Items Tagged ‘vaccines’

November 22, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 22, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

USA Today, A super-vaccine for the flu is being marketed to people 65 and older. Is it legit or a scam? by Adrianna Rodriguez — Flu season is upon us, and the demographic most vulnerable to the disease is people 65 and older. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 70%-80% of […]

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Tags: 3D printer, alzheimer's disease, asthma, blood-brain barrier, Breast Cancer, c-section, Cancer, CAR-T cell, carbon ion therapy, celiac disease, deer season, diabetes


September 27, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for September 27, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Reuters, Patients, doctors may not share priorities for chronic diseases by Carolyn Crist — Patients and doctors often have different views about which chronic health conditions are their top priorities, suggests a study in France.  After separate surveys of patients and their physicians, researchers found that priorities matched up for some conditions, such as diabetes […]

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Tags: ADHD, aging, AI, alzheimer's disease, Andreas Cancer Center, anti-aging, artificial Intelligence, Best Buy, biotin, birth control, board of trustees, Breast Cancer


May 17, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for May 17, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Reuters, Home-based heart rehab may help patients who can’t get to clinics by Lisa Rapaport — “Patients who experience a cardiac event (such as a heart attack or heart surgery), should participate in a cardiac rehabilitation program,” said lead author of the statement Dr. Randal Thomas, medical director of the cardiac rehab program at the […]

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Tags: aging, AI, Alexandria Van Gilder, AliveCor, artificial heart valve, artificial Intelligence, Ashley Zimmerman, brain aneurysm, Brittany Burnham, Camp Wabi, Cancer, canine brucellosis


April 26, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for April 26, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Reuters, In many states, pregnancy invalidates a woman’s DNR by Linda Carroll — Most states have statutes that invalidate a woman’s advance directive if she is pregnant, a U.S. study finds. And because those statutes are often not clearly outlined in the DNR form, women filling out an advance directive most likely would not know […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, amputee, Aneurysm, Arthur Stanley, ASU, Beyoncé, Brooke Kluck, bubble boy, CPR, CSPAN, DNR, Dr. Ammar Killu


Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for April 19, 2019

April 19, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for April 19, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Washington Post, CTE researchers discover possible step toward diagnostic test for living patients by Jacob Bogage — Medical researchers have made what they cautiously characterized as a possible first step toward diagnosing the neurodegenerative illness chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in living patients, according to an article published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. […]

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Tags: A.L.S., aging, arthritis, Ashley Schmitt, Aspirin, Breast Cancer, burnout, cannabis, carillon, Cathy Fraser, Christie Vogel, Cris Ross


March 15, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for March 15, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

NBC News, Improved detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer provides hope by Elizabeth Chuck — While there are currently no approved early detection tests for pancreatic cancer, researchers say there are promising possibilities — particularly in blood tests that can pick up biomarkers for it. “We are slowly making inroads,” said Gloria Petersen, a professor […]

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Tags: alcohol, Alex Trebek, Amy Long, blood donation, breastfeeding, burnout, Colorectal Cancer, conjoined twins, COVR Medical, cremation, crisis center, Daylight Savings Time


March 1, 2019

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for March 1, 2019

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

CNN, Tech platforms, stop enabling the anti-vaxers by Megan Garcia — Anti-vaccine groups with subtle names like The National Vaccine Information Center and less subtle names like Rage Against Vaccines have, for decades, used debunked research to fuel parents’ fears of the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine, generating a surge in unvaccinated children in the […]

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Tags: Alliance to HEAL, alzheimer's disease, anti-vaxers, biomedical research, blizzard, Cancer, carillon, CBD oil, Centro Médico Puerta de Hierro, Chemotherapy, colon cancer, cough


November 21, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for November 21, 2018

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

New York Times, Why Don’t We Have Vaccines Against Everything? by Donald G. McNeil Jr. — …And as with weaponry, fear changes everything. In epidemiologically quiet times, the anti-vaccine lobby sows doubts; when Ebola or pandemic flu strikes, Americans clamor for protection. There are two obstacles to faster progress, said Dr. Gregory A. Poland, director […]

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Tags: active shooter, aging, AI, alcohol, Alex Biagi, Amanda Dernbach, antibiotics, artificial Intelligence, Breast Cancer, Cancer, carpal tunnel, Cathy Deimeke


October 26, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for October 26, 2018

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Harvard Business Review, Lessons from Mayo Clinic’s Redesign of Stroke Care by W. David Freeman — Facing escalating costs of medications and technology, health care patients and providers in the United States continue to search for opportunities to reduce overall costs while maintaining and improving health care outcomes. At the Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Stroke Center […]

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Tags: 3D mammography, Acute Flaccid Myelitis, asthma, bariatric surgery, Chip Duncan, Christine Feller, contact lenses, COPD, dementia, destination medical center, diet, DMC


October 19, 2018

Mayo Clinic in the News Weekly Highlights for October 19, 2018

By Emily Blahnik Emily Blahnik

Washington Post, ‘We lived like we were Wall Street’ by DeNeen L. Brown — Before it was destroyed in the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, Greenwood was one of the most affluent black communities in the country. It was known as “Black Wall Street” because of its concentrated wealth…“At the time of the riot, there were […]

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Tags: Acute Flaccid Myelitis, All of Us, alzheimer's disease, Amanda Dernbach, antibiotic resistance, breastfeeding, c-section, Chad Pennington, Charles Rosen, cough medicine, croup, dental health


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