Items Tagged ‘kidney donation’

June 28, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for June 28, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Reuters, Strobing stage lights could up risk of epileptic seizures by Saumya Joseph — “If the lighting environment suddenly changes, someone may not have much time to reposition themselves if they are vulnerable,” said Dr. David Burkholder, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who wasn’t involved in the study. “Nothing is completely […]

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Tags: 3D printing, ACL, Adam Maronde, alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Big Blue Dragon Boat Festival, Brighter Tomorrows, Cancer, car seats, Career Immersion Program, celiac disease, Children's Museum


May 24, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for May 24, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

New York Times, In Health Care, Too Much Privacy Is a Bad Thing by Luke Miner — Data-sharing agreements should be standardized so that doctors and hospitals don’t have to draft custom ones every time they want to share information. Some effort has already been made to reform fines by taking into account the “culpability” […]

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Tags: addiction, aging, alcoholism, alzheimer's disease, anxiety, ASU, bariatric surgery, blood donation, blood thinners, cardiac rehab, Chiari malformation, Christine Hughes


February 21, 2019

Woman donates kidney to stranger, benefits from city of Tucson leave policy

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Arizona Daily Star by Mikayla Mace About 100,000 people are on the kidney transplant wait list across the country, said Dr. Caroline Jadlowiec, Fairchild’s surgeon at the Mayo Clinic’s transplant center in Phoenix. Every year, about 30,000 people are added. More than 1,800 people in Arizona are waiting for a kidney, according to the Organ […]

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Tags: Arizona Daily Star, Dr. Caroline Jadlowiec, kidney donation, kidney transplant


February 15, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for February 15, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

STAT, New voices at patients’ bedsides: Amazon, Google, Microsoft, and Apple by Casey Ross — Mayo Clinic, one of the pioneers of voice in health care, built an Alexa-enabled program to deliver first aid instructions to consumers. More recently, it has begun piloting the use of the technology to deliver post-discharge instructions to patients recovering […]

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Tags: Alexa, alzheimer's disease, Amy Klobuchar, Barney Barnhart, black history month, blood sugar, Carson Wentz, Cathy Deimeke, cholla cactus, CREST, Criss Ross, Donna Marathon


January 18, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for January 18, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Health, This Is the Best Diet for Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome by Emily Shiffer — …For starters, it helps to understand what exactly PCOS is. “Polycystic ovary syndrome is often misunderstood because there is no one test that gives the diagnosis,” says Alice Chang, MD, endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic. While difficult to diagnose, […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, Ativa, Bailey MacInnis, Becki Hanson, Bill Henrichs, C. Difficile, cavernous malformations, cold, Corey Koskie, corticosteroids, dementia, destination medical center


November 30, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 30, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Wall Street Journal, Doctors Rethink the Cause—and Treatment—of Diverticular Disease by Laura Landro — Researchers are also learning more about the role of obesity in the risk of diverticulitis, and recommend maintaining a healthy body-mass index—the measure of body fat in relation to height and weight. But in a Mayo Clinic study of rising rates […]

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Tags: active shooter, Adam Bracks, Aerial Yoga, AI, alzheimer's disease, artificial Intelligence, autoimmune encephalopathy, blood donation, Breast Cancer, Cancer, carpal tunnel syndrome, clinical trials


June 29, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for June 29, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

CNN, Sunscreen 101: Your guide to summer sun protection and sunburn care by Maddie Bender — The active ingredients of sunscreens are regulated by the FDA, so FDA-approved sunscreens are safe for adults and children over 6 months. However, Mayo Clinic dermatologist Dr. Dawn Davis previously told CNN that people with sensitive skin or allergies […]

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Tags: allergies, alzheimer's disease, Atul Gawande, BCBS, Becky Spee, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, breathing tubes, bug-borne diseases, Cancer, Career Immersion Program, coffee


June 22, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for June 22, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

        USA Today, Landmark Mediterranean diet study was flawed. Authors retract paper published in NEJM by Ashley May — We’ve been hearing about the benefits of a Mediterranean diet for years, and now authors of a major study long cited for suggesting its heart-healthy benefits said the research was flawed. The original study, published […]

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Tags: 3-D microscope, alzheimer's disease, Ambient, autopsies, back pain, BCBS, biking, Breast Cancer, Camp Sweet Life, Cancer, Charlie Mayo, clinical trials


April 6, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for April 6, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

      Reuters, Many in U.S. take more calcium supplements than necessary by Lisa Rapaport — The study wasn’t a controlled experiment designed to prove whether or how calcium supplements might help or harm health…Still, results add to the evidence that use of calcium supplements is declining, in part out of safety concerns, said […]

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Tags: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Billy Gillispie, boot camp workouts, burnout, C-Sections, calcium, cancer vaccine, clinical trials, condom snorting, dementia, destination medical center, diabetes


March 23, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for March 23, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

      USA Today, ‘Highly fit’ middle-age women nearly 90% less likely to develop dementia decades later, study finds by Karen Weintraub — Maintaining a healthy lifestyle in mid-life, decades before disease sets in, makes sense, said David Knopman, a fellow of the American Academy of Neurology, who was not involved in the study. […]

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Tags: 3D printing, A.L.S., affordable housing, allergies, alzheimer's disease, Amber Kohnhorst, arthritis, asthma, autism, Bailey Sevier, Billy Gillispie, blood donation


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