Items Tagged ‘Katherine Zeratsky’

January 10, 2020

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for January 10, 2020

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

CNN, Losing one night’s sleep may increase risk factor for Alzheimer’s, study says by Sandee LaMotte — In a healthy person, tau and other toxins in the brain are cleared away during sleep, sort of like taking out the garbage. Losing sleep, or having disordered sleep in which sleep cycles are disrupted, can interfere with […]

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Tags: AI, allergies, alzheimer's disease, Amish, Angela Murad, Angie Murad, artificial Intelligence, Austin Ferguson, baby names, back surgery, bariatric surgery, birth defects


December 6, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for December 6, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

NBC News, Toxic metal, leached from e-cigarette coil, permanently scars woman’s lung by Erika Edwards — Doctors have discovered yet another way that vaping — and vaping THC, in particular — can damage the lungs: when the metal coils of electronic cigarettes heat up to turn e-liquids into aerosols, toxic metals can leach into the […]

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Tags: 3D printing, Abri Bentley, BioSig, Cancer, crows, Dawn Kirchner, Diversity, DNA kits, Dr. Andre Terzic, Dr. Christopher Camp, Dr. David Homes Jr, Dr. Joerg Herrmann


August 23, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for August 23, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Wall Street Journal, They’re Committed to Each Other—And a 444-Mile Tandem Bike Ride by Jen Murphy — Katherine Zeratsky, a registered dietitian nutritionist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., says muscles run off carbs and fat, so in an endurance situation, fries and burger buns equal fast energy…Ms. Zeratsky says it’s important to remember […]

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Tags: Ann Curry, atrial fibrillation, back to school, Breast Cancer, Cancer, CBD oil, celiac, cold, Dennis Dahlen, diabetes, Dr. Amaal Starling, Dr. Amid Sood


May 31, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for May 31, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Washington Post, As ACL tears pile up, doctors and coaches worry that kids are playing too much basketball by Samantha Pell — Part of the problem, medical professionals say, is that early specialization in basketball or any sport can leave children more vulnerable to injury as they grow up…Neha Raukar, a senior associate professor in […]

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Tags: 3D printing, ACL, active shooter, ADHD, AI, Alex Trebek, alzheimer's disease, anti-vaxxers, breast feeding, Cancer, Carolyn Petersen, colon cancer


March 29, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for March 29, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Reuters, Biogen scraps two Alzheimer drug trials, wipes $18 billion from market value by Julie Steenhuysen — Biogen Inc and partner Eisai Co Ltd are ending two late-stage trials of their experimental Alzheimer’s disease drug aducanumab, a major setback in the quest to find a treatment for the mind-wasting disease and a blow to Biogen, […]

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Tags: AliveCor, alzheimer's disease, anal cancer, artificial Intelligence, Biogen, blood donation, Blood Donor Program, caffeine, cognitive decline, dementia, depression, Derrick Rose


March 15, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for March 15, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

NBC News, Improved detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer provides hope by Elizabeth Chuck — While there are currently no approved early detection tests for pancreatic cancer, researchers say there are promising possibilities — particularly in blood tests that can pick up biomarkers for it. “We are slowly making inroads,” said Gloria Petersen, a professor […]

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Tags: alcohol, Alex Trebek, Amy Long, blood donation, breastfeeding, burnout, Colorectal Cancer, conjoined twins, COVR Medical, cremation, crisis center, Daylight Savings Time


February 22, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for February 22, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Wall Street Journal, The Fitness Plan for Serious Schmoozers by Jen Murphy — “You really need to make an effort to counteract the effects of sitting for eight hours a day,” says Donald Hensrud, director of the Healthy Living Program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. “Just being active won’t cut it. You need […]

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Tags: Alexa, alzheimer's disease, Anatomage Table, anesthesia, aquatic physical therapy, asthma, Big Blue Dragon Boat, blood sugar, board of trustees, burnout, caregivers, cervical cancer


February 1, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for February 1, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

NBC News, Lowering blood pressure may help cut risk of early dementia, study finds by Shamard Charles, M.D. — Drastically lowering blood pressure may help protect memory and thinking skills later in life, researchers reported Monday — the first hopeful sign that it’s possible to lower rates of mental decline… “In very old people, we […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, anti depressants, blood pressure, Breast Cancer, Caring Canines, cholesterol, Civica Rx, Cologuard, colon cancer, concussion, dementia, diet


November 21, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 21, 2018

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

New York Times, Why Don’t We Have Vaccines Against Everything? by Donald G. McNeil Jr. — …And as with weaponry, fear changes everything. In epidemiologically quiet times, the anti-vaccine lobby sows doubts; when Ebola or pandemic flu strikes, Americans clamor for protection. There are two obstacles to faster progress, said Dr. Gregory A. Poland, director […]

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Tags: active shooter, aging, AI, alcohol, Alex Biagi, Amanda Dernbach, antibiotics, artificial Intelligence, Breast Cancer, Cancer, carpal tunnel, Cathy Deimeke


September 28, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for September 28, 2018

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

  Reuters, Antidepressants, psychotherapy may help ease irritable bowel syndrome by Lisa Rapaport — “One component of IBS is increased sensitivity to the functions of the bowels; simply summarized, this means either the nerves taking messages from the bowel to the brain are more sensitive or that the brain is more attentive or reacts in […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, Amy Lannen, anxiety, artificial Intelligence, Bill Franke, Brittle Bone Disease, calcium, Carolyn Franke, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, childhood cancer, Children's Museum, chronic kidney disease


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