Items Tagged ‘The Journal of Rheumatology’

April 5, 2012 · Leave a Comment

Lower Gastrointestinal Complications Affect Many Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

By Mystery User

It has long been recognized that rheumatoid arthritis patients have an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal complications, such as bleeding and ulcers. A Mayo Clinic study, published online April 1, 2012 in The Journal of Rheumatology, indicates that rheumatoid arthritis patients are also at increased risk for bleeding and ulcers in the lower gastrointestinal tract, […]

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Tags: The Journal of Rheumatology


February 1, 2012 · Leave a Comment

Joint Surgery Growing Less Common in Rheumatoid Arthritis

By Mystery User

Joint replacement surgery continues to become less common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, probably reflecting the widespread adoption of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, judging from findings of a population-based study published in this month’s Journal of Rheumatology…In this study, “we examined whether the prior sex differences and use trends in reduced surgical intervention for RA […]

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Tags: Dr. Courtney A. Shourt, joint replacement surgery, rheumatoid arthritis, The Journal of Rheumatology


January 30, 2012 · Leave a Comment

Orthopaedic Surgery Rates Declining in Rheumatoid Arthritis

By Mystery User

Declining rates of orthopaedic surgery among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over the past 30 years suggest that advances in treatment are slowing progress of the disease, according to a study published online January 15 in The Journal of Rheumatology. Courtney A. Shourt, MD, from the Department of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, […]

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Tags: Courtney A. Shourt, Department of Medicine, orthopaedic surgery, The Journal of Rheumatology


January 25, 2012 · Leave a Comment

Joint Surgery Rates Declining Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients, Mayo Clinic Finds

By Mystery User

The need for joint surgery is declining among rheumatoid arthritis patients, possibly because they can now more effectively manage the disease with medication, Mayo Clinic research has found.  When people diagnosed with arthritis since the mid-1990s do need orthopedic surgery, it now is more often on the knees rather than the hips, the study shows. […]

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Tags: joint surgery, orthopedic surgery, rheumatoid arthritis, The Journal of Rheumatology


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