-care system causing rampant burnout among doctors, nurses by William Wan — Complex regulations on hospital reimbursement gives rise to a long list doctors must tic through in physical exams, even as they try to figure out what’s ailing a patient, so hospitals can charge more or less based on the exam’s complexity…“It’s […]

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Tags: AI, artificial Intelligence, Ashley Musch, asthma, Barbara Slaggie, Ben Merck, Biogen, blood pressure, brain tumor, breakfast, Breast Cancer, breast cancer vaccine


July 19, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for July 19, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

New York Times, Is Your Heartbeat Off, or Blood Sugar High? On the Road, You Can Keep Track by Joshua Brockman — Dr. Bithika Thompson, the director of the diabetes program at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, said the F.D.A.-approved wearable monitors — including the continuous glucose monitors and flash monitors like Abbott’s Freestyle Libre, […]

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Tags: aging brain, alzheimer's disease, Amazon Alexa, Biofourmis, blood donation, blood sugar, broken-heart syndrome, calcium, Cancer, celiac disease, Chris Fjosne, Coulee Recovery Center


January 25, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for January 25, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

New York Times, Spinal Fractures Can Be Terribly Painful. A Common Treatment Isn’t Helping by Gina Kolata — Scientists warned osteoporosis patients on Thursday to avoid two common procedures used to shore up painful fractures in crumbling spines. The treatments, which involve injecting bone cement into broken vertebrae, relieve pain no better than a placebo does, […]

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Tags: affordable housing, AliveCor, alkaline water, alzheimer's disease, biomarkers, Bradly Prigge, brain disease, carillon, Center for Individualized Medicine, Chippewa Valley, colds, Colorectal Cancer


December 21, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for December 21, 2018

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Happy holidays!  Mayo Clinic in the News will be taking a week off.  We’ll be back on January 4, 2019. Wall Street Journal, How pilates helps fight atrophy by Jen Murphy — Pilates can be particularly helpful for people with stability and motor-related issues, says Jane Hein, a physical therapist and lead Pilates instructor at the Mayo […]

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Tags: 3D mammogram, aging, Alison Ecklund, All Abilities Trane Park, altitude sickness, alzheimer's disease, Amelia Davis, Anita Bissinger, Anna Beth Morgan, Antonio Wimbush, Antwan Dixon, Aromatherapy


July 27, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for July 27, 2018

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

STAT, Experimental Alzheimer’s drug significantly slowed patients’ cognitive decline, buoying hopes for treatment by Damian Garde — The Phase 2 trial, which employed multiple statistical measures, failed its primary goal. Four doses of BAN2401 didn’t outperform placebo, and the high dose was tested on just 161 patients. Furthermore, the metric Biogen and Eisai used to […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, amgen, anesthesia, Big Blue Dragon Boat Race, bioethics, brain freeze, BRCA gene, Cancer, dementia, Dr. Amaal Starling, Dr. Amit Sood, Dr. Asad Javed.


July 20, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for July 20, 2018

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Today.com, Heart attack risk on the rise for pregnant women by A. Pawlowski — Expectant mothers, especially older ones, should watch for signs of heart trouble as their pregnancies progress and their babies arrive. A woman’s risk of having a heart attack while pregnant, giving birth or during the two months after delivery rose 25 […]

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Tags: 3D mammogram, 3D printing, ADHD, age-related illnesses, Angie Murad, Big Blue Dragon Boat Race, Cancer, CAR-T cell, constipation, diarrhea, Diversity, Dr Felipe Sierra


December 8, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for December 8, 2017

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

      NBC News, Is this the shoe that will help rewrite marathon history? by David Cox — Dr. Michael Joyner, a Mayo Clinic researcher who predicted that a sub-two hour marathon might be physiologically possible back in 1991, notes that Kipchoge had help from a team of 30 pacemakers, who helped break the […]

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Tags: AIDS, alcohol, alzheimer's disease, antibiotics, Apple Watch, Aromatherapy, ASU, blood pressure, Cancer, carotid stenting, CPR, dementia


December 1, 2017

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for December 1, 2017

By Karl W Oestreich Karl W Oestreich

      CNN, How marriage might be linked to lower dementia risk by Jacqueline Howard — The researchers found no evidence that dementia risk in divorced people differed from those who were married, and they could not examine whether the duration of being widowed or divorced had any influence on the findings. With pooled […]

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Tags: Alatus project, antibiotics, artificial Intelligence, biomedical sciences, blood pressure guidelines, Breast Cancer, breast imaging, Cancer, carpal tunnel syndrome, Chris Wendt, Cologuard, colon cancer


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