Items Tagged ‘Washington Post’

August 16, 2019

Anxiety complicates life for dementia patients — and their caregivers

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Washington Postby Mary-Ellen Deily …Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s disease Research Center, recommends playing a person’s favorite music and using other behavioral approaches to distract them. He also advises against trying to convince a person with dementia that they’re worrying about something that isn’t real. Opt for distraction over confrontation, he said. […]

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Tags: alzheimer's disease, anxiety, Dr. Ronald Petersen, Washington Post


July 18, 2019

This show is really ‘Sick.’ If you’re concerned about your health, that’s why you should watch it.

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Washington Postby Erin Blakemore In a scene from the series, Roberto Cattaneo of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., explains why measles is so contagious. “Sick,” a YouTube show from Seeker, a digital publisher devoted to science, answers that question in gripping, often gross detail. The first season of the series is online now. Reach: Weekday […]

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Tags: Dr. Roberto Cattaneo, measles virus, Sick and YouTube, Washington Post


June 7, 2019

A tick gave a toddler a rare and deadly disease. Here’s what his parents want you to know.

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Washington Postby Lindsey Bever …Bobbi Pritt, a physician and co-director of Vector-Borne Diseases Lab Services at Mayo Clinic, said that although Rocky Mountain spotted fever is considered low-risk, it can be rapidly fatal. In fact, she said, when patients have symptoms consistent with the disease, doctors will typically start treatment without waiting for lab results. […]

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Tags: Dr. Bobi Pritt, pathology, tick-borne disease, ticks, Vector-Borne Diseases Lab Services at Mayo Clinic, Washington Post


January 24, 2019

British doctors may soon write prescriptions for dance, art or music lessons

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Washington Post by Tara Bahrampour Arts in medicine was established as a field in the 1990s, and studies have shown that exposure to the arts improves the health of older people with dementia, children with asthma, and patients with hematological malignancies and other ailments. But instituting it as a national program takes it to a […]

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Tags: art and health, Dr. Paul Scanlon, Johanna Rian, Mayo Clinic Dolores Jean Lavins Center for Humanities in Medicine, Washington Post


January 17, 2019

This couple divorced. Then she gave him her kidney.

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Washington Post by Cathy Free After 21 years of marriage, Bill Henrichs and Mary Ziegler — once high school sweethearts — concluded that they were no longer a good match. The couple amicably divorced in 1995 and went their separate ways, but they continued to see each other at their kids’ school and sporting events. […]

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Tags: Bill Henrichs, Dr. Andrew Bentall, kidney transplant, Mary Ziegler, Washington Post


October 19, 2018

Rising drug prices widen gap between have, have-not patients

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Washington Post (Associated Press) by Linda Johnson For Bridgett Snelten, changing her health insurance meant enduring wild blood sugar swings, bouts of vomiting and weight gain. The Sandy, Utah mother of two young girls has diabetes and has had to change health insurance plans three years in a row. Twice, new insurers wouldn’t cover Trulicity, […]

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Tags: Associated Press, Dr. Stephen Kopecky, prescription drug prices, Washington Post


October 12, 2018

A toddler couldn’t move his arm. Doctors discovered a polio-like condition.

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Washington Post by Lindsey Bever When Orville Young ran up to his mother, Elaine Young, to give her the mail, she noticed he was using his non-dominant hand. Although a seemingly insignificant detail, it made the Minnesota mom stop and think — her then-3-year-old son had developed a cough and a runny nose over the […]

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Tags: AFM, Dr. Marc Patterson, polio-like condition, Washington Post


July 20, 2018

They’re out in the woods picking up ticks — on purpose

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Washington Post by Sheila Mulrooney Eldred It’s a ­picture-perfect summer day in the woods of central Minnesota: 71 degrees, humidity around 73 percent, sunshine dappling the trees and glinting off glimpses of the Mississippi River. But as five scientists pull on white painter suits and start duct-taping the cuffs to their hiking boots, no one […]

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Tags: Dr. Bobbi Pritt, parasites, ticks, Washington Post


July 5, 2018

Life’s genetic code explored through science, art and medicine

By Karl W Oestreich KarlWOestreich

Washington Post by Erin Blackmore Your genes define all of that and more. DNA holds the key to diversity, ancestry and which traits you’ll pass to future generations. It’s inside all living things, and it takes center stage at “Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code,” at the Rochester Art Center in Rochester, Minn. The exhibition, open through […]

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Tags: Genome, Washington Post


March 2, 2018

Bad genes don’t mean you are doomed to heart disease and early death

By Kelley Luckstein KelleyLuckstein

Washington Post Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women, killing more than 600,000 people annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Every year, about 735,000 Americans have a heart attack. Of these, 525,000 are a first heart attack, and 210,000 occur in people who already […]

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Tags: Chicago Tribune, Dr. Iftikhar Kullo, Washington Post


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