Items Tagged ‘opioids’

March 1, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for March 1, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

CNN, Tech platforms, stop enabling the anti-vaxers by Megan Garcia — Anti-vaccine groups with subtle names like The National Vaccine Information Center and less subtle names like Rage Against Vaccines have, for decades, used debunked research to fuel parents’ fears of the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine, generating a surge in unvaccinated children in the […]

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Tags: Alliance to HEAL, alzheimer's disease, anti-vaxers, biomedical research, blizzard, Cancer, carillon, CBD oil, Centro Médico Puerta de Hierro, Chemotherapy, colon cancer, cough


January 25, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for January 25, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

New York Times, Spinal Fractures Can Be Terribly Painful. A Common Treatment Isn’t Helping by Gina Kolata — Scientists warned osteoporosis patients on Thursday to avoid two common procedures used to shore up painful fractures in crumbling spines. The treatments, which involve injecting bone cement into broken vertebrae, relieve pain no better than a placebo does, […]

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Tags: affordable housing, AliveCor, alkaline water, alzheimer's disease, biomarkers, Bradly Prigge, brain disease, carillon, Center for Individualized Medicine, Chippewa Valley, colds, Colorectal Cancer


January 18, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for January 18, 2019

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Health, This Is the Best Diet for Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome by Emily Shiffer — …For starters, it helps to understand what exactly PCOS is. “Polycystic ovary syndrome is often misunderstood because there is no one test that gives the diagnosis,” says Alice Chang, MD, endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic. While difficult to diagnose, […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, Ativa, Bailey MacInnis, Becki Hanson, Bill Henrichs, C. Difficile, cavernous malformations, cold, Corey Koskie, corticosteroids, dementia, destination medical center


November 21, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 21, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

New York Times, Why Don’t We Have Vaccines Against Everything? by Donald G. McNeil Jr. — …And as with weaponry, fear changes everything. In epidemiologically quiet times, the anti-vaccine lobby sows doubts; when Ebola or pandemic flu strikes, Americans clamor for protection. There are two obstacles to faster progress, said Dr. Gregory A. Poland, director […]

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Tags: active shooter, aging, AI, alcohol, Alex Biagi, Amanda Dernbach, antibiotics, artificial Intelligence, Breast Cancer, Cancer, carpal tunnel, Cathy Deimeke


November 16, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 16, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

Reuters, New drug options, risk factors added to U.S. heart guidelines by Deena Beasley — The new guidelines are fairly “conservative” in recommending that the newer drugs be used only after other options, said Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, adding “I think that was the right approach.” The […]

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Tags: ADHD, AI, alzheimer's disease, Anne Harguth, artificial Intelligence, carpal tunnel, Chateau Theater, childbirth, Colorectal Cancer, destination medical center, DMC, Dr. Amy Pollak


October 26, 2018

Many Americans have misconceptions about opioids, Mayo Clinic survey finds

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

MinnPost by Susan Perry Although most Americans say they would prefer being treated with something other than an opioid medication to relieve pain after surgery, few of them talk to their health care provider about it, according to the results of a survey released Tuesday by the Mayo Clinic. The survey also found that many […]

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Tags: Dr. Helen Gazelka, Mayo Clinic Health Check Up, MinnPost, opioids


October 26, 2018

Americans say they want alternatives to opioid prescription, Mayo study finds

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Florida Times-Union by Matt Soergel Nearly half of Americans think opioid abuse is a significant issue in their community — though 67 percent are confident they themselves wouldn’t become addicted if they were prescribed opioids for chronic pain. That’s one of the findings in the Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, a survey of 1,270 adults […]

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Tags: Dr. Steve Porter, Florida Times-Union, Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, opioids


October 12, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for October 12, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

US News & World Report, Joining the Opioid Battle by Linda Marsa — Many hospitals, including Stanford Health Care, Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins, have launched pain management boot camps that provide alternatives to painkillers for people suffering from chronic pain. These outpatient programs integrate traditional and complementary medicine techniques. The Mayo Clinic’s […]

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Tags: 2018 Mayo Transform Conference, 3D Breast Imaging, 3D mammogram, alzheimer's disease, arthritis, artificial joints, autopsies, bacterial infections, Breast Cancer, breast health, cardiac arrest, Civica Rx


October 5, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for October 5, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

NBC News, Everything you ever wanted to know about coffee and your health by Vivian Manning-Schaffel — Caffeine is readily consumed by about 85 percent of Americans one way or another every single day, according to a study published in Food and Beverage Toxicology. That’s quite a buzz! Coffee — caffeine’s most popular vehicle of […]

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Tags: ADHD, alzheimer's disease, artificial sweeteners, Baxter, brain aneurysm, brain injury, Breast Cancer, breast density, Caesarean section, cancer treatments, coffee, colds


September 28, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for September 28, 2018

By Emily Blahnik eblahnik

  Reuters, Antidepressants, psychotherapy may help ease irritable bowel syndrome by Lisa Rapaport — “One component of IBS is increased sensitivity to the functions of the bowels; simply summarized, this means either the nerves taking messages from the bowel to the brain are more sensitive or that the brain is more attentive or reacts in […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, Amy Lannen, anxiety, artificial Intelligence, Bill Franke, Brittle Bone Disease, calcium, Carolyn Franke, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, childhood cancer, Children's Museum, chronic kidney disease


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