Items Tagged ‘Mayo Clinic Proceedings’

January 11, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for January 11, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

USA Today, A medical rarity: Two patients get back-to-back, triple-organ transplants by Ken Altucker — …Mayo Clinic Rochester has completed 100 multi-organ transplants, including four heart-liver-kidney transplants, said Alfredo Clavell, Mayo Rochester’s medical director of the heart transplant program. Clavell agreed that a new liver often allows patients to take lower levels of anti-rejection drugs […]

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Tags: anxiety, artificial Intelligence, blood drive, Cancer, Chron's disease, Civica Rx, concussion, diet, Dr. Alfredo Clavell, Dr. Amy L. Lightner, Dr. Charles Peters, Dr. Claude Deschamps


January 4, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for January 4, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

USA Today, Need a new diet this new year? Here’s out to pick one and stick with it by Brett Molina — Focus on small changes at first: Angie Murad, a wellness dietitian with the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, said the key to choosing a diet is making sure it’s sustainable. One way to […]

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Tags: acne, Acute Flaccid Myelitis, alcohol, Angie Murad, Anita Bissinger, arthritis, balance, bed rest, Bill Henrichs, BioFire, cancer treatment, Chad Corey


December 14, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for December 14, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

HealthDay, AHA: Exercise After Heart Attack May Improve Survival — The study supports exercise as “one of the most important medicines people can take before cardiac events but, in particular, after them as well,” said Dr. Randal Thomas, medical director of the cardiac rehabilitation program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The study sends […]

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Tags: 3-D breast imaging, A.L.S., Alexander D. Weston, All Abilities Park, Annie Redlin, apple cider vinegar, Balloon Brigade, BioSig, breathing techniques, Cancer, CBD, chatbots


November 2, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 2, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Associated Press, Trippy depression treatment? Hopes and hype for ketamine by Lindsey Tanner — It was launched decades ago as an anesthetic for animals and people, became a potent battlefield pain reliever in Vietnam and morphed into the trippy club drug Special K. Now the chameleon drug ketamine is finding new life as an unapproved […]

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Tags: acute kidney injury, bike racks, blood donation, Breast Cancer, breast cancer vaccine, breastfeeding, C. Difficile, Caroline Wozniacki, dementia, depression, Dr. Brynn Dredla, Dr. Daniel Grossman


October 26, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for October 26, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Harvard Business Review, Lessons from Mayo Clinic’s Redesign of Stroke Care by W. David Freeman — Facing escalating costs of medications and technology, health care patients and providers in the United States continue to search for opportunities to reduce overall costs while maintaining and improving health care outcomes. At the Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Stroke Center […]

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Tags: 3D mammography, Acute Flaccid Myelitis, asthma, bariatric surgery, Chip Duncan, Christine Feller, contact lenses, COPD, dementia, destination medical center, diet, DMC


October 5, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for October 5, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

NBC News, Everything you ever wanted to know about coffee and your health by Vivian Manning-Schaffel — Caffeine is readily consumed by about 85 percent of Americans one way or another every single day, according to a study published in Food and Beverage Toxicology. That’s quite a buzz! Coffee — caffeine’s most popular vehicle of […]

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Tags: ADHD, alzheimer's disease, artificial sweeteners, Baxter, brain aneurysm, brain injury, Breast Cancer, breast density, Caesarean section, cancer treatments, coffee, colds


September 28, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for September 28, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

  Reuters, Antidepressants, psychotherapy may help ease irritable bowel syndrome by Lisa Rapaport — “One component of IBS is increased sensitivity to the functions of the bowels; simply summarized, this means either the nerves taking messages from the bowel to the brain are more sensitive or that the brain is more attentive or reacts in […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, Amy Lannen, anxiety, artificial Intelligence, Bill Franke, Brittle Bone Disease, calcium, Carolyn Franke, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, childhood cancer, Children's Museum, chronic kidney disease


September 14, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for September 14, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

  Washington Post, ‘Black hairy tongue’ is an actual medical condition, and it looks as weird as it sounds by Lindsey Bever — …Luckily, black hairy tongue, or lingua villosa nigra, is typically painless and temporary. It occurs when the tiny bumps on the tongue, called papillae, which are normally about 1 millimeter in length, […]

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Tags: 3D mammography, Alfred Moes, AliveCor, Apple Watch, Barrett's esophagus, black hairy tongue, blood donation, Brad Keselowski, Breast Cancer, Christopher Ewers, CRISPR, dementia


September 7, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for September 7, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Washington Post, Now we’re finding out you should do two kinds of stretching, slow and vigorous by Marlene Cimons — …Dynamic stretching, on the other hand, puts the muscles in motion repetitively, and “is essentially preparing your muscle in a gradually progressive fashion to do the job you want it to do,” said Edward Laskowski, […]

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Tags: 3D printers, alzheimer's disease, back to school, Bel Kambach, Ben Roethlisberger, bionic eye, Breast Cancer, Brigid Ann Scanlan Eiynck, Cancer Center, car seats, Casey Dills-Dailey, documentary


August 31, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for August 31, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Los Angeles Times, Noise causes stress. Here’s why you need to seek out some silence by Alene Dawson — It’s a noisy planet. So much so that research calls noise pollution a “modern plague” and a threat to our health and well-being. “Noisy, chaotic environments increase stress levels, and chronic stress has been shown to… […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer’s walk, art center, arthritis, ASU, Austin Ferguson, Bradley Prigge, breast milk, carillon, clay, Dan Gaz, Diversity


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